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K-Pop group Momoland returns to Manila for exclusive fan meet

K-Pop group Momoland returns to Manila for exclusive fan meet.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: thestandard thestandardDec 6th, 2018

A special media conference with South-Korean girl group MOMOLAND for Frontrow Ph…

A special media conference with South-Korean girl group MOMOLAND for Frontrow Philippines at their newest branch in Mother Ignacia St., Q.C. Also, Frontrow Philippines held an exclusive fan meet session with Momoland at ABS-CBN Vertis Tent to thank their loyal members. Photos by Danilo Factor Source link: A special media conference with South-Korean girl group MOMOLAND for Frontrow Ph….....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2018

IN PHOTOS: Momoland meets Manny Pacquiao, wife Jinkee

MANILA, Philippines  – Korean girl group Momoland arrived in Manila Thursday, August 16 and got the chance to meet boxing champion turned senator Manny Pacquiao in an event. In a post from the group's official social media pages, they said: "Momoland arrived in the Philippines today and had a chance for meeting the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

Dominguez leads Philippine team to exclusive Alibaba forum

MANILA, Philippines — A delegation of finance and central bank officials from the Philippines is set to meet Alibaba Group founder Jack Ma in Hangzhou, China.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 29th, 2018

Libyan-Canadian cleric linked to Manchester bomber plans return to Canada to clear his name – CBC News

A Libyan-Canadian cleric linked in U.S. and British media reports to Manchester bomber Salman Abedi says he will return to Canada in weeks with the intention of clearing his name. Abdul Baset Egwilla was an Ottawa-based imam until his return to Libya in 2007. In an exclusive interview with CBC News over Skype, Egwilla denied any connection to Abedi. &'8220;I challenge whoever accuses me of such a connection to produce evidence, such as a time, date and place where I met with the suicide bomber,&'8221; Egwilla said. CBC News has agreed not to disclose Egwilla's current location due to concerns for his safety, as he is the subject of death threats in Libya. Salman Abedi, 22, was identified on May 23 as the suicide bomber who killed 22 people and wounded more than 60 others, including children, at a pop concert in Manchester. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack. The bomber's father, Ramadan Abedi, who denies his son was a member of ISIS, has since been arrested by Libyan counter-terrorism officers. U.S. and British media reports, citing anonymous sources, have claimed a link between Salman, his father and Libyan-Canadian cleric Egwilla. A senior American official told the New York Times on May 24 that Salman Abedi &'8220;had links to a radical preacher in Libya&'8221; identified as Abdul Baset Egwilla, and that Egwilla's son had died fighting for ISIS. Egwilla's son did die in 2016, but Libyan news reports and a martyrdom notice at the time said he was killed fighting for the Omar Mukhtar Brigade, a Libyan Islamist militia that is not a listed terrorist organization. The Times newspaper in the U.K. reported May 27 that Ramadan Abedi was an associate of &'8220;extremist Canadian-Libyan preacher&'8221; Egwilla, and that the Libyan-Canadian is believed to have radicalized Ramadan's son, Salman Abedi. The father would regularly meet with Egwilla at Friday prayers in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, in 2015, added the Times, citing a resident of the city who asked not to be named. The Greater Manchester Police Force would neither confirm nor deny to CBC News that Egwilla is under investigation for possible involvement in the Manchester bombing. Egwilla, who has been absent from Libya for several months since fleeing a plot to assassinate him, said he has never, to his knowledge, met either Salman or Ramadan Abedi. &'8220;I am a public figure, I appear in the media. I show up in mosques and preach to a multitude of people. People know me, but I do not know them,&'8221; Egwilla said. &'8220;And if I met him once or twice before, it could be that he changed his beliefs later on, but I never met him in the first place,&'8221; Egwilla said of the Manchester bomber. Declassified documents released by Canada's Integrated Terrorism Assessment Centre in 2014 flagged a YouTube video in which Egwilla is seen &'8220;promoting violent jihad in Libya.&'8221; &'8220;In the video, Egwilla urged an audience of Libyan Islamist fighters to take part in jihad, stating that 'jihad is simply and easily accessible, and does not require moving as in the past, as it was for Afghanistan and Iraq,'&'8221; the report said. Egwilla says that call to jihad was made to recruit people to fight specifically against a militia led by a former general in Moammar Gadhafi's regime, and not a call to support the global jihadi movement. &'8220;I spoke about jihad only through Fajr Libya Dawn (a rebel militia alliance) and only when [Moammar Gadhafi] suppressed peaceful demonstrators and bombed them with anti-aircraft weaponry,&'8221; said Egwilla. &'8220;This was unjust and an act of tyranny.&'8221; Egwilla said people claiming to be with the government of Canada have attempted to reach out to him using the app Viber, though he says he has never agreed to an interview. Egwilla said he intends to speak to authorities to clear his name when he returns to Canada. After seven years in Ottawa, Egwilla left Canada for Libya in 2007, when Gadhafi's regime began sending signals that it would not persecute returning dissidents. ​ He began working at a Tripoli religious radio station and associated with a group of clerics that included Sadiq al-Ghariani, who today is the country's Grand Mufti, the top religious leader, and a strong supporter of Islamist militias. When rebellion broke out in 2011, Egwilla was a prominent supporter, and after the fall of Gadhafi's regime, was promoted to be the administrative director for the mosques in Tripoli. He said he became a prominent imam and broadcaster. In 2014, as splits emerged between liberals and Islamists over the direction post-Gadhafi Libya should take, Egwilla identified with the &'8220;Libya Dawn&'8221; coalition of Islamist militias that seized Tripoli from the UN-backed government. Libya Dawn soon found itself involved in a war with the secular forces of Gadhafi-era general Khalifa Haftar, and Egwilla's Ottawa-raised son Owais joined one of the Islamist militias battling Haftar. Owais died in combat in March last year. It was reported in some quarters that Owais Egwilla had died fighting for Islamic State. In fact, martyrdom notices posted at the time of his death show him as a member of the Omar Mukhtar Brigade, an Islamist militia that was part of the coalition that fought Islamic State and drove it out of its Libyan stronghold in Sirte. Egwilla says he fled Libya eight months ago following the kidnapping and murder of fellow cleric Nadir al-Omrani by assassins of the Madkhali sect of Sunni Islam. Madkhalis, followers of a school of thought founded by a Saudi cleric, have become increasingly active in Libya. Like Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, Madkhalis in Libya have destroyed ancient shrines and manuscripts they deem un-Islamic and they consider voting to be heresy. In a videotaped confession seen by CBC News, one of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2017

Ukulele-wielding WWE star Xavier Woods returns to Manila

WWE superstar Xavier Woods conducted a meet-and-greet with Filipino fans Friday at the SM Mall of Asia Music Hall in Pasay City......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 30th, 2018

Momoland coming back to Manila

MANILA, Philippines – If you still can't enough of the girls behind "BBoom BBoom" and "BAAM," you're just in luck because K-pop group Momoland will be coming back to the Philippines in 2019.  The official social media accounts of the Araneta Center in Quezon City made the announcement on Monday, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

LOOK: Scarlet Kramer meets iKON s Uncle Bobby

MANILA, Philippines – Young girls usually get parties or gifts during their birthdays. But Scarlet Kramer, daughter to actress Cheska Garcia Kramer and professional basketball player Doug Kramer, got the best birthday gift ever in the form a meet-and-greet with no less than Bobby from Korean group iKON.  Scarlet, her older ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

MAJOR POINT: Finding Family Away From Home

I’ve been in the Philippines now for over 21 years. I can’t believe it has been that long, but I just checked my passport stamp the other day and sure enough my arrival stamp says August 2, 1997. So many things have happened since then that it puts me in this weird nostalgic state of mind thinking back to how I was back then. I had no idea what was in store for me when I decided to try my luck in professional basketball in the Philippines. I thought I knew. I thought I knew everything, but I really had no clue. I was recruited by a Filipino agent living in the United States to come to the Philippines to play basketball. This made me feel pretty special. I had put together a solid playing resume in high school and college and had played a year professionally in Denmark. I thought I would come to the Philippines, play basketball for 11 years, retire, go back to Michigan and get into coaching. That was my plan. It was pretty simple to me. I never thought about the people I’d meet or the relationships I’d build during my stay in the Philippines. And even though I knew nobody in the Philippines, I didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to go to the Philippines to play basketball. There were a few things I underestimated when I came to the Philippines back in 1997. Being from Michigan, the heat was a often times painful adjustment to get used to. I had never lived in a big city before, so Manila and its traffic was also something to get used to. I don’t speak Tagalog, so getting around that can still be difficult at times. The style of play here in the Philippines is different than I was used to, so I had to get used to that. But, the biggest adjustment for me was that I knew absolutely no one when I came to the Philippines. I had no friends. My mom is from Lawaan, Eastern Samar. She had only been back once since she had left the Philippines in the late 1960s. Most of my relatives on her side of the family still live in the province. So while, I have family in the Philippines, I don’t have any relatives in Metro Manila. So, here I was, on the other side of the planet with no family and no friends. Like most people, I like having friends. I had always had a close group of friends in high school and college. Playing a year in Denmark, not having my friends around was probably my biggest adjustment and I went through a rough period of homesickness there. Now that I was in the Philippines, I was in a different, but also similar situation. In my early years here in the Philippines, I played for two great teams. My first team was Tanduay Rhum. My first coach was Alfrancis Chua and my first boss was Boss Bong Tan. Both of those guys took great care of me. After four years with them, I was then traded to Barangay Ginebra. My boss there was Boss Henry Cojuangco. He also took great care of me. I had many great teammates through the years, including my years on those two teams. My teammates were very welcoming of me and I enjoyed my time on the court with those guys. However, when practice ended. My teammates would go back to their friends, family and responsibilities and I would go back to an empty condo unit. Everyday I would have practice in the morning from 9-12. After practice, I’d eat and then go find a gym to workout in. By the time I was done with my workout at 3 or 4 in the afternoon, I would then have to figure out what to do from 3 or 4 until the time I went to bed around 10 or 11. I thought a lot differently back then than I do now, so most of that time was wasted. I spent a lot of that time alone, bored, in front of the TV, just waiting for the day to end, so I could get up and do it again the next day. Although I was living my dream of playing professional basketball, it was strange for me to be living that life day after day after day. My first couple of years here, I didn’t have a car. I didn’t know my way around Manila. I didn’t know anybody outside of my team. I was living in Quezon City in a non-walkable area. It was a grind. I often wondered how long I could continue to stay on that type of grind. It wasn’t until after 18 months of living that way that I started to meet other Filipino-Americans that were going through similar experiences. In the late 1990s, the PBA landscape was much different than it is today. One thing that was a lot different, was there weren’t as many Fil-Ams as there are today. Having Fil-Am players playing in the PBA was still a new thing. There was a novelty about us. We were the new kids in school, in a way. Guys like Jeff Cariaso, Andy and Danny Seigle, Nic Belasco, Ali Peek, Noy Castillo, Rudy Hatfield and myself had played college basketball in the United States. The basketball fans here in the Philippines didn’t know who we were before we went high in the PBA Draft and then started playing in the PBA. Most of us were the only Fil-Americans on our teams. Upon meeting them, I found out that these guys were living the similar grind I had been going through. It’s hard to explain, but after meeting some of the other Fil-American basketball players, my life instantly got better. It was so refreshing to hear about their experiences. Although, we were all different and from different areas of the US, we were basically going through the same thing at near the same stage of our lives. We were all out here on our own trying to make it in professional basketball in country that was new to us. I found comfort in learning that other people were struggling with similar things that I was struggling with. There is always pressure to win in professional sports. My new friends helped me deal with that pressure. Learning about other peoples experiences in similar situations, having an outlet and having fun with new friends off of the court, helped bring balance to my life. I related to those guys. I smiled and laughed more when I was around those guys. Two guys in particular that helped me were Jeffrey Cariaso and Andy Seigle. Both of those guys are older than me and had been in the country and the PBA before I was. I looked to both of them for advice and valued their opinions. Jeff is from San Francisco was drafted in the PBA in 1995. By the time I had met Jeff in 1999, Jeff had won the PBA Rookie of the Year, had won multiple championships and was a multiple time PBA All-Star. Jeff was always a guy I respected for the way he handled himself on the court and off of it. Jeff was also a leader in the Fil-Am community here, organizing dinners and get togethers. Even today, it is nice to be able to message Jeff and he is still always willing to listen or give advice. Jeff will always shoot you straight. A friend like him is hard to find. Andy was the number one overall pick in the 1997 PBA Draft. At 6 for 10 Andy was the first Fil-Am from my generation to have big expectations put on his shoulders the very first day he stepped on a PBA court. Dealing with that pressure must have been tough, but Andy was one of the most accommodating, giving people I have ever met. Whenever he was doing something, he would invite me. Random days out of the blue, he would invite me to his house to have dinner with his family. Andy would host dinners at his house for holidays, where families from different teams would get together to celebrate. I was fortunate enough to eventually play with Andy at Ginebra, where we won three championships together. Having him in practice and as a friend made my life better in the Philippines. Just as Jeff and Andy helped me, I also tried to help new Fil-Americans that came to the Philippines after me. Rudy Hatfield came to Tanduay a couple of years after I had been there and I tried to show him the ropes. We became very close friends. When Jimmy Alapag and Harvey Carey were new to the country in 2002 and 2003, respectively, I tried help where I could. I can’t say I ever really mentored anybody, but I always tried to listen, and share. Even if I can only help you laugh or smile more, I know that can help. Those guys have also become close friends of mine. I know they have also helped others that have come after them. Since Alapag and Carey arrived, there have already been a couple generations of new Filipino American basketball players. I still see the younger Fil-Ams from different teams hanging out together. While I’ve heard that some people view that as Fil-Ams trying to separate themselves, I don’t believe that is true. Just like guys from the same province or same school are more likely to hang out together, young Fil-Ams are more likely to hang out together. It’s a natural thing to gravitate to things and people you relate to and have something in common with. It’s not the easiest thing to do, to go to a foreign country where you have no family and friends to start a new career. I know. I’ve been there. A lot of things have changed for me since 1997, when I first came to this country. I am now married and have two small children of my own. My wife, kids and her family provide my support system now, as I do for them. However, there was a time and a long time where I didn’t have that. My Fil-American friends were my family and support system. And while that wasn’t ideal, I was always taught to do the best with what you had. I’m thankful for what I had. Eric Menk played in the PBA from 1999 to 2016. Menk is a four-time PBA champion, three-time PBA Finals MVP and one-time PBA MVP (2005). He currently writes for ABS-CBN Sports weekly. Menk also has his podcast Staying MAJOR as welll as his own YouTube channel ......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018

PSEi returns to 7,000; world markets rebound

THE stock market climbed back to the 7,000 level on Friday, with analysts pointing to bargain-hunting following Thursday’s rout and news that US President Donald Trump could meet with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jingping, during next month’s G20 summit. The Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) rose by 1.75 percent or 120.39 points to close at [...] The post PSEi returns to 7,000; world markets rebound appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsOct 12th, 2018

PNP returns security detail to Trillanes

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippine National Police (PNP) has returned the two police security detail of Senator Antonio Trillanes IV, Police Security and Protection Group head Chief Superintendent Filmore Escobal confirmed to Rappler on Thursday, October 11. "Binalik na yung dalawa as ordered by the PNP chief (The two have been returned ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

Diokno: Vodafone eyeing PH market

Britain’s Vodafone Group Plc is exploring the possibility of entering the Philippines’ “duopolistic” telco market, a Cabinet official said on Wednesday. “While I was in UK, I was able to meet various members of British business, education and government sectors in hopes of securing investments and partnerships for the Philippines,” Budget Secretary Benjamin Diokno told [...] The post Diokno: Vodafone eyeing PH market appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsOct 3rd, 2018

Spa manager arrested for sexual abuse of minor

MANILA, Philippines – Police arrested in Marikina City a spa manager accused of sexually abusing a minor and threatening to post their sex video on social media if she refused to meet him again.  Chief Inspector Benigno Meneses, head of the Eastern Police District-Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (EPD-CIDG), said ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 3rd, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: Philippine medalists given additional financial incentives

Medalists from the recently-concluded Asian Games just got richer after getting additional financial incentives for their hard work and success. The incentives, which were a sum of the funds given by the MVP Group, San Miguel Corporation and the PBA, were given to the athletes in a special ceremony before the Ginebra-San Miguel tussle at the Big Dome Sunday evening. Bronze medalists were awarded PHP 300,000 while silver medalists got PHP 500,000 and gold medalists were bestowed a prize of PHP 2,000,000 each.  The latter prize was is in addition of the previous incentives awarded by the Philippine government and the private sector of PHP 7,000,000 for the gold medalists. Some medalists were on-hand in the awarding ceremony, including Pauline Lopez (bronze, taekwondo); Agatha Wong (bronze, taijijian, taijiquan); Rogen Ladon (silver, boxing), Hidilyn Diaz (gold, weightlifting), Yuka Saso (gold, golf).  The winning National Sports Associations were also given a cash prize in a ceremony earlier this day. Finishing the quadriennial meet with a 4 gold- 2 silver-15 bronze medal count, the Philippines finished 19 out of 46 participating nations, coming up short of a top-15 finish that the national sports governing bodies had set for themselves, but a noticeable improvement from the 1-3-11 medal haul in the Incheon Games in 2014.  Philippine Olympics Committee (POC) President Ricky Vargas was nonetheless proud of the national athletes, whose countless hours of hard work and dedication had brought pride to the country. "That was difficult. We got 4 golds, which was something that we were very happy with. Also we just hit 19. Yung goal natin maging 15 eh darating rin tayo doon. Or even better," Vargas said after the ceremonies.  The ABAP President also added that additional private sponsors had pledged their support for the athletes in the upcoming South East Asian Games to be held in Clark and Manila late 2019. "They are coming in, and I am very happy that they are coming in. And they have confirmed their support just today. I spoke to some of them who were there in the Owner's Lounge there. So importante yun. Importante rin ang POC, di ba?" "So nag-meeting rin kami with [PSC Chairman William 'Butch] Ramirez and complete support for the South East Asian Games. They're coming to our place. To our home. We will perform well in our home."   __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

Kpop group MOMOLAND Performs ‘Boom Boom’ in Manila – Manila Video

Kpop group MOMOLAND Performed ‘Boom Boom’ in Manila. Video courtesy: Audie Gemora source link: Kpop group MOMOLAND Performs ‘Boom Boom’ in Manila – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 19th, 2018

Momoland to perform at UAAP Season 81 opening

MANILA, Philippines – Korean group Momoland will headline the opening of the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) Season 81 on September 8 at the Mall of Asia (MOA) Arena. The announcement was made on the MOA Arena's Twitter account. Further details will be announced. ( LOOK: Momoland is in Manila ) {source} .....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 19th, 2018

IN PHOTOS: Momoland press conference in Manila

MANILA, Philippines – Momoland recently arrived in the Philippines for the first time as a group, and on  Friday, August 17, they attended a press event where they met their “most engaged” Facebook fans and answered questions from the press. With Yeon woo in Maldives and Nayun on a health-related hiatus, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

LOOK: Manny, Jinkee Pacquiao meet members of Korean pop group Momoland

LOOK: Manny, Jinkee Pacquiao meet members of Korean pop group Momoland.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

K-pop girl group Momoland is in Manila – Manila Video

K-pop girl group Momoland is in Manila – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

MOMOLAND finally Arrives in Manila Airport Philippines – Manila Video

Famous Kpop girl Group finally Arrive in manila airport august 16 2018 Nancy source link: MOMOLAND finally Arrives in Manila Airport Philippines – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 16th, 2018

K-pop group Momoland arrives in Manila - Philippine Star

K-pop group Momoland arrives in Manila - Philippine Star.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsAug 16th, 2018