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Category: newsSource: mindanews mindanewsApr 12th, 2018

Knicks won t rush Porzingis or future building plans

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Kristaps Porzingis is back with his teammates, though the New York Knicks don’t know when he’ll be back on the court. Joakim Noah won’t be back, though the terms of his departure still are being negotiated. So while there are questions, the Knicks also feel they have certainty with the way they are building their team. They insist their future first-round draft picks will be used to select players for their own team, not to be dangled in trades that could land them an established player. “We’re committed to following a plan and not just shifting and pivoting because we see something that we think is attractive and might fast track something,” Knicks president Steve Mills said Thursday. “I’ve seen that happen and go wrong too many times and that’s not what we’re going to do.” It’s happened in New York, where the Knicks traded young players and future assets in 2011 to acquire Carmelo Anthony, rather than sign him the following summer as a free agent with the cap space they had. This time, they say they will wait for the summer of 2019, when Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler, Kevin Durant and Kawhi Leonard could be among the free agents — even if one of them suddenly became available by trade now. “We don’t want to jump at the shiny things,” coach David Fizdale said. “We want to make solid decisions and be patient with this process.” They will be patient with Porzingis, their All-Star forward who is still recovering from a torn ACL in February. He is back in New York and working out with his teammates, but faces more testing and rehab before the Knicks know when he can play. “As he meets certain milestones, we’ll continue his rehab process,” Mills said, “all toward the direction of when he feels 100 percent comfortable and we feel 100 percent comfortable that we’re not taking any risks with him, then he’ll be ready to come back.” Not so for Noah, despite the two years left on the $72 million deal he signed in 2015. He has been away from the team since clashing with former coach Jeff Hornacek last season. The Knicks remain in discussions with Noah and his representation to determine how he’ll leave the club. “The hope is that we can come to a resolution that is both advantageous to both Joakim and to the Knicks, and so that’s where it sits right now,” general manager Scott Perry said. Porzingis is eligible for an extension this fall, but the Knicks seem prepared to wait until next summer. That would allow them to have more salary-cap space in July if they try to sign a player they won’t mortgage any of their future for now. “We feel comfortable with our organization and where we’re going and what we’re developing here,” Mills said, “and we think that when it’s time for us to go after free agents, we’ll be a place to attract free agents and we shouldn’t use our draft picks like that.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News9 hr. 9 min. ago

Floyd Mayweather: No Pacquiao rematch in December 2018

It seems Floyd Mayweather Jr. is not ready to jump into the ring to fight Manny Pacquiao in a rematch in December as fight fans had wished and hoped for......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated News13 hr. 9 min. ago

Philippine peso to hit P58 vs $1, inflation to jump – Capital Economics

MANILA, Philippines – London-based research firm Capital Economics sees the Philippine peso  sinking further to P55 against the greenback this year and fall to P58 in 2019. In a report released last Friday, September 14, Capital Economics said that they expected the peso to slide ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Boxing: Donnie Nietes not too keen on Palicte rematch or Pinoy-versus-Pinoy title bouts

Following last weekend’s controversial Split Draw decision at the end of the Donnie Nietes-Aston Palicte bout for the vacant WBO Super Flyweight World Championship, at SuperFly 3 in Los Angeles, California, the WBO’s 115-pound strap remains, well, vacant. Nietes and Palicte battled for twelve rounds, ending with one judge scoring it for the former, 118-110, the other judge scoring it 116-112 for the latter, and the third judge scoring it 114-114 for the Split Draw. Many thought that Nietes had done more than enough to earn a fourth-division world championship, so obviously, the Split Draw left a bitter taste in the mouth of the longest-reigning Filipino boxing world champion. As such, the most-likely scenario is that Nietes and Palicte lock horns once again, with the hopes of finally determining a new WBO Super Flyweight king. While no official announcement or decision has been made regarding the matter, Nietes isn’t exactly chomping at the bit to get back in there with his fellow Negrense. For Nietes, who was one scorecard away from joining Manny Pacquiao and Nonito Donaire Jr. as the only Filipino four-division world champions, he feels that a rematch isn’t necessary given that many-including himself- believe that he won the 12-round affair. “Para sa akin siguro, sa akin lang ah, siguro wala na yung rematch dapat, kasi alam naman ng mga tao na ako talaga yung panalo,” Nietes told ABS-CBN Sports. “Siguro mas better na maghanap na kami ng ibang makakalaban, rated diyan sa WBO.” Obviously, there’s no shortage in contenders in the WBO’s 115-pound shark tank. Nietes and Palicte are 1 and 2 respectively. Still, Nietes has never been one to back down from any challenge, and the 36-year old Murcia, Negros-native says that he’s down for anyone. “Depende sa WBO tsaka sa manager ko kung sino gusto nila ipa-laban sa akin. Ako, open naman ako kahit sinong lalabanan.” Nietes says he’s targeting a return to the ring in February, but with rumours of a WBO title bout against Japan's Kazuto Ioka also swirling around, the Filipino boxing star says he has no problem coming back earlier. Ioka defeated WBO-ranked McWilliams Arroyo at SuperFly 3. Another name that’s being mentioned is compatriot Jerwin Ancajas, the IBF’s reigning 115-pound king. Ancajas defeated Nietes’ teammate Jonas Sultan earlier this year in what was the first all-Filipino world championship bout in 92 years. With Nietes’ jump to super flyweight, fans and pundits alike all salivated at the prospect of another high-level all-Filipino world championship clash between Nietes and Ancajas. While that would definitely be a must-see matchup, Nietes says he’d rather not have to share the ring against a fellow Pinoy, unless completely necessary. “For me, siguro hindi lang muna ako [lalaban] sa mga Pinoy siguro,” Nietes shared. “Much better kung mga ibang lahi lang muna. Kung sakali namang wala na talagang makakalaban kami na ibang lahi, okay ako mag-unify ng Pinoy against Pinoy.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 14th, 2018

Trade gap breaches $20-B mark

The trade-in-goods deficit further widened to $22.49 billion at the end of the first seven months as the sustained jump in imports outpaced exports recovery in July.   Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Ernesto M. Pernia told the Inquirer that even as the balance of trade in goods stayed at a deficit and breached the $20-billion mark as of July, the level was "still manageable enough."   "In fact, the current account deficit is only about 0.8 percent of gross domestic product---one of the lowest among emerging markets. So [the trade deficit remained] comfortable and manageable," added Pernia, who heads the state planning agency National Economic and Development Author...Keep on reading: Trade gap breaches $20-B mark.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Foreign investments jump 42% in first half of 2018

Foreign direct investments continued to flow into the country on the back of strong macroconomic fundamentals and growth prospects, rising by more than 42 percent to $5.75 billion in the first half from $4.04 billion a year ago, according to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 10th, 2018

Rice prices jump to new highs in 4th week of August

MANILA, Philippines – As poor Filipinos struggled to keep up with elevated prices of fish, meat, and vegetables , prices of rice accelerated further to new highs in August. According to the latest price monitoring report of the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) , the average retail price of regular milled rice rose to P43.86 per ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 10th, 2018

Herd mentality

Have you ever heard a mother say, “Why are you not thinking? If your friends tell you to jump off the building, would you do that?”.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

No pressure for Donnie Nietes as he makes his super flyweight debut

With 46 professional bouts and three world championship runs across as many weight divisions, ALA Promotions star Donnie Nietes is certainly no stranger to the bright lights.  On Saturday evening (Sunday morning, Manila time), Nietes steps back on the big stage as he looks to add a fourth world championship when he makes his highly-anticipated super flyweight debut against compatriot Aston Palicte on the SuperFly 3 card at The Forum in Los Angeles, California.  Nietes and Palicte will fight for the vacant WBO Super Flyweight World Championship.  While he's the smaller man in terms of height and reach, Nietes comes in as the bigger star among the two Negrense protagonists.  As mentioned earlier, Nietes has been here before, challenging for a world championship. For his opponent on the other hand, this is the closest that Palicte has been to a world championship.  "For me, wala naman nang pressure." Nietes shared with ABS-CBN's Steve Angeles. "Iniisip ko lang na parang normal na laban para hindi tayo ma-out of focus sa gameplan natin." After years of dominating in the light flyweight division, where he eclipsed Filipino boxing great Gabriel "Flash" Elorde as the longest-reigning Filipino boxing world champion, Nietes made the jump to the flyweight division. While his run at the 112-pound division lasted for all of just three bouts, it saw him capture and defend the IBF world title.  Now set to embark on his super flyweight journey, Nietes says he's comfortable and confident in his new weight division.  "Yes, for now masasabi ko na nadagdagan ko yung power ko kasi umakyat ako ng timbang. yung katawan ko kumportable talaga sa 115-pounds." Not to overlook the task that's in front of him, but Nietes knows that Palicte is just the beginning for him.  The 36-year old Murcia, Negros native is finally in a spot where he can go after all those 'big names' that he's wanted to face for so long.  Names like Roman 'Chocolatito' Gonzales, like Juan Francisco Estrada, like Srisaket Sor Rungvisai, and even fellow Pinoy Jerwin Ancajas.  Simply put, Nietes wants all of them.  "Lahat ng nasa super flyweight, gusto ko kalabanin. Hindi naman ako medyo maliit kumpara sa kanila, talagang makakatapat ako sa kanila sa timbang." "Talagang pinag-hahandaan namin ang super flyweight." he added. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

Steph Curry EARLY Morning Work On His Jump Shot in Manila! – Manila Video

Steph Curry preparing to try to 3 peat as he works on his jump shot early in the morning. #StephCurry #Warriors #GoldenState source link: Steph Curry EARLY Morning Work On His Jump Shot in Manila! – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018

FIBA WORLD CUP: Slaughter will not be 100 percent for Gilas if he does play

There's still a lot of uncertainly regarding the true severity of his latest ankle injury but one thing is for sure regarding Greg Slaughter exactly one week before Gilas Pilipinas plays Iran in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers. If he does play, he will not be at 100 percent. Wednesday in the PBA Governors' Cup, Slaughter tweaked his left ankle in the fourth quarter of Ginebra's win over Northport after landing on Sean Anthony following a rebound play. It's the same left ankle that bothered him towards the end of the 2018 PBA Philippine Cup, causing him to miss the Gin Kings' playoff run that ended with a semifinals defeat at the hands of eventual champion San Miguel. Greg showed up to national team practice Thursday wearing a brace to support his ankle. He did not participate in drills. "No doubt if I play I won't be 100 percent. I'll have to be on some painkillers and everything," Slaughter said. "Right now we're just trying to control the swelling, because when it swells you can't get the range on your ankle to do any jumping or running," he added. Before coming to practice, Slaughter says he spent time getting therapy done on his ankle. However, it's still definitely painful 24 hours after he tweaked it. "We did some needling, try to get some oxygenated blood in to maybe speed up the healing. Right now, my ankle is hurt because I stepped on Sean Anthony's body last night on that rebound. It was really unlucky but I'm still doing everything I can to get back," he said. "I'm gonna go see a doctor tomorrow. Today I was just trying to get some therapy. I really wanted to not be as bad as it is right now because I've really been looking forward to this opportunity, I'm really excited. Right now, it's all about trying to get my ability to run and jump," Slaughter added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Unflinching look at porn and prostitution in ‘The Deuce’s’ sophomore season

      In the '70s, while the groundbreaking movies of Filipino film practitioners led to the rebirth of the so-called Golden Age of Philippine cinema, New York City's Times Square area bore witness to a different kind of "second coming."   Jump-started by Andy Warhol's "Blue Movie" and Bill Osco's "Mona," the Golden Age of Porn gave rise (no pun intended) to the dauntless likes of Linda Lovelace ("Deep Throat"), Marilyn Chambers ("Behind the Green Door") and their "irrepressible" male counterparts, John Holmes, Harry Reems and Ron Jeremy, who still appears in mainstream flicks these days.   At the time, even Pulitzer-winning film critic R...Keep on reading: Unflinching look at porn and prostitution in ‘The Deuce’s’ sophomore season.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Balancing price fluctuations, meeting the economy’s growing demand

THE inflation rate has made a considerable jump this year from 3.8% in January to 5.7% this July. This brings inflation beyond the upper end of the 2 to 4% target of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) and already within the full-year forecast of the Development Budget Coordination Committee (DBCC) at 4.5%. The post Balancing price fluctuations, meeting the economy’s growing demand appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Inflation expected to jump even higher in August 2018

MANILA, Philippines – Government agencies and various investment houses expected inflation , or the movement of prices of goods, to jump even higher in August. The Department of Finance (DOF) announced on Monday, September 3, that they projected inflation to settle at 5.9%. (READ:  Who's to blame for soaring inflation? 'All of them' in gov't, says economist ) Alcoholic beverages and tobacco ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2018

Fire razes 50 Pagadian homes amid heavy rain

PAGADIAN CITY -- While heavy rain poured on Pagadian City in Zamboanga del Sur, fire was razing houses in Purok Romblon, Balangasan District, Saturday afternoon. The blaze left more than a hundred families homeless.   Zenaida Lim, a fire victim, told the Inquirer that she immediately carried her two grandchildren, 1-year-old Breyshell and 3-year-old Bryan, after hearing a neighbor shout 'Sunog!'   But seeing that they were caught in the middle of burning houses, she decided to jump into the river beside their house, notwithstanding the strong current caused by the heavy rain.   Wading in waist-deep water, Lim carried the two children safely until bara...Keep on reading: Fire razes 50 Pagadian homes amid heavy rain.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

American long jumper Lawson tests positive for steroid

MONACO --- American long jumper Jarrion Lawson, who won silver at last year's world championships, has been suspended after failing a doping test. The Athletics Integrity Unit, which handles doping issues in track and field, says Lawson tested positive for a metabolite of the banned anabolic steroid trenbolone. It didn't say when the positive sample was taken. Lawson has been suspended until a full disciplinary hearing. Lawson was fourth in the long jump at the 2016 Olympics and second at last year's world championships, finishing four centimeters behind gold medalist Luvo Manyonga of South Africa. Lawson also won the 100 meters, 200 meters and long jump for the University...Keep on reading: American long jumper Lawson tests positive for steroid.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: Philippines looks to end 24-year medal drought in athletics

JAKARTA — If Eric Shawn Cray can just make a repeat performance of his semifinal running in the 400m hurdles of the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympics, there is a big chance he might win the gold in the 18th Asian Games. Cray, whose pet event was originally set on Monday, will try to qualify first in the re-scheduled 400m hurdles at 11 a.m. on Sunday and hope to take it from there in an effort to win the Philippines’ first medal in the Asian Games in 24 years. The 29-year-old Cray ran the 400m hurdles of the Rio Olympics in a blistering 49.37 seconds, which if he did during the 2014 Incheon Asian Games, would have easily dislodged the 49.71 of gold medal winner, Bahrain’s Ali Khamis, who is defending his title here. And from the looks of it, the Filipino-American is in tip-top shape. The two-time 400m hurdles champion of the SEA Games (Myanmar and Singapore) is coming off a gold medal in the 400M hurdles of the 2017 Asian Athletics Championships. He was also the silver medalist in the 60M Run of the 2017 Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games. “If everything goes right, many of our athletes can spring some surprises,” said Philippine Athletics Track and Field Association president Dr. Philip Ella Juico. Cray, who finished sixth with a 51.47 in the Incheon edition of the games, has improved since that performance. He had 50.04 in the World Championships in Beijing, China in 2015, before submitting a 49.07 during the 2016 World Challenge in Kawasaki, Japan, where he earned a silver. In the same World Challenge, this time in Madrid, Spain, also in 2016, Cray ran a scorching 48.98, his personal best, to likewise earn the silver, before his title-clinching 49.57 in the Asian Championships in Bhubaneswar, only last year. The last time the Philippines bagged an athletics’ medal of any color in the Asian Games was during the 1994 Hiroshima Asiad, courtesy of Elma Muros, whose 6.41-meter leap in the long jump competitions was worth a bronze. Aside from Cray, three more from the athletics’ team here plunge into action as marathoner Mary Joy Tabal, hurdler Clinton Bautista and long jumper Marestella Torres-Sunang get going. Tabal, the marathon queen of the 2017 Kuala Lumpur  SEA Games, starts the PH campaign for the day with the marathon at 6 a.m. “This is a special opportunity for Tabal to prove herself against the North Koreans, Japan, China and some of these middle eastern countries,” said Juico, “I don’t think she will be wanting in spirit. According to the report I got, she’s ready, she’s well-conditioned, she spent most of her time in Tuscany, Italy (training). We are hoping for the best as usual.” After Tabal, Bautista, the bronze medalist in the same Malaysia SEA Games, takes his turn as he tries to qualify in the 110M hurdles at 10 a.m. A four-time SEA Games long jump queen whose reign began in the Manila edition of the meet in 2005, Torres-Sunang makes what could be her last hurrah in these games as attempts to advance in the finals of the long jump competitions starting at 10:30 a.m. Meanwhile, SEA Games decathlon gold medalist Aries Toledo began his bid on a bright note as he placed second in the first event of his discipline, clocking 10.84 in the 100M behind Saudi Arabia’s AL QAREE Mohammed Jasem Al Qaree (10.77). He later ranked 4th in the high jump and eighth in the shotput. Newcomer Kristina Knott was scheduled in the 100M heats later in the day.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2018

2018-19 NBA.com Rookie Survey

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com It will be difficult for this year's rookie class to live up to the standard set by the class of 2017. Last season, we saw the debuts of Donovan Mitchell, Ben Simmons and Jayson Tatum, future All-Stars who not only put up good numbers in the regular season, but also impacted in the playoffs as well. De'Aaron Fox averaged more points and assists than 2016-17 Rookie of the Year Malcolm Brogdon and didn't even make Second Team All-Rookie last season. This year's class, at least according to the class itself, has the potential to be just as deep. In the annual Rookie Survey, 20 different players were tabbed as the answer for one -- or both -- of the first two questions: "Who will be the Rookie of the Year" and "Which rookie will have the best career." Big men were taken with five of the first seven picks in the Draft, but a lot of eyes will be turned toward Atlanta, where 6-foot-2 guard Trae Young will hope to make Hawks general manager Travis Schlenk look smart for trading the No. 3 pick (Luka Doncic), picking up an extra pick, and selecting Young at No. 5. For now, Young has the support of his fellow rookies, who named the 19-year-old former Oklahoma star as the class' best shooter and best playmaker. For the 10th time in the last 12 years, NBA.com sat down with the rookie class at the annual Rookie Photo Shoot at the New York Knicks' practice facility. This year's group (of 36) answered seven questions about their class, as well as a few about the current player they most admire and what they're expecting as they make the jump to the NBA. NOTE: Players were asked not to vote for themselves, college teammates or NBA teammates. (Some still did, and those votes were discounted.) * * * Who will be the 2018-19 Kia Rookie of the Year? 1. DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix -- 18%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 18% 3. Luka Doncic, Dallas -- 9%     Kevin Knox, New York -- 9% 5. Mohamed Bamba, Orlando -- 6%     Devonte' Graham, Charlotte -- 6%     Michael Porter Jr., Denver -- 6%     Trae Young, Atlanta -- 6% Others receiving votes: Marvin Bagley III, Sacramento; Troy Brown Jr., Washington; Wendell Carter Jr., Chicago; Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City; Harry Giles, Sacramento; Jaren Jackson Jr., Memphis; Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio Last year: Dennis Smith Jr. – 26% Worth noting: In the first nine years of this survey, at least one player got at least 24 percent of the vote. The only time the rookies got this right was in 2007 (the first year of the survey), when Kevin Durant received 54 percent of the vote. Which rookie will have the best career? 1. Wendell Carter Jr., Chicago -- 13% 2. Kevin Knox, New York -- 10%     Jerome Robinson, LA Clippers -- 10% 3. DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix -- 7%     Mohamed Bamba, Orlando -- 7%     Mikal Bridges, Phoenix -- 7%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 7%     Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio -- 7% Others receiving votes: Marvin Bagley III, Sacramento; Miles Bridges, Charlotte; Troy Brown Jr., Washington; Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City; Donte DiVincenzo, Milwaukee; Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, LA Clippers; Devonte' Graham, Charlotte; Jaren Jackson Jr., Memphis; Michael Porter Jr., Denver; Trae Young, Atlanta Last year: Lonzo Ball, Jayson Tatum -- 18% Worth noting: This is the fifth straight year that a Duke guy has earned the most votes on this question, with Carter joining Jabari Parker (2014), Jahlil Okafor (2015), Brandon Ingram (2016) and Tatum. Which rookie was the biggest steal at where he was selected in the Draft? 1. Keita Bates-Diop (48), Minnesota -- 13% 2. Michael Porter Jr. (14), Denver -- 10%     Lonnie Walker IV (18), San Antonio -- 10% 4. Jalen Brunson (33), Dallas -- 6%     Gary Trent Jr. (37), Portland -- 6% Others receiving votes: Grayson Allen (21), Utah; Mohamed Bamba (6), Orlando; Miles Bridges (12), Charlotte; Bruce Brown (42), Detroit; Jevon Carter (32), Memphis; Hamidou Diallo (45), Oklahoma City; Donte DiVincenzo (17), Milwaukee; Luka Doncic (3), Dallas; Jacob Evans (28), Golden State; Devonte' Graham (34), Charlotte; De'Anthony Melton (46), Houston; Svi Mykhailiuk (47), L.A. Lakers; Jerome Robinson (13), LA Clippers; Mitchell Robinson (36), New York; Mo Wagner (25), L.A. Lakers; Robert Williams III (27), Boston; Trae Young (5), Atlanta Last year: Donovan Mitchell -- 19% Worth noting: This question got the biggest variety of answers, and we'll see if Bates-Diop gets a chance to crack Tom Thibodeau's typically-short rotation in Minnesota. Last year's rookies certainly got this one right. Which rookie is the most athletic? 1. Zhaire Smith, Philadelphia -- 24% 2. Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City -- 15%     Josh Okogie, Minnesota -- 15%     Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio -- 15% 5. Marvin Bagley III, Sacramento -- 6%     Miles Bridges, Charlotte -- 6% Others receiving votes: DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix; Mikal Bridges, Phoenix; Bruce Brown, Detroit; Donte DiVincenzo, Milwaukee; Michael Porter Jr., Denver; Collin Sexton, Cleveland; Robert Williams III, Boston Last year: Dennis Smith Jr. -- 44% Worth noting: We'll have to wait to see just how athletic Smith really is. He just had foot surgery to repair a Jones fracture, the same injury that forced Simmons to miss the season after being drafted. Which rookie is the best shooter? 1. Trae Young, Atlanta -- 47% 2. Kevin Huerter, Atlanta -- 13%     Svi Mykhailiuk, L.A. Lakers -- 13% 4. Gary Trent Jr., Portland -- 9% 5. Grayson Allen, Utah -- 6%     Donte DiVincenzo, Milwaukee -- 6% Others receiving votes: Aaron Holiday, Indiana; Kevin Knox, New York Last year: Luke Kennard -- 49% Worth noting: As usual, this question garnered the closest thing to a consensus. In fact, Young received more votes on this question (15) than any other player received on the first seven questions total. Which rookie is the best defender? 1. Jevon Carter, Memphis -- 29% 2. Mohamed Bamba, Orlando -- 14% 3. Josh Okogie, Minnesota -- 11% 4. Mikal Bridges, Phoenix -- 9% 5. Jaren Jackson Jr., Memphis -- 6%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 6% Others receiving votes: DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix; Bruce Brown, Detroit; Wendell Carter Jr., Chicago; Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City; Melvin Frazier Jr., Orlando; Mitchell Robinson, New York; Omari Spellman, Atlanta; Gary Trent Jr., Portland; Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio Last year: Josh Jackson -- 26% Worth noting: Carter is another rookie who just had surgery. But it was to repair a torn ligament in his right thumb and he's such a good defender that his fellow rookies gave him twice as many votes as any other player despite his absence at the Rookie Photo Shoot. Which rookie is the best playmaker? 1. Trae Young, Atlanta -- 35% 2. Jalen Brunson, Dallas -- 15% 3. Luka Doncic, Dallas -- 9%     Shai Gilgeous-Alexander -- 9%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 9% 6. Troy Brown Jr., Washington -- 6%     Aaron Holiday, Indiana -- 6% Others receiving votes: Devonte' Graham, Charlotte; De'Anthony Melton, Houston; Michael Porter Jr., Denver; Jerome Robinson, LA Clippers Last year: Lonzo Ball -- 72% Worth noting: Young is the first player in the 10 years of the Rookie Survey to get the most votes in both the "Best shooter" and "Best playmaker" questions. He's also one of five rookies – Diallo, Porter, Sexton and Walker are the others – to receive votes on five of the first seven questions this year. Sexton was the only one to receive more than one vote on at least four questions. What will be the biggest adjustment for you, playing in the NBA? 1. Speed or pace of the game -- 31% 2. Schedule/Length of season -- 24% 3. Physicality (size and strength of opponents) -- 19% 4. Travel -- 10% 5. Lifestyle/Time management -- 8% Also receiving votes: Conditioning, Playing NBA defense, Not having the ball as much Last year: Physicality (size and strength of opponents) -- 37% Worth noting: The top four answers on this question have been pretty consistent over the last few years. What is the most important skill you need to develop? 1. Ball-handling -- 19%     Shooting -- 19% 3. Defense -- 14% 4. Playmaking/Reading the defense -- 11% 5. Everything -- 8% 6. Motor/Work ethic -- 6%     Strength -- 6%     Time management -- 6% Also receiving votes: Basketball IQ, Communication, Confidence, Leadership Last year: N/A Worth noting: Good news for coaches: "Defense" got five times as many votes as it did last year. Who is your favorite player in the league? 1. LeBron James, L.A. Lakers -- 29% 2. Stephen Curry, Golden State -- 9%     Kevin Durant, Golden State -- 9% 4. Giannis Antetokounmpo, Milwaukee -- 6%     Chris Paul, Houston -- 6%     Dwyane Wade -- 6%     Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City -- 6% Others receiving votes: Kobe Bryant; DeMarcus Cousins, Golden State; Anthony Davis, New Orleans; Paul George, Oklahoma City; James Harden, Houston; Jrue & Justin Holiday, New Orleans/Chicago; Kyrie Irving, Boston; Jusuf Nurkic, Portland; John Wall, Washington; Nick Young, Last year: LeBron James -- 31% Worth noting: James has been on a different team each time he has led this category, while Bryant is still getting votes two years after his retirement. John Schuhmann is a staff writer for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018