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Jr. NBA: Sexton, Ticha want young Pinoy ballers to keep working

Being great at basketball is a lot of hard work. It takes a lot of dedication and for most players that get to an elite level, preparation starts at a very young age. And so for the 2019 Jr. NBA Philippines program, Cleveland Cavaliers rookie Collin Sexton and WNBA legend Ticha Penicheiro want aspiring young Pinoy ballers to keep working and chasing that elusive basketball dream. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] Penicheiro, who left her native Portugal to pursue a career in basketball in the United States, says that programs like Jr. NBA are a great help to aspiring athletes all over the globe. It’s something she wished she had access to growing up. “It’s amazing, they [Jr. NBA athletes] don’t even know how lucky they are. I wish when i was their age I had an opportunity to play in a league like the Jr. NBA,” Penicheiro told ABS-CBN Sports. “Anytime you associate the name, ‘NBA’ to anything, it’s major right? Basketball is a growing sport and the NBA does a great job of creating opportunities for young kids not just boys but also girls,” she added. Penicheiro was the no. 2 pick of the 1998 WNBA Draft and she won the WNBA title in 2005 with the Sacramento Monarchs. She officially retired in 2012 and has since transitioned into being an agent. “I think the secret for success is to love what you do and work hard. Those are the two things that I know I did and it worked out for me,” Ticha said. “I completely love the game and I worked everyday to get better. These kids, the most important thing is they have fun because they’re still kids and to have big dreams to to work hard to accomplish those dreams. Also helping out the top youth players aged 13-14 for the 2019 Jr. NBA Philippines program is Collin Sexton, the Cavs’ top lottery pick from last year. Sexton, who finished with an average of 16.6 points, 3 rebounds, and 2.8 assists for his rookie year in Cleveland, is also big on work ethic and that’s what he’d like to remind everyone over at Jr. NBA Philippines. “Just keep working. Someone is still watching,” Sexton told ABS-CBN Sports. “Don’t ever give up on yourself and believe when nobody else does. I can be a testament to that just because when people were doubting me, I just kept working,” he added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnMay 17th, 2019

30 Teams in 30 Days: Cavaliers to lean heavily on young roster

Like most summers in the NBA, the 2019 edition was chock full of trades, free agent news and player movement. From the defending-champion Toronto Raptors to just about every other team in the league, change was the most applicable word when it came to describing team rosters for the 2019-20 season. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- in order of regular-season finish from 2018-19 -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Cleveland Cavaliers 2018-19 Record: 19-63, did not qualify for the playoffs Key additions: Darius Garland (Draft), Kevin Porter Jr. (Draft), Dylan Windler (Draft), John Beilein (coach) Key departures: JR Smith, Cameron Payne, David Nwaba The lowdown: The first season in the post-LeBron James era, Part II, was almost a carbon copy of the first one: He leaves and the team crumbles. This was pretty much expected from a team that was built around LeBron and then suddenly grew old overnight once he left. It didn’t help matters when Kevin Love, given a rich contract the previous summer, played only 22 games because of injury. That ensured the Cavs would be locked into a rebuilding season and rookie point guard Collin Sexton would receive ample playing time as a result, which was not necessarily a bad thing at all. After shaky initially, Sexton finished strong and averaged 20 points the last 2 1/2 months to make the All-Rookie Second Team. Also, swingman Cedi Osman benefited from increased playing time and had moments in his second season. In a mild disappointment, Larry Nance Jr. failed to take a generous step in his development and there’s fear he will be nothing more than a scrappy, hard-working role player who’ll make the occasional highlight dunk. Otherwise, the Cavs’ season served no major purpose. The remaining pieces from the LeBron era either crumbled in various ways or simply disappeared: JR Smith was suspended, essentially for insubordination; Love was hurt; Tristan Thompson plateaued; George Hill and Kyle Korver were traded. The Cavs sunk toward the bottom of the East, fell off radar for the first time in six years, and once again found themselves back in the lottery looking for help. Summer summary: In a summer of surprises around the NBA, one of the more under-rated events happened when the Cavs’ coaching search ended with a 66-year-old grandfatherly type who never spent a day on an NBA bench. John Beilein might well be a revelation, one way or another. He spent much of his college career at Michigan, where he was highly respected for his strategy, composure and character -- three elements he’ll need in Cleveland. Beilein had flirted with the NBA in years past; when nothing materialized, some NBA people thought his time had passed, especially once he reached retirement age. But the Cavs went with an out-of-the-box choice anyway, plucking Beilein even as the college-to-NBA transition comes with inconsistent results and yellow flags. Brad Stevens is the exception, and besides, he was in his mid-30s when he left Butler and took the Celtics job. The one current college coach whose name surfaces the most in NBA conversation is Jay Wright of Villanova, who has served on Team USA and appears NBA-ready (temperament, two-time champ, even wardrobe). Word is Wright will be on the Sixers’ short list if and when that job opens. Because of Beilein's age and the state of the Cavs, he seems a bridge-gap coach; if so, that’s a smart choice. He’s experienced at managing young players, and the Cavs will build their next era through the Draft. Top free agents don’t make Cleveland a destination choice, even when presented with the chance to play alongside LeBron. Given how quiet the Cavs were this summer, the odds are great that they’ll return to the draft lottery in 2020 and give Beilein additional players in their early 20s to nurture. He’ll have five this season, with Sexton and Osman returning, plus Darius Garland, Dylan Windler and Kevin Porter Jr. coming on via first-round picks. The prize is Garland, the No. 5 pick who was limited by a meniscus injury to five games in his one and only season at Vanderbilt. This seems eerily similar to years earlier when the Cavs took another guard with a limited (11-game) college career: Kyrie Irving. Garland was a three-time Mr. Basketball in Tennessee and was considered the best recruit ever at Vandy, and that’s about all NBA scouts had to work with this spring. Not only was his college career brief, but he also left the combine early. Apparently, that was enough for the Cavs, smitten by Garland’s instincts. The only question is how he fits with Sexton; both can play off the ball, although each is more comfortable as the lead playmaker. Porter represents a wild card of sorts. Talent-wise, he can be considered a steal with the 30th pick ... after being red-flagged by teams following a suspension at USC for poor conduct that cost him much of that single season. Porter was a workout beast prior to the draft, a swingman who brings great size (6-foot-6) and can create off the dribble. The Cavs had nothing to lose by choosing him at that point. Windler benefited from four years in college, steering underdog Belmont to the NCAA tourney and developing into a prospect by his senior year. The Cavs and Beilein can figure out how it all fits later. Right now, Cleveland is all about stockpiling as many assets as possible and giving that young core plenty of time to make their mistakes now, rather than later. And speaking of assets, they didn’t trade Love this summer. But that doesn’t mean he’ll be on the roster when next season ends, either. If the right price comes along — and that’ll be tricky because of his age, injury history and salary — Love can and will exit. LeBron James will eventually get a statue outside Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse (formerly Quicken Loans Arena), but he isn’t walking through that door again. The Cavs must take another road to respectability, and it could be a long one. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2019

Cavs Sexton, WNBA great Ticha Penicheiro to grace Jr. NBA camp

Ballers chosen from five regional selection camps all over the country will be able to get up close and personal with the basketball stars......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 9th, 2019

Grammy-award winning performer Jason Mraz hinanap si Renee Dominique ng Star Magic para makipag-collaborate

HABANG ang ilang artists ay nangangarap pa lang makakuha ng atensyon ng  global audience or working with a world-renowned Hollywood performer, ABS-CBN Star Magic artist Renee Dominique is already living both! The young singer, composer and … Read More The post Grammy-award winning performer Jason Mraz hinanap si Renee Dominique ng Star Magic para makipag-collaborate appeared first on Pinoy Parazzi......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinoyparazziRelated NewsMay 1st, 2019

SETH FEDELIN and ANDREA BRILLANTES: A Golden Young Love Story

SETH FEDELIN Real Name: Mark Seth Yancy Fronda Fedelin Birthdate: July 9, 2002 Zodiac Sign: Cancer ANDREA BRILLANTES Real Name: Anndrew Blythe Daguio Gorostiza Birthdate: March 12, 2003 Zodiac Sign: Pisces ADIK KA BA sa programang … Read More The post SETH FEDELIN and ANDREA BRILLANTES: A Golden Young Love Story appeared first on Pinoy Parazzi......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinoyparazziRelated NewsSep 19th, 2019

TUNAY NA ‘CLASH’: Tapatan nina Julie Anne San Jose at Rita Daniela, muling bubuhayin!

WAY BACK in 2005, unang nagkasama at nagkalaban ang mga young promising talents na sina Rita Iringan (now Rita Daniela) and Julie Anne San Jose. Sa nasabing patimpalak ay itinanghal na grand winner si Rita. … Read More The post TUNAY NA ‘CLASH’: Tapatan nina Julie Anne San Jose at Rita Daniela, muling bubuhayin! appeared first on Pinoy Parazzi......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinoyparazziRelated NewsSep 19th, 2019

30 Teams in 30 Days: Solid finish, playoff push prompts Magic to run it back

Like most summers in the NBA, the 2019 edition was chock full of trades, free agent news and player movement. From the defending-champion Toronto Raptors to just about every other team in the league, change was the most applicable word when it came to describing team rosters for the 2019-20 season. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- in order of regular-season finish from 2018-19 -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Orlando Magic 2018-19 Record: 42-40, lost to Raptors in first round of playoffs Key additions: Al-Farouq Aminu (free agency), Chuma Okeke (Draft) Key departures: Timofey Mozgov The lowdown: It perhaps escaped your notice, but the Magic actually raised a banner in 2018-19. They won the admittedly-weakened Southeast Division, and while that might make folks snicker, any progress is good progress for a franchise still looking to gain traction in this, the unfulfilled post-Dwight Howard era. They were beastly down the stretch, going 11-2 to fight their way out of a midseason slump to reach the playoffs. Plus, they took a game from the eventual-champion Toronto Raptors in the first round. It helps to be in the Eastern Conference, but let’s not water-down what the Magic did too much. They received solid seasons from Aaron Gordon and Evan Fornier, a career season from Terrence Ross and an All-Star season from Nikola Vucevic. (It didn’t hurt that Vucevic and Ross were pending free agents playing for money.) The club also responded well to new coach Steve Clifford. However, there were mild disappointments -- mainly from the last two first-round picks. Jonathan Isaac didn’t take a leap in his second season and seemed unsure whether to be a stretch-four or use his size advantage in the paint. He wound up being just OK at both (9.6 points, 5.5 rebounds per game). Rookie Mo Bamba looked like a project throughout the season as injuries limited him to just 47 games. All told, the Magic made the playoffs for the first time in seven years and won more games in any strike-shortened season since 2010-11. That was enough to pacify the home crowd and finally show up on NBA radar, however faint. Summer summary: For the second time this decade, the Magic arrived at a crossroads regarding their All-Star center and had to make a decision with fairly large future ramifications. Last time, it was Howard. This time, it was the guy who replaced Howard. The decision now, as then: Should they re-sign the big man? Actually, it was a dual decision. Orlando had to want "Vooch" and vice-versa, considering he was an unrestricted free agent, and it wasn’t an automatic call in either case. Vucevic and his family enjoyed Orlando, yet the franchise, despite finally posting a winning season, was hardly in contender condition. He had options as a number of teams -- the LA Clippers among them -- expressed interest in the center with a soft touch and sound footwork. As for the Magic, they’d just drafted Bamba in 2018 with the No. 6 overall pick. The idea, at least you’d think, was having Bamba replace Vucevic at some point. By keeping Vucevic, what signal were they sending to Bamba? Why would they stifle the growth of a player whom they took over Wendell Carter Jr. and Collin Sexton? In the end, both the Magic and Vucevic agreed and Orlando delivered a four-year, $100 million deal. The team's thinking? Vucevic is an asset and so it’s better to keep him, even at a high price, rather than let him walk and get nothing back. Bamba must wait his turn, and he’ll need more time to develop after a raw rookie season. The other investment was in Ross, who spent much of his previous six NBA seasons as an athletic swingman who teased a lot. Last season, he was (for once) a primary option and shot well from deep (38.3 percent), earning himself a four-year, $54 million deal from Orlando. The Magic believe Ross, 27, is tapping into his prime later than usual. Then Orlando added depth at that position with Aminu. He can spread the floor and is decent defensively ... but isn’t a shot creator because of a weak dribble. At three years and $29 million, Aminu was a reasonable buy. In recent years past, Orlando was a fixture at the Draft lottery, and then their fate changed abruptly by making the playoffs. The downside, though, is Orlando had a middle first-round pick, where future superstars don’t normally live. Those picks are where teams take risks, and the Magic did so by selecting Okeke, who missed Auburn’s Final Four appearance after injuring his knee in the Sweet 16. Before the injury, the 6-foot-8 Okeke showed strong instincts around the basket, especially rebounding, while also shooting 3-pointers. Most scouts believe he would’ve been a lottery pick, and perhaps taken in the top-10, if not for the injury. The Magic spent the summer mulling whether to “redshirt” Okeke as they have another young player at his spot in Isaac. Plus, Okeke can heal thoroughly and also get reps in the NBA G League. There's also former No. 1 overall pick Markelle Fultz here, too, whom the Magic added in a deadline-day trade last season with the Philadelphia 76ers. He's still recovering from the thoracic outlet syndrome he was diagnosed with last season and hasn't played a game for the Magic. Still, Orlando believed in him enough to exercise his contract option for 2020-21. If he's ever healthy and shows the talent that made him a star a Washington, Fultz could help Orlando rise up as a real East contender. Other than big-money decisions on Vucevic and Ross, the Magic was content to make only minor changes. They still lack the superstar needed to rise the ranks in the East, yet their core is proven and capable of knocking on playoffs' door for a second straight season. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2019

CERTIFIED BUSINESSWOMAN: Kris Bernal, may bagong negosyo na naman!

NAKAKATUWA ang Kapuso actress na si Kris Bernal. Maliban sa pagiging isang magaling na teleserye actress (mapapanood siya tuwing hapon sa ‘Hanggang sa Dulo ng Buhay Ko’ with Rayver Cruz, Megan Young and Kim Domingo), … Read More The post CERTIFIED BUSINESSWOMAN: Kris Bernal, may bagong negosyo na naman! appeared first on Pinoy Parazzi......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinoyparazziRelated NewsSep 16th, 2019

Maymay nawindang sa ginawa ni Kathryn habang kumakain: OMG!

NA-SHOCK si Maymay Entrata sa ginawa sa kanya ni Kathryn Bernardo minsang kumakain sila habang break sa shooting ng “Hello, Love, Goodbye”. Hanggang ngayon ay hindi pa rin makapaniwala ang Kapamilya young actress na naging bahagi siya ng highest grossing Pinoy film of all time na pinagbibidahan nina Kathryn at Alden Richards. Kamakailan ay ginanap […] The post Maymay nawindang sa ginawa ni Kathryn habang kumakain: OMG! appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 9th, 2019

Anita Linda, hindi naging pabigat sa syuting ng Circa kahit 94 na

ANITA LINDA is already 94 years old and she’s still working. Bida ang aktres sa pelikulang Circa mula sa direksyon ni Adolf Alix Jr. na kasali sa 2019 Pista ng Pelikulang Pilipino na magsisimula sa … Read More The post Anita Linda, hindi naging pabigat sa syuting ng Circa kahit 94 na appeared first on Pinoy Parazzi......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinoyparazziRelated NewsSep 9th, 2019

Pinoy netters aim for top ATF finish

Four young netters, toughened up by a series of tournaments on the local front, bring their act to Malaysia this week as they slug it out for top singles honors against a crack international field in the ATF (Asian Tennis Federation) 14-and-Under Series in Kuching, Sarawak......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2019

Pinoy netters aim for top ATF finish

Four young netters, toughened up by a series of tournaments on the local front, bring their act to Malaysia this week as they slug it out for top singles honors against a tough international field in the ATF (Asian Tennis Federation) 14-and-Under Series in Kuching, Sarawak......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 1st, 2019

Baguio City retains Batang Pinoy crown

PUERTO PRINCESA CITY — Baguio City defended its overall crown at the conclusion of the Philippine Sports Commission (PSC)-Batang Pinoy national finals yesterday here. The young athletes from the country’s Summer Capital banked on their strong showing in combat sports to become the most successful local government unit in this competition organized by the PSC […] The post Baguio City retains Batang Pinoy crown appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 31st, 2019

Into Africa: Raptors president brings the game home

TORONTO (AP) — Masai Ujiri could see it in the proud posture and wide smiles of the young female players. The Toronto Raptors president was in Somalia last week for the last stop on his annual Giants of Africa tour. "We have to preach equality on the continent and all over the world," Ujiri told The Canadian Press. "There's as much talent in girls as there is in boys. They have to be given the opportunity, too. At the end of the day, you see them walking taller, which was very important for us to continue on this journey." Ujiri has barely paused since the Raptors won the NBA championship in June. There was free agency and the departure of superstar Kawhi Leonard to the Los Angeles Clippers. Much of his time has been devoted to Giants of Africa, his passion project since 2003. The tour added Somalia and South Sudan to the schedule this summer, two countries still staggering from civil wars. Islamic extremism in Somalia had forbidden females to watch sports let alone participate in them. The sight of young girls shooting hoops and kicking balls is unusual. The resurgence of female athletes has been in itself a symbol of defiance. The 50 girls at the Giants of Africa camp in Mogadishu played in hijabs. It was held at the Elman Peace and Human Rights Center, which is co-run by Ilwad Elman, a Somali-Canadian. Her father, Elman Ali Ahmen, was assassinated in 1996. He was a renowned peace activist responsible for a campaign to rehabilitate young soldiers through education. Elman has introduced sports to girls and women at the center as a way to empower them. "Basketball has been a breath of fresh air there," Ujiri said. "It's about what sports can bring you: happiness, peace, bringing people together, working together. For us, that was our message." Sitting in his office at an otherwise quiet OVO Athletic Centre this week, the 49-year-old executive reflected on his tour, which also included trips to Morocco, Mali, Cameroon and Tanzania. Arriving as the reigning NBA champions took the tour to a new level. "That was awesome, just to show that at least we can do it ... we can believe in ourselves to do this," Ujiri said. "I love it that Pascal (Siakam) and Serge (Ibaka, a Congolese native) played brilliant roles for us in this championship. Kids can see that." But he also wants the youngsters to know it's not only the players who can achieve "something big." He listed Patrick Engelbrecht, the Raptors' director of global scouting from South Africa; Raptors assistant coach Patrick Mutombo, who is Congolese; Jama Mahlalela, the Swazi-Canadian head coach of Raptors 905, an NBA G League team; and Raptors assistant Eric Khoury, who's Egyptian. Ujiri is an English-born Nigerian. When the Raptors won the Larry O'Brien Trophy, he became the first African to lead a franchise to a major North American title. He took the trophy home to Zaria, Nigeria. "We as Africans have to go back and do more," Ujiri said. "I have to continue to do more and more, to create more opportunity. It's very important that we tell the story and create the narrative there rather than somebody else create it for us." Ujiri said the tour was a chance to "recharge" before jumping back into his seventh season at the helm. Toronto opens at Scotiabank Arena on Oct. 22 when a championship banner will be raised and rings presented. Ujiri says the NBA crown stands beside his work in Africa. "These people have an incredible passion for life," he said. "It's joy for me, and an obligation. I feel so good doing it every year.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 27th, 2019

PVL: She makes the work easy -- Okumu on Tolenada

Setter Iris Tolenada’s role in Motolite goes beyond being the squad’s designated playmaker. The Fil-American also plays as Motolite head coach Godfrey Okumu’s deputy inside the court. Okumu didn’t need to give much instructions to Tolenada as he would with the other Motolite players because he knows that the setter already has an idea on how he wants their game plan to be executed inside the court. Okumu is confident that his instructions will be relayed to the tee knowing that he’s communicating it with Tolenada, who herself is a volleyball mentor in the US.   “We always talk, before I tell her anything about what I’m expecting from her, I just tell her ‘I know, and I believe you know what I’m about to say and I don’t need to tell you this,’” said Okumu of Tolenada on Sunday following Motolite’s 25-9, 25-20, 25-19, drubbing of BaliPure for a 2-1 win-loss record in the Premier Volleyball League Season 3 Open Conference.   “That’s what I always tell her. ‘I don’t have to tell you this.’ So it’s something that she knows,” added Okumu of the playmaker, who tallied 17 excellent sets and four points. Tolenada, who works as San Francisco State University women’s volleyball team assistant coach and also made a stint as volleyball instructor at Stanford University summer camp, made her return to the league three years since she led Pocari Sweat in the defunct Shakey’s V-League Open Conference crown in 2016.      Playing with a relatively young core, Okumu knows that Tolenada needs a lot of adjustment but the mentor lauds the playmaker for making his work easy.   “I think we have to find a way for the team to jell together, how to defend, how to attack. This player plays this ball perfectly, get the ball, maybe she’s struggling. So those are the things that again we have to find a way as we go so we make it easier for her to know how to play with different spikers,” said Okumu. “But all in all, the work is easy,” Okumu said. “She makes the work easy.” Tolenada welcomes the challenge of leading a young team together with Myla Pablo, whom she has played with before in Pocari Sweat.   “It’s definitely been different,” she said. “They make us feel young but it has been great.” “I think they’re starting to learn. I think Myla and myself, we’re doing our best to be leaders for them and we just tried to drop them in and make them compete as hard as possible,” Tolenada added. “They have the potential so we just to keep on working hard.”   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2019

Tennis champ, trailblazer Althea Gibson honored at US Open

By Melissa Murphy, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Althea Gibson basked in a ticker-tape parade in New York a decade before Arthur Ashe won the 1968 U.S. Open. Gibson won 11 majors in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open singles titles. She integrated two sports — tennis and golf — during an era of racial segregation in the United States. "She's our Jackie Robinson of tennis," said Billie Jean King, who at 13 watched Gibson play. "I saw what it meant to be the best." One Love Tennis is an athletic and educational program for youth in Wilmington, North Carolina. During a rainy day in 2017, the girls watched the documentary "Althea and Arthur." They learned Ashe has a stadium named for him at the U.S. Open on the grounds of the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York. The mood in the room grew somber afterward, according to program director Lenny Simpson. The girls realized there wasn't even a "dag-gone hot dog stand" named for Gibson. Why wasn't there a monument to the first African American to win a major title (1956 French Open) before winning both the U.S. Nationals (precursor to the U.S. Open) and Wimbledon in 1957-58? Simpson suggested the girls be part of the solution by writing letters to his friend and then-U.S. Tennis Association President Katrina Adams. King and Adams had been working on the Gibson project for years. King's advocacy before the USTA board resulted in a unanimous vote. Adams later read letters to the board from the girls, including Xerra Robinson, to reinforce the importance of a tribute. "I know she would be proud to see the progress that's been made with so many women of color leading the pack in professional tennis," Adams said of Gibson, who died in 2003 at 76. "Her bravery, perseverance and determination paved the way." On Monday, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. The girls and boys of One Love Tennis will attend the ceremony, along with Gibson's 85-year-old doubles partner, Angela Buxton of Britain. "It's about bloody time," said Buxton, who won the 1956 French and Wimbledon titles with her friend. More things to know about Gibson, who made the covers of Time and Sports Illustrated and was voted AP Female Athlete of the Year in 1957-58: EARLY YEARS Gibson traveled the hard road from Harlem to Wimbledon, but she had a community of support. The oldest of five children, Gibson was born in Silver, South Carolina, before her sharecropper parents relocated to Harlem. At 18, Gibson moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, to live with Dr. Hubert and Celeste Eaton. She honed her tennis and social skills on Dr. Eaton's court at his home, called "the black country club" because African Americans couldn't play at public courts or white country clubs. "Culturally, it was a tough adjustment," said Simpson, who met his coach and mentor on that court at age 5 when Gibson gave him a racket and called him "champ." ''(In Harlem), she didn't see the signs of white and colored water fountains and white and colored bathrooms. The prejudice and discrimination certainly was there, but nothing like the Jim Crow days of the South." She spent summers in Lynchburg, Virginia, training on the court of Dr. Robert Walter Johnson, who later nurtured Ashe, a winner of five Grand Slam titles. Both were forced to play in segregated tournaments early in their careers. Barred by the precursor of the USTA, Gibson won 10 straight American Tennis Association women's titles starting in 1947. After lobbying by the ATA and a withering editorial from four-time champion Alice Marble, Gibson became the first African American to compete in the 1950 U.S. Nationals at Forest Hills on her 23rd birthday. A graduate of Florida A&M, Gibson taught physical education and considered quitting tennis because she couldn't make a living in the low-paying amateur days. But in 1955, she was tapped by the State Department for a goodwill tennis tour of Asia. That's how she met Buxton in India. ALTHEA YEARS Both were looking for a doubles partner in 1956. Buxton was denied membership at the club in London where she practiced after she listed Jewish for religion on the application. She grew up in England and South Africa and understood Gibson's struggle. "No one spoke to her, let alone played with her," Buxton said by phone from London. "(Her playing style) was like a young man. She wore little shorts, a vest and hit the ball hard, even her second serve. She came charging up to the net. She bamboozled people with her attitude." They won at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, but the "powers that be" were not thrilled and "you needed a spy glass to see the headline 'Minorities Win,'" Buxton said. Both were denied membership at the All England Club despite being Wimbledon champions. (Buxton is still waiting). Nonetheless, Gibson got the royal treatment with a ticker-tape parade in July in New York after receiving the 1957 Wimbledon trophy from Queen Elizabeth II. Two months later, she won the U.S. Nationals at Forest Hills. "That was an incredible joy for her," Simpson said. She duplicated those feats and retired from tennis at No. 1 in 1958 — a winner of more than 50 singles and doubles titles — because there was no significant prize money until the professional era began in 1968. The men's and women's 2019 U.S. Open winner will each receive a check for $3.8 million. No other African American woman won the U.S. Open until Serena Williams in 1999 or Wimbledon until Venus Williams in 2000. AFTER TENNIS Gibson played exhibition tennis before Harlem Globetrotters games, signing a $100,000 contract, and joined the LPGA full-time in 1964. In 1975, she became state commissioner of athletics in New Jersey. She served on the state athletics control board, and the governor's council on physical fitness until 1992. The twice-divorced Gibson's health failed in her late 60s after a stroke and she struggled to make ends meet. Buxton said Gibson reached out to a handful of tennis friends without much success. Gibson was on the verge of suicide in 1995 when the tennis great called her, she said. Buxton provided financial support and visited her friend in East Orange, New Jersey. "Angela Buxton saved her life, literally," Simpson said. Buxton also wrote a letter to Tennis Week magazine, and donations flooded in from all over the world. The WTA currently has a hardship fund to help former players. Frances Gray, a longtime friend and co-founder of the Althea Gibson Foundation, has kept her legacy alive. A self-described "born athlete," Gibson said she wanted to be remembered as "strong and tough and quick." "If not for Althea Gibson, there would be no Arthur Ashe, no Serena and Venus, Madison Keys, Sloane Stephens and the list goes on," Simpson said. "She opened it up for all of us.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2019

Batang Pinoy lures best young athletes

The finest young athletes will battle for slots to the Philippine team seeing action in the Children of Asia Games in Russia next year when the National Finals of the Batang Pinoy unfolds today at the Ramon V. Mitra Sports Complex in Puerto Princesa, Palawan......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 25th, 2019

Rookie Survey: Zion Williamson, Ja Morant early favorites to shine in 2019-20

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com Last season was the first time in 34 years (since 1984-85) that the top five picks of the previous Draft went on to be the five players who comprised the All-Rookie First Team. One year later, the teams that had those top five picks should feel pretty good about their decisions. Time will tell about the five teams that had the top five picks in this year's Draft. But it's clear that fellow rookies approve of the guys selected in the top two. In this year's NBA.com Rookie Survey, 62 percent of responders picked the New Orleans Pelicans' Zion Williamson or the Memphis Grizzlies' Ja Morant to win the Kia Rookie of the Year award. Williamson made Rookie Survey history with how many votes he got in the "Most athletic" question, while Morant was a clear favorite for "Best playmaker." The two top picks received the most total votes on the survey, but it was No. 7 pick Coby White (of the Chicago Bulls) and No. 33 pick Carsen Edwards (Boston Celtics) who each received votes on a survey-high five questions. In total, 38 different rookies received votes on at least one of the seven questions about their class, a deep one if these guys got it right. For the 11th time in the last 13 years, NBA.com sat down with the rookie class at the annual Rookie Photo Shoot. In addition to the seven questions about their fellow rookies, this year's group (of 42) answered a few about the current player they most admire and what they're expecting as they make the jump to the NBA. * * * NOTE: Players were asked not to vote for themselves, college teammates or NBA teammates. (Some still did, and those votes were discounted.) * * * Who will be the 2019-20 Kia Rookie of the Year? 1. Zion Williamson, New Orleans -- 35% 2. Ja Morant, Memphis -- 27% 3. R.J. Barrett, New York -- 5%     Cam Reddish, Atlanta -- 5% Others receiving votes: Nickeil Alexander-Walker, New Orleans; Goga Bitadze, Indiana; Brandon Clarke, Memphis; Carsen Edwards, Boston; Darius Garland, Cleveland; Kyle Guy, Sacramento; Rui Hachimura, Washington; Romeo Langford, Boston; Coby White, Chicago; Grant Williams, Boston Last year: DeAndre Ayton and Collin Sexton -- 18% Worth noting: Williamson feels like a strong pick, but in the previous 10 years of the survey, the top vote-getter has gone on to win the Kia Rookie of the Year award just once. That was in 2007 (the first year of the survey), when Kevin Durant received 54 percent of the vote. Williamson is the first player in the last five years to receive at least one third of the vote, and he might have had more if some of his fellow rookies (those that voted for the six guys selected outside the Lottery) had studied their history. Of the 67 Rookie of the Year winners (that weren't territorial picks in the 1950s and early '60s), 61 (or 91 percent) were selected in the top 10 of the Draft, and 52 (or 78 percent) were selected in the top five. Which rookie will have the best career? 1. Cam Reddish, Atlanta -- 19% 2. Ja Morant, Memphis -- 16% 3. De'Andre Hunter, Atlanta -- 11% 4. R.J. Barrett, New York -- 5%     Jaxson Hayes, New Orleans -- 5%     Coby White, Chicago -- 5%     Zion Williamson, New Orleans -- 5% Others receiving votes: Nickeil Alexander-Walker, New Orleans; Jarrett Culver, Minnesota; Carsen Edwards, Boston; Darius Garland, Cleveland; Rui Hachimura, Washington; Keldon Johnson, San Antonio; Mfiondu Kabengele, LA Clippers; Romeo Langford, Boston; Cody Martin, Charlotte; Eric Paschall, Golden State; Tremont Waters, Boston; Dylan Windler, Cleveland Last year: Wendell Carter Jr. -- 13% Worth noting: This is the sixth straight year that a Duke player has earned (or tied for) the most votes on this question, with Reddish joining Jabari Parker (2014), Jahlil Okafor (2015), Brandon Ingram (2016), Jayson Tatum (2017) and Carter. The seven players who received multiple votes were all selected in the top 10, though there were another eight votes for players selected outside the Lottery. Which rookie was the biggest steal at where he was selected in the Draft? 1. Bol Bol (44), Denver -- 19%     Kevin Porter Jr. (30), Cleveland -- 19% 3. Carsen Edwards (33), Boston -- 5%     Nassir Little (25), Portland -- 5%     Isaiah Roby (45), Dallas -- 5%     Coby White (7), Chicago -- 5%     Grant Williams (22), Boston -- 5% Others receiving votes: Nickeil Alexander-Walker (17), New Orleans; Brandon Clarke (21), Memphis; Jaxson Hayes (8), New Orleans; Talen Horton-Tucker (46), L.A. Lakers; Keldon Johnson (29), San Antonio; Mfiondu Kabengele (27), LA Clippers; Romeo Langford (14), Boston; Jordan Poole (28), Golden State; Cam Reddish (10), Atlanta; Luka Samanic (19), San Antonio; Admiral Schofield (42), Washington; Quinndary Weatherspoon (49), San Antonio; Dylan Windler (26), Cleveland Last year: Keita Bates-Diop -- 13% Worth noting: As it often does, this question got the biggest range of answers, including each of the last six picks of the first round. But Bol and Porter, two of the six players from the Pac-12 Conference, clearly stood out among the group. Draymond Green is the only one of the previous 16 players to earn (or tie for) the most votes on this question (which was worded "Which rookie is being most overlooked" through 2014) that has ever been an All-Star, though Donovan Mitchell is certainly a potential All-Star in the years to come. Which rookie is the most athletic? 1. Zion Williamson, New Orleans -- 87% 2. Brandon Clarke, Memphis -- 8% Others receiving votes: Jaxson Hayes, New Orleans; Kevin Porter Jr., Cleveland Last year: Zhaire Smith -- 24% Worth noting: The 87 percent that Williamson earned here is the greatest percentage of the vote that any player has earned on any question in the history of the Rookie Survey, surpassing the 79 percent that Stephen Curry got for "Best Shooter" in 2009. That's good company. Which rookie is the best shooter? 1. Tyler Herro, Miami -- 33% 2. Kyle Guy, Sacramento -- 29% 3. Cameron Johnson, Phoenix -- 13% 4. Ty Jerome, Phoenix -- 8% 5. Jordan Poole, Golden State -- 4% Others receiving votes: Ignas Brazdeikis, New York; Carsen Edwards, Boston; Darius Garland, Cleveland; Zion Williamson, New Orleans; Dylan Windler, Cleveland Last year: Trae Young -- 47% Worth noting: Guy made twice as many 3-pointers (120 at a 43-percent clip) for Virginia last season than Herro did in his one season for Kentucky (60 at 36 percent). Johnson (47 percent) shot better than both of them and the Suns could benefit from having two of the top four players here. Phoenix ranked 29th or 30th in effective field goal percentage from outside the paint in each of the last three seasons. Which rookie is the best defender? 1. Matisse Thybulle, Philadelphia -- 37% 2. De'Andre Hunter, Atlanta -- 29% 3. Brandon Clarke, Memphis -- 8%     Jaxson Hayes, New Orleans -- 8%     Nassir Little, Portland -- 8% Others receiving votes: Bol Bol, Denver; Jarrett Culver, Minnesota; Bruno Fernando, Atlanta; Coby White, Chicago Last year: Jevon Carter -- 29% Worth noting: This is the only question for which Thybulle received any votes, but he received the greatest percentage of the vote on this question since Victor Oladipo (63% in 2013). While Thybulle is joining a team with a handful of guys that have already proven to be impact defenders, Hunter's defense is more critical to the success of the Hawks, who ranked 28th on that end of the floor last season. Which rookie is the best playmaker? 1. Ja Morant, Memphis -- 40% 2. Darius Garland, Cleveland -- 15% 3. Ty Jerome, Phoenix -- 10%     Coby White, Chicago -- 10% 5. Nickeil Alexander-Walker, New Orleans -- 8% 6. Kevin Porter Jr., Cleveland -- 6%     Tremont Waters, Boston -- 6% Others receiving votes: Carsen Edwards, Boston; Kyle Guy, Sacramento Last year: Trae Young -- 35% Worth noting: Morant led the nation in assists by a pretty wide margin. In Memphis, the latest winner on this question is replacing the first; Mike Conley received 45 percent of the vote for best playmaker in the initial, 2007 survey. The Grizzlies would surely love to see Morant stick around as long as Conley did. Winning this category as a Laker -- as Lonzo Ball and D'Angelo Russell both once did -- apparently means that you're going to be traded less than two years after doing so. What will be the biggest adjustment for you, playing in the NBA? 1. Speed or pace of the game -- 40% 2. Physicality (athleticism, size and strength of opponents) -- 21%     Schedule/Length of season -- 21% 4. Lifestyle/Time management -- 12% Also receiving votes: Longer 3-point distance, Playing NBA defense Last year: Speed or pace of the game -- 31% Worth noting: According to the great Ken Pomeroy, the average pace in NCAA Division I was just 69.0 possessions per 40 minutes last season. When adjusted for a 48-minute game (82.8), that would be almost 18 possessions per 48 slower than the average NBA pace (100.7 per 48). So yeah, speed of the game should be an adjustment. What is the most important skill you need to develop? 1. Shooting -- 32% 2. Ball-handling -- 16% 3. Passing -- 9% 4. Strength -- 7% 5. Decision-making -- 5%     Defense -- 5%     Everything -- 5%     Money management -- 5% Also receiving votes: Leadership, Mindset, Patience, Playmaking, Playing off the ball, Post skills, Time management Last year: Ball-handling and shooting -- 19% Worth noting: Self-improvement is both a physical and mental thing. There are five votes in here for the mental aspects of improvement (even more if you consider "passing" and/or "defense" to be more of a mindset than anything else), and a few more for managing things (time and money) off the court. Who is your favorite player in the league? 1. LeBron James, L.A. Lakers -- 38% 2. Kevin Durant, Brooklyn -- 20% 3. Kawhi Leonard, LA Clippers -- 8%     Damian Lillard, Portland -- 8% 5. Devin Booker, Phoenix -- 5%     James Harden, Houston -- 5% Others receiving votes: Jamal Crawford; Kevin Garnett; Paul George, LA Clippers; C.J. McCollum, Portland; Steve Nash; Pascal Siakam, Toronto; Russell Westbrook, Houston Last year: LeBron James -- 29% Worth noting: In the 10-year history of this question, only three players have been the top vote-getter. James, named the top guy for the fourth time, separates himself from Durant (3) and Kobe Bryant (3). Interestingly, Bryant wasn't one of the two retired guys -- Garnett and Nash, this time -- to get votes. John Schuhmann is a senior stats analyst for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 20th, 2019

PVL: I have to prove myself – Manilla Santos-Ng

Returning Manilla Santos-Ng has to reintroduce herself. The volleyball legend may have an impressive résumé under her belt but after a decade removed from competitive play, Santos-Ng will have to start from scratch. It’s like her rookie year with De La Salle University all over again. Santos-Ng is staging a comeback since her last stint in the UAAP in 2009 after signing up with newcomer ChocoMucho in the Premier Volleyball League Season 3 Open Conference. “It’s 10 years ago [since I last played]. Sa totoo lang, I consider myself a rookie in this pro-league, bago lang ako,” said the four-time UAAP champion. Just like other newbies, Santos-Ng, who during her time in the UAAP was known for her high-leaping exploits, high-octane offense and solid floor defense, has to vie for playing time under head coach Oliver Almadro. “I really have to prove myself also kung talagang karapa’t dapat kang makalaro,” said Santos-Ng. “Kung maglalaro ka go, if you can contribute go. If not, maybe in some other ways like inspiring the kids.” Santos-Ng has to compete against her younger and taller teammates to convince Alamdro for minutes. And earning her playing time won’t be easy for the 34-year old, 5-foot-4 hitter in a Flying Titans team stacked with young and very talented wing spikers in Kat Tolentino, Shang Berte, Carla Sandoval, Bang Pineda, Cindy Imbo, Shannen Palec and Gyra Barroga.    It’s a big challenge that Santos-Ng knows she has to face. “One thing I like about Coach Oliver is that he’s very honest with us,” said the UAAP Season 71 Most Valuable Player, who played under Almadro back when the mentor worked as deputy to DLSU head coach Ramil De Jesus.   “Kilala ko rin siya na, 'Hindi porke’t kilala kita bibigyan kita ng spot,'” she added. Santos-Ng also acknowledges that she has to work double time to adapt to this generation’s level of play and try to bring back if not exceed her vintage form.    “Honestly speaking may pressure because people are expecting a lot,” said Santos-Ng, who knows very well the hype that was built in her return. “But as I said, I consider myself a rookie here. Naga-adjust pa ako.” The three-time UAAP Best Receiver decided to come back to fulfill her son Kenzi's wish of seeing her in action. “When I decided to come back, I started losing weight muna, low impact. Adaptive phase kasi matagal akong di nakapaglaro tapos nagdyi-gym ako,” she said. Santos-Ng then trained with ChocoMucho’s sister-team Creamline for a few months. “I told my husband I need court skills also so he said since affiliated naman siya sa Rebisco, he asked the management and the management is gracious enough to accept me to train with them,” Santos-Ng said. “And then during training, there was a new team being formed under Coach Oliver. Sinabi ko naman if I could join sa ChocoMucho because Coach Oliver’s there,” she continued. The former Queen Lady Spiker, who had her jersey no. 14 retired by DLSU, is now working on bringing back her hops and hang time that wowed fans a decade ago when the sport’s following was limited only to Filipino volleyball purists.   “Ngayon lang ulit ako tumalon, nitong June. Nu’ng nag-start ako mag-training with Creamline noong February hanggang May more on floor defense lang ako, hindi pa ako kaagad tumatalon,” she said. “Again it’s been 10 years, it’s been a long time baka if nabigla ako ma-injury lang. So noong June pa lang ako nag-start, sakto noong nasa ChocoMucho ako.”         When asked if this generation will have a chance to see the vintage Illa Santos operate inside the court, Santos-Ng answered. “Let’s just say na my teammates nagsasabi na may talon pa rin naman,” she said.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2019

The ‘Other’

The travails and triumphs of a working mom with young children still resonate with me even if I am 25 years past waking up at dawn to see my son off to school, struggling to button up his shirt and tie his shoelaces before the school bus arrives and beats the sunrise......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 8th, 2019

ABL official is new UAAP basketball commissioner

The UAAP has tapped the technical director of the ABL as commissioner for its basketball tournaments. Jensen Ilagan will now serve as the chief administrator for the basketball tournaments of the UAAP, with the Men's and Women's tourneys beginning on September 4. "I'm humbled to be the new UAAP commissioner. I will do my best to uphold the league's integrity through fair competition," said Ilagan. Though just 37 years young, Ilagan already has a wealth of experience under his belt. Besides being the technical director of the ABL for the last four years, the Asia Pacific College graduate is also a FIBA-certified table official. "His experience working in the ABL made us decide to tap him as our commissioner," said UAAP Season 82 president Emmanuel Fernandez. "His youth will bring more technological advancements to our league this season." "I commend the UAAP's choice, spearheaded by this season's host, as we continue to open our doors to candidates other than the traditional names in basketball," added UAAP executive director Atty. Rebo Saguisag. One of the innovations Ilagan plans to introduce for this season is the "Video Review Initiative." With this, every member of the officiating pool will be mandated to review the games that were played after every game day. "If it's a good game, it will be the standard. If it's a bad game, then it will serve as a lesson for the officials as well," shared the youthful commissioner. The league, though, has yet to finalize the pool of game officials for the season. Ilagan held a tryout last July 22 and 23 where 174 referees from 12 officiating groups attended. The pool was then trimmed down to 73 referees who will all undergo intensive training next week. "We have very high expectations and we will continue to watch him. I wish Mr. Ilagan luck in leading his office with pride and honor - his success is our success," expressed Saguisag. Assisting Ilagan as tournament director is a former Ateneo Blue Eagle and ex-Lyceum Jrs. head coach in LA Mumar......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 6th, 2019