Advertisements


Kings Zach Randolph gets community service after LA arrest

LOS ANGELES — Sacramento Kings forward Zach Randolph was sentenced to community service on Wednesday (Thursday in Manila) after being charged with marijuana.....»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarSep 14th, 2017

NBA veteran Zach Randolph, hinatulan ng community service

NBA veteran Zach Randolph, hinatulan ng community service.....»»

Category: newsSource:  pinasglobalRelated NewsSep 14th, 2017

Kings Zach Randolph faces misdemeanor marijuana charge in LA

LOS ANGELES — Sacramento Kings forward Zach Randolph has been charged with misdemeanor marijuana possession and resisting arrest following an incident this m.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 1st, 2017

Kings’ Randolph arrested on pot charge at LA housing project

LOS ANGELES — Sacramento Kings forward Zach Randolph was arrested on a marijuana charge after several police cars were vandalized when a large gathering beca.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 11th, 2017

Kings land veteran free agents Zach Randolph, George Hill

The Sacramento Kings added veteran help to their young roster on Tuesday (Wednesday Manila time) by agreeing to free-agent contracts with forward Zach Randol.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 5th, 2017

Man arrested over vandalism of Fort Collins, Colorado mosque – CBS News

Police arrested a suspect in connection with the vandalism at a mosque near Colorado State University, a case they are investigating as a hate crime. Joseph Scott Giaquinto, 35, was arrested on suspicion of criminal mischief, third-degree trespass, and bias-motivated crime, according to CBS Denver. Police had asked for the public’s help in identifying the person who overturned benches, broke windows and threw a Bible into Islamic Center of Fort Collins, which is about 60 miles north of Denver. A police spokeswoman told the newspaper that she did not have details on how police came to identify Giaquinto as the suspect. Police released two clips of surveillance video that captured the vandalism at the Islamic Center of Fort Collins before dawn Sunday. In one, a man is shown picking up a paving stone and walking away. In another clip, he kicks a door. The center’s president, Tawfik Aboellail, said the man tried to break into the mosque about 4 a.m. Sunday, but he did not get inside. The vandalism prompted the center to cancel religious classes for children that morning, but it has also led to an outpouring of support. The Coloradoan reports that congregants from Plymouth Congregational Church visited after their morning service, and later about 1,000 people gathered at the mosque for a rally of support organized by a rabbi Sunday evening. Many have also been making donations online to pay for repairs and improved security. CBS Denver reports that at least $20,000 had been donated as of Monday evening, which the mosque said would go toward repairs and hiring security. The Council on American-Islamic Relations had urged police to investigate the case as a possible hate crime. Police Chief John Hutto, who attended the support rally, said the incident has a “very real impact on our Muslim friends and neighbors.” “We will not tolerate acts of hatred in our community, and I hope this arrest sends that message loud and clear,” Hutto said in a statement. “While the building can be repaired, this incident caused deeper hurt that won’t just go away. I urge all of our citizens to continue showing the kind of support and acceptance demonstrated at the Islamic Center rally on Sunday night.” The vandalism comes about a month after someone threw a rock through a window at a mosque in the Denver area. The incident at the Colorado Muslim Society was also captured on surveillance video, but no one has been arrested. Investigators in the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office have exhausted their leads, spokeswoman Julie Brooks said Monday. 57&'160;total views, 57&'160;views today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 28th, 2017

Bodies of some of the 10 missing US sailors found after collision off Singapore – ABC News

Bodies of some of the 10 missing sailors have been found in flooded compartments of the USS John S. McCain, a Navy destroyer that collided with a commercial vessel east of Singapore early Monday morning, the U.S. Navy said. Ten sailors have been missing since the collision, and the remains of some were found by divers performing recovery operations inside the ship, Adm. Scott Swift, the commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, said in a statement. Remains that may belong to another sailor missing from the McCain were found by the Royal Malaysian Navy as it assisted the U.S. in waters east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore, Swift said. &'8220;Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with the families of those sailors and the families of our sailors who were injured,&'8221; he said in the statement, issued from Singapore's Changi Naval Base today, where the damaged USS McCain is docked and where the tanker that it collided with is anchored. &'8220;The search-and-rescue efforts continue.&'8221; One of the missing sailors was identified by government officials as Ohio resident Jacob Drake. Drake's cousin, Brandie Roberts, told ABC News that he joined the Navy right out of high school at 17 years old. Roberts described her cousin as a &'8220;hilarious&'8221; and &'8220;ridiculously smart&'8221; person. &'8220;We are all begging for answers and begging he is found safe,&'8221; she said. Drake is engaged, Roberts said. He has plans to marry next summer, The Columbus Dispatch reported. In a statement, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, offered his support to Drake's family and the U.S. Navy. &'8220;Connie and I are thinking of Jacob’s family during this horrible time and we join Ohioans in praying for Jacob’s well-being and safety,&'8221; Brown said. &'8220;Servicemembers like Jacob represent the very best of our state, and I’m hopeful the divers searching for these brave sailors can find him and bring him home safely.&'8221; Ohio Gov. John Kasich wrote on Twitter that he is &'8220;praying for all, especially Ohio's own Jacob Drake.&'8221; The McCain was heading to Singapore on a routine port visit after conducting a sensitive freedom-of-navigation operation near one of China's man-made islands in the South China Sea, according to the Navy. The destroyer collided with a tanker vessel, the Alnic MC, off the coast of Singapore around 5:20 a.m. local time Monday, the Stealth Maritime Corp. said in a statement. Reports of the damage to the two ships seem to indicate that they were crossing paths or at least attempting to move in different directions at the time of the collision. The McCain's hull received significant damage as a result of the collision, according to the Navy. Photos show what looks like a wide cave on the port side of the ship at the water line. An initial report about the collision indicated that the ship reported a loss of steering three minutes prior to the impact, a U.S. official said. The official notes this was an initial report, and that it’s not clear if this is what led to the collision, as the crew could have taken several evasive maneuvers to avoid a collision &'8212; something crews are trained to deal with. After the collision, adjacent compartments on the McCain —- including crew berth, machinery and communications rooms —- flooded, according to the Navy, which added that a damage-control response prevented the situation from becoming more serious. Ships from multiple countries searched for the missing sailors after the collision. President Trump tweeted that his &'8220;thoughts and prayers&'8221; are with the McCain's sailors. Several politicians on both sides of the aisle echoed his sentiment, including Sen. John McCain. The ship is named for his grandfather John Sidney McCain Sr. and his father, John Sidney McCain Jr. &'8220;Cindy and I are keeping America's sailors aboard the USS John S McCain in our prayers tonight &'8212; appreciate the work of search &'38; rescue crews,&'8221; McCain wrote in a tweet. The collision was hardly an isolated incident for the Navy. It comes only two months after the USS Fitzgerald's collision with a Philippine container ship in the middle of the night off the coast of Japan. Seven U.S. sailors lost their lives in that collision, and last week the Navy relieved the Fitzgerald's commanding officer, executive officer and senior enlisted sailor for mistakes that led to the crash. The USS Lake Champlain, a guided missile cruiser, collided with a fishing boat in the Sea of Japan in May. There were no injuries from that crash. The Navy ship tried to alert the fishing boat before the collision, but it was too late. The USS Antietam, also a guided-missile cruiser, ran aground off the coast of Japan in February, damaging its propellers and spilling oil into the water. John Richardson, the Navy's top admiral, called for an operational pause in the region and &'8220;a deeper look into how we train and certify forces operating in and around Japan,&'8221; after the McCain's collision. &'8220;We'll examine the process in which we train and certify our forces that are deployed in Japan to make sure we're doing all we can to make them ready for operations and war fighting,&'8221; he told reporters. &'8220;This will include but not be limited to looking at operational tempo, trends in personnel, material, maintenance and equipment. It will also include a review of how we train and certify our service warfare community, including tactical and navigational proficiency,&'8221; he said yesterday at a press conference.( MICHAEL EDISON HAYDEN, JULIA [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2017

Trump’s transgender military ban ‘not worked out yet’ – BBC News

The White House has not yet decided how it will implement the president's ban on transgender people serving in the US military. Mr Trump's surprise Twitter announcement on Wednesday has been met with criticism from rights groups. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the administration would work alongside the Pentagon to decide how to proceed. It is not yet clear how the announcement will affect current transgender service personnel. &'8220;The United States government will not accept or allow transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US military,&'8221; Donald Trump tweeted. &'8220;Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail.&'8221; Asked at a press briefing if troops on battlefields would be immediately sent back, White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the policy had yet to be worked out. &'8220;The decision is based on a military decision. It's not meant to be anything more than that,&'8221; she said. However, some US media outlets questioned the spending justification. The Washington Post drew attention to an analysis that the US military spends almost $42m (£32m) a year on the erectile dysfunction medication Viagra &'' several times the total estimated cost of transgender medical support. Meanwhile, Politico reports that the move was prompted by threats from Republican hardliners over a spending bill which would provide funding for Mr Trump's promised military spending and border wall plans. One Republican lawmaker had already tabled an amendment to the spending bill to prevent the military paying for transgender surgical procedures. The timing of this transgender ban is almost as interesting as the move itself. Why now? With the Trump administration being buffeted by the Jeff Sessions political death watch, the ongoing multi-prong investigation into the Trump campaign, the healthcare drama in the Senate and the impending Russian sanctions bill, perhaps the administration decided this was a good time to change the subject and rally conservative forces to his side. Republicans have long used cultural issues as a wedge to divide Democrats and energise evangelicals. As one White House insider acknowledged, this is straight out of that playbook. While Mr Trump campaigned as sympathetic to LGBT rights, he needs the traditional religious conservatives to stay loyal to him now, more than ever. The president's action will create a furore among liberals and the media commentators whose disdain for the current administration is not a new development. This is a fight the White House will welcome. The decision to allow transgender people to serve openly in the military was made by the Obama administration last year, with a one-year review period allowed for its implementation. The policy included a provision for the military to provide medical help for service members wanting to change gender. But in June, Defence Secretary James Mattis agreed to a further six-month delay. In 2016, the independent Rand Corporation estimated that about 4,000 US active-duty and reserve service members are transgender, although some campaigners put the figure higher than 10,000. Rand also predicted that the inclusion of transgender people in the military would cause a 0.13% increase in healthcare spending (approximately $8.4m). Kristin Beck, a retired elite Navy SEAL, issued a challenge to President Trump in an interview with Business Insider: &'8220;Let's meet face to face and you tell me I'm not worthy.&'8221; She said that during her decorated military career, she had been &'8220;defending individual liberty&'8221;. &'8220;Being transgender doesn't affect anyone else,&'8221; she said. &'8220;We are liberty's light. If you can't defend that for everyone that's an American citizen, that's not right.&'8221; Army reservist Rudy Akbarian, in Los Angeles, said: &'8220;My heart dropped a little bit, you know. It hurt.&'8221; &'8220;Not everyone responded well after learning I was transitioning,&'8221; he said. &'8220;But after spending time on missions and realising we all share the same love for the country, we worked together and got the job done. &'8220;The discrimination I'm facing now is from those outside the military &'' not the people who work with me.&'8221; Mr Trump said his decision was based on consultation with his generals, but there has been a mixed reaction. Former Defence Secretary Ash Carter, who lifted the ban last year under President Obama, said: &'8220;To choose service members on other grounds than military qualifications is social policy and has no place in our military.&'8221; Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Republican John McCain, said major policy announcements should not be made via Twitter. &'8220;Any American who meets current medical and readiness standards should be allowed to continue serving,&'8221; he added. Several British military generals also condemned Mr Trump's decision, including the commander of the UK Maritime Forces, Rear Admiral Alex Burton, who said &'8220;I am so glad we are not going this way.&'8221; &'8220;Each dollar needs to be spent to address threats facing our nation,&'8221; Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler, a long-time opponent of the Obama administration's position, said in a statement. &'8220;The costs incurred by funding transgender surgeries and the required additional care it demands should not be the focus of our military resources,&'8221; she said. Trump supporter and political commentator Scott Presler is among those who disagree with the military carrying the cost of such interventions. While disagreeing with the ban, he added that &'8220;generals know more about war than I do.&'8221; &'8220;I don't think this is an attack on the LGBT community &' I'm mixed, but I have confidence in the guidance that President [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 27th, 2017

McGregor completes community service for pre-fight fracas

LAS VEGAS — UFC star Conor McGregor has completed the 25 hours of community service imposed by Nevada officials following a profanity-laced, bottle-throwing.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2017

NPA harass troops while conducting community service

A squad of Task Group Alpha of 78th Infantry (Warrior) Battalion while conducting Community Service at Barangay Paglaum, Carigara, Leyte was harassed by undetermined number of NPA terrorist group on June 19, 2017......»»

Category: newsSource:  samarnewsRelated NewsJul 19th, 2017

Inside Indonesia’s LGBT crackdown – BBC News

In less than 18 months, being gay in Indonesia has gone from widely tolerated to just plain dangerous. An unprecedented wave of police raids, vigilante attacks, and calls for the criminalization of homosexual sex have left many in the country's LGBT community fearing for their safety. &'8220;(Gay Indonesians) are exhausted and they're horrified,&'8221; Kyle Knight, a Human Rights Watch researcher with the LGBT rights program, told CNN. &'8220;Even the activists I know who started the very first organizations in the 1980s say they've never seen anything like this.&'8221; It's a dark turn for a country that for decades prided itself on its diverse, heterogeneous society. The world's largest Muslim democracy, Indonesia is often considered something of a bulwark of tolerance amid growing conservatism elsewhere in the Islamic world. But that perception is now shifting, amid increasing verbal attacks on minority groups and the growing implementation of Islamic bylaws by regional governments. In less than two weeks, two young men were seized by vigilantes who burst into their home in Aceh province, then taken to authorities who caned them for having homosexual sex. In a separate incident, later in the month, attendees at an alleged gay party in a Jakarta sauna were arrested and images of their faces were disseminated online by Indonesian police. Homosexual sex is not illegal in the majority of Indonesia, except in the extremely conservative province of Aceh. Jakarta is not part of any province; it is controlled by the central government. One week ago, West Java Police Chief Anton Charliyan announced that he would create a special taskforce to crack down on LGBT people. &'8220;They will face the law and heavy social sanctions. They will not be accepted by society,&'8221; he said. It wasn't always this way. Despite being a Muslim-majority country, only small parts of Indonesia — such as Aceh province — follow strict Islamic law. Same-sex relations have never been illegal either, even if a 2013 Pew survey found that 93% of the country refused to accept homosexuality. Jonta Saragih a former LGBT activist from Sumatra, now studying in the UK, said while his family weren't quick to accept him when he came out, Indonesians used to have a live and let live attitude to their country's LGBT population. &'8220;[Even] a few years ago, when I was in Jakarta, though homosexuality was not recognized by the law, there was no one talking about it,&'8221; he told CNN. Indonesian human rights activist Tunggal Pawestricorroborates this notion that homosexuality was previously frowned upon but tolerated. &'8220;Since my childhood I was told that LGBT people are sinful, being a homosexual is sinful but of course &' it doesn't mean you have to criminalize them,&'8221; she said. So what changed? The problems began in early 2016, when a number of high-profile Indonesian politicians, including several government ministers, suddenly started to make unprompted attacks on Indonesia's LGBT community. Among them was the Defense Minister, Ryamizard Ryacudu, who said Indonesia's LGBT movement was more dangerous than &'8220;a nuclear war.&'8221; &'8220;In a nuclear war, if a bomb is dropped over Jakarta, Semarang will not be affected &'8212; but (with LGBT rights) everything we know could disappear in an instant &'8212; it's dangerous,&'8221; he said, according to the state Antara news agency. Soon, the country's medical professionals joined in. The Indonesian Psychiatrists Association issued a statement in February saying people who were gay or bisexual had &'8220;psychiatric problems.&'8220; By August, a group of conservative activists had taken a case to the Constitutional Court to call for homosexual sex to be made illegal in Indonesia. Knight said it's hard to tell why the sudden wave of anti-LGBT feeling swelled up across the country, but where it was heading appeared much clearer. &'8220;This is fueled not just by bigotry and misunderstanding but by public officials &' I think that's the really scary thing as we go forward. It's fair game to go after LGBT people in Indonesia,&'8221; he said. More than a dozen gay dating apps, including Grindr, were banned in Indonesia in late 2016, Jonta said, making it harder for gay men and women to communicate with each other. &'8220;(I have) some good friends &' we started discussing these issues on social media, eventually some of them deleted me on Facebook. They said we are not friends anymore,&'8221; Jonta said. Conservative Islam is a growing political force in Indonesia. The arrest and later conviction of former Jakarta governor Basuki 'Ahok' Tjahaja Purnama in April this year, on charges of blasphemy, followedhuge protests instigated by conservative groups. Pawestri blamed vocally conservative politicians and an &'8220;irresponsible&'8221; media for the rise in anti-LGBT rhetoric. &'8220;Before LGBT Indonesians had quite a lot of confidence, now they're very careful and cry to me, calling me at night. We've been trying to do whatever we can to avoid (criminalization),&'8221; Pawestri said. Criminalization might be closer than most would expect. Since August, a team of lawyers has been arguing in Indonesia's Constitutional Court, on behalf of 12 individuals, to change the criminal code. Prosecution legal team spokesman, Feizal Syahmenan, told CNN they would like three articles changed in the criminal code &'8212; one to outlaw sex outside of marriage, one to outlaw homosexual rape and one to outlaw homosexual sex entirely. Two of those 12 individuals are members of the AILA, the Family Love Alliance, a prominent conservative Islamic group. Syahmenan told CNN homosexuality is just not Indonesian. &'8220;All of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 1st, 2017

China chases billionaire who threatens ‘explosive’ allegations against elite – The Guardian

A flamboyant Chinese billionaire known for his love of supercars and social media has claimed he is the victim of a political witch hunt after he threatened to lift the lid on “explosive information” about corruption at the top of Chinese politics. On Wednesday China’s foreign ministry confirmed that, at Beijing’s request, Interpol had issued a red notice for the arrest of Guo Wengui, a 50-year-old tycoon who had in recent months taken the highly unusual step of speaking out about alleged cases of corruption involving the relatives of senior leaders. Lu Kang, a foreign ministry spokesperson, described Guo as a “suspect” but offered no further details. But citing anonymous sources, the South China Morning Post, a Hong Kong-based newspaper to which Beijing often hands politically sensitive scoops, claimed the billionaire was wanted for allegedly paying a 60m yuan (£6.8m) bribe to former spy chief Ma Jian, one of the most powerful victims of President Xi Jinping’s high-profile war on corruption. Guo rejected those claims on Wednesday, in an interview with the Chinese language service of Voice of America, claiming he was being targeted as part of a cover-up attempt. The billionaire, who has aired his as yet unproven allegations on his Twitter account and in a succession of recent interviews, accused Beijing of trying to silence him with “terror” tactics. “I’m greatly encouraged by the arrest notice. At least it will make people understand the true nature of my case,” he said. “If there was no such thing as corruption in China, the government wouldn’t become scared and frightened of me speaking the truth.” In a brief message to the Associated Press, Guo added: “It’s all lies, all threats. It shows they are scared of me leaking explosive information.” Willy Lam, a political expert from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, said Guo’s decision to go public was an extraordinary move that was certain to put him on the wrong side of Xi Jinping. “It is the first time a [Chinese] billionaire, whether in or outside of China, has exposed this kind of dirty linen in public,” he said. Lam said Guo’s claims concerning the relatives of top Communist party figures had yet to be fully substantiated. Even so, they represented “a big public relations disaster for the Xi Jinping administration and for the Communist party in general” since they suggested Xi’s anti-corruption crusade had failed to halt what the president himself has described as the party’s moral slide. The scandal would reinforce the impression that, for all Xi’s efforts, the families of top leaders were still able “to make a killing” from their political connections, Lam added. “It is not a pretty picture.” Born and raised in Shandong province, Guo made a fortune as a real estate developer in Beijing, where he was behind one of the capital’s most unusual skyscrapers – the dragon-shaped Pangu Plaza near the Olympic Bird’s Nest stadium. He was recently photographed at Mark’s Club, an exclusive club in Mayfair, London, that bills itself as a refuge for the “global A-list” and whose members include former British prime minister David Cameron. Guo reportedly left China in 2015. According to the New York Times, which has reported extensively on his case, he now lives in the United States where he frequents Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club and resides in a $67.5m penthouse with views over Central Park. It was reportedly from this apartment that Guo spoke to the US-funded Voice of America on Wednesday, making fresh corruption allegations involving a relative of a senior Chinese politician. The New York Times reported that the Chinese government had attempted to stop the interview, summoning Voice of America’s Beijing correspondent and warning him against interfering in China’s “internal affairs”. Lam said that by going public Guo might be hoping to shield himself from a similar fate to fellow billionaire Xiao Jianhua who was snatched from Hong Kong’s Four Seasons hotel in January and apparently spirited into custody in mainland China. He was, however, playing a dangerous game. “His fate now depends on the US government,” Lam said.( Guo reportedly left China in 2015. According to the New York Times, which has reported extensively on his case, he now lives in the United States where he frequents Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club and resides in a $67.5m penthouse with views over Central Park. It was reportedly from this apartment that Guo spoke to the US-funded Voice of America on Wednesday, making fresh corruption allegations involving a relative of a senior Chinese politician. The New York Times reported that the Chinese government had attempted to stop the interview, summoning Voice of America’s Beijing correspondent and warning him against interfering in China’s “internal affairs”. Lam said that by going public Guo might be hoping to shield himself from a similar fate to fellow billionaire Xiao Jianhua who was snatched from Hong Kong’s Four Seasons hotel in January and apparently spirited into custody in mainland China. He was, however, playing a dangerous game. “His fate now depends on the US government,” Lam said. Guo reportedly left China in 2015. According to the New York Times, which has reported extensively on his case, he now lives in the United States where he frequents Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club and resides in a $67.5m penthouse with views over Central Park. It was reportedly from this apartment that Guo spoke to the US-funded Voice of America on Wednesday, [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 20th, 2017

Myanmar’s great hope fails to live up to expectations – The Guardian

The script called for the lead actor, a Nobel prize winner, to seize control of a country, bring peace where there was conflict and prosperity where there was poverty. A nation emerging from years of military dictatorship was to become a beacon of hope not only for its cowed population but also for much of a fractured and turbulent south-east Asia. But like many political dramas – especially over the past 12 months – the script has not been followed by Myanmar and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Now, a year since one of the world’s most famous prisoners of conscience came to power in the specially created position of state counsellor, the talk is not of progress. Instead, it is of drastically escalating ethnic conflicts that have simmered and sporadically exploded for decades; a new Rohingya Muslim insurgency that has prompted an army crackdown some say may amount to crimes against humanity; a rash of online defamation cases that have fostered a panic over freedom of speech; and a repressive legal framework that allowed the generals to jail so many still being in place. And all the while, Aung San Suu Kyi is accused of remaining mostly silent, doggedly avoiding the media. Many who led the campaign [to free her] were on the liberal side. I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher. Interviews by the Guardian with more than a dozen diplomats, analysts and current and former advisers reveal frustrations with a top-down government struggling to cope with immense challenges. Aung San Suu Kyi’s questionable leadership style, her inability or unwillingness to communicate a vision, and her reluctance to speak out against the persecution of minorities have raised the question of whether the popular narrative is misplaced. And although some defend her, saying it takes time to right the wrongs of decades, others see a fundamental misunderstanding of the woman herself. “Many of the people who led the campaign [to free Aung San Suu Kyi] … were more on the liberal side of the spectrum,” one diplomat put it. “I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher.” It’s a stark contrast to the Aung San Suu Kyi who, during 15 years of house arrest at her lakeside villa on University Avenue in Yangon, stood on rickety tables and delivered speeches about human rights over the gate. “And she was electric,” said David Mathieson, a longtime Myanmar researcher for Human Rights Watch who is now an independent consultant. “She was funny. She was informative. She was principled … And I think it’s lamentable that she’s not doing the equivalent of that now.” Five hours north by car from Yangon, Myanmar’s dystopian capital Naypyidaw stands surrounded by densely forested mountains. It is here, in the so-called Abode of Kings supposedly built to insulate Myanmar’s generals from attack, amid a landscape of deserted 20-lane highways and grandiose hotels, that Aung Sun Suu Kyi lives her life in power. The 71-year-old is a disciplined ruler. Her habit, established during imprisonment, is to wake before dawn and meditate in the house she shares with her pet dog and a small retinue of maids. She has breakfast with an adviser, often Kyaw Tint Swe, a former ambassador who spent decades defending the junta’s actions. An aide, Win Htein, says Aung San Suu Kyi eats very little. “The amount of food she is taking is like a kitten,” he said. “She doesn’t eat carbohydrates. Fruit and vegetables. No pork, or mutton, or beef. Only fish.” Her few indulgences include a vast wardrobe of luxurious silk longyis and evening film viewings, musicals being her favourite. Win Htein recently gave her a copy of La La Land. But mostly she works. And there is a lot of work. As well as state counsellor – a position created to get around the military-drafted constitution that bars her from the presidency – she is foreign minister, minister of the president’s office and chair of numerous committees. Widely described as a micromanager, she pores over documents after hours. A source close to the attorney general’s office says she asks to see a copy of every draft bill before it is submitted to parliament. Ministers routinely pass decisions upwards. “The problem is there are no policymakers in her cabinet,” said Burmese political analyst Myat Ko. People who know her say Aung San Suu Kyi inspires both devotion and fear. She is variously described as charming and charismatic, and sharp and authoritarian. “She feels like a real leader,” one diplomat said. “Intelligent, quick-witted, quite funny.” At the same time, he added: “I would say that she has appeared to be very keen to be the sole decision-maker to have no chance of establishing rival power centres.” Echelons above her subordinates in stature, the state counsellor is often depicted as living in a bubble, surrounded by a cabal of advisers who are too nervous to convey hard truths. A Yangon-based analyst working on the peace process said bad news often does not reach her. “In meetings, she is dismissive, dictatorial – in some cases, belittling,” said a senior aid worker who, like many others interviewed for this story, insisted on anonymity because he works with the administration. The government, he said, has become “so centralised, there is complete fear of her”. This is not the administration many hoped for when the National League for Democracy (NLD) took over the government [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 31st, 2017

Tensions rising between Turkish, European leaders before elections – CNN News

Turkey and the Netherlands' diplomatic feud deepened Sunday with the Turkish president accusing the NATO ally of fascism, and declaring the Dutch would &'8220;pay the price&'8221; for harming relations. The Danish Prime Minister also entered the fray, saying he couldn't host a yet-to-be scheduled visit by his Turkish counterpart in light of &'8220;current rhetorical attacks&'8221; against the Dutch. Upcoming votes in Turkey and the Netherlands serve as a backdrop for the dispute: In Turkey, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has cracked down on opposition &'8212; particularly journalists, academics and the public service sector &'8212; since a July coup attempt, is pushing an April referendum that would expand his powers. In the Netherlands, this week's general elections will pit a hardline anti-Islam candidate in a tight race against the incumbent prime minister. Erdogan is keen to rally the roughly 4.6 million expatriate Turks living in Western Europe, many of whom will be permitted to vote in the Turkish referendum. Following similar moves in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, the Netherlands on Saturday barred a plane carrying Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu from entering the country, citing security concerns. Cavusoglu sought to address expats in support of the Turkish referendum. The Dutch also stopped Turkey's family affairs minister from entering the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam. Protests broke out in both countries, and Erdogan responded by saying the Netherlands is &'8220;sacrificing Turkish-Dutch relations&'8221; and accused the country &'8212; which lost more than 200,000 of its citizens during Germany's World War II occupation &'8212; of Nazism. Rotterdam, where Cavusoglu hoped to speak, was especially hard hit by the Nazis. Next month, Turkish voters will cast ballots in a constitutional referendum that could change their government structure. If passed, it would transform the country's parliamentary system into a presidential one, effectively consolidating the power of three legislative bodies into one executive branch under Erdogan. Critics call the move anti-democratic and say it's indicative of Erdogan's drift toward authoritarian rule since the coup attempt eight months ago. Erdogan and his Justice and Development Party, or AKP, ministers have said those who oppose it stand with the coup plotters and terrorists. Cavusoglu has promised tenfold retaliation against the Netherlands, while Erdogan has likened the country to a &'8220;banana republic&'8221; and called for sanctions, according to the state-run Anadolu Agency. A Turkish diplomatic source told Anadolu that Dutch diplomatic missions in Ankara and Istanbul had been closed off due to security concerns. Meanwhile, the agency reported, the Turkish Foreign Ministry has told the Dutch ambassador, who is presently on leave out of the country, he need &'8220;not return for a while.&'8221; The Netherlands isn't the first nation Erdogan has accused of Nazism. Germany, too, became a target of Erdogan's Nazi comparisons after canceling Turkish rallies on its soil this month. Some 1.5 million Turkish nationals living in Germany are eligible to vote in the referendum, according to Anadolu. &'8220;I thought Nazism was over but I was wrong,&'8221; Erdogan said at the International Goodness Awards in Istanbul on Sunday. &'8220;What we saw in the last couple of days in Germany and Netherlands are the reflections of Islamophobia.&'8221; Turkey is overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim. Chancellor Angela Merkel issued a sharp rebuke, saying such comparisons serve only to belittle Nazi crimes. German-Turkish relations have been on a downslide of late. Among the incidents chipping away at the countries' security and economic partnership was last month's arrest of Die Welt journalist Deniz Yucel on terrorism charges, and Turkey bristled last year when Germany's parliament declared the 1915 massacre of hundreds of thousands of Armenians &'8220;genocide.&'8221; European governments have been especially critical of Erdogan's commitment to basic freedoms since the coup. The country jailed more journalists than any other country in 2016, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Also, nearly 140 media outlets have been shuttered, more than 41,000 people have been arrested and about 100,000 workers have been dismissed from public service positions. Facebook, YouTube, Twitter interrupted during uprising Affording Turkey some leverage in the international spat is its key role in a Syrian migrant deal in which Turkey will resettle one refugee for every refugee resettled in Europe. In November, responding to European Union freezing EU membership talks with Turkey, Erdogan threatened, &'8220;If you go too far, the border gates will be opened,&'8221; according to Anadolu. Amid Sunday's diplomatic turmoil, Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen postponed a yet-to-be-scheduled visit from his Turkish counterpart. &'8220;Under normal circumstances it would be a pleasure for me to greet Prime Minister (Binali) Yildirim in Copenhagen,&'8221; Rasmussen said. &'8220;But with the current rhetorical attacks by Turkey against the Netherlands, a new meeting cannot be seen isolated from that.&'8221; The Danish government is observing developments in Turkey &'8220;with great concern as democratic principles are under considerable pressure,&'8221; he said. &'8220;A meeting right now would be interpreted as if Denmark is viewing developments in Turkey more mildly, which is not at all the case.&'8221; The prime minister's office said Danish representatives and Turkish officials had been discussing the possible meeting for several weeks. It would have been scheduled for later this month in Denmark. In the Netherlands, far-right politician Geert Wilders praised the decision to bar the Turkish minister from entering the country and credited his own party for the decision. The Netherlands is heading for a nationwide vote Wednesday, with concerns about Muslim immigration a central issue. Riding a populist wave that ushered Donald Trump into the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 13th, 2017

Trump hails Secret Service for White House intruder arrest

Trump hails Secret Service for White House intruder arrest.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 12th, 2017

387 erring cops to face Duterte, clean Pasig River

MANILA, Philippines —  Hundreds of cops from the National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) are facing a community-service style of punishment and a rebuk.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2017

Duterte urged to continue peace talks with rebels

DAVAO CITY – Farmers fighting for genuine land reform have appealed on Sunday to President Rodrigo Duterte to continue the peace talks with communist rebels after he scrapped the negotiations following the spate of deadly attacks by insurgents in southern Philippines. Duterte’s decision to abandon the negotiations with communist leaders came on Saturday barely a day after he terminated the government’s unilateral ceasefire with New People’s Army rebels who also ended earlier its own truce. Since then, at least 4 soldiers had been killed by rebels in separate attacks and three more are being held prisoners in the troubled region. The rebels demanded the release of some 400 political prisoners &'' mostly NPA fighters and their leaders – languishing in jails across the country, but Duterte flatly rejected the demand, saying, a peace accord must be signed first before he could grant amnesty to political prisoners, although he had ordered the release from prison at least 21 senior rebel leaders to join the peace talks. Duterte said he cannot free all political prisoners and claimed that such action may trigger unrest in the police and military. Peace talks and land reform  But Joseph Canlas, chairman of the Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas, one of the biggest farmers’ organizations in the country, said the continuation of peace negotiations is in the best interest of farmers, who are pressing for genuine land reform, land distribution and real change under the Duterte administration. “Farmers want the peace negotiations to continue. We want the peace talks to help address the problem of land monopoly, landlessness of farmers, unemployment and to realize the equitable distribution of social wealth,” Canlas said. “The peace negotiation is a separate and distinct track of struggle to press for significant pro-people reforms. While the New People’s Army and President Duterte announced the termination of the unilateral interim ceasefires, it should not hinder the continuation of the talks that is gaining relevant developments with regard to discussions on the Comprehensive Agreement on Social and Economic Reforms, particularly agrarian reform and rural development,” he added. Canlas said based on the reported outcome of third round of the peace talks in Rome recently, the government, in principle, acquiesced to free land distribution to farmers and farm workers and that alone is a milestone with regard to pushing for socio-economic reforms and enough grounds to continue the talks. Pedro Arnado, leader of the farmers’ group in southern Mindanao, also urged Duterte not to abandon the peace talks, saying, the resumption of war with rebels may spark a series of illegal arrest and human rights violations, and even extrajudicial killings of civilians by government soldiers. “We call for the continuation of the peace talks and compliance to the Comprehensive Agreement on Respect for Human Rights and International Law to avoid rights violations of civilians,” said Arnado, who noted that at least 20 farmers and national minorities were killed during the ceasefire period. “For us farmers, a just peace means food for our families, education for our children and recognition of our right to the land we till.” Arnado said while the ultimate goal of the peace talks is to resolve the armed conflict and achieve cessation of hostilities, that wouldn’t be possible at this period when there are conflicting social classes and interests. “Big land estates, haciendas and landholdings remain intact and under the control of a few landlord families. That is in contrast with the situation of millions of tillers,” Arnado said, adding, Duterte should realize that people in the countryside are supporting and even joining the armed revolution because of the systemic and chronic crisis that is worsened by the government’s failure to address the most basic problems in rural areas. “Historically, it is the peasant masses that have made the ultimate sacrifices to achieve peace. Buhay na ang ibinuwis ng mga magsasaka para sa lupa at kapayapaan. The cost of peace is too expensive, farmers have paid it with their lives,” Arnado said. Cancel passport of communist negotiators Duterte also threatened to cancel the passports of the representatives National Democratic Front of the Philippines &'' the political wing of the Communist Party of the Philippines and the NPA &'' who make up the peace panel negotiating with the government, saying, “they are in the wanted list, so I will alert the International Police to arrest them where they are because they are in wanted list. I'll cancel their passports.” “They can return, all of them. For those released by the government, they should, on their own volition, return here and go back to prison. Or else I will be forced to, I am alerting all the intelligence community to keep track of where they are now,” Duterte said. “Iyon na-release temporarily to talk with us in Oslo, they should come back and submit themselves to the jurisdiction of the government because they are still in prison. Walang pardon, walang amnesty, wala lahat.” Blame Duterte, AFP The NPA blamed Duterte for the breakdown of the talks and accused the military of sabotaging the peace negotiations, saying, security forces encroached and attacked rebel territories in Mindanao, and murdered innocent civilians suspected of supporting the communist group. “To conceal their own ceasefire violation, the spin doctors of the Armed Forces of the Philippines concocted yet another storyline of an anti-criminality operation to assist the Philippine National Police in going after lawless elements such as their botched combat operations in Makilala and Matalam [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2017

Cavs rally to beat Sixers; Kings arrest 7-game slide

LOS ANGELES—LeBron James delivered his third triple-double of the season as the Cleveland Cavaliers are off to one of the best starts in franchise history with a 112-108 win over Philadelphia on Sunday.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 28th, 2016

Community service for Cebu City drug surrenderers okayed - Inquirer.net

Community service for Cebu City drug surrenderers okayed - Inquirer.net.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsNov 12th, 2016

Opinion: Ad Lib -- Greg B. Macabenta: "Do US Filipinos 'count' in the Philippines?"

In early August this year, I chaired the 2nd Alex Esclamado Memorial Awards for Community Service at the 12th biennial empowerment conference of the National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA), held in Greater Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.....»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsNov 1st, 2016

Nigeria arrests militant behind oil attacks police

LAGOS: The Nigerian secret police on Saturday announced the arrest of a militant who they say confessed to carrying out recent attacks on oil pipelines in the energy-rich south. The Department of State Service (DSS) said it arrested a man … Read mor.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 24th, 2016