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July Fourth: Americans celebrate their union, rue divisions

NEW YORK --- With backyard barbecues and fireworks, Americans were celebrating Independence Day by participating in time-honored traditions that express pride in their country's 242nd birthday. But this quintessential American holiday will also be marked with a sense of a United States divided for some --- evidenced by competing televised events in the nation's capital. From New York to California, July Fourth festivities will be at times lively and lighthearted, with Macy's July Fourth fireworks and Nathan's Famous hotdog eating contest. The day's events will also be stately and traditional, with parades lining streets across the country and the world's oldest commissioned ...Keep on reading: July Fourth: Americans celebrate their union, rue divisions.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJul 5th, 2018

Africa’s ‘Grammys’ celebrate hits of the continent

After a 15-year career in banking and marketing, Nigerian Mike Dada was looking for a platform to "communicate the strength of Africa to the rest of the world". He decided to set up Afrima--- the All Africa Music Awards --- Africa's equivalent of the Grammys, whose fourth edition takes place this weekend in Ghana's capital, Accra. In 2014, penniless but passionate about music, he worked with private sponsors in Nigeria and a partner in Kenya. Together, they organized the awards ceremony to "create jobs" and "make Africans proud," he told local media, earning the backing of the African Union. In four years, Afrima has managed to carve out a space as a platform to...Keep on reading: Africa’s ‘Grammys’ celebrate hits of the continent.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 24th, 2018

Mets deGrom gets Cy with record-low wins; Snell takes AL

By Jake Seiner, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — After a season marred by narrow defeats, Jacob deGrom became a runaway winner. The New York Mets ace easily won the National League Cy Young Award on Wednesday night, a reward for a historically fruitless season in Flushing. The right-hander had just 10 victories, the fewest ever by a Cy Young-winning starter. The AL prize also reflected a change in voters’ values, with Blake Snell of the Tampa Bay Rays narrowly beating out past winners Justin Verlander and Corey Kluber for his first Cy Young. Snell pitched just 180 2/3 innings, fewest ever by a Cy Young-winning starter. Over full seasons, Snell is the second starter to win the award with fewer than 200 innings after Clayton Kershaw logged 198 1/3 in 2014. “I definitely think the game has changed in that aspect,” deGrom said. “I feel like it’s just turning more into quality of work and what did you accomplish in those innings,” Snell said. “I think that’s just the way it’s going.” DeGrom easily beat out Washington’s Max Scherzer, who was seeking a third straight Cy Young and fourth overall. DeGrom got 29 first-place votes and 207 points from members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. Scherzer had the other first-place vote. In his first season after chopping off his distinctive long hair, deGrom cut down hitters from start to finish despite little help from teammates. He had a 1.70 ERA, the lowest in the NL since Zack Greinke’s 1.66 mark in 2015. Yet the 30-year-old right-hander went 10-9, eclipsing the low bar among starters of 13 victories set by the Dodgers’ Fernando Valenzuela in 1981 and matched by Seattle’s Felix Hernandez in 2010. DeGrom allowed three runs or fewer in 29 consecutive starts to close the season, breaking Leslie “King” Cole’s 108-year-old record of 26 such outings. Yet the Mets were 11-18 in those games and 14-18 overall with deGrom on the mound. “My thought process was, ‘Hey, take the ball every fifth day and continue to try to put this team in position to win and control what you can control,’” deGrom said. Hernandez’s Cy Young victory signaled a major shift from voters, who once prioritized pitcher wins. The push toward advanced analytics made deGrom’s candidacy possible, and by September there was little debate deGrom was worthy, even as the Mets regularly wasted his dominance. “This was one of my goals,” deGrom said. “The team didn’t end up where we wanted to be this past season, but you kind of set personal goals, and I think being able to accomplish something that has been a dream of yours is just something special. To be a Cy Young Award winner, you’re in great company, and it truly is an honor.” Perhaps no pitcher had ever been such a hard-luck loser. New York averaged 3.5 runs in games started by deGrom, second only to Cole Hamels for worst support in the majors among qualified pitchers. During one stretch late in the season, the Mets totaled 10 runs over seven of deGrom’s outings, and four of those were driven in by the pitcher himself. DeGrom nearly produced more wins above replacement than actual wins — an unfortunate sabermetric feat that has only been accomplished once, when the Philadelphia Athletics’ Eddie Smith went 4-17 with 4.1 WAR in 1937. Baseball-Reference calculated deGrom for 9.6 WAR. The 2014 NL Rookie of the Year, he became the seventh rookie winner voted a Cy Young, joining fellow Mets Tom Seaver and Dwight Gooden. R.A. Dickey was the only other Met to win a Cy Young. The Mets unveiled a deGrom bobblehead featuring the Cy Young Award shortly after deGrom was crowned. They will give away 25,000 prior to a home game April 7 against Scherzer’s Nationals. Snell got 17 first-place votes and 169 points to 13 first-place votes and 154 points for Verlander. Kluber had 71 points, followed by Boston’s Chris Sale and Houston’s Gerrit Cole. Snell had a 1.89 ERA, third best in the AL since the DH was introduced, trailing only Ron Guidry (1.74) in 1978 and Pedro Martinez (1.74) in 2000. The 25-year-old pitched had 33 1/3 fewer innings than Verlander, but his dominance was enough to sway the electorate. The lefty nicknamed Snellzilla wreaked havoc against the AL’s top lineups. He was 3-0 with a 1.08 ERA in four starts against the World Series champion Red Sox, and 2-0 in two starts each against the Astros and Indians. The Yankees roughed Snell up twice, but he got threw five scoreless innings in a victory Aug. 16. That came during a late-season run of nine consecutive wins for Snell, including a victory against every team in the AL East. He also made five starts against former Cy Young winners and went 3-0 with an 0.59 ERA. Snell was the first player 25-or-younger to win 21 games since Barry Zito in 2002. He was highly regarded as a minor leaguer for his electric arsenal, but subpar control led to struggles during his first two major league seasons. He was even demoted to Triple-A for a month in 2017. It all came together this year. Snell was a stalwart for a most unusual pitching staff, taking the ball every fifth day while manager Kevin Cash successfully experimented with reliever “openers” to start games in between. Snell led the Rays with 31 starts, and no other traditional starter had more than 17. After longtime franchise ace Chris Archer was traded to the Pirates on July 31, Snell went 9-0 with a 1.17 ERA. “I felt with the opener, I had a bigger role on the team,” Snell said. Snell is the second Rays pitcher to win the award, following David Price in 2012. Scherzer went 18-7 with a 2.53 ERA and led the majors with 220 2/3 innings and 300 strikeouts. He was attempting to become the first player since Randy Johnson to win three consecutive Cy Youngs. He got the first-place vote of John Maffei of the San Diego Union-Tribune, 29 seconds and 123 points. Aaron Nola of the Philadelphia Phillies was third with 86 points, followed by Colorado’s Kyle Freeland and Arizona’s Patrick Corbin. Verlander led the AL with 290 strikeouts while going 16-9 with a 2.52 ERA for AL West champion Houston. This is his third second-place finish since winning the Cy Young and MVP in 2011 with Detroit. Kluber was attempting to win his second straight Cy Young and third overall. He went 20-7 with a 2.89 ERA for AL Central champion Cleveland and led the AL with 215 innings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2018

Comm. Silver, NBPA say competitive imbalance not a problem

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com LAS VEGAS -- First came the backlash. Next, backlash to the backlash. By Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), much of the whipsawing over competitive balance -- or more accurately, imbalance -- as an NBA problem rising to the level of crisis had calmed down. Yet powerful voices from the league’s summer nerve center could not dismiss it entirely as an issue meriting closer inspection. “I'm not here to say we have a problem,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said Tuesday after the Board of Governors meeting. “And I love where the league is right now. [But] I think we can create a better system.” Neither Silver nor Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, sounded an alarm in their separate news conferences about what many see as a widening gap between the league’s haves and have-nots. Roberts, in fact, seemed to feel that all is well and that talent inequality is in the eye of the beholder. “Competitive balance, it almost depends on what your favorite team is,” said Roberts, who was rehired as head of the players union in another four-year contract announced Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “I don’t hear anybody in the Bay Area worrying about competitive balance. I also don’t hear the people in Philadelphia worrying about competitive balance, or Houston. “We’ve got great teams. And it’s never been the case, as far as I’m concerned, where I was not able most of the time to predict what teams were going to be in the Finals.” The topic came up in precisely that context before the Finals last month when Silver was asked about Golden State and Cleveland meeting in the championship series for the fourth consecutive year, a first in any of the major professional sports leagues. It reared its head again this month soon after free agency opened on July 1, with events conspiring to make insiders wonder about a growing disparity among teams. LeBron James’ signing with the Los Angeles Lakers was the biggest move in what appeared to be a continuing shift of strength into the league’s Western Conference. That was followed by the news that DeMarcus Cousins, New Orleans’ All-Star center, had joined the champion Warriors. That signing sparked the initial backlash, a rich-getting-richer cry that pointed not to Cousins’ one-year deal for $5.3 million in 2018-19 salary but the fact that the Warriors will spend in excess of $20 million for it when luxury taxes are counted. Golden State had the NBA’s fattest payroll in 2017-18 of $137.5 million, despite a $99 million salary cap, thanks to various exceptions in the prevailing “soft cap” system. “I don't necessarily think it's per se bad that the Warriors are so dominant,” Silver told reporters, not long after discussing the “competitive landscape” with the owners. “As I've said before, we're not trying to create some sort of forced parity. What we really focus on is parity of opportunity. And a fair point could be made in the tax system, when certain teams are spending significantly more than others, that that's not parity of opportunity.” The counter-backlash came from folks who rushed to the Warriors’ and Cousins’ defense, correctly noting that neither did anything wrong, conducting their business within the rules as specified by the collective bargaining agreement between the owners and the players. That CBA is the object of endless study and imagined revision, with amendments possible if negotiated prior to the end of the current deal after the 2023-24 season. Shooting for a “hard cap” likely would be a tough sell to players accustomed to the freedom of movement they currently enjoy. “It's not necessarily [Roberts’] issue,” Silver said in response to the union director’s characterization. “I think it's on me and our Labor Relations Committee, ultimately, to sit with the players and their committee and convince them that there may be a better way of doing things.” Silver mentioned Charlotte owner and legendary NBA superstar Michael Jordan, chairman of that Labor Relations Committee, as a valuable resource in addressing owners’ and players’ competition concerns. Both sides have valid arguments. Interest in the NBA never has been higher by almost any metric chosen, from selected TV ratings and licensing revenues to the game’s growth globally. Attendance at the MGM Resorts Las Vegas Summer League keeps pushing higher, with fans eager to see top rookies, second-year players and relative free-agent unknowns chasing their pro hoops’ dreams. The valuations of the 30 NBA franchises, of course, all have soared beyond $1 billion, according to Forbes.com, with the Knicks, the Lakers and the Warriors all estimated to be worth more than $3 billion. Longtime NBA observers such as TNT’s David Aldridge wrote a column this week that argued on behalf of dominant teams, anyway, saying that they actually drive rather than depress fan interest. As for any inability to win games or titles, he laid the blame for that on poor franchise management. The Knicks and the Clippers have all sorts of big-market advantages but haven’t won any championships lately (or at all in the Clippers' case). For Roberts, whose players reap 51 percent of NBA basketball-related income that tops $7 billion annually, business is good, period. “I’m excited about this new season,” she said Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “This free agency, there’s been a lot to write about so we’re all, I think, looking forward to what’s going to happen come October. “To the extent that people are predicting the end of the game, I just don’t think so. I would be surprised if Adam called me to say, ‘What the hell are we going to do?’ I think he’s as happy as I am. ... I think we’re in good shape.” Critics note Golden State’s on-court dominance in winning the last two championships. It only took nine NBA Finals games --one over the minimum -- while facing arguably the league’s best player in LeBron James. But those same critics seem to foget that the Warriors were pushed to the full seven games in the conference finals, and actually faced elimination twice before beating the Rockets. “I recognize what Michele's saying,” Silver said. “But at the same time, if you talk to players in the league, and I've talked to plenty of individual players as well, they want to be in the most competitive league possible too.” For every player on the Warriors' roster -- or the Rockets, the Thunder, the Celtics or the Sixers -- there are five or six on teams that realistically have no chance of chasing a ring or the Larry O’Brien Trophy. Cleveland went to four straight Finals thanks to James; no one envisions the Cavaliers getting back any time soon. “Maybe there are some players who think they’re on a second-class team,” said Sacramento wing Garrett Temple, one of the NBPA vice presidents. “But most players I’ve played with or been around, their thought process is, ‘We’re gonna get our team to become one of those first-class teams.’ It’s more of a challenge. More so than, ‘We need them to disband so we can make everybody equal.’ Because we’re competitors.” That really is the crux of the issue. Silver and some franchises want most of the competition to come on the floor, in games, in full view of fans who believe their teams can sufficiently compete. The league’s current title contenders are fine with a system that allows them to compete all the way to the top, with an owner stroking gargantuan checks to crowd out rivals. “Let me make clear that under the current system we want teams to compete like crazy,” Silver said. “So I think the Warriors within the framework of this deal should be doing everything they can to increase their dominance. That's what you want to see in a league. “You want teams to compete in every way they can within the rules.” Silver addressed a variety of topics that were came from the BOG agenda, including: -- Change is coming on multiple fronts, most notably in the league’s age limit. That seems likely to be re-set back to 18 years old from 19, permitting players to enter the league from high school. It’s a move that the NBA should be better equipped to handle with a near 30-for-30 farm-system affiliation with its G League. It also fits with the findings of an NCAA task force that cites dissatisfaction with “one-and-done” college players. Said Silver: “My personal view is that we’re ready to make that change.” -- The start of free agency, annually triggered at midnight ET on July 1 (12:00pm, July 1, PHL time), will be moved to a daytime or prime time opening bell. It’s one of those traditions that no one thought to change, Silver said. -- The league’s investigation into the Dallas Mavericks’ sexual harassment issues should be completed by the end of the month. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

Statement of Senator Nancy Binay on the killing of General Tinio, Nueva Ecija Mayor Ferdinand Bote

July 4, 2018. Nakikiramay ako sa pamilya at mga kababayan ni Mayor Ferdinand Bote ng General Tinio, Nueva Ecija na karumal-dumal na pinaslang kahapon. Mayor Bote is the fourth local politician murdered since January 2018, following the killings of La Union second district representative Eufranio Eriguel;… Source link link: Statement of Senator Nancy Binay on the killing of General Tinio, Nueva Ecija Mayor Ferdinand Bote.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 4th, 2018

Sargent & Weah, both 18, score as US beats Bolivia 3-0

By Ronald Blum, Associated Press CHESTER, Pa. (AP) — Josh Sargent became the fourth-youngest American to score, making an audacious interception of a goalkeeper's pass over his head to put the ball into the net in his international debut at just 18 years, 102 days. Tim Weah, two days younger than Sargent, got his first goal seven minutes later. With no World Cup to play for, the United States gave youth a chance and they came through in a 3-0 exhibition win over an equally inexperienced Bolivia team on Monday night. "It's great feeling both of us getting to do this together," Sargent said. Walker Zimmerman, a relative geezer at 25 but making just his third international appearance, put the Americans ahead in the 37th minute with his first international goal , on a header from Joe Corona's corner kick. Sargent doubled the lead in the 52nd. "We've come such a long way," said Weah, a son of former FIFA Player of the Year and current Liberia President George Weah. "We just want to impress our fans. We just want to play with our hearts." Christian Pulisic, playing exactly two years after become the youngest American to score — also against Bolivia — struggled to make sharp touches in the 19-year-old's first national team match since the loss at Trinidad and Tobago last October that ended the U.S. streak of seven consecutive World Cup appearances. Interim U.S. coach Dave Sarachan gave six players their debuts, raising the total to 15 in four matches since he took over after the loss in Trinidad. Defenders Erik Palmer-Brown and Antonee Robinson and goalkeeper Alex Bono joined Sargent as debutants in the starting lineup, and defender Matt Olosunde and midfielder Keaton Parks entered in the second half. The U.S. starting lineup averaged 22 years, 160 days, and 6.7 international appearances. Fans always have sky-high hopes prospects will become stars, and Sargent and Weah raised the anticipation even higher. "They're reading a lot about themselves and so on," Sarachan said. "They're still steps. If you want to get to A, you still start at D and then to C, then to B. We're very quick to jump them up into the A category. I think that's a process that we have to manage, with expectations, with a lot of noise on the outside." Only three Americans have scored at a younger age than Weah and Sargent: Pulisic (17 years, 253 days), Juan Agudelo at South Africa in 2010 (17-359) and Jozy Altidore against Mexico in 2008 (18-96). Agudelo is the only younger player to score in his debut. Weah has played just three first-team matches for Paris Saint-Germain, one of his father's former clubs, entering twice as a second-half sub in March and getting his first start on the final day of the season this month. Sargent hasn't played any. Sargent scored four goals at last year's Under-20 World Cup and three at the Under-17 World Cup, where Weah was a teammate. He signed a pro contract with Werder Bremen on his 18th birthday, Feb. 20. That was after the international transfer window closed, making him ineligible until next season. "I was very nervous to be honest coming out," Sargent said. "It was my first professional game ever." He made up for lack of experience with daring. Goalkeeper Carlos Lampe rolled the ball to Luis Haquin on the right flank, and the defender returned it. Lampe lofted the ball back toward Haquin. Sargent turned toward the touchline to follow the flight of the ball, stuck out his right leg near the edge of the penalty area to redirect it back toward the center of the field, and then ran onto the ball for an 11-yard right-footed shot that deflected in off the keeper's leg. "I saw him start to chip the ball over, so I started backing up a little bit, and had a good touch to turn it around and good shot," Sargent said. Weah scored after Antonee Robinson beat a defender down the left flank and made a one-hop cross into the penalty area. Weah made a perfect cut and volleyed the ball with his right foot. "Once I saw the service come in, I was like, I got to get there. I got to get this. This is my opportunity to get the goal," Weah said exuberantly. He had felt pain in his right knee after a challenge about 15 minutes in and signaled he needed to come off. "He was all over the shop," Sarachan said. "He looked like a kid that has never played at a higher level, to a guy that was looking to come out a game where he wasn't sure if he was even hurt to flying and beating guys. And so he was the prototypical young, nervous guy." NOTES: Nico Romeijn, the U.S. Soccer Federation's chief sport development officer, said the USSF intends to hire the GM before the World Cup, a position expected to go to former American forward Earnie Stewart, currently sporting director of Major League Soccer's Philadelphia Union. The new GM will head the search for a new coach, whom the USSF hopes to have in place ahead of September exhibitions. "But maybe it takes more time. You never know," Romeijn said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 29th, 2018

Anger as Swedish neo-Nazis prepare for Yom Kippur march – Al Jazeera

Swedish anti-racist politicians, watchdog groups and Jewish organisations have expressed anger as self-professed National Socialists prepare for a rally slated to take place on the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur in the country's second-largest city. The Nordic Resistance Movement (NRM), which anti-racist organisations describe as neo-Nazis, is holding a demonstration on September 30 in Gothenburg, which is located on Sweden's western coast. They have dubbed the event &'8220;Revolt against the traitors&'8221;. The event will be a rally against &'8220;the politicians in the Swedish parliament as well as the European Parliament&'8221; who &'8220;have flung our nation's borders wide open to an unprecedented invasion&'8221;, the NRM said in a statement, referring to the country's acceptance of refugees and migrants fleeing war and economic devastation in recent years. The statement added, &'8220;Today's politicians and journalists are nothing short of robbers and traitors!&'8221; At the time of publication, the NRM had not replied to Al Jazeera's repeated requests for additional comment. Linda Snecker, a spokesperson for Sweden's Left Party, described the NRM as &'8220;a threat against our democracy and open society&'8221;. Speaking to Al Jazeera by telephone, she said, &'8220;It's a threat against all of us who are anti-racists, who are feminists, [and those] who celebrate LGBTQ society. The neo-Nazis are a threat against all of those values that we believe and fight for.&'8221; Police have changed the NRM's planned route, prompting the group to hold a flash demonstration in Gothenburg on September 17, with some 60 demonstrators marching through the city centre. In a video posted on the NRM's YouTube channel, the demonstrators waved flags and chanted against immigration. When angry passers-by confronted them, an NRM protester threw a woman to the pavement. Although the NRM has been active for two decades, Snecker said the group is attempting to capitalise on the rise of the far-right Sweden Democrats Party, which has 49 seats in the national legislature, and the wave of far-right populism that has hit parts of Europe and the US in recent years. &'8220;Their agenda is violence, to scare people, to show you can't protest against them and that they have a violent capacity,&'8221; she said. &'8220;That's really scary.&'8221; The demonstration was set to pass near a synagogue in the city centre, which has prompted faith leaders to express concern for the city's Jewish community. However, a court ruled on Monday that the route would have to be changed. Aron Verstandig, chairman of The Official Council of Swedish Jewish Communities, and Allan Stutzinky, chairman of the Jewish Community in Gothenburg, decried the police's decision to grant the NRM a permit in an opinion article published by the Svenska Dagbladet newspaper earlier this month. &'8220;Aside from out of fear for our own security, it evokes uncomfortable associations for us Jews. During the Holocaust, it wasn't unusual for the German Nazis to conduct their horrendous atrocities on the most important days of the Jewish calendar,&'8221; they wrote. Henrik Dahlberg, a media spokesperson for the City of Gothenburg, said it does not have the legal authority to prevent the march from taking place. &'8220;Demonstrations such as this one have a very strong protection in the Swedish constitution,&'8221; he told Al Jazeera by email. &'8220;Therefore, the march in and of itself cannot be stopped.&'8221; In 2016, the anti-racist magazine Expo documented 3,064 instances of neo-Nazi activities in Sweden. The bulk of the activities involved spreading propaganda, such as distributing flyers and posting stickers. In a December 2016 study that examined the profiles of 159 NRM members, Expo found that more than a quarter of them had previously been charged with violent crimes, while 56 percent had been convicted of a crime. Explaining that the group had grown in recent years, Expo added that a third of active NRM members in 2015 had not previously had any documented connections to neo-Nazi organisations. Last week, Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven called for action to combat the rise in far-right activity in the country. &'8220;When we now see an escalation of these extremist forces, and we are moving towards a normalization of racist parties too, then we must do something,&'8221; he said. Daniel Wiklander, Expo's acting managing editor, described the NRM's upcoming demonstration as &'8220;an outrage&'8221;. Wiklander explains that the NRM draws on the ideological traditions of the German National Socialists, American white supremacist groups that were prevalent in the 1980s and other European fascist organisations that were active in the lead-up to and during World War II. &'8220;At this point, it's the only national socialist organisation, but they exist within a larger white nationalist and far-right alignment,&'8221; he said. &'8220;For a long time, they were a fringe movement because they were very hostile to [far-right] competition and mostly stuck to their own. In the last 10 years, they've [benefited from] different [white supremacist] groups coming together.&'8221; The NRM was founded as the Swedish Resistance Movement in 1997 by Klas Lund, who has previously spent time in prison for bank robbery and manslaughter for the 1986 killing of an anti-racist organiser who intervened to stop the harassment of migrants. More recently, the NRM has established a branch in neighbouring Finland, where its members have attacked anti-racist demonstrations and LGBTQ pride events. The group advocates Sweden's exit from the European Union, the mass deportation of all refugees and migrants and what it describes as &'8220;Nordic self-sufficiency&'8221; based on National Socialist ideology, among other far-right policies. In July 2017, a court in [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

Verlander stars as Astros clinch AL West

HOUSTON (AP) — Justin Verlander struck out 10 batters over seven innings in his first home start for Houston while Derek Fisher and Marwin Gonzalez homered in a big fifth inning as the Astros clinched the American League West with a 7-1 win over the Seattle Mariners on Sunday for their first division title since 2001. George Springer and Carlos Correa also homered for the Astros, who won their first division title since 2001 and seventh overall. The Astros become the first team in Major League Baseball history to win titles in three divisions after previously winning the NL West and NL Central. Verlander (13-8) retired his first seven batters before Ben Gamel homered into the right-center bullpen in the third. He allowed just two singles after that to improve to 3-0 since he was acquired from Detroit on Aug. 31. Andrew Moore (1-4) allowed three runs and seven hits in 4 2/3 innings. strong>TIGERS 12, WHITE SOX 0 /strong> DETROIT (AP) — Matthew Boyd's no-hit bid ended when Tim Anderson doubled with two outs in the ninth inning, and the Detroit left-hander closed out a one-hitter for the first shutout of his professional career. Boyd (6-10) allowed only two runners — a walk to Rob Brantly in the third and Anderson's double to the gap in right-center field with two outs in the ninth. He struck out five and threw 121 pitches — his big league high. Dylan Covey (0-6) allowed five runs, seven hits and four walks in 3 2/3 innings. Nick Castellanos, Mikie Mahtook and Jeimer Candelario homered. strong>RAYS 3, RED SOX 2 /strong> ST. PETERSBURG, Florida (AP) — David Price pitched two hitless innings in his first big league game since July 22 after being sidelined by left elbow inflammation. The 2012 AL Cy Young Award winner made his first relief appearance since 2010. Jake Odorizzi (9-8) gave up one hit in six innings, a Jackie Bradley Jr. home run. Jesus Sucre hit a tiebreaking solo home run off Eduardo Rodriguez (5-6) in the sixth. Alex Colome pitched the ninth for his major league-leading 45th save. Tampa Bay remained 5½ games behind the Twins. strong>PADRES 4, ROCKIES 3 /strong> DENVER (AP) — Rockies closer Greg Holland dropped the ball trying to tag Matt Szczur at home on Austin Hedge's squeeze bunt in the ninth inning, allowing San Diego to finish its rally and beat Colorado. Hedges bunted back to Holland (3-6) with runners at the corners and one out, but after making a nice play to scoop up the ball, Holland lost control trying to tag a sliding Szczur. Colorado's bullpen blew its first save in three weeks and let the Rockies' lead for the second NL wild card shrink to 2 1/2 games over Milwaukee. The Brewers beat Miami on Sunday, and St. Louis, which lost to the Chicago Cubs, stayed 4 1/2 back. Kirby Yates (4-5) pitched the eighth, and Brad Hand got the last three outs for his 18th save. strong>ORIOLES 6, YANKEES 4 /strong> NEW YORK (AP) — Ubaldo Jimenez (6-1) struck out 10 in just five innings, and Tim Beckham hit a three-run homer off Sonny Gray (9-11), who allowed five runs in four innings during his shortest start this season. Didi Gregorius homered for the third straight day as New York's four-game winning streak ended. The Yankees remained three games behind AL East-leading Boston and four games ahead of Minnesota for the top AL wild card. Baltimore, which had lost nine of 10, is 5½ games behind the Twins. With two outs and a runner on third in the ninth, Zach Britton intentionally walked Aaron Judge, then struck out Gary Sanchez for his 15th save. strong>TWINS 13, BLUE JAYS 7 /strong> MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Eddie Rosario homered twice, Joe Mauer hit his first grand slam at home and Minnesota overcame a 5-0 deficit with seven runs in the second inning and six in the fifth. Minnesota reopened a two-game lead over the Los Angeles Angels for the second AL wild card. Kyle Gibson (11-10) allowed five runs, three hits and five walks in six innings. Joe Biagini (3-11) gave up six runs — four earned — and five hits in 1 1/3 innings. Josh Donaldson homered twice in the first two innings. strong>RANGERS 4, ANGELS 2 /strong> ANAHEIM, California (AP) — Joey Gallo hit a home run off Garrett Richards (0-2) that landed near the top of the grass hill in center field in the second inning, a drive that would have traveled 490 feet unimpeded, according to MLB Statcast. Adrian Beltre ht a two-run double to center field in the first. Miguel Gonzalez (8-11) allowed one run and two hits in five innings, and Jake Diekman got five outs for his first save this season. strong>INDIANS 3, ROYALS 2 /strong> CLEVELAND (AP) — A day after Cleveland clinched the AL Central, Corey Kluber (17-4) allowed three singles in seven innings. He has not given up a run in 22 innings and has lost once since July 4. Edwin Encarnacion hit a two-run homer in the fourth off Danny Duffy (8-9) as the Indians improved to 33-5 since Aug. 11 despite getting only three hits. Cody Allen worked out of a two-on jam in the ninth for his 28th save. Kansas City dropped five games behind the Twins. strong>CUBS 4, CARDINALS 3 /strong> CHICAGO (AP) — Jason Heyward hit a tiebreaking RBI single off Matt Bowman with two outs in the seventh as Chicago overcame a 3-0 deficit to win its sixth straight game. The Cubs remained four games ahead of second-place Milwaukee as Ben Zobrist drove in two runs and Kyle Schwarber hit his 27th homer. Pedro Strop (5-4) worked a rocky seventh for the win and Wade Davis got three outs for his 31st save, retiring Dexter Fowler on a game-ending flyout to the warning track with a runner on first. Tyler Lyons (4-1) was the loser. strong>BREWERS 10, MARLINS 3 /strong> MILWAUKEE (AP) — Travis Shaw, Jesus Aguilar and Manny Pina each had two hits in an eight-run fourth inning. The Brewers won two of three in a series moved from Florida following Hurricane Irma. Brandon Woodruff (2-2) allowed three runs and eight hits in seven innings. Dillon Peters (0-2) yielded eight runs, nine hits and three walks in 3 2/3 innings. strong>REDS 5, PIRATES 2 /strong> CINCINNATI (AP) — Eugenio Suarez and Scooter Gennett hit two-run homers in the sixth off Gerrit Cole (11-11) as Cincinnati completed its second three-game sweep of Pittsburgh this season. Robert Stephenson (5-5) allowed one hit in six scoreless innings, and Michael Lorenzen pitched a perfect ninth for his second save. strong>ATHLETICS 6, PHILLIES 3 /strong> PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Joey Wendle hit a go-ahead grand slam off Edubray Ramos after the first two batters in the sixth reached off Henderson Alvarez (0-1), who made his first start since May 22, 2015, with Miami. Sean Manaea (11-10) gave up three runs in five innings, and five relievers combined for four hitless innings. Blake Treinen got three outs for his 11th save. strong>METS 5, BRAVES 1 /strong> ATLANTA (AP) — Robert Gsellman (7-7) allowed an unearned run and three hits in seven innings, while pinch-hitter Asdrubal Cabrera had a two-run, pinch-hit homer. Atlanta (67-81) was eliminated from postseason contention and must win its remaining 14 games to avoid a losing record in four straight seasons for the first time since seven in a row from 1984-90. Julio Teheran (11-12) gave up two runs, three hits and four walks in six innings. strong>GIANTS 7, DIAMONDBACKS 2 /strong> SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Pablo Sandoval homered and drove in three runs, rookie Chris Stratton (3-3) allowed two runs and five hits in six innings. Arizona had won 20 of 25 games and nine straight on the road. Taijuan Walker (9-8) Walker gave up four runs and seven hits in five innings. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2017

The Surprising Connection Between the Philippines and the Fourth of July

By Becky Little/news.nationalgeographic.com – The United States isn’t the only country to ever celebrate independence on July 4. In the mid-20th century, people in the Philippines also marked July 4 as the day that they broke away from a colon.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thepinoyRelated NewsJul 17th, 2016

ONE Championship: Four World Titles make Team Lakay’s Christmas special this 2018

Christmas is one the biggest holidays in the Philippines. Incomparable to other countries, Christmas lights and holiday jingles start to play as early as September.   People from all walks of life gather on this special occasion and celebrate the holiday with food, drinks, and by spending time with friends and family.   Members of Team Lakay, the country's most renowned mixed martial arts group, have its own way of holding an annual celebration for the Yuletide season.   Housing four ONE World Champions such as Eduard Folayang, Kevin Belingon, Geje Eustaquio and Joshua Pacio, the Baguio City-headquartered camp holds a yearly Christmas party in mid-December to cap off the year.   "We have an early celebration coming up this Saturday, 15 December. We are going to have a beach house party in San Juan, La Union," Eustaquio shared.   "The gathering will celebrate our accomplishments this 2018, and also prepare for 2019. Everybody will come that day, most notably our professional athletes.”   Their way of celebration is not like any other party as it involves honoring their native tradition with a sumptuous feast and holding insightful talks for the advancement of their athletes’ career.   "We have a program, a feast, and an open mat for whoever wants to roll. Our world champions will share their experience and tell what they went through this year," Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao bared.   "This kind of gathering is our way to spend quality time with each other. This is our way to inspire other athletes, tighten our bond, and learn from each other.”   Finishing their campaign with four gold-plated belts under the ONE Championship banner, Sangiao believes that 2018 is Team Lakay’s most successful year since its inception in 2003   “It’s our biggest year. We won championship titles and received many awards this year. This is the result of our hard work, dedication, and sacrifice,” the Team Lakay headmaster said.   “Like we always say, this is our passion. We love what we do. These awards and titles are just the fruit of our hard labor.”   Although Team Lakay hauled all the titles, recognition and accolades that they could possibly get in 2018, all that matters to them is seeing each individual with gleeful smiles on their faces by the year's end.   "We are grateful for every year. We are always full of joy,” Eustaquio stated. “Seeing each other happy, seeing everyone living a peaceful life is more than enough.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 13th, 2018

Team Lakay celebrates Christmas with four world titles, experiences to share

Team Lakay has a ton of reasons to celebrate for after four of its top fighters earned world titles this year with Eduard Folayang capping it off by reclaiming the ONE lightweight crown last month. And there's no better time to celebrate the victories than the Yuletide season. "We have an early celebration coming up this Saturday, 15 December. We are going to have a beach house party in San Juan, La Union," said ONE flyweight champion Geje Eustaquio. "The gathering will celebrate our accomplishments this 2018, and also prepare for 2019. Everybody will come that day, most notably our professional athletes." Team Lakay's celebration is also an opportunity for Folayang, Eustaquio, ban...Keep on reading: Team Lakay celebrates Christmas with four world titles, experiences to share.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 11th, 2018

Longtime friends James, Wade prepare for last meeting as opponents

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com LOS ANGELES — Friendships are never formed totally by choice, because fate demands a say-so in the process by creating the time and the place and in the curious case of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the basketball court. It was in Chicago, June of 2003, site of the NBA’s annual draft combine, the meet market for young players gathered to someday change the game, when Wade and LeBron had each other at wassup. In some ways, it was an unlikely pairing: Teenaged phenom from Akron, Ohio, fresh from the cover of Sports Illustrated and the high school prom who already had a national following; and an overlooked underdog from the Chicago suburbs who only became an acquired basketball taste weeks earlier after a searing run through the NCAA tournament. That day, Wade and LeBron went through the checkup lines for height and weight, vertical leap and whatever else the combines put rookies through and then during a break came the only measurement that counted, when one future Hall of Famer sized up the other. LeBron said: “Some things you can’t explain. Sometimes it’s just chemistry.” Wade said: “When you’re young and coming into the league, you find guys you have something in common with, then you continue to link and that’s what we did. It’s organic how we built this friendship.” Some 15 years later, the bond will endure, likely forever. The basketball part, however, ends Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) after the game when Wade, who’s calling it a career after this season, peels off his sweat-soaked Heat jersey and swaps it for a Laker top belonging to LeBron. It might qualify as the best trade of the NBA season, or at least the most emotional. "It's sweet and sour,” said LeBron, anticipating the moment at Staples Center. “The sweet part about it is I've always loved being on the same floor with my brother. And the sour part about it is that this is our last time sharing the same court.” Brother? How many folks with different blood can call each other that? True friendship is answering the phone at 3 a.m. instead of letting it ring, and reaching for the tab with longer arms, and above all, becoming a mattress when the other guy falls. Those tests were aced throughout the LeBron-Wade bromance that stretched through two Olympic teams, four years in Miami, two NBA championships and even 46 games in Cleveland together but of course was always put on hold whenever they were on opposite benches. This is best placed into proper context by Gabrielle Union, the actress and wife of Wade, who says ever so delicately about her husband in those friend vs. friend moments: “He wants to kill him. Drop three-balls on him.” Perhaps so, because as Wade says, “you always want to beat your best friend,” yet their competitive spirit is confined within the baselines and between the jump ball and buzzer. Then the teasing and bragging rights begin by text or call, almost instantly. This arrangement irked the old-school basketball culture, long cringing at the chummy ways of a new generation, believing that most if not all interaction should cease until the offseason, or even better, when careers are done. Wade and LeBron then turned up the volume on that subject when they linked up as teammates with the Heat in 2010, angering the purists and creating, at least initially, a team to be despised as well as respected. Not that Wade and LeBron regret that experience at all, or the noise that followed; this was, as Union observed, “far bigger than basketball.” The chance to be neighbors and watch their kids grow up together and celebrate championships on South Beach until well past sunrise was a priceless part of the bonding process, something neither will be able to duplicate as they begin a new phase of their relationship. The chance to let their hair down (well, Wade anyway) and loosen up, away from the crowds and the media, is something they could keep to themselves. Although: Mrs.Wade spilled a few friendship secrets the other day, with an ohmigod and a roll of the eyes. “They laugh a lot,” she said. “LeBron is silly. Dwyane is silly. They’re silly and goofy together. When they’re around each other it’s like a never-ending sleepover. That’s what it feels like when you’re in their orbit. They have an unspoken language and jokes and it’s like a show and everyone’s watching.” It helped that, in addition to being in the same sport, both LeBron and Wade became all-time greats, because like-minded and like-talented people tend to magnetize. It was LeBron who collected MVP awards and a huge social media flock at first, then Wade followed up by winning a championship first, and this created a mutual respect for each other’s abilities. It also allowed them to walk through the same exclusive doors together, for example, making a pair of Olympic teams and a batch of All-Star Games, therefore putting them in close company even before the Heat experience. From those moments, a relationship tightened. And when life threw airballs in their direction, one was there to help the other. “When I was going through the custody of my kids and that battle, he was someone I talked to constantly and told him what I was going through,” said Wade. “And vice versa, when he was going through things family-wise, I could talk to him and try to relate. You lean on guys who have similar stories and have gone through similar things in their lives to help with advice or just be there to listen.” Curiously, one of their few awkward moments happened when they became teammates in Miami initially. The transition, Wade admitted, was friction-free but not totally smooth. Superstars have egos. Adjustments were needed and were done and this was made possible by LeBron’s game, which is built on unselfish play. “It would’ve been easier if we went to a neutral site,” Wade said. “But because he came to Miami, it was my team before he got there. It was a little hard because of that, but once we got through the first year it was easy. He can play with anybody. He can go out and score or he can get 17 points and 20 assists. He knows if a guy hasn’t shot the ball in a while and how to get him going.” Their on-court chemistry was astonishing to witness at times, the best entertainment in basketball back then. They knew each other’s tendencies, spots on the floor and how to mesh. How many times did Wade toss a lob to a streaking LeBron for a dunk, or vice-versa? Along with Chris Bosh, this was one of the most productive link-ups in NBA history. Four years and four trips to the NBA Finals don’t lie. And true friendship is following your pal to Cleveland in winter, as Wade did last year in an awkward attempt to re-create the past. To this, Wade shook his head and laughed: “Yeah, yeah, you right about that.” While Wade is putting a bow on this retirement season, he marvels at his friend’s staying power and salutes LeBron’s decision to sign up with the Lakers and take on Los Angeles. “I think it’s great, something he wanted to do,” Wade said. “For a player to be able to map out his career the way he has been able to do, he’s doing it his way. This is the way he wanted, to end it here in L.A., on and off the court. His career is not over, but this is the last layer of his career.” And LeBron, reflecting on Wade’s NBA imprint, said: “D-Wade has definitely had a helluva career, obviously. A first-ballot Hall of Famer, a three-time champion and so on and so on. I mean, it speaks for itself. But what he's done for that franchise and what he's done for that community since he's been drafted has been a pretty good story.” This is curious timing, how the NBA schedule has Wade making his last trip to Los Angeles and against LeBron not long after Wade and Union, who have a home in L.A., recently welcomed a newborn daughter. The families spent Sunday (Monday, PHL time) together at the baby shower, then the farewell game tips 24 hours later. Union calls it the “end of a basketball brotherhood but the beginning of a real friendship with basketball gone” and Wade agrees. “When we first came into the league people couldn’t understand how we could be friends during the season," Wade said. "When I was in Cleveland for a game I’d go to his house the night before, we’d go to the movies and hang out and then we’d go at each other in the game. We’d laugh about that. We enjoy having a different relationship than what was done before us, but then going out and playing against him, I’d always want to whup his you-know-what. And vice versa. Just the times we shared. The moments when it’s not all been great, but to be able to have somebody to talk to and run things by. A lot of people don’t have a LeBron James to call up and say, 'Hey, I’m thinking about this, what do you think about it?’ That’s special.” What will also be special Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) is when Wade, as has been his routine after every game this season, swaps jerseys with an opposing player; this will be the 1,001st game of Wade’s dwindling NBA career. “Obviously this is something I wanted to do in my last year,” Wade said. “But of all the players in the league, LeBron is one of my closest friends so this one will mean a little more, because of the paths that we both went down as competitors against each other and as teammates. We’ll be linked together forever.” And what might be said between friends and competitors caught up in that moment? Wade offers this: “We’ll look at each other and say, 'Yo, this is it.’ It’s crazy that it happened so fast. We remember the night we got drafted like yesterday. But it comes fast. Just an ending of a chapter in both of our lives.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Goodbye, George

Americans offered their final farewells to George H.W. Bush ahead of his Thursday burial in Texas, concluding a four-day tribute to the 41st president that saw the nation briefly set aside its political divisions. After a state funeral Wednesday in Washington that was attended by the country’s five living presidents and foreign dignitaries, Bush’s flag-draped […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018

Eovaldi agrees to $68 million, 4-year deal with Red Sox

By Kyle Hightower, Associated Press BOSTON (AP) — Nathan Eovaldi’s marathon relief performance in Game 3 of the World Series is a moment that will resonate in Red Sox history. Boston rewarded him with a $68 million, four-year contract. “We’re very happy to have Nathan back with us,” Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said in a statement as the deal was announced Thursday. “He did a tremendous job for us last season, playing a significant role in helping us win the division and the World Series. His performance in the postseason was outstanding, both as a starting pitcher and as a reliever.” A 28-year-old right-hander who has had a pair of Tommy John surgeries, Eovaldi was acquired by Boston from Tampa Bay on July 25. He went 3-3 with a 3.33 ERA down the stretch. He made four starts against the Yankees, going 2-0 with a 0.39 ERA, and beat the New York in Game 3 of the AL Division Series, when he gave up one run in seven innings. In six postseason appearances, including two starts, Eovaldi went 2-1 with a 1.61 ERA, a .185 opponent’s batting average, 16 strikeouts, and three walks Eovaldi pitched one inning of relief in each of the first two games of the World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers. He entered Game 3 in the 12th inning and threw 97 pitches over six-plus innings, preventing the bullpen from enduring additional stress. Boston lost the game when Eovaldi surrendered an 18th-inning home run to Max Muncy, but his performance inspired his teammates. Manager Alex Cora credited Eovaldi’s effort with being one of the catalysts that helped Boston win its fourth World Series title in 15 years. At the premiere of the Red Sox’s 2018 season highlight video, Eovaldi got the biggest cheers when his name was mentioned, with the crowd chanting “Bring him back!” “Nobody’s going to remember who won that game. Everybody’s going to remember Nate Eovaldi,” Cora said. Eovaldi is part of a projected starting rotation that includes Chris Sale, David Price, Rick Porcello and Eduardo Rodriguez. Eovaldi had Tommy John surgery in 2007 when he was a junior in high school and his second in August 2016 while with the Yankees. He was let go by New York after the season and signed with Tampa Bay, a deal that guaranteed $2 million in 2017 and included a $2 million option for 2018. He had arthroscopic surgery late in spring training to remove loose bodies in his pitching elbow and did not make his season debut until May 30 — his first major league game since Aug. 10, 2016. Boston earlier reached a $6.25 million, one-year contract with first baseman Steve Pearce, the World Series MVP. Remaining unsigned players who became free agents after winning the Series include closer Craig Kimbrel, left-hander Drew Pomeranz, right-hander Joe Kelly and second basemen Brandon Phillips and Ian Kinsler......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018

Thailand calls for dissolution of Buddhist temple’s charitable foundations

Thailand's Department of Special Investigation (DSI) is calling on public prosecutors to dissolve the Khun Yay Maha Ratana Upasika Chandra Khonnokyoong Foundation, a charitable foundation tied to the controversial Dhammakaya Temple. The foundation was implicated in a embezzlement case involving a local credit union and was part of an apparatus that defrauded investors of hundreds of millions of Thai Baht. The DSI also wants the prosecutors to ask the courts to confiscate the foundation's Bt13-billion assets, DSI chief Pol Colonel Paisit Wongmuang said yesterday, according to the Nation Newspaper. The foundation -- established on July 30, 2004 -- is under the patronage of Dha...Keep on reading: Thailand calls for dissolution of Buddhist temple’s charitable foundations.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2018

UAAP Finals: Matty Ice extinguishes flames of red-hot UP

Safe to say, the UAAP 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament hasn’t gone according to plan for Matt Nieto. Ateneo de Manila University’s court general, now in his fourth season, has only averaged 6.4 points, 2.5 assists, and 2.3 rebounds after playing only 11 out of 15 games. Once he went on the biggest stage and under the brightest lights of the tournament, however, the real Matt Nieto showed up. Scoring a career-high 27 points built on four triples, the heady guard keyed the Blue Eagles’ convincing victory versus the University of the Philippines in Game 1 of the Finals. He did all of that, in the face of the red-hot Fighting Maroons, who were backed by a rowdy crowd. Of course, if there’s one collegiate team which knows how to persevere through that, it’s Ateneo – and if there’s one collegiate player which knows how to persevere through that, it’s “Matty Ice.” “Yung mindset namin as a team, paglabas namin sa MOA, nakita namin yung crowd, sabi ko, ‘Hindi ba naranasan na natin ‘to,’” he shared. “Yung Jones Cup experience namin, naranasan na namin yan so sabi ko, we were overpowered by the Taiwanese (fans) when we were up against them. This is nothing new for us.” During the 2018 Jones Cup last July, the Blue Eagles flew to Taiwan to take on national and club teams from other countries. There, Nieto also hit a memorable game-winner against Chinese Taipei Blue. Since then, he has had to power through a left pinky fracture as well as dengue – injury and illness that have slowed down his current campaign. That is exactly why, now in the Finals, the 6-foot playmaker was nothing but thankful for retaining the full faith of head coach Tab Baldwin – in what has been a down season for him.  “I credit Coach Tab and my teammates for trusting me in that situation. I just want to win because I’m a competitive person and I don’t want to lose to any team,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2018

Paul Lee in no mood to celebrate despite semis win: Job is not yet done

Game 4 provided the perfect opportunity for Paul Lee to bounce back from his crucial blunders in Magnolia's loss two days ago. In Game 3,Lee had a couple of late-game blunders against the Gin Kings, a turnover and a missed three in the final 30 or so seconds, paving way for Ginebra to extend the series to a fourth game. But when Lee stepped up to the line for two crucial freethrows, that107-103 loss was far from his mind. "Last game was over," said a stoic Lee in Filipino after he and the Hotshots vindicated themselves from that Game 3 loss with a 112-108 Game 4 win to eliminate Ginebra Friday at Ynares Center in Antipolo. Lee was able to right his past mistakes when his ...Keep on reading: Paul Lee in no mood to celebrate despite semis win: Job is not yet done.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 17th, 2018

UAAP Women s Basketball: NU wins 78th straight, sweeps elims for outright Finals berth

For the fifth straight season, the ladies of the National University cruised to another sweep of the 14-game elimination round. This UAAP Season 81, the Lady Bulldogs cemented their inevitable history against the Far Eastern University via a 68-44 victory Friday afternoon at the Filoil Flying V Centre. It was also NU's record-setting 78th consecutive win dating back to July 13, 2014. National University Lady Bulldogs sweep the elimination rounds of #UAAPSeason81! This is their fifth straight sweep in the league. @abscbnsports pic.twitter.com/x6PLxuRsDe — Danine Cruz (@the9cruz) November 16, 2018 Dominant forces in the paint, Jack Animam and Rhena Itesi topped the scoreboards once again. Animam towed NU with 19 points, 18 rebounds, and two assists while Itesi added 14 points and 14 rebounds. Animam and Itesi limited FEU's Clare Castro to just six points on 3-of-11 shooting, well below her aveage of 16.5 points prior to the match. To add to NU's growing memorabilia, the NU community present in the venue celebrated the milestone with 14-0 shirts. National University Lady Bulldogs sweeps #UAAPSeason81! This is their fifth straight eliminations sweep. @abscbnsports pic.twitter.com/XpavE1dvax — Danine Cruz (@the9cruz) November 16, 2018 "I'm just happy na nasurvive namin uli yung 14-0 uli. We're just waiting for the championship kung sino man but still yung job namin is not yet done. We hope na we get the championship, that's the most important thing this season," said NU head coach Pat Aquino as his squad enjoyed their advantage. As they wait for their opponent in the finals, Aquino said that their team will be having a series of practice games and a team building. "We'll have a team building this next weekend and we'll continue working hard. Then we'll have practice games again with the boys like we did last few years back yung mga past season, yun ginagawa namin. There will be a Taiwan team na baka mag practice game kami, series of practice games," Aquino added. Valerie Mamaril and Fatima Quiapo produced nine points each to lead the way for the Lady Tamaraws. With a 9-5 record after the elimination round, FEU is tied with Adamson University and is set to have a playoff for the second seed and twice-to-beat advantage in the step-ladder semifinals. Adamson secured a spot in the step-ladder semifinals berth and a playoff for the twice-to-beat bonus in the process following an 80-65 romp of Ateneo. The University of Santo Tomas lost a 10-point third quarter lead but regrouped late in the game to nip De La Salle, 68-65, to extend its season and tie its victims at 8-6. With their ninth win in 14 contests, the Lady Falcons will play the Lady Tamaraws in a playoff for the No. 2 ranking in the semis on Wednesday. The Tigresses and the Lady Archers meet again in a do-or-die playoff for the last semifinals slot on Wednesday. Mariz Cacho scored 20 points while Nathalie Prado also had 20 points and pulled down 12 rebounds for Adamson University, which finished the elims with back-to-back wins. The University of the East beat fellow also-ran University of the Philippines, 71-56, to cap its season with two consecutive wins. The Lady Warriors, who placed second last year, ended up tied with the Lady Eagles in sixth and seven spots at 4-10. The Scores: First Game UE (71) -- Cortizano 15, Requiron 15, Francisco 11, Ganade 11, P. Pedregosa 10, L. Pedregosa 9, Borromeo 0, Nama 0, Brencis 0, Ebeza 0, Gaa 0, Strachan 0. UP (56) -- L. Ordoveza 15, Rodas 13, Cruz 12, Medina 7, Gonzales 6, Bascon 3, Amar 0, De Leon 0, De Guzman 0, Rivera 0, Hidalgo 0, Lebico 0, Moa 0, N. Ordoveza 0. Quarterscores: 14-17, 37-35, 56-49, 71-56 Second Game AdU (80) -- Cacho 20, Prado 20, Alcoy 11, Araja 9, Bilbao 8, Rosario 5, Camacho 3, Razalo 2, Aciro 2, Cabug 0, Osano 0, Tandaan 0. Ateneo (65) -- Buendia 15, Nimes 15, Guytingco 10, Go 7, Villamor 6, Cancio 5, Chu 3, Joson 2, Seigle 2, Newsome 0, Moslares 0, Miranda 0, Payac 0, Gino-gino 0, De Dios 0, Aquisap 0. Quarterscores: 16-14, 40-32, 66-48, 80-65 Third Game NU (68) -- Animam 19, Itesi 14, Pingol 9, Nabalan 7, Del Carmen 6, Camelo 6, Fabruada 4, Bartolo 2. Goto 1, Canuto 0, Cacho 0, Cac 0, Harada 0, Ceño 0, Layug 0. FEU (44) -- Mamaril 9, Quiapo 9, Castro 6, Antiola 5, Adriano 5, Bahuyan 4, Bastatas 2, Abat 2, Vidal 2, Taguiam 0, Payadon 0, Dugay 0. Quarterscores: 20-9, 35-21, 54-30, 68-44 Fourth Game UST (68) -- Larosa 25, Irebu 13, Ferrer 8, Capilit 7, Portillo 6, Aujero 4, Rivera 3, Sangalang 2, Tacatac 0, Magat 0, Gonzales 0. DLSU (65) -- K. Castillo 16, Nuñez 14, Revillosa 11, Claro 10, Paraiso 5, Torres 4, Binaohan 3, Quingco 2, Delcampo 0, Arciga 0, Jimenez 0. Quarterscores: 10-17, 31-28, 54-44, 68-65  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 16th, 2018

Jollibee nets P2B in Q3 amid global push

HOMEGROWN food giant Jollibee Foods Corp. (JFC) expanded its attributable profit by a fourth from July to September, lifted by its global store expansion alongside the consolidation of American burger chain Smashburger into its portfolio......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

Pacers finish with a flourish, run past Heat 110-102

By TIM REYNOLDS,  AP Basketball Writer MIAMI (AP) — Victor Oladipo had 22 points and 10 assists, Bojan Bogdanovic put Indiana ahead to stay on a 3-pointer with just under a minute remaining and the Pacers beat the Miami Heat 110-102 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). Domantas Sabonis and Darren Collison each scored 17 points, and Bogdanovic had 16 to help the Pacers snap a two-game slide. Sabonis finished with 11 rebounds, and the Pacers outscored Miami 16-2 in the final 3:31. Kelly Olynyk led the Heat with 20 points, but missed most of the fourth quarter with an injury. Josh Richardson scored 18, Tyler Johnson had 15 and Hassan Whiteside ended up with 11 points and 20 rebounds for Miami. The Heat were again without Dwyane Wade, who's excused while he and wife Gabrielle Union-Wade continue celebrating the birth earlier this week of their daughter. Heat coach Erik Spoelstra is calling Wade's absence day-to-day, though said the team will give him as much time as he wants and needs. Olynyk left early in the fourth holding his midsection. Olynyk was kneed by Indiana's Tyreke Evans around the ribs, and remained down for a couple minutes before going to the locker room. It was part of a rough night for Olynyk — he took an elbow in the face from Indiana's Thaddeus Young late in the first half. Young was ejected for the Flagrant-2 foul. Evans was called for an offensive foul on the play that knocked Olynyk from the game for most of the fourth; he returned in the final seconds. Miami led by 11 early and held a six-point lead with 3:50 left, then went cold — shooting 1 for 8 with four turnovers the rest of the way. Bogdanovic's 3-pointer from the top of the key was the 12th and final lead change of the night, and capped the Pacers' rally from what had been as much as an 11-point deficit. Miami debuted its "Vice" court and uniforms, the black, fuchsia and light blue color scheme designed as nod to the city in the 1980s and the team's original home — Miami Arena. TIP-INS Pacers: Indiana is 8-0 when scoring 102 or more points; 0-5 when scoring 101 or less. ... Oladipo, who tweaked a knee Wednesday in a home loss to Philadelphia, shot 9 for 22. ... The Pacers turned 24 Heat turnovers into 29 points. Heat: Whiteside is the second player in Heat history with two straight 20-rebound games. Rony Seikaly is the other, and he pulled the feat off four times. ... Miami was without Goran Dragic (right knee inflammation), who may try to play Saturday. ... Miami's first field-goal attempt came 3:37 into the game — its first six possessions ended in either turnovers or trips to the foul line. FOUL The teams were awful from the line: Miami was 16 for 27, slightly outpacing Indiana's 17 for 29 effort. It was a strange shooting night all around for the Heat; they shot 59 percent from the foul line, 52 percent (14-27) from 3-point range and 42 percent (22-53) from 2-point land. RARITY The game started the 20th home-home back-to-back in Heat history, and only the second since the lockout-shortened 2011-12 season. In the previous 19, the Heat went 2-0 six times, 0-2 four times, and 1-1 in the other nine instances. QUIRKY The teams play again next Friday in Indianapolis. Miami has three games before then; Indiana has only one. UP NEXT Pacers: Visit Houston on Sunday. Heat: Host Washington on Saturday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 10th, 2018

MAJOR POINT: Finding Family Away From Home

I’ve been in the Philippines now for over 21 years. I can’t believe it has been that long, but I just checked my passport stamp the other day and sure enough my arrival stamp says August 2, 1997. So many things have happened since then that it puts me in this weird nostalgic state of mind thinking back to how I was back then. I had no idea what was in store for me when I decided to try my luck in professional basketball in the Philippines. I thought I knew. I thought I knew everything, but I really had no clue. I was recruited by a Filipino agent living in the United States to come to the Philippines to play basketball. This made me feel pretty special. I had put together a solid playing resume in high school and college and had played a year professionally in Denmark. I thought I would come to the Philippines, play basketball for 11 years, retire, go back to Michigan and get into coaching. That was my plan. It was pretty simple to me. I never thought about the people I’d meet or the relationships I’d build during my stay in the Philippines. And even though I knew nobody in the Philippines, I didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to go to the Philippines to play basketball. There were a few things I underestimated when I came to the Philippines back in 1997. Being from Michigan, the heat was a often times painful adjustment to get used to. I had never lived in a big city before, so Manila and its traffic was also something to get used to. I don’t speak Tagalog, so getting around that can still be difficult at times. The style of play here in the Philippines is different than I was used to, so I had to get used to that. But, the biggest adjustment for me was that I knew absolutely no one when I came to the Philippines. I had no friends. My mom is from Lawaan, Eastern Samar. She had only been back once since she had left the Philippines in the late 1960s. Most of my relatives on her side of the family still live in the province. So while, I have family in the Philippines, I don’t have any relatives in Metro Manila. So, here I was, on the other side of the planet with no family and no friends. Like most people, I like having friends. I had always had a close group of friends in high school and college. Playing a year in Denmark, not having my friends around was probably my biggest adjustment and I went through a rough period of homesickness there. Now that I was in the Philippines, I was in a different, but also similar situation. In my early years here in the Philippines, I played for two great teams. My first team was Tanduay Rhum. My first coach was Alfrancis Chua and my first boss was Boss Bong Tan. Both of those guys took great care of me. After four years with them, I was then traded to Barangay Ginebra. My boss there was Boss Henry Cojuangco. He also took great care of me. I had many great teammates through the years, including my years on those two teams. My teammates were very welcoming of me and I enjoyed my time on the court with those guys. However, when practice ended. My teammates would go back to their friends, family and responsibilities and I would go back to an empty condo unit. Everyday I would have practice in the morning from 9-12. After practice, I’d eat and then go find a gym to workout in. By the time I was done with my workout at 3 or 4 in the afternoon, I would then have to figure out what to do from 3 or 4 until the time I went to bed around 10 or 11. I thought a lot differently back then than I do now, so most of that time was wasted. I spent a lot of that time alone, bored, in front of the TV, just waiting for the day to end, so I could get up and do it again the next day. Although I was living my dream of playing professional basketball, it was strange for me to be living that life day after day after day. My first couple of years here, I didn’t have a car. I didn’t know my way around Manila. I didn’t know anybody outside of my team. I was living in Quezon City in a non-walkable area. It was a grind. I often wondered how long I could continue to stay on that type of grind. It wasn’t until after 18 months of living that way that I started to meet other Filipino-Americans that were going through similar experiences. In the late 1990s, the PBA landscape was much different than it is today. One thing that was a lot different, was there weren’t as many Fil-Ams as there are today. Having Fil-Am players playing in the PBA was still a new thing. There was a novelty about us. We were the new kids in school, in a way. Guys like Jeff Cariaso, Andy and Danny Seigle, Nic Belasco, Ali Peek, Noy Castillo, Rudy Hatfield and myself had played college basketball in the United States. The basketball fans here in the Philippines didn’t know who we were before we went high in the PBA Draft and then started playing in the PBA. Most of us were the only Fil-Americans on our teams. Upon meeting them, I found out that these guys were living the similar grind I had been going through. It’s hard to explain, but after meeting some of the other Fil-American basketball players, my life instantly got better. It was so refreshing to hear about their experiences. Although, we were all different and from different areas of the US, we were basically going through the same thing at near the same stage of our lives. We were all out here on our own trying to make it in professional basketball in country that was new to us. I found comfort in learning that other people were struggling with similar things that I was struggling with. There is always pressure to win in professional sports. My new friends helped me deal with that pressure. Learning about other peoples experiences in similar situations, having an outlet and having fun with new friends off of the court, helped bring balance to my life. I related to those guys. I smiled and laughed more when I was around those guys. Two guys in particular that helped me were Jeffrey Cariaso and Andy Seigle. Both of those guys are older than me and had been in the country and the PBA before I was. I looked to both of them for advice and valued their opinions. Jeff is from San Francisco was drafted in the PBA in 1995. By the time I had met Jeff in 1999, Jeff had won the PBA Rookie of the Year, had won multiple championships and was a multiple time PBA All-Star. Jeff was always a guy I respected for the way he handled himself on the court and off of it. Jeff was also a leader in the Fil-Am community here, organizing dinners and get togethers. Even today, it is nice to be able to message Jeff and he is still always willing to listen or give advice. Jeff will always shoot you straight. A friend like him is hard to find. Andy was the number one overall pick in the 1997 PBA Draft. At 6 for 10 Andy was the first Fil-Am from my generation to have big expectations put on his shoulders the very first day he stepped on a PBA court. Dealing with that pressure must have been tough, but Andy was one of the most accommodating, giving people I have ever met. Whenever he was doing something, he would invite me. Random days out of the blue, he would invite me to his house to have dinner with his family. Andy would host dinners at his house for holidays, where families from different teams would get together to celebrate. I was fortunate enough to eventually play with Andy at Ginebra, where we won three championships together. Having him in practice and as a friend made my life better in the Philippines. Just as Jeff and Andy helped me, I also tried to help new Fil-Americans that came to the Philippines after me. Rudy Hatfield came to Tanduay a couple of years after I had been there and I tried to show him the ropes. We became very close friends. When Jimmy Alapag and Harvey Carey were new to the country in 2002 and 2003, respectively, I tried help where I could. I can’t say I ever really mentored anybody, but I always tried to listen, and share. Even if I can only help you laugh or smile more, I know that can help. Those guys have also become close friends of mine. I know they have also helped others that have come after them. Since Alapag and Carey arrived, there have already been a couple generations of new Filipino American basketball players. I still see the younger Fil-Ams from different teams hanging out together. While I’ve heard that some people view that as Fil-Ams trying to separate themselves, I don’t believe that is true. Just like guys from the same province or same school are more likely to hang out together, young Fil-Ams are more likely to hang out together. It’s a natural thing to gravitate to things and people you relate to and have something in common with. It’s not the easiest thing to do, to go to a foreign country where you have no family and friends to start a new career. I know. I’ve been there. A lot of things have changed for me since 1997, when I first came to this country. I am now married and have two small children of my own. My wife, kids and her family provide my support system now, as I do for them. However, there was a time and a long time where I didn’t have that. My Fil-American friends were my family and support system. And while that wasn’t ideal, I was always taught to do the best with what you had. I’m thankful for what I had. Eric Menk played in the PBA from 1999 to 2016. Menk is a four-time PBA champion, three-time PBA Finals MVP and one-time PBA MVP (2005). He currently writes for ABS-CBN Sports weekly. Menk also has his podcast Staying MAJOR as welll as his own YouTube channel ......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018