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KathNiel rules over ABS-CBN TV plus& rsquo; new channel

KathNiel rules over ABS-CBN TV plus& rsquo; new channel.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: thestandard thestandardSep 14th, 2018

"It's my kingdom in the lightwieght division" - Eduard Folayang

On November 10th, Manila will play host to a historic meeting of champions, as ONE Championship lightweight king Eduard Folayang of the Philippines puts his title on the line against reigning ONE Championship featherweight champion Martin Nguyen of Australia.  This will be the first time that ONE Championship has set up a champion-versus-champion superfight, and given that both Folayang and Nguyen are a pair of hard-hitting warriors, this November 10th main event is sure to produce fireworks.  After successfully defending his championship against Ev Ting back in April, Folayang cemented his place as the top guy in ONE Championship's lightweight division.  Now, the top guy from a division down wants to come up and challenge the king, and during the media faceoffs in Manila, 'The Landslide' said that he wants to teach Nguyen a lesson.  em>' /em> em>Siguro ang gusto ko ituro sa kanya, it’s my kingdom in the lightweight division. (I want to teach him that it's my kingdom in the lightweight division)' /em> Folayang told the media Tuesday afternoon. em> 'It will be a good lesson for him to try my division.' /em> em>'Dito sa division ko, of course it’s bigger, mas malalaki yung mga nasa lightweight as compared sa mga nasa featherweight (In my division, it's bigger, the fighters in the lightweight division are bigger than those in featherweight)' /em> Folayang continued. em> 'As a champion, I want my division to be respected, and gagawin ko yung best ko para ma-defend yung lightweight belt na nakataya dito. (As a champion I want by division to be respected, and I'm going to do my best to defend the lightweight belt that's at stake.)' /em> The Baguio-native however said that in taking a fight against a bigger champion, Nguyen took a gamble, a gamble that could pay-off big should things go the Aussie's way.  em>'Mas mataas yung risk na itinaya niya, and syempre kung naging maganda naman yung resulta for him, it will be a good return for him. (He took a big risk, but if he gets a good result, it will be a good return for him.)'  /em> For his part, Nguyen believes that while the smaller weight classes have their own upside as well.  em>'The lightweight division is a strong division, but I still think that the potential experience that comes from the bantamweight and the featherweight division still rules over the lightweight and welterweight divisions, but we’ll see come fight night!' /em>   strong>Eduard Folayang defends his ONE Championship lightweight world title against reignign ONE Championship featherweight world champion Martin Nguyen in the main event of ONE: Legends of the World on Friday, November 10th at the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay City.  /strong> strong>Catch the action LIVE on S+A channel 23!  /strong> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2017

PVL: Fighting Warays try to stay alive in semis hunt

Tacloban’s semifinals bid now depends on fate. Though needing to pray hard for other teams still in the hunt for the last Final Four spot to drop their remaining assignments, the Fighting Warays, for now, must take care of the things they have control over. Tacloban is in a must-win situation when it clashes with upset-conscious Adamson-Akari Saturday in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan.   Game time is at 4:00 p.m. and will air live on LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183 and via livestream.  The Fighting Warays are in a two-way tie at fifth to sixth spots with idle Pocari Sweat-Air Force, sporting 5-7 win-loss records. PetroGazz, which will face Ateneo-Motolite at 6:00 p.m., currently occupies the fourth spot behind the semis-bound Lady Eagles, Creamline and BanKo. Tacloban needs to sweep its remaining games and hope that Pocari Sweat and PetroGazz drop all of their next assignments to advance to the semis. The Fighting Warays are coming off a week-long  rest after outlasting PetroGazz in five sets. But pressure will be on Tacloban’s side against a team with nothing to lose. The Lady Falcons have yet to capture the elusive victory after bowing down on their last 10 outings.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles     .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 17th, 2018

Knowledge Channel screens & lsquo;Fantastic Beasts& rsquo; to raise funds for children

Knowledge Channel screens & lsquo;Fantastic Beasts& rsquo; to raise funds for children.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 14th, 2018

PVL: BanKo out to secure at least a semis spot playoff

BanKo seeks to secure at least a playoff for a semifinals spot when the Perlas Spikers face PetroGazz Sunday in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Fresh from a dominating win over Ateneo-Motolite, BanKo looks to extend its winning streak to four straight in its 6:00 p.m. tussle with the Angels. The game will air live on ABS-CBN S+A Channel 23, ABS-CBN S+A HD Channel 166, LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183 and via livestream.    The Perlas Spikers halted the Lady Eagles’ four-game winning romp with a cold-blooded, 26-24, 25-22, 25-16, sweep Saturday to take the lead with an 8-2 win-loss record. BanKo also defeated the Angels in the first round. PetroGazz is on a two-game losing slump for a 5-5 slate tied with Pocari Sweat-Air Force. The Angels absorbed a 25-15, 23-25, 25-22, 20-25, 13-15, loss to Tacloban on Saturday.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 10th, 2018

NCAA Finals: It could ve been a better Finals -- Robinson

Lyceum of the Philippines University head coach Topex Robinson accepted the fact that San Beda University pushed their backs against the wall after taking Game 1 of the NCAA Season 94 seniors basketball Finals. Robinson admitted that they were shooting bricks, committing turnovers and seemed to have lost the energy and drive while allowing the three-peat seeking Red Lions chase them out of the MOA Arena during the match. But what ticked the mentor the most was the event that happened outside of the basketball court just 24 hours before tipoff that put a handicap on LPU in the biggest stage of the season. The Pirates marched into the war without its most important weapon in CJ Perez after the league slapped him with a one-game ban for failing to notify the NCAA that he filed an application for the PBA Draft.     “The reason it's painful for us is because CJ didn't do anything wrong. Hindi naman siya nag-ligang labas. Kung naglarong labas sana siya at nahuli, I would accept that. But I don't know,” said Topex. “The kid didn't do anything wrong.” Without Perez, LPU was deprived of a player that has been averaging 18.7 points, 8.2 rebounds, 3.9 assists, and 3.3 steals per game. San Beda won the game, 73-60, and even Red Lions head coach Boyet Fernandez did some math and thought that the complexion of the championship rematch opener could be a bit different if Perez was there.  “With CJ there, if you look at it, we only beat them by 13 so idagdag mo 18 ni CJ, talo pa kami,” said Fernandez. Robinson agreed. “It could've been a better Finals,” he said. “It's no guarantee that we're going to win but you want your best player in the game. He deserves to be there. That's just the way I feel.” “I'm speaking on my behalf, not of the school. I'm speaking as a father to a son that lost an opportunity to play in the Finals,” added a disappointed Robinson. “I don't know how you call it but life is really unfair. We have to accept the fact that again, we have a game to play.” Robinson also cited a precedent that happened back 11 years ago when then Red Lion Yousif Aljamal got away with a season ban after being drafted in the PBA as No. 8 overall pick by Air21 while the season was still ongoing. San Beda filed a Temporary Restraining Order and the NCAA retracted from its decision as Aljamal eventually helped the Red Lions win its second title under then mentor Frankie Lim.  “If they had a chance that back in 2007... Kumbaga, if those are the rules, it has to be the rules. Kumbaga, yun lang ako. Wag yung pabago bago. Kung nagawa na yun dati, pinayagan at nagawan ng paraan, yun lang sana,” said Robinson. “I don't want to put the blame on whoever makes those rules. We're just here to follow them I just hope there will be consistency. If there's players at fault, let them face it. “’Wag nilang itago yung mali at gagawan nila ng paraan. Yun lang sa akin. I'm speaking on my behalf again. If they're gonna hate me, so be it,” he continued. “I'm speaking here not as a coach of LPU but as a father to CJ and I just feel about the pain he has to go through.” “He's there helplessly watching the game from wherever. Kung may ginawa sanang mali eh. Kung nag-drugs yan o gumawa ng kalokohan.” LPU will have a week to prepare for a bounce back and Perez will be back in action for Game 2 on Monday. “We're excited to have CJ back. I hope he doesn't enter the draft again,” said Robinson on a lighter note. “He'll be ready for Game Two.”   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 6th, 2018

MAJOR POINT: Finding Family Away From Home

I’ve been in the Philippines now for over 21 years. I can’t believe it has been that long, but I just checked my passport stamp the other day and sure enough my arrival stamp says August 2, 1997. So many things have happened since then that it puts me in this weird nostalgic state of mind thinking back to how I was back then. I had no idea what was in store for me when I decided to try my luck in professional basketball in the Philippines. I thought I knew. I thought I knew everything, but I really had no clue. I was recruited by a Filipino agent living in the United States to come to the Philippines to play basketball. This made me feel pretty special. I had put together a solid playing resume in high school and college and had played a year professionally in Denmark. I thought I would come to the Philippines, play basketball for 11 years, retire, go back to Michigan and get into coaching. That was my plan. It was pretty simple to me. I never thought about the people I’d meet or the relationships I’d build during my stay in the Philippines. And even though I knew nobody in the Philippines, I didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to go to the Philippines to play basketball. There were a few things I underestimated when I came to the Philippines back in 1997. Being from Michigan, the heat was a often times painful adjustment to get used to. I had never lived in a big city before, so Manila and its traffic was also something to get used to. I don’t speak Tagalog, so getting around that can still be difficult at times. The style of play here in the Philippines is different than I was used to, so I had to get used to that. But, the biggest adjustment for me was that I knew absolutely no one when I came to the Philippines. I had no friends. My mom is from Lawaan, Eastern Samar. She had only been back once since she had left the Philippines in the late 1960s. Most of my relatives on her side of the family still live in the province. So while, I have family in the Philippines, I don’t have any relatives in Metro Manila. So, here I was, on the other side of the planet with no family and no friends. Like most people, I like having friends. I had always had a close group of friends in high school and college. Playing a year in Denmark, not having my friends around was probably my biggest adjustment and I went through a rough period of homesickness there. Now that I was in the Philippines, I was in a different, but also similar situation. In my early years here in the Philippines, I played for two great teams. My first team was Tanduay Rhum. My first coach was Alfrancis Chua and my first boss was Boss Bong Tan. Both of those guys took great care of me. After four years with them, I was then traded to Barangay Ginebra. My boss there was Boss Henry Cojuangco. He also took great care of me. I had many great teammates through the years, including my years on those two teams. My teammates were very welcoming of me and I enjoyed my time on the court with those guys. However, when practice ended. My teammates would go back to their friends, family and responsibilities and I would go back to an empty condo unit. Everyday I would have practice in the morning from 9-12. After practice, I’d eat and then go find a gym to workout in. By the time I was done with my workout at 3 or 4 in the afternoon, I would then have to figure out what to do from 3 or 4 until the time I went to bed around 10 or 11. I thought a lot differently back then than I do now, so most of that time was wasted. I spent a lot of that time alone, bored, in front of the TV, just waiting for the day to end, so I could get up and do it again the next day. Although I was living my dream of playing professional basketball, it was strange for me to be living that life day after day after day. My first couple of years here, I didn’t have a car. I didn’t know my way around Manila. I didn’t know anybody outside of my team. I was living in Quezon City in a non-walkable area. It was a grind. I often wondered how long I could continue to stay on that type of grind. It wasn’t until after 18 months of living that way that I started to meet other Filipino-Americans that were going through similar experiences. In the late 1990s, the PBA landscape was much different than it is today. One thing that was a lot different, was there weren’t as many Fil-Ams as there are today. Having Fil-Am players playing in the PBA was still a new thing. There was a novelty about us. We were the new kids in school, in a way. Guys like Jeff Cariaso, Andy and Danny Seigle, Nic Belasco, Ali Peek, Noy Castillo, Rudy Hatfield and myself had played college basketball in the United States. The basketball fans here in the Philippines didn’t know who we were before we went high in the PBA Draft and then started playing in the PBA. Most of us were the only Fil-Americans on our teams. Upon meeting them, I found out that these guys were living the similar grind I had been going through. It’s hard to explain, but after meeting some of the other Fil-American basketball players, my life instantly got better. It was so refreshing to hear about their experiences. Although, we were all different and from different areas of the US, we were basically going through the same thing at near the same stage of our lives. We were all out here on our own trying to make it in professional basketball in country that was new to us. I found comfort in learning that other people were struggling with similar things that I was struggling with. There is always pressure to win in professional sports. My new friends helped me deal with that pressure. Learning about other peoples experiences in similar situations, having an outlet and having fun with new friends off of the court, helped bring balance to my life. I related to those guys. I smiled and laughed more when I was around those guys. Two guys in particular that helped me were Jeffrey Cariaso and Andy Seigle. Both of those guys are older than me and had been in the country and the PBA before I was. I looked to both of them for advice and valued their opinions. Jeff is from San Francisco was drafted in the PBA in 1995. By the time I had met Jeff in 1999, Jeff had won the PBA Rookie of the Year, had won multiple championships and was a multiple time PBA All-Star. Jeff was always a guy I respected for the way he handled himself on the court and off of it. Jeff was also a leader in the Fil-Am community here, organizing dinners and get togethers. Even today, it is nice to be able to message Jeff and he is still always willing to listen or give advice. Jeff will always shoot you straight. A friend like him is hard to find. Andy was the number one overall pick in the 1997 PBA Draft. At 6 for 10 Andy was the first Fil-Am from my generation to have big expectations put on his shoulders the very first day he stepped on a PBA court. Dealing with that pressure must have been tough, but Andy was one of the most accommodating, giving people I have ever met. Whenever he was doing something, he would invite me. Random days out of the blue, he would invite me to his house to have dinner with his family. Andy would host dinners at his house for holidays, where families from different teams would get together to celebrate. I was fortunate enough to eventually play with Andy at Ginebra, where we won three championships together. Having him in practice and as a friend made my life better in the Philippines. Just as Jeff and Andy helped me, I also tried to help new Fil-Americans that came to the Philippines after me. Rudy Hatfield came to Tanduay a couple of years after I had been there and I tried to show him the ropes. We became very close friends. When Jimmy Alapag and Harvey Carey were new to the country in 2002 and 2003, respectively, I tried help where I could. I can’t say I ever really mentored anybody, but I always tried to listen, and share. Even if I can only help you laugh or smile more, I know that can help. Those guys have also become close friends of mine. I know they have also helped others that have come after them. Since Alapag and Carey arrived, there have already been a couple generations of new Filipino American basketball players. I still see the younger Fil-Ams from different teams hanging out together. While I’ve heard that some people view that as Fil-Ams trying to separate themselves, I don’t believe that is true. Just like guys from the same province or same school are more likely to hang out together, young Fil-Ams are more likely to hang out together. It’s a natural thing to gravitate to things and people you relate to and have something in common with. It’s not the easiest thing to do, to go to a foreign country where you have no family and friends to start a new career. I know. I’ve been there. A lot of things have changed for me since 1997, when I first came to this country. I am now married and have two small children of my own. My wife, kids and her family provide my support system now, as I do for them. However, there was a time and a long time where I didn’t have that. My Fil-American friends were my family and support system. And while that wasn’t ideal, I was always taught to do the best with what you had. I’m thankful for what I had. Eric Menk played in the PBA from 1999 to 2016. Menk is a four-time PBA champion, three-time PBA Finals MVP and one-time PBA MVP (2005). He currently writes for ABS-CBN Sports weekly. Menk also has his podcast Staying MAJOR as welll as his own YouTube channel ......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018

& lsquo;Hello K-Idol& rsquo; airs on MYX Channel

& lsquo;Hello K-Idol& rsquo; airs on MYX Channel.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

UAAP Season 81 Chess: FEU tops NU for men s crown; DLSU rules women s division

Far Eastern University ended National University's three-year reign in the men's division while De La Salle ruled the women's category for the second straight year in the UAAP Season 81 chess tournament over the weekend at the UST Quadricentennial Pavilion. The Tamaraws collected a 14-round total of 40 points to claim their 14th men’s crown overall while the Lady Woodpushers from Taft snared their ninth tiara in the distaff side after finishing with 43 points. FEU actually secured the men's championship in the 13th round following a 2-2 stalemate with De La Salle Saturday. The Morayta-based chessers then put the icing on the cake with a 2.5-1.5 win over eventual third placers Adamson University in the final round Sunday. Rookie of the Year Jeth Morado led the Tamaraws by winning the Board 2 gold, while Romy Fagon was the team's other gold medalist in Board 4. The Bulldogs' saw their dynasty end after a 2-2 draw with University of the East Saturday. As a consolation for NU, International Master Paulo Bersamina, who topped Board 1, was named the season MVP for the fourth year in a row.  Arnel Ilagan was the other gold medalist for NU in Board 6. The Lady Woodpushers drew the best from WCM Mira Mirano was named the tournament MVP and Board 1 gold medalist, while her teammate Samantha Revita bagged the Rookie of the Year honors, as well as the Board 4 gold.        De La Salle blanked FEU, 4-0, to seal the title in the 13th round Saturday before ending the season with a 3.5-0.5 win over University of the Philippines Sunday. Ella Moulic was the Lady Woodpushers' other gold medalist in Board 3. The Lady Maroons and the Lady Falcons finished second and third respectively. In the juniors division, FEU-Diliman won the boys title for the fourth straight year with Dale Bernardo, a veteran of the 19th ASEAN Chess Age Group Championship, winning the season MVP honors, while NU annexed its first-ever girls crown behind tournament MVP Fide Master Allanney Jia Doroy.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

KathNiel, Ella, Zanjoe in KBO& rsquo;s Hallow weekend

KathNiel, Ella, Zanjoe in KBO& rsquo;s Hallow weekend.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 27th, 2018

IT S FINAL: No sanctions for Perpetual in ligang labas issue

The NCAA has “sternly warned” University of Perpetual Help about the “infraction” it incurred at the midway mark of the Season 94 Men’s Basketball Tournament. “The Policy Board resolves to reprimand and sternly warn (Perpetual) that a similar infraction shall be dealt with severely,” the league said in a memo issued on Friday. #NCAASeason94 Management Committee statement on the issue regarding the residency of some Perpetual players. pic.twitter.com/9L9C1yR59E — Normie Riego (@riegogogo) Oktubre 26, 2018 Three weeks ago, a report first broken by Christian Jacinto of spin.ph found out that Perps’ lead guard Edgar Charcos, versatile forward Kim Aurin, and key reserves Kyt Jimenez and Tonton Peralta played in a commercial league last year. The four reportedly played for the Las Pinas Home Defenders in the Metro Basketball Tournament a year ago. According to sources closely monitoring the situation, NCAA rules on residency is understood to be like this – a player undergoing residency is only allowed to see action in another league if he will still be representing the school. After the investigation, however, the league has apparently determined that the Las Pinas Home Defenders is a school-based squad. “The Policy Board resolves that Perpetual has fielded a school-based team in joining a non-NCAA league,” the memo said. As such, the Altas have committed no infraction and will be able to play in the Final Four without any issues from here on out. As of press time, they are dueling with defending champion San Beda University. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 26th, 2018

The Rondo-like spit that once mired the PBA

That infamous, nasty incident wherein Rajon Rondo was seen spitting on Chris Paul that led to an ugly melee that marred the Lakers-Rockets game at the Staples Center Saturday leaves NBA fans shocked at how their idols can go so low in “stressing a point.” Would our much admired Filipino players do the same in our beloved sport? You would say yes given the colorful history of Philippine basketball, wherein a nudge, trip, kick, or undercut (the legacy of our menacing and tough yet legendary “enforcers”) was so common that players would just seem to set them aside as part of the game. But a spit on the face? It’s the most denigrating, unsportsmanlike, objectionable act on a person that should trigger a most livid physical response given how it’s done deliberately and consciously. Surely, it was considered a common yet somewhat unnoticed foul move in the earlier days of local basketball, committed by even the biggest legends of the sport. Just like rough physical play, notorious, cunning players would allegedly spit on driving opponents to distract them from making the basket. And they would get away with it, given how the offended player would find it extremely difficult to prove it (no quadruple zoom-slo mo video at the time, sorry). Except of course, he shows his saliva-laden face to the officials. But in recent years, with the coming of the slo-mo replays that have really advanced as years went by, these actions have been caught on film, which is clear, unquestionable proof about the offender’s culpability. Many were sanctioned, most especially in college basketball wherein such acts are blamed on youthful recklessness. But in pro basketball, wherein players are considered demigods in cage fare? Would they do it in full view of everyone in the court, in the stands and the millions at home with the handy instant replays? And of course, heavier, stiffer penalties awaiting them? The PBA at present has carefully prevented hooliganism in recent years with its strict, unbending rules against extreme physicality. And these were crafted by the worst “court crimes” they’ve witnessed. There was one incident, by far, that was considered the most disconcerting because it involved a player throwing ball of saliva plastering his DNA onto a player’s face. It was an eliminations game as the 1991 PBA Reinforced Conference was underway, Ginebra faced Presto figured in a much-awaited encounter. Tivoli coach Jimmy Mariano fielded point guard and known badass enforcer Onchie dela Cruz to wreak havoc on defense, given that Ginebra is a tough never-say-die squad, and Robert Jaworski, Sr. himself recognized his fearsome ways. As Ginebra import Wes Matthews drove in for a shot, Dela Cruz in his patented rough, streetwise style mercilessly hacked the former Laker. Not used to that kind of foul even in his NBA days, Matthews was fuming, taunting Dela Cruz who appeared indifferent at first. But when Matthews continued his taunting, and with cameras focused on the two, Dela Cruz suddenly released his deepest rancor by blowing a disgusting round of spit on his adversary. And this triggered a free for all that almost stopped the match. He then was meted a suspension and a fine. Truly one of a kind, such unbecoming and despicable act is unwarranted even if provoked. Yet, luckily and thankfully no other such incidents were reported or recorded. At least in public.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 23rd, 2018

SC urged to order gov& rsquo;t to issue fishing vessels monitoring rules

SC urged to order gov& rsquo;t to issue fishing vessels monitoring rules.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

Uncut shows from East Asia land on TV Plus& rsquo; Asianovela Channel

Uncut shows from East Asia land on TV Plus& rsquo; Asianovela Channel.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

MAJOR POINT: Has the PBA Solved Its Draft Problem?

Late last week on October 12th, the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) made an announcement that the PBA Board of Governors voted and agreed unanimously that starting 2019, the number 1 overall draft pick can no longer be traded and is exclusively for the worst team in the league to pick who they choose. At first glance, the PBA’s announcement looks like a solution to the draft problem that has gone on for over a decade. If you just read the headline or skimmed through the press release or an article written on the subject maybe you think the PBA has found its solution to the draft problem that caused division in the PBA Board and led to the hiring of a new commissioner after another draft debacle last year. Ever the skeptic, I read more than the headlines. Instead of skimming through the press release and articles, I read the fine print. After my readings and a few discussions with basketball people, do I feel the PBA has found a solution to its draft problem? I’m skeptical. I have questions. But before we get to my questions, lets take a look at how the PBA got itself in a situation where they had to make an actual rule that the worst team in the league CAN’T trade the number one overall pick: 2005: Anthony “Jay” Washington gets drafted number one overall by Air21 Express. Washington gets traded on draft day to the Talk ’N Text Phone Pals. Talk ’N Text was second in wins in the PBA in the three conferences leading up to the 2005 draft. 2008: The Talk ’N Text Phone Pals have picks 2 and 4 in the first round of the draft despite being tied for the most number of wins in the 2006-2007 season. They draft Jared Dillinger and Rob Reyes with those picks. TNT trades Jay Washington to the San Miguel Beermen and acquires the third overall pick, which turns out to be Jayson Castro. 2009: Japeth Aguilar is selected number one overall by the Burger King Whoppers. Aguilar plays one game for the Whoppers, before he is shipped to the Talk N Text Tropang Texters in a three-way trade also involving Barako Bull. Burger King was able to get Barako Bull’s 2010 (previously acquired by Talk ‘N Text) and 2012 first-round picks along with Talk ‘N Text’s 2013 and 2014 first-round picks. 2010: Noy Baclao and Rabeh Al-Hussaini are selected first and second overall by Air21 Express. Midway through their rookie season both Baclao and Al-Hussaini along with Rey Guevarra are traded to Petron Blaze in exchange for Danny Seigle, Dondon Hontiveros, Dorian Peña and Paul Artadi. Baclao and Al-Hussaini help the Petron Blaze win the 2011 PBA Governors’ Cup. Al-Hussaini wins Rookie of the Year. 2012: The Petron Blaze Boosters (from Barako Bull via Air21) select June Mar Fajardo number one overall. 2013: Barangay Ginebra (from Air21) selects Greg Slaughter number one overall. Barako Bull had the fourth, fifth and sixth picks in the first round. Barako Bull decides to trade away all three first round picks. The fifth pick turns out to be Terrence Romeo. 2014: Despite winning the Philippine Cup in a 4-0 sweep, Talk ’N Text lands the second and fourth picks overall and selects Kevin Alas and Matthew Ganuelas-Rosser before the 2014-2015 PBA season begins. Alas & Ganuelas-Rosser help Talk ’N Text win the 2015 Commisioner’s Cup. Kia Sorento with their first pick in franchise history selects Manny Pacquiao 11th overall. 2015: Despite winning the 2015 Commissioner’s Cup, Talk ’N Text has the number one overall pick (from Blackwater). Talk ’N Text selects Moala Tautuaa number one and then two days later trade for the number two overall pick, Troy Rosario (Mahindra). 2016: The “Special” Draft. Gilas players are selected behind closed doors. One Gilas cadet per team, not to be traded for two years. Draft order was never released to the PBA fans/public. 2017: The San Miguel Beerman, despite winning two championships, having the most wins and the best win percentage, select Christian Standhardinger number one overall after a trade from Kia. Losing out on the Standhardinger sweepstakes, TNT blasts Commissioner Narvasa for approving the trade. The PBA divides where seven teams declare they have a “loss of confidence” in Commissioner Narvasa. Five teams support Commissioner Narvasa. After a three-month stalemate, Commissioner Narvasa steps down and the PBA Board appoints a new commissioner, Willie Marcial. As you can see, it is a little more complicated than having the number one overall pick protected from a trade. While the number one overall pick has been traded seven times in the last 13 years, which has to be some kind of record, there have been other issues as well. And that is where my long list of questions begins: -    What’s to stop an already winning team from stacking up multiple first round picks other than the number one overall pick, like in 2008 and 2014? -    This "no trading of the top pick rule" becomes effective in 2019. Why the wait? Why can’t it apply this year? Columbian Dyip has the first pick this season. History says they could likely trade that pick to a championship team. Why do we have to go through this make-believe world another year? -    Hypothetically, how would the PBA handle this situation: Phoenix trades an active player to Rain or Shine for ROS’s 2021 1st round pick. Unfortunately, in 2020, ROS has a variety of injuries and acquires the number one overall pick. What happens then? Who gets the first pick? ROS or Phoenix? -    After the first pick is drafted, when does that player selected first become tradeable? Can it be traded after the draft? If not, for how long? Looking at the draft history of the last 13 years, you have to wonder, what were the objectives of teams like Air21, Barako Bull & Kia? Were those teams in the league to form competitive teams? Were they attempting to build championship teams? Why were those teams trading so many of their top picks? Columbian justified its trading of the number pick last year by saying they were going to play in an “unconventional” way. Their unconventional way has led them to five wins in 31 games so far this season. It has also earned them the number one overall pick for the second year in a row. The PBA Draft is supposed to be fun. It used to be fun. Before 2005, the PBA Draft was a legitimate event. It was something to look forward to. The idea of the draft is still special in theory. It’s a day where dreams come true. Drafted players lives change that day. Many times, the lives of a player's family change forever when their son or husband or father is drafted in the PBA. It's an opportunity for teams who have struggled to get better. It's supposed to give hope to teams drafting high and a challenge to teams drafting low. That is how the draft system is supposed to work. Unfortunately, in the PBA that system has been broke for a long time. I like the idea and the spirit of the draft. However, last year on my podcast, Staying MAJOR, I argued that the PBA should scrap its draft. That made me sad. It made me sad because I feel like the spirit of the PBA Draft has been lost. It's been lost by teams manipulating the system for the improvement of their individual team or their team's objective, but not for the betterment of the league. I’m tired of the PBA Draft getting hijacked every year. And now we have to likely go through it again this year. Even after what happened last year. Not being able to trade the number one pick sounds good. It’s a nice blanket statement. I even think it might be a step in the right direction. But, sometimes when you're bleeding, you need more than a band-aid. Fans aren’t naive. They can figure out what’s going on when year after year the rich get richer and the poor stay poor. Maybe some of my questions will get answered here as the draft approaches? Maybe Columbian Dyip won’t trade their pick again? Maybe that’s just wishful thinking on my part? If there is a silver lining, it is at least the PBA and its Board have acknowledged that there is a problem. At least there was an attempt to fix it. I’d say vetting of new potential franchises, so the PBA doesn’t have members who want to trade their draft picks to already successful teams is the bigger issue, but hopefully this is a start of trying to level the playing field. Wouldn’t it be fun to have teams that haven’t won in a while, keep their picks and build contending teams? Or at least not give them to the already strong teams? Wouldn’t that be fun? Wouldn’t it be fun to celebrate the draft spirit of hope on draft day without trying to figure out how the best teams ended up with the top picks again? The PBA is a professional, competitive, sports league. That’s what it’s supposed to be. The PBA is supposed to be fun too. However, it’s NOT fun or competitive when the top teams keep picking high every year. That’s not real competition to me. So will the PBA’s new rule regarding the number one overall pick change anything? This year, no. Starting next year, maybe. I’d like to be optimistic that there will be change or that this rule will initiate an on-going conversation of how to make the draft better. Unfortunately, we still have a full year of waiting before we find out. Eric Menk played in the PBA from 1999 to 2016. Menk is a four-time PBA champion, three-time PBA Finals MVP and one-time PBA MVP (2005). He will be writing for ABS-CBN Sports weekly. Menk also has his podcast Staying MAJOR as welll as his own YouTube channel ......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

Establishments told to comply with new rules as & lsquo;Bora& rsquo; reopens

Establishments told to comply with new rules as ‘Bora’ reopens Source link link: Establishments told to comply with new rules as ‘Bora’ reopens.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Looking for an edge: Teams trying to turn data into wins

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press Data is pored over by coaches and staff of the Orlando Magic on a regular basis. They’ll dissect how far a player runs during practice, how quickly that player accelerates and decelerates, how his performance changes as the workout goes along, biometric measurements like his heartbeat or when his workload is particularly heavy. The charts and graphs are detailed and precise. But how it’ll help the Magic win, that’s still an unknown. Wearable technology — chips worn during practice to collect information that analysts churn into reports — has been around the NBA for the past several seasons. It’s not permitted on game nights, and anything specific about processes the 30 teams are using falls into the category of closely guarded secrets. And when it comes to coaches deciding what play to call in the final seconds with a game on the line, it doesn’t seem to have an impact quite yet. “It’s all very beneficial stuff,” Magic coach Steve Clifford said. “But I can only digest X amount of information. And it has to be the right amount of information.” That’s one of the challenges that NBA teams are facing in this information age. Everyone knows analytics can help in countless ways. But the question remains simple: How? “You’ve got to take it and use it as best you can,” said New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry, who said he resisted using some data that he was presented several years ago when he coached in Phoenix — and wound up taking that Suns team to the Western Conference finals. “But at the end of the day, I think the instincts that you have as a coach become just as important, really.” There are some consistencies in what’s being collected. Regardless of what hardware a team is using, everything basically tracks the same things: distance of movement, speed of movement, acceleration and deceleration, workload and heart rate. Teams work on their own, largely without NBA oversight except for some rules laid out in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. It’s already been a boost in how teams monitor a player’s recovery from injury or surgery. But some also have wondered if the data collection is too invasive, or could be used against a player — something that isn’t supposed to happen under league rule. “It seems inherently geared to advantage the team,” University of Illinois law professor Michael LeRoy said in comments posted to his blog last year. “When it’s not linked to performance and not actually linked to injury, just correlation ... it’s hard to see where that data can be used to the advantage of a player.” The NBA has put together a list of what brands (like Catapult and STATSports) and types of products that teams can use, much in the same way it approves knee braces and other accessories. Teams aren’t mandated to share the data they’re collecting from the wearables with the league, although that may change once devices are permitted to be used during games. “Data collected through wearable devices has the potential to have a number of applications to improve player health — but it’s not a silver bullet,” said Dr. John DiFiori, the NBA’s medical director. “Information from wearables can add more detail on each player’s loading, which, together with a team’s overall toolkit, can help develop more individualized injury prevention programs, and assist teams in promoting safe return to play following an injury.” There could be benefits to standardizing the data, but that seems a long way off — especially since teams are still figuring out how to best go forward individually. The league and the NBA Players Association are working on finalizing a validation program will be in place to ensure that devices are measuring what the manufacturers say they’re measuring, and that they do so accurately. Atlanta rookie Kevin Huerter said in his short time as a pro, he’s learned a ton about his body that he didn’t even know because of what he’s gleaned off what his team has collected. “At this level, they worry and care so much more about your body,” Huerter said. “The technology monitors how tough practices are and how tough you’re pushing yourself. It’s a longer season, everybody knows that. So I think a lot of it is making sure guys stay healthy and listening when guys are hurting a little bit one day.” It might extend careers, help with injury management, maybe develop ways to avoid injuries. But whether this data will ever be sharpened to the point of helping a team figure out how to overcome a five-point deficit with 28.2 seconds remaining, that’s anyone’s guess. “Where the league is going, you’re looking for every edge,” Clifford said. “But as a coach, what you can’t do is you can’t stop watching the film. The data, talking to people, the numbers, all that, it’s all good information. But to have the clarity I think you need to make the right decisions, you better have watched enough film because that’s where you can see why, why, why it’s happening.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Establishments told to comply with new rules as & lsquo;Bora& rsquo; reopens

Establishments told to comply with new rules as & lsquo;Bora& rsquo; reopens.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 13th, 2018

PVL: Valdez, Pablo cross paths in explosive showdown

Two of the league’s biggest names collide on Sunday when Alyssa Valdez and Creamline meet Myla Pablo and the Pocari Sweat-Air Force Lady Warriors in an exciting Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference battle at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan.    Action is set to begin at 6:00 p.m. that will air live on ABS-CBN S+A Channel 23, ABS-CBN S+A HD Channel 166, LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183 and via livestream.  Tied at 3-1 win-loss slates, the Cool Smashers and Lady Warriors will dispute the second spot behind league-leading and unbeaten BanKo (5-0). Also at stake for both teams are their winning streaks. The two squads started out on the wrong foot but gained back their confidence by winning their next three games, respectively. Leading Creamline is power hitter Valdez, who is averaging 21 points per game, backed by a solid crew led by Risa Sato, Jema Galanza, setter Jia Morado, veteran libero Mel Gohing and the returning Pau Soriano. Jem Gutierrez also made her presence felt in the Cool Smashers’ emphatic sweep of Adamson-Akari after scoring eight points, thus, giving head coach Tai Bundit another option on offense. But Creamline will definitely need to bring its A-game when they face Pablo and the Lady Warriors. The reigning Most Valuable Player Pablo is averaging 19 points per game and displayed solid floor defense for Poacri Sweat. Pablo will also have a veteran crew to help her with middles Jeanette Panaga and Del Palomata, setter Wendy Semana and hitter May Ann Pantino.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 13th, 2018

PVL: Angels seek to end first round on a high note

Ending the first round elimination on a winning note will be PetroGazz’s mission Saturday when its marches into battle against winless Adamson-Akari in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. After a one-week rest, the Angels are back into action hoping to rediscover their winning ways in the 6:00 p.m. encounter with the freefalling Lady Falcons. The match will air live on LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183 and via livestream. PetroGazz sports a 3-3 win-loss record and is coming off a stinging 21-25, 25-17, 25-19, 14-25, 7-15 defeat at the hands of Ateneo-Motolite.         Meanwhile, Adamson-Akari seemed to find a hard time taking flight in the season-ending tournament following a third place finish in the Collegiate Conference. The Lady Falcons are winless in four outings and are fresh from a 16-25, 9-25, 20-25, rout from Alyssa Valdez and Creamline.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2018

PVL: Perlas Spikers stake unbeaten slate

BanKo looks to extend its winning romp to five straight in a showdown with shaky Tacloban in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference Wednesday at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Game time is at 4:00 p.m. and will air live on LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183 and via livestream. The Perlas Spikers sport a 4-0 win-loss record and hold the solo lead. Veterans Dzi Gervacio, Nicole Tiamzon and Kathy Bersola spearheaded BanKo’s straight sets domination of Ateneo-Motolite, 27-25, 25-19, 25-11, last Sunday, a day after taking down Adamson-Akari in four sets. The Fighting Warays are coming off a 15-25, 21-25, 15-25, defeat at the hands of Creamline 10 days ago. Tacloban holds a 2-2 slate.     ---    Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 9th, 2018