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Jimmy Alapag says work not over

San Miguel Pale Pilsen Alab is safely in the ABL Finals but head coach Jimmy Alapag said yesterday while he’s proud of how the team overcame adversity throughout the season, the work isn’t over until the title is in the bag......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarApr 17th, 2018

Alab shoots for clincher

BANGKOK---As a player, Jimmy Alapag became an international legend by making big shots at the crunch for Gilas Pilipinas. Now coaching San Miguel Alab Pilipinas in the Asean Basketball League, the pint-sized gunslinger can gift the Philippines with an international crown. Two imports who have endeared themselves to a country that embraces the sport like religion and a young star with plenty to prove will help Alapag achieve his goal. Alapag knows his players have their work cut out for them when they shoot for the ABL crown against Mono Vampire on Monday at Stadium 29 in the Thai capital of Bangkok. "We'll put our heart and our soul in Game 4," said Alapag after Alab, led by ...Keep on reading: Alab shoots for clincher.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 29th, 2018

Coach Jimmy finding his balance a big key to Alab s Finals run

San Miguel-Alab Pilipinas' turnaround in the ABL season can be mostly attributed to the arrival of imports Justin Brownlee and Renaldo Balkman. However, those two can't win all the games for Alab. That's why as the season went on, head coach Jimmy Alapag slowly figured out how to balance his team, creating a rotation where all the needed players are on the floor at specific times. Now, Alab's fire is still burning and the team has the chance to be the first Philippine team to win the ABL title in five years. "As a player, confidence is such a valuable part of playing in this game and that’s one thing that I wanna make sure I encourage my guys that I told them, as we progress in the season, we will need everybody," Alapag said, talking about his improved rotation after advancing to the ABL Finals. "Even guys who early on, weren’t getting minutes. Like Pamboy (Raymundo), like Pao (Javelona), but again, we had some injuries. Josh (Urbiztondo) is still banged up, Rico (Maierhofer) is still out, we’re hopeful he’ll be back in the Finals. It’s a credit to these guys’ work ethic. Whether they’re playing, or they’re not playing, they come in every day, work hard, put in the time and the effort. It wasn’t surprising to see them come off the bench and ready to contribute," he added. But while Alab's local guys have started to get their groove on, Alapag acknowledges that his two outstanding imports have done their part in helping install a winning attitude to the team. And coach Jimmy is thankful. "If you guys remember back in the season, we were dead last. These guys [Brownlee and Balkman] showed up off the plane and got a big win against Malaysia. It really just kind of set us off. It just seemed like the whole environment of our team changed when you bring in two quality imports who are not just again good players, that’s the obvious part, but great people," Alapag said. "Being able to have the opportunity to go up against Balk and Jus, both with Gilas and my last year playing. To be finally on the same side with them, it’s been huge. I couldn’t be more thankful to having both the locals and Justin and Balk," he added.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 19th, 2018

Jimmy Alapag says work not over

San Miguel Pale Pilsen Alab is safely in the ABL Finals but head coach Jimmy Alapag said yesterday while he’s proud of how the team overcame adversity throughout the season, the work isn’t over until the title is in the bag......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 17th, 2018

Lo Domingo’s breakout reminds us that Alab is deepest team in ABL

HO CHI MINH, VIETNAM – Alab Pilipinas put away Saigon last Saturday at the CIS Arena, finishing off a quarterfinals sweep that sends them back into the Final Four. Facing the tough, tough Heat and their rowdy, rowdy crowd, the Filipinos needed to play their best to come out on top. They did just that as Renaldo Balkman and Justin Brownlee both did their thing, Ray Parks Jr. and Josh Urbiztondo provided support, and even Pao Javelona and Pamboy Raymundo delivered contributions of their own. The star of Game 2, though, was sixth man Lo Domingo who had 21 points, six rebounds, and three assists in 25 minutes of action – bar none, his best game in the season. Lawrence Domingo escapes his defender for the JAM! #ABL8Playoffs pic.twitter.com/EkhVNhLEfa — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) Abril 7, 2018 It was also his thunderous throwdown that ignited the 10-2 blast that boosted the Philippines ahead for good. Asked about it post-game, he answered, “That dunk, I was kind of really bouncy in warmups. I had the lane there and that gave me a chance to do it so I did.” The six-foot-five forward would only continue his strong play from there, outmuscling the likes of Maxie Esho, David Arnold, and Moses Morgan and having his way inside. For head coach Jimmy Alapag, Domingo’s breakout was yet another proof that hard work pays off. “He’s been great for us for a while now and it’s great to see a young kid come in and work hard every day. It’s great see him reap the rewards of his hard work,” he said. For the Filipino-American from New Mexico, his breakout was just him doing anything and everything to help his team win. “I was just being patient, knowing that my time is gonna come. It’s already come now that it’s the playoffs,” he said. He then continued, “I feel like I’ve been playing hard all year and this is just something that comes from playing hard. In the end, I’m just gonna do whatever my team needs me to do.” With Domingo, Balkman, Brownlee, Parks Jr., Urbiztondo, Javelona, and Raymundo all on-point, Alab is indeed proving Heat point guard Akeem Scott’s statement that “they have a deep bench and it’s hard to beat a team like that.” They are going to need to keep proving that if they are to go through defending champion Hong Kong in the semifinals and then a Finals battle up against whoever among top-seed Chong Son of China, upstart Mono of Thailand, or rival Singapore. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 8th, 2018

LOOK: Pinoy sports world celebrates Kobe Bryant s jersey retirement

Even from half the world away, Kobe Bryant's effect in our hoops-crazed nation manifested itself during his jersey retirement with the Los Angeles Lakers. Both his #8 and #24 jersey numbers were hung in the rafters, and for good reason. His career spanned two eras, all defined by himself, and he was able to inspire a LOT of fans during his 20-year career. His legacy, even in the Philippines was made known by some of the popular sports people of the country, as they celebrated the monumental occasion by posting their favorite memory of the one and only Kobe Bryant.     Ang tunay na #lodi at #petmalu 🐍 @kobebryant #mamba #mambamentality #frobe A post shared by Renren Ritualo (@renrenritualo414) on Dec 18, 2017 at 10:20pm PST   🐍 A post shared by Mico Halili (@micohalili) on Dec 18, 2017 at 6:58pm PST Kobe talking to his daughters now about hard work. Can you imagine Kobe being your dad and being your tutor in math? I mean, Kobe as a mamba mentality math tutor at home: natatakot ako just thinking about it. — Mico Halili (@micohalili) December 19, 2017   #MambaDay #ko8e24 24 8vs24 🐍🐍 @kobebryant #ThingsIveLearnedFromKobe A post shared by Chris Newsome (@new11new) on Dec 18, 2017 at 10:15pm PST   Legends are FOREVER...Salute to the Mamba🐍 #MambaMentality A post shared by Jimmy Alapag (@jalapag3) on Dec 19, 2017 at 1:21am PST That #Ko8e24 ceremony made me wna work right nowwww 💪🏽💪🏽💪🏽 — Angeline Gervacio (@dzigervacio) December 19, 2017 My 2 favorite players of all-time. It’s no coincidence that 8 + 24 = 32 #magicmamba #Ko8e24 pic.twitter.com/swFhFMSdYa — Chot Reyes (@coachot) December 19, 2017 That. Was. Awesome. From the cartoon, the voice over, Magic & Jeanie, the unveiling, and eventually Kobe’s messages. Great job, @Lakers! I’m glad @abscbnsports got to show that LIVE 🙂👍🏼 #Ko8e24 — TJ Manotoc (@tjmanotoc) December 19, 2017.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 19th, 2017

NO SURPRISE SUBSTITUTIONS: Jimmy is done playing

With Alab Pilipinas down 15 points and Jimmy Alapag standing in front of the team bench, don't lie and just admit that you thought the Mighty Mouse had a spare jersey underneath his sharp blue suit. Like he was just waiting for the right opportunity to take off his jacket, trade his brown dress shoes for some low-cut Kobes and check in to lead yet another epic comeback. Tanduay Alab Pilipinas head coach Jimmy Alapag says that he could've checked in during his team's eventual 89-92 loss to defending champion Hong Kong in the ABL season-opener Sunday, but he made the right choice and chose not to. That's because he done playing. For good this time. "No, no. You know somewhere deep inside, a little voice might be there saying to check in," Alapag said. "But I'm done playing. I'm completely focused now on helping our team and putting the guys in position to win games," he added. Despite taking a loss on his first game as head coach, Jimmy says that there are a lot of positives for him personally and for his team. He also says that there is a big room for improvement and that starts with the team's preparation for their Nov. 29 home game against Singapore. "Just like the players, they' have to get work at practice and I'll do my part watching video and making sure we're better on the 29th," Alapag said.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017

Excess guards for Gilas five

Kiefer Ravena showed up for practice on Monday, making a total of four point guards vying for spots in the Gilas Pilipinas roster that will play Japan and Chinese Taipei later this month at the start of the Fiba World Cup 2019 Asian Qualifiers. Terrence Romeo also reported for work earlier. Together with Jayson Castro and the improved Kevin Alas in the pool, there will be four point guards that Reyes would have to choose from in time for the clash with the Japanese slated Nov. 24 in Tokyo. But having so many point guards in his squad is not new to Reyes, who took four with him to Seville, Spain, in 2014---Castro, Romeo, Paul Lee and Jimmy Alapag---in the World Cup where the Fil...Keep on reading: Excess guards for Gilas five.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

Players react to Gilas vs. Australia brawl

What was supposed to be a non-bearing FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers meeting between Gilas Pilipinas and Australia ended in infamy, as a massive brawl ultimately put a stop to the game, Monday evening at the Philippine Arena in Bulacan.  With Australia up 31 midway through the third quarter, things got physical between Gilas player RR Pogoy and Australian players Chris Goulding and Daniel Kickert, eventually erupting to a bench-clearing brawl that saw punches, kicks, water bottles, and even chairs get thrown.  Bench-clearing brawl between Gilas and Australia. pic.twitter.com/RotOFNiMgl — Camille B. Naredo (@camillenaredo) July 2, 2018 The incident, of course, became viral almost instantly.  Andrew Bogut, and Australian former NBA player and national team member obviously wasn't pleased with the events that took place.  MAN WTF!!! Disgusting — Andrew Bogut (@andrewbogut) July 2, 2018 Cameras caught a number of Gilas players, led by Marc Pingris, taking a selfie as the officials sorted things out. This didn't sit well with Bogut either.  Blokes taking a team selfie after all that. Down 31. Yep. They really just took a team selfie. — Andrew Bogut (@andrewbogut) July 2, 2018  Being the hosts, it certainly wasn't a good look on the Philippines' part, and a number of former Gilas players and current PBA players expressed their dismay as well.  Embarassing… — Jimmy Alapag (@JAlapag3) July 2, 2018 Roommate!! 😩🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️ — L.A Tenorio (@LA_Tenorio) July 2, 2018 Can’t believe some people are proud of this.... 🤦🏽‍♂️ wrong sport! — Solomon Mercado (@M3rcMyWords) July 2, 2018 Junemar tho... what a beast! And didn’t feel the need to throw one punch or throw any chairs to show his pride. #4timeMVP — Solomon Mercado (@M3rcMyWords) July 2, 2018 Embarrassing!!! — Chris Ross (@cmross6) July 2, 2018 This is unfortunate. — joe devance (@jdv_38) July 2, 2018 Aleast we won the rumble not sure about the game!! — marcus douthit (@DouthitMarcus) July 2, 2018 As a player, what would u do if u are hit or u see ur teammate get hit on the face? U cant just back down. Goes for both 🇵🇭 and 🇦🇺 players. Im not saying that the fight is a good thing. Tough situation really. #GilasPilipinas — Jai Reyes (@jaireyes5) July 2, 2018 This is embarrassing — alex cabagnot (@askcabaggie) July 2, 2018 Congrats .. yall just made shaqtin a fool — alex cabagnot (@askcabaggie) July 2, 2018 Wow man....😔 — Kel Williams (@KelWilliams21) July 2, 2018 Christian Standhardinger, a former Gilas player himself, took to Twitter to stand up for his basketball brothers.  If you attack one of us, you attack all of us! THAT WAS A CHEAP SHOT AGAINST POGOY. I hope nobody got seriously injured. — Chris Standhardinger (@cstandhardinger) July 2, 2018 Wag nalang tayo magmalinis lahat.. kung ikaw yung nasa court at nakita mo yung teammate mo na sadyang sinaktan matutuwa ka?? Isip tayo!! Wag tayo puro embarrasing!! Oo panget tignan masisira name ng bansa pero wag paagarabyado lalo na sarili natin bansa to!! — Ronald Tubid (@ront71) July 2, 2018 Other members of the Philippine basketball community also took to Twitter to share their two cents.  This is not gonna be good for our country in the long run 😕 — Thirdy (@ThirdyRavenaaa) July 2, 2018 😳 — Kib Montalbo (@kibmontalbo) July 2, 2018   It's just so difficult to keep your cool in a crazy situation like that (I probably couldn't) I've always had the highest regard for JMF and Gabe pero lalo pang tumaas ngayon. (And Baser too) — Jason Webb (@Jason_Webb_Phil) July 2, 2018 Even NBA Rookie of the Year runner-up Donovan Mitchell, who was in Manila just a few weeks ago, caught wind of the fiasco. Yo @ThonMaker14 out here tryin hit dudes wit the flying knee😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭 — Donovan Mitchell (@spidadmitchell) July 2, 2018 Thon Maker, a player for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Australian National Team, was seen on camera attempting a flying kick on Gilas guard Terrence Romeo.  Speaking of Romeo, the fan-favorite was unapologetic as he stood up for his Gilas teammates as well.  Dun sa mga kapwa namin players na nag sasabing embarassing kami wala kaming paki alam sa inyo . Kami mag kaka teammate sa loob kailangan namin mag tulungan. Hindi namin pwede pabayaan yung isat isa. Kung embarassing kami sa mata niyo bat di kayo mag convert ng australian. — Terrence Romeo (@tbvromeo) July 2, 2018 Kahit anong sabihin niyo nag lalaro kami para sa isat isa para sa kapwa natin pilipino higit sa lahat para sa bayan. Hindi niyo alam ang sacrifice namin Kung para sainyo mali tulungan namin yung kakampi namin sinasaktan problema niyo na yun basta kami walang iwanan tapos!!! — Terrence Romeo (@tbvromeo) July 2, 2018 In the end, 13 players were ejected, with nine of them coming from Gilas Pilipinas.  The game continued, with Baser Amer, Gabe Norwood, and June Mar Fajardo being the lone Gilas players not to be ejected.  The game waa called eventually, with Australia winning 89-53.  According to FIBA, disciplinary proceedings will be opened and decisions, and most likely sanctions will be handed out in the coming days.  Following the incident that occured in the third quarter of the Philippines-Australia game on Monday in the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2019 Asian Qualifiers, FIBA will now open disciplinary proceedings against both teams. The decision(s) will be communicated in the coming days. — FIBA media (@FIBA_media) July 2, 2018.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 2nd, 2018

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

Rose practicing patience, perspective in the majors

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Justin Rose was coming up on 15 years as a pro and still didn't have a major. What he found was perspective. "Between 30 and 40, that's going to be my opportunity to go really out and get things done," Rose said. "That's 40 major championships. I'm going to create chances with those 40. I'm going to be on leaderboards." More than getting into weekend conditions, however, was realizing that it wasn't always going to work out. It was OK to fail. That was the secret to playing so well under pressure at Merion, where he broke through in the 2013 U.S. Open. "I think what happened to me at Merion, I also realized I'm going to win majors, and I'm also going to lose majors," he said. "You can't skip through your career without one or two slipping through the net. It's a byproduct of being on the leaderboard that those things happen. So I wasn't scared of losing, and that helped me win my first major championship. I wasn't shying away from the pressure of trying to win my first major." Rose had top 10s in the majors, but he didn't have a lot of chances in his 20s. The lone exception was 2007 at the Masters, where he started the final round one shot out of the lead, closed with a 73 and finished three shots back. Since his victory at Merion, he played in the final group at the 2015 Masters and couldn't make up any ground on Jordan Spieth's four-shot lead, and he lost a two-shot lead on the back nine in the 2017 Masters before losing in a playoff to Sergio Garcia. He also started three back on the final day at St. Andrews in 2015. "Ideally in your career, you grasp more than slip away, right?" he said. "But it's a byproduct of being a good player and being on the leaderboard that both things are going to happen." The message applies to Rickie Fowler, who finished one shot behind Patrick Reed at the Masters. Fowler also had a share of the lead on the back nine at Valhalla in the 2014 PGA Championship, and he played in the final group at two majors that same year. A year ago at the U.S. Open, Fowler started the final round two shots behind. "He's creating those opportunities," Rose said. "He played plenty well enough at the Masters that it could have been his year. He will let one or two go in the future. He's going to be on the leaderboard for a long, long time, and I'm sure things are going to line up for him more than once." ___ WEDDING BELLS Rickie Fowler was lugging around something and it was high time he got rid of it. So he asked girlfriend Allison Stokke to marry him while they were on a Long Island beach. "There was nothing planned out," Fowler said Wednesday, four days after he and Stokke, a former track and field athlete at Cal, got engaged. "I just really didn't want to carry the ring around any longer." That comment drew hearty laughter at a news conference for the U.S. Open. "So it worked out perfectly," he added. "We kept things very, very casual. And like I said, I didn't have anything planned out. ... I didn't want to have to keep toting that thing around for that long." Fowler got traditional, getting down on his knees to ask for her hand in marriage. Waves broke against the shore just behind the couple as Fowler's friend and PGA Championship winner Justin Thomas snapped photos. ___ PEBBLES IN THE SAND The USGA has a local rule for Shinnecock Hills in this U.S. Open that allows players to remove stones and pebbles from bunkers without penalty. Phil Mickelson could have used that 14 years ago. Tied for the lead with two holes to play, Mickelson made double bogey from the bunker on the 17th hole and finished two behind Retief Goosen. Mickelson never talked about the bunker shot after his round, but Fred Funk revealed what happened in a 2014 interview. There was a small rock under his ball. "We didn't know the rock was there, but you could hear it," said Funk, who played with Mickelson in the final round. "Phil showed me his pitching wedge. But he never said anything about it (to the media)." Mickelson's shot ran out about 5 or 6 feet above the hole. The bigger problem was running the putt by 4 feet and missing the comebacker. Funk thought small rocks could be removed as long as the player could see it, though the USGA confirmed the local rule was not in effect in 2004. ___ ALL-AMERICAN This year's U.S. Open will be a chance to celebrate the state of golf in the country. Americans hold all four of golf's major trophies for the first time since 2004. Patrick Reed won the Masters this year, joining PGA champion Justin Thomas, British Open champion Jordan Spieth and last year's U.S. Open winner, Brooks Koepka. The last time that happened was 2004, when Phil Mickelson won his first major. At the time, Jim Furyk (U.S. Open), Ben Curtis (British) and Shaun Micheel were the reigning champions. But it's not just the majors. The United States also won the most recent Ryder Cup, Presidents Cup, Solheim Cup and Walker Cup. Rory McIlroy, who hopes to end the streak, attributed it to golf going in cycles. And he said some of the credit goes to Tiger Woods. "European golf was very healthy a few years ago for a long time," he said. "It seemed every major, someone from the island of Ireland turned up to, we were winning it. It doesn't seem that long ago. But the great young players from this country, they're playing well. They have probably a couple of guys, but one in particular that they try to emulate who's back out here playing, and he's become a friend of theirs. "I think that's been a huge part of all this," he said. "A lot of these guys have gotten to know Tiger. And being able to say, 'OK, this is what he does, and we might not be able to achieve everything that he has, but you can at least try to do that.' I think that's been a huge thing for Ryder Cups and Presidents Cups, and them as individuals." ___ AP Sports Writers Barry Wilner and Jimmy Golen contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Knock, knock: Browns there; team set for HBO s Hard Knocks

By Tom Withers, Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) — Ready or not, the Cleveland Browns are getting their close-up. Coming off a historic, dismal 0-16 season, the Browns have been chosen to appear on HBO's popular "Hard Knocks" series that gives NFL fans a behind-the-scenes look at training camp. The Browns have turned down previous opportunities to be on the award-winning series. But with renewed optimism around Cleveland following the recent draft, and the selection of quarterback Baker Mayfield, the team is granting HBO unlimited access to its upcoming camp. Cleveland is the 13th franchise to participate in "Hard Knocks," which began in 2001 with the Baltimore Ravens. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were featured last summer. Although they've won only one game the past two seasons under coach Hue Jackson, the Browns see the show as a possibility to highlight some of their younger players and put a positive spin on their rebuild. And for HBO, Mayfield's quest to win the starting job is just one of several juicy story lines. "NFL Films has always been exceptional at bringing fans closer to the game and they do an outstanding job with every show they produce, including HBO's Hard Knocks," Browns owners Dee and Jimmy Haslam said. "We have been asked multiple times about being featured on Hard Knocks, and we really felt like it was our turn this year and the timing was right. We want to be great partners in this league, and we also recognize Hard Knocks gives fans a special opportunity to learn more about our team and players." HBO's cameras are certain to focus on Mayfield, the brash Heisman Trophy winner from Oklahoma the Browns chose over other quarterbacks. Mayfield is expected to back up Tyrod Taylor this season, but their competition could make for the kind compelling TV that has made the series a must-watch for football junkies. A 30-person film crew will be at the team's training facility in Berea to record more than 2,000 hours of footage for the five-segment series that will debut Aug. 7. The Browns have some good young players who are not well known outside Cleveland. But "Hard Knocks" will give national exposure to budding stars like defensive end Myles Garrett, Mayfield and safety Jabrill Peppers and give the network a chance to tell the well-documented story of former Pro Bowl wide receiver Josh Gordon, who has missed most of the past three seasons because of drug suspensions. Mayfield has experience in front of the cameras. He was recently featured in a recent documentary series as he prepared for the draft, and feels the Browns can make "Hard Knocks" a positive experience. "For me looking at it, and us as a team, I'd say it can be good if you handle it right. I'll just say that," he said on SiriusXM NFL Radio. "If you think about it as a way to get on camera and try to show off and do certain things and handle it the wrong way then that can be very negative, it can be a distraction. But if you use it as a sense of, 'OK, I got to block out everything else and just focus on playing ball,' then that can be a great thing for us." Jackson and Browns defensive coordinator Gregg Williams have both been on "Hard Knocks" — Jackson with the Cincinnati Bengals in 2013 and Williams with the Los Angeles Rams in 2016. "Being able to bring our fans in so they can get to know our players and our organization in a different way will be a huge positive for us," Jackson said. "I want people to see how much our players and coaches care, how hard they work and how badly they want to win for Cleveland. This will be a great opportunity for our team." Browns general manager John Dorsey had reservations about the series, but feels the team is equipped to handle the added scrutiny. "Once we sat down and talked about it as an organization, I feel a lot better and understand why the time is right," said Dorsey, who has been overhauling the team since being hired in December. "Hue and I both feel like this team is in a good place and that we are in the process of building something that will lead to success.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 18th, 2018

Jimmy Alapag credits Norman Black, NBA’s Stevens, Popovich for champion coaching mentality

MANILA, Philippines – For the first time in 5 years, the Philippines is again home to the ASEAN Basketball League (ABL) Championship. This was done largely thanks to Renaldo Balkman, Justin Brownlee, Ray Parks, and of course, the rookie head coach of San Miguel Alab Pilipinas, Jimmy Alapag. In a Rappler Talk, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 15th, 2018

ABL: LA Tenorio had a hand in Alab Pilipinas’ championship

Jimmy Alapag is a champion in his first year as head coach and Alab Pilipinas is a champion in its second season of existence. Overcoming very game Mono Vampire in a Finals series that went the distance, the Filipinos have taken the regional trophy back home for the first time since 2013. That 2013 championship was won by the San Miguel Beermen. And in this 2018 championship, San Miguel played a big part. “Of course, (they came) aboard when things weren’t looking good at the start of the season. Who knows if we would even be here without their support,” Alapag said. The Philippine team’s initial backer withdrew their support after five games, citing differences with Alapag and team owner Charlie Dy. And so, Alab was left without somebody to steer them through the rough seas of the Southeast Asian pay-for-play league. That was until Alapag reached out to a former teammate in the national team – and technically, a former rival. “I could tell you guys now that I reached out to LA Tenorio. He was able to connect (us) to boss Alfrancis [Chua]. It really set off from there,” he shared. As a player, Alapag was a stalwart for both TNT and Meralco. Tenorio, on the other hand, is now Ginebra’s longtime court general. In the end, Tenorio’s assist for Alapag proved to be the turning point for the Filipinos – as the new backer’s entry steadied a rudderless ship. “When you lose your sponsor five games into the season, that’s not ideal. I know Charlie and I looked into each other and said, ‘So now what,’” the latter shared. He then continued, “For them to come on board and support us the way they did, that’s big. All of us deserve (this championship).” Along with that, the always amiable mentor wanted to give thanks to the team’s management and staff for doing what was needed to be done for the title. “I’m just thankful for the guys behind the scenes that a lot of people don’t see,” he said. And for all they have accomplished, especially as it came against all odds, Alapag is nothing but proud. “I’m just really thankful for all our guys. I’m proud of them because there’s nothing like bringing the championship back home,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 10th, 2018

WATCH: Renaldo Balkman owes Jimmy Alapag big time

Much has been said about Renaldo Balkman's pivotal role in scripting San Miguel Alab Pilipinas' ASEAN Basketball League championship story......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 10th, 2018

Brighter days seem to be in store for Knicks, new coach Fizdale

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst There was only one job that made sense for David Fizdale. Despite all the openings for which he interviewed, his pedigree and background -- and, let’s be honest, ambition -- made one gig stand out above the others. And it’s the one he got, with the New York Knicks. New York agreed to a four-year deal with Fizdale last week, a correct pairing of young coach and franchise that is trying to build back up the right way, with an emphasis on defense and conditioning that is right up Fizdale’s alley. No matter the occasional oddity created by working for Jim Dolan, he is an owner who has been willing to spend money when asked, and his team is in the top media market on earth. When you win there, they have parades for you in the Canyon of Heroes, and you almost always wind up in your particular sport’s Hall of Fame. You can’t not take the shot. The Knicks believe they’re in a place where the things Fizdale did in Miami and what he took to Memphis -- his philosophy of culture-building, team-building, discipline and how he connects to players -- were a good fit for where they are as a franchise. Among the 11 candidates the Knicks interviewed for the job, several had more head coaching experience than Fizdale -- whose tenure in Memphis lasted exactly 101 regular season games and six playoff games. But Fizdale checked the most boxes, and at 43, the Knicks are betting he has a lot of growing and improving to do, just as the team does. The Knicks, of course, looked into just why the Grizzlies fired Fizdale so abruptly last season, after just 19 games. Team president Steve Mills and General Manager Scott Perry didn’t just get started in the league last week; they know a lot of people. The chatter around the league was that Memphis chose star center Marc Gasol over Fizdale after the two clashed during the coach’s season-plus there. As I wrote just after Fizdale was fired, the deterioration in their relationship reached the point of no return when Fizdale went after Gasol hard in a film session, basically dismissing the importance of Gasol’s accomplishments overseas, including as a member of the Spanish national team. That that rankled Gasol to no end should have been no surprise to anyone paying attention. The Spanish team’s international triumphs are a point of considerable and understandable pride for both Marc Gasol and his brother, Pau. They helped lead Spain to the greatest era of basketball accomplishment in that country’s history, including a 2006 gold medal at what was then called the FIBA World Championships. Fizdale tried to fix things with Gasol, even flying to Europe after the season to try and make it right. But Gasol was close with majority owner Robert Pera; Fizdale wasn’t. That closed off a potential area of outreach between the two. Gasol had no interest in rapprochement, a stance that Grizzlies players made clear to Fizdale throughout the season. (Caught most in the middle, per league sources, was Grizzlies veteran point guard Mike Conley, Jr., who did and does have strong relationships with both men.) But, importantly, in his discussions with the Knicks, Fizdale took responsibility for his failures with Gasol. He didn’t blame Gasol or anyone else. As one of his chief calling cards is connecting with players, and not finding common ground with Gasol was an L he has to take. “He knew where he messed up and what he’d try to let it never happen again,” said a source who’s spoken with Fizdale since his firing. But, equally importantly, just because Fizdale couldn’t make it work with Gasol doesn’t mean he’s doomed to a similar outcome with All-Star forward Kristaps Porzingis. The 22-year-old’s relationship with the Knicks has been scrutinized within an inch of its life the last couple of years. The toxicity level reached under former president Phil Jackson has abated some, but Porzingis and the team still have some navigation to do -- a trip that is blurred as Porzingis continues rehabbing and recovering from the torn ACL he suffered in February. (Porzingis’s brother, Janis, who serves as his agent, politely declined comment on the Fizdale hire via text Saturday, though the Knicks were in contact with Janis Porzingis during the coaching search.) Porzingis’s injury keeps the Knicks in flux, a position it seems they’ve been in most years since the Nixon administration. He is a potential superstar -- “potential” is used quite deliberately here, as “The Unicorn’s” stans on social media have made a very talented offensive player into something that he is not, at least not yet -- a transcendent player. But, assuming Porzingis ultimately makes a full and healthy return, New York has a terrific building block around which to build. And, they have a chance to really get in the game in the summer of 2019. First, they’ll have to resolve Joakim Noah’s status -- he has two years and roughly $38 million left on his current deal. It’s likely the Knicks will stretch him and the only question is whether that happens before or after next season. If it’s the former, the Knicks can spread the remainder of his salary across five seasons; if the latter, three seasons. Nothing is certain, but it would be surprising to see Noah still in New York by the start of camp. Why saddle a new coach with an old problem? That would leave the Knicks with more flexibility going into ’19, which is when Perry has said he’d like New York to be ready to pounce in free agency -- and when the likes of Kemba Walker, Klay Thompson, Kawhi Leonard (player option) and Jimmy Butler (player option) can be free agents. But until that bridge year, Fizdale will have to max out the existing roster. Charitably, there’s not a lot there at present that’s proven and has led to much winning anywhere. The Knicks will need to be lucky in next week’s Lottery -- preferably, getting a high enough pick to land one of the elite big men that should be among the top four or five picks in the Draft. If that doesn’t happen, the hope in New York is that until the roster improves, Fizdale can develop the talents of the Knicks’ trio of guards -- Frank Ntilikina, Emmanuel Mudiay and Tim Hardaway, Jr. -- in which New York has invested Draft and literal treasure the last couple of seasons. (It will help that Fizdale’s relationship with Hardaway, Jr., goes back to when the latter was a kid and his father, the master of the killer crossover, worked in the Heat organization after Tim Hardaway Sr.’s playing days ended.) The additional hope is that Fizdale will get Ntilikina in elite shape while honing his competitive edge, and that a full season under Fizdale will let the Knicks know once and for all if Mudiay can be a significant contributor. Fizdale will also have to adjust his nomenclature. Last week’s story in the New York Daily News correctly identified Fizdale’s consistent referencing “the Miami Way” as shorthand for how he wanted to do things in Memphis alienated Grizzlies people who were -- again, justifiably -- proud of the “Grit-n’Grind” era that produced seven straight playoff appearances before this season’s 22-60 crater. And, he’ll have to be prepared to be, perhaps, the biggest face of the franchise, in a city whose media is dogged and nonplussed and will often go off cockeyed in a crazy, incorrect direction. But its influence should never be underestimated. Fizdale is from Los Angeles, and he has a great way with most. And it didn’t hurt him to work some for ESPN while he was between jobs. But he’ll have to learn the media landscape in New York quickly -- who to befriend, who to be wary of, who he can trust and who he cannot. (Also: I’m sure the Knicks pointed out to him that while he had several causes which were near and dear to him in Memphis, from advocating the removal of Confederate statues in the city to lending his name to other civic causes, he needs to win games in Gotham first.) At base, the Knicks will want to see players throughout the roster held accountable, and charged to compete on a nightly basis. There was not enough of either last season under coach Jeff Hornacek -- who, in fairness, didn’t have all that much time to put his stamp on what was a poor roster. Fizdale will get more time. The Knicks’ roster will look a lot different in two years than it does now. Fizdale will have to be a lot different coach than he was in Memphis, as well. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 8th, 2018

WATCH: Chot Reyes on triumphant Jimmy Alapag

From one winner coach to another......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 4th, 2018

ABL: Alab Pilipinas has nothing but respect for Mono Vampire

STA. ROSA, LAGUNA – Alab Pilipinas left no doubt in winning the championship of the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League. In complete control all throughout the winner-take-all Game 5 last Wednesday at the Sta. Rosa Multi-Purpose Complex, the Filipinos left Thailand’s Mono Vampire in the dust once and for all. Still, Philippine head coach Jimmy Alapag gave big ups to the Thais. In fact, the first words out of his mouth in his post-win interview was, “First, I’d like to just give my respect to Mono Vampire, coach [Douglas] Marty, and all of the guys there. That was a very, very good team we played against.” He then continued, “It really took one of our best efforts of the season to pull out this win.” Indeed, Mono gave Alab all it can handle – at one point even snatching away homecourt advantage. Looking back at their season, Vampire head coach is nothing but proud. “It was a wonderful ride. I’m so proud of this group,” he told reporters. He then continued, “Naturally, we wanted to win tonight so we’re disappointed, but when we look at the season as a whole and all the times we pulled together, we still had so much success.” And for the always amiable Marty, there was no other team they would rather lose to than Alab. “We want to congratulate Alab because they’re great champions. They are a very good team and they earned that (championship) tonight,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2018

ABL: Just hours after Game 4 loss, Alab already headed home to prepare for Game 5

BANGKOK, THAILAND – Alab Pilipinas won’t be staying long in the place where they fell short of winning the championship in the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League. “We’re outta here tonight,” head coach Jimmy Alapag told reporters after he and the Filipino team surrendered an 83-88 decision to Mono Vampire in Game 4 of the Finals on Monday at the Stadium 29 here. With that decision, the best-of-five championship series is now all even at 2-2. The winner-take-all Game 5 is then scheduled on Wednesday at the Sta. Rosa Multi-Purpose Complex Arena in Laguna. The Philippines is wasting no time in getting ready for that do-or-die matchup – as after Game 5, they will only be going back to their hotels to get their things and check out. Right after, they are boarding a plane back to Manila. For Alab, there is no other concern other than that Game 5. “Just on to Game 5. We (wanted to go to) Thailand and get a split. We got a split,” Alapag said. He then continued, “Now, we got Game 5 at home.” Indeed, before travelling to Bangkok, the head coach said their primary objective is to “get one in Thailand.” The Filipinos already did that two days ago and Game 4 was just one of their two golden opportunities to win their country’s first title since 2013. And so, even after losing Game 4, they have another shot at a championship – and homecourt advantage is in their favor. That is exactly why the Philippines has remained upbeat about its chances. As local standout Ray Parks Jr. put it, “We just gotta stay positive and let this one go. we came here to get a split and we got the job done.” He then continued, “It’s just (now about) coming home and getting the championship in our home.” As always, Game 5, tipping off at 8:00 PM, will be on S+A, S+A HD, and livestream. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 30th, 2018

ABL: Paul Zamar hit a dagger right through the hearts of Filipinos

BANGKOK, THAILAND – As if the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League Finals needed even more of it, Ray Parks Jr. and Paul Zamar have even more evidence to prove just how equally matched Alab Pilipinas and Mono Vampire are. In Game 4 on Saturday, Zamar swished a floater over the outstretched arms of Parks Jr. to put out the fire in Alab’s comeback and push Mono to an 88-83 win. This, coming from two days earlier when Parks Jr. hit a fadeaway jumper over the outstretched arms of Zamar to keep Mono at bay and claim for Alab a 99-93 win. Filipino head coach Jimmy Alapag could only marvel at the parallelism of those shots. “Down the stretch, Zamar hit a big one-legged shot similar to Ray’s the other night. That was a big shot,” he told reporters. For Zamar, his clutch shot wasn’t answer to Parks Jr.’s clutch shot. “I didn’t look at it as redemption. I looked at is as survival because our season was on the line,” he said. Indeed, the Thais needed to win Game 4 to level the best-of-five championship series at 2-2 and schedule a winner-take-all Game 5. Good thing then that their Filipino import came through with, in his own eyes, one of the biggest shots of his career. “Coach was stressing before the game that it’s not gonna be easy so we have to find other ways to win. We pushed especially in the end when we needed it the most the most,” he said. In the end, staying true to how he has long known to be, Zamar remained modest and deflected all credit to his teammates. “That clutch shot, it’s team effort that gave me the opportunity. We were trading blows with them (Alab) and I made it,” he said. He then continued, “I’m thankful and relieved I made it.” Zamar and Mono Vampire hope for the same result when they travel to the Philippines for Game 5 on Wednesday at the Sta. Rosa Multi-Purpose Complex in Laguna. That final showdown of the season tips off at 8:00 PM and will be on S+A, S+A HD, and livestream. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 30th, 2018

ABL: Justin Brownlee dropped 27 points and he wasn’t even supposed to play

BANGKOK, THAILAND – Three days after dropping Game 2 of the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League Finals at home, Alab Pilipinas bounced right back with a well-earned win on Mono Vampire’s soil. Ray Parks Jr. scored 30 points, eight coming in the last three minutes; Renaldo Balkman remained a force with 24 points, 16 rebounds, seven assists, four steals, and two blocks; and Justin Brownlee posted his own 27-point, 12-rebound double-double despite not being 100 percent on Saturday at the Stadium 29 here. “I’ve said a lot this season, but I’m just really proud of these guys. They’re been a resilient group throughout and tonight was just another opportunity to show that,” head coach Jimmy Alapag told reporters after the Filipinos moved one win away from the country’s first championship since 2013. That resilience couldn’t be more evident than in Brownlee who was a game-time decision for this one because of the leg injury he suffered in Game 2. Then, he was forced to the bench near the end of the third quarter and missed the majority of the final frame. In Game 3, though, it didn’t look like he was injured at all. “Justin wasn’t 100 percent. I really don’t have any explanation to describe what type of player and person he is,” Alapag said. As it turns out, the American reinforcement wasn’t even supposed to play so that he could nurse himself back to full strength. “Honestly, my plan wasn’t to play him, but he came up to me and said he was ready to go. I didn’t really have any intention to play him,” the Philippine mentor shared. He then continued, “38 minutes later, he had 27 points, 12 rebounds, and seven assists.” Looks like Brownlee has indeed gotten the heart of the Filipino – giving his best no matter what. Of course, he also had help to do so. As Alapag put it, “I want to give credit to [conditioning] coach Chappy [Callanta]. They were really working on Justin non-stop the last 48 hours.” In the end, Alab’s reinforcements have yet again proven why their team is on the brink of a title. “Talking about Balk and Justin, they are just two winners,” their head coach expressed. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 28th, 2018