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ISIS claims London terror attacks that killed 7; police arrest 12 in raids – Fox News

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the latest London terror attack through its propaganda wing Amaq News Agency, the SITE intelligence group reported Sunday. The terror network reportedly claimed a &'8220;detachment&'8221; of its fighters crashed a rented van into a crowd of people on London Bridge before going on a stabbing rampage Saturday night, killing seven people and wounding nearly 50 others. However, ISIS gave no evidence to back up its claim. Earlier on Sunday, British Prime Minister Theresa May condemned the “evil ideology” behind the London attacks. May addressed the attacks Sunday after a meeting of the government’s COBRA emergency committee. She called for a tougher stance against extremists and tougher controls on cyberspace to prevent its use by extremists. She said the measures were needed because “terrorism breeds terrorism” and attackers copy each other. Counterterrorism police carried out raids in east London and arrested 12 people in connection with the attacks. &'8220;Searches of a number of addresses in Barking are continuing,&'8221; London Metro Police said as the raids were being conducted. The homes raided included one belonging to one of the three terrorists who carried out the attacks, Sky News reported. &'8220;He's lived here for about three years,&'8221; neighbor Damien Pettit said. &'8220;He's one of our neighbors. I've said hello in passing more than 50, 60 occasions. He has two young kids. He was a very nice guy.&'8221; ISIS has claimed responsibility for a series of attacks in recent years &'8212; but police have pushed back in some instances. The terror network announced it was behind the deadly attack on a casino and shopping complex in the Philippines last Friday &'8212; but Manila police said the killer was a Filipino gambling addict heavily in debt, with no terror links. Saturday’s horror began around 10 p.m. local time when a white van veered off the road and barreled into pedestrians on London Bridge. The van’s three occupants then jumped out with large knives and attacked people at bars and restaurants in nearby Borough Market, police said. Elizabeth O’Neill said her son was stabbed in the stomach by a man who approached him and yelled “this is for Islam.” Daniel O’Neill, 23, suffered a 7-inch knife wound, she said, according to Sky News. He was recovering. &'8220;He had just stepped outside the bar for a second and a man ran up to him and said 'this is for my family, this is for Islam' and stuck a knife straight in him,” the mother said. Gerard Vowles, 47, told local media that he saw the three attackers stabbing a woman at the south end of London Bridge. He said he threw chairs, glasses and bottles at the attackers in a bid to stop them. &'8220;They went 'this is for Allah' and then they just started stabbing her multiple times,” he told Sky News. The Guardian quoted Vowles as saying, “They kept coming to try to stab me. They were stabbing everyone. Evil, evil people.” He added, according to the paper, &'8220;I want to know if this girl is still alive. I've been walking around for an hour and a half crying my eyes out. I don't know what to do.&'8221; Brad Myers, an American vacationing in London, told “Fox &'38; Friends” Sunday that he had just taken some pictures and was about to walk along the Thames River when he heard a noise. “Then I saw the van come on to the pavement and continue along the side of the road just right where I was a few moments before, just mowing down pedestrians,” he said. “Everyone was in shock,” he said. What he saw reminded him of the truck attack in Nice, France. “It’s crazy to think I was right there,” Myers said. Eight police officers killed the attackers after arriving on the scene within eight minutes. The officers fired 50 shots, London's assistant police commissioner Mark Rowley said at a press briefing Sunday, calling the number unprecedented. One of the bullets struck an innocent bystander. The person was recovering in a hospital. Rowley said that the officers had no choice. &'8220;The situation these officers were confronted with was critical &'' a matter of life and death &'' three armed men, wearing what appeared to be suicide belts, had already attacked and killed members of the public and had to be stopped immediately,&'8221; he said. It turned out the suicide belts were fake. Rowley said the van had been rented recently by one of the attackers. May said 48 people were injured and many had life-threatening injuries. Thirty-six remained hospitalized Sunday. A courageous cop was one of the wounded. He confronted the three knife-wielding terrorists armed only with a baton. He was stabbed in the face, head and a leg. He was in stable condition. British Transport Police Chief Constable Paul Crowther said of the officer that &'8220;it became clear that he showed enormous courage in the face of danger.&'8221; Crowther added that &'8220;for an officer who only joined us less than two years ago, the bravery he showed was outstanding and makes me extremely proud.&'8221; Those killed included a Canadian and a French national. May said the Thursday's national election would be held as scheduled because &'8220;violence can never be allowed to disrupt the democratic process.&'8221; Major parties suspended national campaigning Sunday out of respect for the victims. Speaking to Fox News from London, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said the latest [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource: mindanaoexaminer mindanaoexaminerJun 5th, 2017

ISIS claims responsibility for Palm Sunday church bombings in Egypt – CNN News

Egypt's President says he will declare a state of emergency after two deadly bombings targeted Coptic Christian churches on Palm Sunday. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attacks, which were aimed at a vulnerable religious minority on one of the most important days on the Christian calendar. The death toll rose to at least 49 Monday, state media reported. At least 27 people died in a blast inside a church in the northern city of Tanta, and 78 people were injured, according to Egypt's state-run news agency Al-Ahram. In Alexandria, 18 civilians and four police officers were killed when a suicide bomber blew himself up outside a Coptic church, Al-Ahram said. Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi declared three days of nationwide mourning following the bombings and said a three-month state of emergency would come into force once legal and constitutional measures have been completed. In response to the attacks, the country will also form a supreme council to counter terrorism and extremism, Sisi said on state television Sunday after an emergency meeting of the country's National Defense Council. &'8220;We have to pay attention because of Egypt and Egypt's future. We know this is a big sacrifice but we are capable of facing it,&'8221; he said. &'8220;The attack will not undermine the resolve and true will of the Egyptian people to counter the forces of evil, but will only harden their determination to move forward on their trajectory to realize security, stability and comprehensive development,&'8221; the President said in a statement. In a statement issued on the Telegram messaging platform and circulated by several ISIS supporters, the militant group identified the bombers as Egyptian nationals. Egyptian authorities have not confirmed the bombers' nationalities. ISIS warned of more attacks in its statement. &'8220;The Crusaders and their apostate followers must be aware that the bill between us and them is very large, and they will be paying it like a river of blood from their sons, if God is willing,&'8221; the group said in Arabic. The bombings came on the Sunday before Easter, the day that marks the start of Holy Week for Christians. The first blast ripped through a Palm Sunday service at St. George's Church in Tanta, killing at least 27 and wounding 78 others, state TV reported. An explosive device had been planted under a seat in the main prayer hall, it said. News footage from Tanta showed people gathering at the church, singing hymns. The video then quickly switched to bars as harrowing screams and cries echo in the background. &'8220;Everything is destroyed inside the church,&'8221; said Peter Kamel, who saw the aftermath of the bombing. Its marble pillars were covered with blood, he said. Kamel said that most of the injured appeared to be priests and members of the choir. Not long afterward, a suicide bomber attacked outside St. Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in Alexandria, according to state news outlets. &'8220;Everything is destroyed inside the church,&'8221; said Peter Kamel, who saw the aftermath of the bombing. Its marble pillars were covered with blood, he said. Kamel said that most of the injured appeared to be priests and members of the choir. Not long afterward, a suicide bomber attacked outside St. Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in Alexandria, according to state news outlets. Police officers who had been posted outside the church stopped a man wearing an explosive belt from entering the church, the Interior Ministry said. Two of those officers, a man and a woman, were killed, along with civilians and other police staff. Egyptian blogger Maged Butter said he saw five or six ambulances and bloodstains 100 meters away from the site of the explosion, which happened near the church gate. He said women were crying and looking for their loved ones and were yelling at police for &'8220;not protecting&'8221; them. &'8220;Every now and then, I see a person crying &'8212; I think they are Christian &'8212; and they keep saying: 'have you seen my family? Have you seen my family?'&'8221; Butter said. Nile and Masriya TV, Egyptian state outlets, aired black banners in the upper left of their newscasts to signify mourning for the victims of both explosions. Fadi Sami heard about the Tanta bombing as he sat in the Alexandria cathedral on Sunday. The head of Egypt's Coptic Church, Pope Tawadros II, was leading Palm Sunday prayers. Though no one announced the Tanta news, Sami said he could hear the sadness in the pope's voice. He left as the pope finished the sermon. Twenty minutes later, a suicide bomber blew himself up at the gate of the church. &'8220;I came back and the area was covered in smoke. The stores around the church were all destroyed,&'8221; he said. &'8220;There were bodies and body parts everywhere, outside and inside the gate. I saw a man put together what was left of his son in a bag.&'8221; Alexandria sits on the Mediterranean and has a large Christian population. Downtown is usually busy but was relatively quiet on Sunday because of the holiday. &'8220;Thank God it is a Sunday, and many shops are closed,&'8221; Butter said. David Saeed said he was sitting in the last row in the church when the bomb went off. &'8220;We were just singing and suddenly in a blink of (an) eye, smoke, fire everywhere. I didn't realize what's happening until I saw blood and organs of our friends scattered over the ground,&'8221; Saeed told CNN. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 10th, 2017

5 dead in vehicle, knife attack at British Parliament – The Japan News

A knife-wielding man went on a deadly rampage in the heart of Britain’s seat of power Wednesday, plowing a car into pedestrians on London’s Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer to death inside the gates of Parliament. Five people were killed, including the assailant, and 40 others were injured in what Prime Minister Theresa May condemned as a “sick and depraved terrorist attack.” Lawmakers, lords, staff and visitors were locked down after the man was shot by police within the perimeter of Parliament, just meters from entrances to the building itself and in the shadow of the iconic Big Ben clock tower. He died, as did three pedestrians on the bridge, and the police officer. A doctor who treated the wounded from the bridge said some had “catastrophic” injuries. Three police officers, several French teenagers on a school trip, two Romanian tourists and five South Korean visitors were among the injured. Police said they were treating the attack as terrorism. There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Metropolitan Police counterterrorism chief Mark Rowley said police believed there was only one attacker, “but it would be foolish to be overconfident early on.” He said an unarmed policeman, three civilians and the attacker died. Forty others, including three police officers, were injured. Islamic extremism was suspected in the attack, Rowley said, adding that authorities believe they know the assailant’s identity but would not reveal it while the investigation was ongoing. The threat level for international terrorism in the U.K. was already listed at severe, meaning an attack was “highly likely.” Speaking outside 10 Downing St. after chairing a meeting of government’s emergency committee, COBRA, May said that level would not change. She said attempts to defeat British values of democracy and freedom through terrorism would fail. “Tomorrow morning, Parliament will meet as normal,” she said. Londoners and visitors “will all move forward together, never giving in to terror and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart.” U.S. President Donald Trump was among world leaders offering condolences, and in Paris, the lights of the Eiffel Tower were to be dimmed in solidarity with London. London has been a target for terrorism many times over past decades. Just this weekend, hundreds of armed police took part in an exercise simulating a “marauding” terrorist attack on the River Thames. Wednesday was the anniversary of suicide bombings in the Brussels airport and subway that killed 32 people last year, and the latest events echoed recent vehicle attacks in Berlin and Nice, France. In the House of Commons, legislators were holding a series of votes on pensions when deputy Speaker Lindsay Hoyle announced that the sitting was being suspended and told lawmakers not to leave. Parliament was locked down for several hours, and the adjoining Westminster subway station was shuttered. Conservative lawmaker Tobias Ellwood, whose brother was killed in the Bali terror attack in 2002, performed first aid on the wounded police officer, who later died. About 10 yards away lay the assailant. “I tried to stem the flow of blood and give mouth to mouth while waiting for the medics to arrive but I think he had lost too much blood,” Ellwood said. “He had multiple wounds, under the arm and in the back.” The attack began early Wednesday afternoon as a driver in a gray SUV slammed into pedestrians on the bridge linking Parliament to the south bank of the River Thames. Former Polish foreign minister Radek Sikorski was in a car crossing the bridge when he heard “something like a car hitting metal sheet” and then saw people lying on the pavement. “I saw one person who gave no signs of life. One man was bleeding from his head. I saw five people who were at least seriously injured,” Sikorski told Poland’s TVN24. Ambulances arrived within minutes to treat people who lay scattered along the length of the bridge. One bloodied woman lay surrounded by a scattering of postcards. Police said one injured woman was pulled from the river. The car crashed into railings on the north side of the bridge, less than 200 meters from the entrance to Parliament. As people scattered in panic, witnesses saw a man holding a knife run toward the building. “The whole crowd just surged around the corner by the gates just opposite Big Ben,” said witness Rick Longley. “A guy came past my right shoulder with a big knife and just started plunging it into the policeman. I have never seen anything like that. I just can’t believe what I just saw.” The attacker managed to get past a gate into Parliament’s fenced-in New Palace Yard, a cobbled courtyard in the shadow of the Big Ben clock tower. Daily Mail journalist Quentin Letts said a man in black attacked the police officer before being shot two or three times as he tried to storm into the building. “As this attacker was running towards the entrance two plain-clothed guys with guns shouted at him what sounded like a warning, he ignored it and they shot two or three times and he fell,” Letts told the BBC. The attacker fell to the cobbles just yards from the entrance to 1,000-year-old Westminster Hall, the oldest part of the parliamentary complex, busy with visitors and school groups. Beyond that, a corridor leads to the building’s Central Lobby, flanked by House of Commons and House of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2017

Israel in uproar over Argentina pre-World Cup friendly snub

By Aron Heller, Associated Press JERUSALEM (AP) — The sports-crazed nation of Israel was in uproar Wednesday over Argentina's abrupt cancellation of a World Cup warmup match following pro-Palestinian protests, with some of the country's leaders accusing Lionel Messi and his teammates of caving to terrorism. Israel was eagerly awaiting the sold-out international friendly scheduled for Saturday night at Jerusalem's Teddy Kollek Stadium and the arrival of some of the world's best players. Argentina is one of the most popular national teams among Israelis and fans had been scrambling to get a chance to see Messi in person. But after a fierce Palestinian campaign, which included images of Argentina's white and sky-blue striped jersey stained with red paint resembling blood and threats to burn Messi posters, Argentina's football federation announced it was skipping the event. Claudio Tapia, president of the Argentine Football Association, apologized for cancelling the match but said the safety of the players was at stake. "What has happened in the last 72 hours, the actions, the threats that have occurred have led us to take the decision not to travel," he said during a news conference in Barcelona, where the Argentine team is training prior to the start of the World Cup next week. "(We) apologize to the Israeli community. It's nothing against the Israeli community, the Jewish community and I would like everyone to take this decision as a contribution to world peace," he said. "In the end, they've done the right thing, and this is behind us," Argentina striker Gonzalo Higuain told ESPN. "Health and common sense come first. We felt that it wasn't right to go." Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Argentine President Mauricio Macri and urged him to intervene, to no avail. Later Wednesday, Israel's Sports Ministry said a "negotiation" about the match was underway, perhaps in hopes of salvaging it, but gave no further details. "It's unfortunate the soccer knights of Argentina did not withstand the pressure of the Israeli-hating inciters, whose only goal is to harm our basic right to self-defense and bring about the destruction of Israel," said Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman. "We will not yield before a pack of anti-Semitic terrorist supporters." The head of the Palestinian football association, Jibril Rajoub, had called on Arab soccer fans to burn Messi posters and T-shirts if he participated. He has long tried to get soccer's world governing body, FIFA, and the International Olympic Committee to impose sanctions against Israel. Rajoub believes Israel should be punished for restricting movement of Palestinian players, and for forming teams in West Bank settlements. Rajoub had also objected to holding the match in Jerusalem, whose eastern sector the Palestinians claim as their capital. Although the Kollek stadium is in west Jerusalem, it is located in a neighborhood built where a Palestinian village once stood before it was destroyed in the war surrounding Israel's independence in 1948. Following the move, he held a press conference in Ramallah featuring a picture of him with Messi and a sign reading: "From Palestine, thank you Messi." Rajoub had accused Israel of playing politics with the game, by moving it from its original location in Haifa to Jerusalem, and by trying to link it to celebrations surrounding Israel's 70th anniversary. He called it a victory for "ethics and values" of sports. "They tried to use sport as a tool for political ends, and for this I think, they failed," Rajoub said. Israeli President Reuven Rivlin said it was a sad morning for Israeli sports fans, including his own grandchildren. "But there are values that are greater than even Messi. The politicization of the Argentinean move worries me greatly," he said. Opposition figures, however, accused Israel's headline-seeking sports minister Miri Regev of bringing on the politicization of the sporting event by insisting on moving the game from Haifa to contested Jerusalem and by trying to orchestrate a politicized photo-op with Messi. Israel captured east Jerusalem in the 1967 Mideast war and annexed the area in a move that is not internationally recognized. Israel considers the entire city to be its capital, while the Palestinians seek east Jerusalem as the capital of a future state. Regev rejected the backlash at a press conference Wednesday evening saying "there is no bigger lie" than claims her decision to hold the match in Jerusalem aided in its cancellation. She said the Argentinians had not objected and that Messi himself had wanted to visit sacred Christian and Jewish sites in the holy city. Regev said the match was canceled following "threats by terror elements sent to Messi and his family and to other players." Opposition leader Isaac Herzog called the snub a "spectacular own goal" by Regev that delivered victory to boycotters of the Jewish State. Labor Party leader Avi Gabbay called for a police investigation into Regev's "corrupt conduct." "We just absorbed a shot in the face. This is not just sports," he tweeted. "This, unfortunately, could start an international tsunami." Regev claimed that "terrorist" groups had made threats against Argentina's players and their families, sending them images of dead children, though she gave no further evidence. She accused members of the Israeli parliament, or Knesset, of backing the boycott advocates. "Unfortunately, we have Trojan Horses in the Knesset who give headwind to terrorism," she said. The Palestinian militant Islamic group Hamas praised Argentina for canceling the game. Spokesman Husam Badran said Hamas "applauds" the move and reiterated its position that rejects "all forms of normalization" with the Jewish state. A senior official at the Argentine Football Federation said the national team decided to call off the match with Israel after receiving threats from Hamas. The official, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity due to safety concerns, did not provide evidence or details of the alleged threats. A Hamas official mocked reports that the group had threatened the players, calling them unrealistic, and saying they don't deserve a comment. The Hamas official was not authorized to comment in the issue and also spoke on condition of anonymity. Hamas is sworn to Israel's destruction and has ruled Gaza with an iron fist since it took over the territory in 2007. Israel and the United States consider it a terror organization for its bombings, shooting and rocket attacks targeting civilians. Israel has largely fended off the boycott campaign with only a small number of artists and organizations shunning the country. Argentina's snubbing would appear to be the boycott movement's greatest achievement thus far. The grassroots movement advocates boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel in what supporters say is a way to promote Palestinian rights through nonviolent means. Israel says the campaign goes beyond Israeli occupation of lands claimed by the Palestinians and masks a deeper aim of delegitimizing or even destroying the country. It has formed a government ministry whose primary mission is to combat the boycott movement. The Argentinean move, which featured on the front pages of all the major Israeli dailies, raised fears that it could serve as a template for future boycotts of Jerusalem, most notably next year's scheduled hosting of the popular Eurovision song contest. The Palestinians celebrated the cancellation as a major triumph. Israeli organizers said an offer had been floated to have the game played in Barcelona instead, but it was highly unlikely. "I think sports should never be involved with politics," said Shahaf Ashraga, a fan in Jerusalem. "It just makes me sad to think that the game has to be canceled because of the Palestinian pressure." Argentina opens its Group D campaign in Russia against Iceland on June 16. It then plays Croatia on June 21 and Nigeria on June 26. It is unclear whether Argentina will play another warmup, or if it will arrive in Moscow ahead of schedule. ___ Associated Press writers Debora Rey and Victor Caivano in Buenos Aires, Argentina, contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2018

Terror attack on London Bridge leaves 6 dead; police shoot 3

LONDON — Terror struck at the heart of London on Saturday night as attackers killed six people in a series of vehicle and knife attacks before police shot th.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 4th, 2017

Inside Indonesia’s LGBT crackdown – BBC News

In less than 18 months, being gay in Indonesia has gone from widely tolerated to just plain dangerous. An unprecedented wave of police raids, vigilante attacks, and calls for the criminalization of homosexual sex have left many in the country's LGBT community fearing for their safety. &'8220;(Gay Indonesians) are exhausted and they're horrified,&'8221; Kyle Knight, a Human Rights Watch researcher with the LGBT rights program, told CNN. &'8220;Even the activists I know who started the very first organizations in the 1980s say they've never seen anything like this.&'8221; It's a dark turn for a country that for decades prided itself on its diverse, heterogeneous society. The world's largest Muslim democracy, Indonesia is often considered something of a bulwark of tolerance amid growing conservatism elsewhere in the Islamic world. But that perception is now shifting, amid increasing verbal attacks on minority groups and the growing implementation of Islamic bylaws by regional governments. In less than two weeks, two young men were seized by vigilantes who burst into their home in Aceh province, then taken to authorities who caned them for having homosexual sex. In a separate incident, later in the month, attendees at an alleged gay party in a Jakarta sauna were arrested and images of their faces were disseminated online by Indonesian police. Homosexual sex is not illegal in the majority of Indonesia, except in the extremely conservative province of Aceh. Jakarta is not part of any province; it is controlled by the central government. One week ago, West Java Police Chief Anton Charliyan announced that he would create a special taskforce to crack down on LGBT people. &'8220;They will face the law and heavy social sanctions. They will not be accepted by society,&'8221; he said. It wasn't always this way. Despite being a Muslim-majority country, only small parts of Indonesia — such as Aceh province — follow strict Islamic law. Same-sex relations have never been illegal either, even if a 2013 Pew survey found that 93% of the country refused to accept homosexuality. Jonta Saragih a former LGBT activist from Sumatra, now studying in the UK, said while his family weren't quick to accept him when he came out, Indonesians used to have a live and let live attitude to their country's LGBT population. &'8220;[Even] a few years ago, when I was in Jakarta, though homosexuality was not recognized by the law, there was no one talking about it,&'8221; he told CNN. Indonesian human rights activist Tunggal Pawestricorroborates this notion that homosexuality was previously frowned upon but tolerated. &'8220;Since my childhood I was told that LGBT people are sinful, being a homosexual is sinful but of course &' it doesn't mean you have to criminalize them,&'8221; she said. So what changed? The problems began in early 2016, when a number of high-profile Indonesian politicians, including several government ministers, suddenly started to make unprompted attacks on Indonesia's LGBT community. Among them was the Defense Minister, Ryamizard Ryacudu, who said Indonesia's LGBT movement was more dangerous than &'8220;a nuclear war.&'8221; &'8220;In a nuclear war, if a bomb is dropped over Jakarta, Semarang will not be affected &'8212; but (with LGBT rights) everything we know could disappear in an instant &'8212; it's dangerous,&'8221; he said, according to the state Antara news agency. Soon, the country's medical professionals joined in. The Indonesian Psychiatrists Association issued a statement in February saying people who were gay or bisexual had &'8220;psychiatric problems.&'8220; By August, a group of conservative activists had taken a case to the Constitutional Court to call for homosexual sex to be made illegal in Indonesia. Knight said it's hard to tell why the sudden wave of anti-LGBT feeling swelled up across the country, but where it was heading appeared much clearer. &'8220;This is fueled not just by bigotry and misunderstanding but by public officials &' I think that's the really scary thing as we go forward. It's fair game to go after LGBT people in Indonesia,&'8221; he said. More than a dozen gay dating apps, including Grindr, were banned in Indonesia in late 2016, Jonta said, making it harder for gay men and women to communicate with each other. &'8220;(I have) some good friends &' we started discussing these issues on social media, eventually some of them deleted me on Facebook. They said we are not friends anymore,&'8221; Jonta said. Conservative Islam is a growing political force in Indonesia. The arrest and later conviction of former Jakarta governor Basuki 'Ahok' Tjahaja Purnama in April this year, on charges of blasphemy, followedhuge protests instigated by conservative groups. Pawestri blamed vocally conservative politicians and an &'8220;irresponsible&'8221; media for the rise in anti-LGBT rhetoric. &'8220;Before LGBT Indonesians had quite a lot of confidence, now they're very careful and cry to me, calling me at night. We've been trying to do whatever we can to avoid (criminalization),&'8221; Pawestri said. Criminalization might be closer than most would expect. Since August, a team of lawyers has been arguing in Indonesia's Constitutional Court, on behalf of 12 individuals, to change the criminal code. Prosecution legal team spokesman, Feizal Syahmenan, told CNN they would like three articles changed in the criminal code &'8212; one to outlaw sex outside of marriage, one to outlaw homosexual rape and one to outlaw homosexual sex entirely. Two of those 12 individuals are members of the AILA, the Family Love Alliance, a prominent conservative Islamic group. Syahmenan told CNN homosexuality is just not Indonesian. &'8220;All of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 1st, 2017

May to tackle Trump over ‘evidence’ leaks – BBC News

Theresa May is to raise concerns with Donald Trump after evidence from the Manchester Arena bombing was apparently leaked to US media. UK officials were &'8220;furious&'8221; when photos appearing to show debris from the attack appeared in the New York Times. Monday night's attack at Manchester Arena killed 22 people &'' including children &'' and injured 64. Eight men are now in custody following the attack, carried out by suicide bomber Salman Abedi. The prime minister is expected to raise the issue of the leak with the US president when they meet at a Nato summit later. Details about Abedi's identity had already emerged in the US media less than 24 hours after the explosion and against the UK's wishes. Home Secretary Amber Rudd said she was &'8220;irritated&'8221; by the disclosure of Abedi's identity and had warned Washington &'8220;it should not happen again&'8221;. However, the pictures of debris &'' which appear to show bloodstained fragments from the bomb and the backpack used to conceal it &'' were subsequently leaked to the New York Times, prompting a furious response from within Whitehall and from UK police chiefs. BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera says UK officials believe that US law enforcement rather than the White House is the likely culprit for the leaks. The meeting between Mrs May and Mr Trump, at a Nato summit in Brussels, will take place as British police continue to investigate an alleged &'8220;network&'8221; linked to Abedi. Early on Thursday morning, detectives carried out a controlled explosion as they searched a property in the Moss Side area of Manchester. Two men were also arrested following a search of an address in the Withington area of Greater Manchester. In total, eight men, including Abedi's older brother, and a woman have been arrested in a series of raids across Manchester, Wigan and Nuneaton. The woman was subsequently released without charge in the early hours of Thursday. Meanwhile, Abedi's father and a younger brother have been detained by militia in Libya. A Whitehall source described the second US leak as &'8220;on another level&'8221;, and told the BBC it had caused &'8220;disbelief and astonishment&'8221; across the British government. The source said the the issue was &'8220;being raised at every relevant level by the British authorities with their US counterparts&'8221;. The UK's National Police Chiefs' Council described the &'8220;unauthorised disclosure&'8221; as a breach of trust which had potentially undermined a &'8220;major counter-terrorism investigation&'8221;. Counter-terrorism detectives have spoken in the past about how important it sometimes is the names of suspects do not make it into the media. A delay of around 36 hours, before the public know who they are investigating, can allow them to arrest known associates of the suspect before they know police are looking for them. Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said the leaks had worried him &'8220;greatly,&'8221; and he had raised them with the US ambassador. Mr Burnham told Newsnight a decision had been taken to adopt a &'8220;cautious approach&'8221; to making information public, &'8220;and yet the first reports were coming seemingly out of the United States&'8221;. Abedi's identity was first reported in the US &'' with American TV networks CBS and NBC naming him as the suspect. In other developments, the government has announced that a minute's silence will be held at 11:00 BST on Thursday in remembrance of those who lost their lives or were affected by the attack. The Conservatives and Labour are to resume local general election campaigning on Thursday, and national campaigning on Friday. Eight men and one woman have been arrested in the UK since Monday night, including Abedi's older brother Ismail, 23, although the woman has since been released. Younger brother Hashem, 20, was held by militia in the Libyan capital Tripoli, as was their father. Speaking on Wednesday afternoon, Greater Manchester Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said: &'8220;I think it's very clear that this is a network that we are investigating. &'8220;And as I've said, it continues at a pace. There's extensive investigations going on and activity taking place across Greater Manchester, as we speak.&'8221; As part of their investigation, police raided a block of flats near Manchester Piccadilly station in the city centre, requiring them to carry out a controlled explosion and briefly close the railway line. Police carried out another controlled explosion in the early hours of Thursday morning at an address in the Moss Side area of Manchester. Some of the victims had been making their way outside at the end of the gig when Abedi detonated his &'8220;nuts-and-bolts&'8221; bomb. Others had been waiting in the foyer to pick up children and family. A serving Cheshire police officer &'' off-duty at the time &'' was among those killed. She has not yet been named. The victims include 14-year-old Sorrell Leczkowski, from Leeds, whose grandmother is critically injured in hospital. Others who died are mother-of-three Michelle Kiss, Nell Jones, 14, eight-year-oldSaffie Roussos, Alison Howe, Lisa Lees, Jane Tweddle-Taylor, 51, Martyn Hett, 29, and Olivia Campbell, 15. Kelly Brewster, 32, John Atkinson, 28, Georgina Callander &'' thought to be 18 &'' and Marcin and Angelika Klis, a Polish couple from York, have also been named. South Shields couple Chloe Rutherford, 17, and Liam Curry, 19 have been named among the dead. Family members paid tribute to the teenagers and in a statement issued by police said: &'8220;They wanted to be together forever and now they are.&'8221; Of the 64 injured, [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMay 29th, 2017

The World: British police arrest 7 in probe into terror attack

LONDON -- British police have arrested seven people in the investigation into an attacker who killed three people and injured about 40 before being shot to death by police, Britain's most senior counter-terrorism officer said on Thursday......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2017

Aaron Driver, ISIS sympathizer under peace bond, killed by police responding to terror threat – CBC News

Aaron Driver, ISIS sympathizer under peace bond, killed by police responding to terror threat – CBC News.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsAug 11th, 2016

With flags, song, pride, French celebrate unifying victory

By Elaine Ganley, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — It was a victory for all of France and the home crowd did it justice, pouring into Paris' Champs-Elysees Avenue by the tens of thousands to celebrate in an explosion of joy. France's 4-2 win over Croatia in the World Cup final in Moscow on Sunday marked the second time in 20 years that France has won the World Cup, and came at a time when the people feel needy. "It represents enormous things," said Goffrey Hamsik, dressed in a hat resembling a rooster — the French national symbol — and a shirt with the No. 10 for Kylian Mpappe, the 19-year-old breakout star who hails from the Paris suburb of Bondy. "We've had lots of problems in France these past years," he said, recalling deadly terror attacks. "This is good for the morale ... Here, we are all united. We mix. There is no religion, there is nothing, and that's what feels good." Troublemakers marred some of the festivities at the top of the Champs-Elysees, breaking the window of a major store, throwing bottles, temporary barriers and even a bicycle at riot police as the celebrations wound down close to midnight. Police responded with water cannon and tear gas. BFM-TV reported that the store was pillaged. Earlier, people wrapped in flags and dressed in crazy hats, and one man spotted totally nude except for the Tricolor, marched down the avenue where France displayed its military might a day earlier for Bastille Day. Revelers set off smoke bombs in the national colors — blue, white and red — obscuring Napoleon's triumphal arch. People climbed atop every newspaper kiosk and bus stop in the area to wave flags and lead the crowds below in cheers. The national anthem, the Marseillaise, rang out, cars honked horns and cherry bombs cracks. A young man sprayed a fire extinguisher on the crowd on a late hot afternoon. Hundreds of police in riot gear were discretely lined up on side streets to monitor revelers. Typically, celebrations in France end up with some broken shop windows and other destruction, and Sunday was no exception. Tear gas was lobbed at one point on the Champs-Elysees. About 4,000 police watched over the fan zone — packed to its 90,000 capacity — during the match, then moved to the Champs-Elysees and neighboring streets. As night fell, The Eiffel Tower flashed 1998-2018 to mark France's two World Cup titles. The Arc de Triomph was awash in the national colors, lit with the rooster, the faces of the winning team and the words "Proud to be Blue," or French. The celebrations were spread across the nation. For all the crazy antics — and some revelers who got out of control — a sense of patriotism and unity was almost visceral. Antoine Griezmann, the France striker who scored one of the goal's Sunday, told a news conference two days before the final, televised on BFM TV, that pride in country is in short supply. "We say it so little ... We should be proud to be French," Griezmann said. Mahmoud Bourassi was among those taking a longer-term view and he had some sobering thoughts about France's run to the title and the festivities it has sparked. Bourassi runs a youth center in Bondy — Mbappe's home that was among those scarred by riots in 2005 that exposed the fissures of France that have yet to heal — and he knows the teenage star of the tournament. "All this euphoria and effervescence, it's positive but it's emotional and ephemeral," he said ahead of France's win. Bourassi said sports is a "catalyst to bring people and nations together." But, he added, it must be built on. "What we're seeing is magic, exceptional. But what are we going to do with it tomorrow?" That is a question for President Emmanuel Macron, who was in Moscow celebrating with the team on victory night, and will receive the squad more formally on Monday at the presidential Elysee Palace. Revelers celebrated the moment. "We're happy. It took 20 years ... It's the pride of the nation. It unites everyone. It federates," Frederique Pourquet said as she and her friend left the Champs-Elysees. The win "shows that the French people are consolidated and the work of all France," said Omar Bzi. Hajar Maghnaoui, of Asnieres, north of Paris, said "It's a way to bring the French people together, and also the world." ___ John Leicester in Moscow contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

UK remembers London Bridge attack victims on 1st anniversary

LONDON --- British Prime Minister Theresa May joined survivors, victims' families and emergency workers at a memorial service Sunday to mark a year since a deadly vehicle-and-knife attack brought terror to London Bridge on a warm Saturday night. Eight people were killed and almost 50 injured when three Islamic State group-inspired extremists ran down pedestrians on the bridge, then stabbed people at packed bars and restaurants in nearby Borough Market, one of London's main foodie hubs. The three attackers were shot dead by police within minutes. The rampage came two weeks after a bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester Arena that killed 22 people. More than 700 peo...Keep on reading: UK remembers London Bridge attack victims on 1st anniversary.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

War on drugs: Police kill 7, arrest 811 during Holy Week 2018

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippine National Police (PNP) killed 7 and arrested 811 during Holy Week. This was announced by PNP chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa on Monday, April 2, in a Camp Crame briefing. The killings and arrests were all done under anti-illegal drugs raids and buy-busts as Oplan ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

Terror fears allayed

THE Philippine National Police yesterday allayed fears of any impending terror attacks in Metro Manila in the aftermath of the arrest last Saturday of a Maute Group sub-leader in Tondo saying that the PNP and the Armed Forces remain on top of the situation in the metropolis and the rest….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Gunman opens fire on Cairo church; shootout kills at least 9

CAIRO, Egypt --- A gunman on a motorcycle opened fire Friday outside a church in a Cairo suburb and at a nearby store, sparking a shootout that killed at least nine people, including eight Coptic Christians, authorities said. It was the latest attack targeting Egypt's embattled Christian minority. The gunman was also killed, along with at least one police officer, officials said. The local affiliate of the extremist Islamic State (ISIS) group claimed responsibility for the attack late Friday, saying it was carried out by a "security detail" and that one of its men was "martyred" in the strike. The claim was carried by the group's Aamaq news agency. The attack began when the ...Keep on reading: Gunman opens fire on Cairo church; shootout kills at least 9.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 30th, 2017

‘Amin Baco’ could be in Basilan, may recruit more Malaysians

MALAYSIAN MILITANT Amin Baco may be hiding in Basilan and could recruit more Malaysians for attacks in other parts of southern Philippines if he is still alive, a former hostage says. The Philippine authorities were earlier divided on whether Sabahan Amin was still alive and emir of the Islamic State (IS) in Southeast Asia, as claimed by an Indonesian militant captured in the besieged city of Marawi. But the latest statements by the Philippine military indicate that the seasoned terrorist may still be alive and is one of 10 militants who could be the new leader of the terror group’s regional arm. “Amin was definitely one of the leaders during the siege on Marawi,” college teacher Lordvin Acopio, who spent four months in captivity by the pro-IS groups which attacked Marawi, told FMT. “I can’t say how many groups were in Marawi. Amin led one of the groups. “Each group had 10-15 fighters, but the number depended on the size of the area they were guarding. “If Amin is still alive, it’s possible he’ll recruit more Malaysians to join in attack plots in other parts of southern Philippines.” Amin and others were said to be potential candidates to succeed IS’ Southeast Asia emir designate Isnilon Hapilon, who was killed last month in Marawi. Amin, who was from Tawau, was also reported to be an expert bomb-maker, recruiter and facilitator of weapons movement between southern Philippines and the east coast of Sabah. Malaysian counter-terrorism chief Ayob Khan Mydin Pitchay last week revealed Amin was Isnilon’s son-in-law, which caught analysts and experts by surprise. Some analysts said Amin’s family relationship with Isnilon, as well as his leadership position, vast experience and network, could set him apart from the other candidates for the top post. “If Amin is Isnilon’s son-in-law, most probably the IS’ regional leadership position was given to him after Isnilon was killed. The possibility is high,” Lordvin said. In October, FMT broke the news about a Malaysian teenager whom Lordvin had seen fighting troops alongside his militant father in Marawi. FMT withheld the identity of the militant and his son, but last week, Ayob Khan revealed the boy’s name, adding that he was Amin’s son. Lordvin, who was kidnapped on May 23, the first day of the Marawi war, said Amin and his son had access to siege leader Isnilon. “The boy was always at Isnilon’s place if he was not at the frontline fighting with his father,” Lordvin told FMT. “All of us hostages kept getting moved around, but wherever we were held, Isnilon was always in a building nearby and we weren’t allowed to go there. “Not everyone could see Isnilon at his place or command centre unless they were high-ranking militants. “I believe Amin’s son always visited his step-grandfather Isnilon at the command centre to collect firearms or to give situational reports.” Ayob Khan had said last week that Amin’s son was still alive and probably in Basilan, the base of the Abu Sayyaf group led by Isnilon. “If the boy is now in Basilan, then most probably Amin is also there because the duo never left each other’s side in Marawi,” Lordvin said. “In fact, intelligence reported by the Philippine media says militants are planning attacks there and elsewhere as revenge for the loss of their caliphate in Marawi. “Many relatives of those militants killed in Marawi are said to be doing recruitments now.” More than 1,000 people, mostly militants, were killed in the five-month clashes between the authorities and militants who wanted to set up a so-called IS caliphate in the lake city. (By Zam Yusa – Free Malaysia Today) 1,489 total views, 1,489 views today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

Spain terror attacks leave 14 dead; 5 suspects killed

BARCELONA (AP) – Police yesterday shot and killed five people wearing fake bomb belts who staged a car attack in a seaside resort in Spain’s Catalonia region.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 18th, 2017

Marines facing ‘discouraging’ challenges in Afghanistan – CNN News

The plume of smoke and dust rose over the runway, high above the now-deserted but once costly and vital control towers. Then a second rocket slammed into the tarmac just feet away from where a C130 cargo plane would imminently land to ferry us out. The Marines with us at first appeared unfazed. Some were perhaps young and new to it all, while the older ones stood tall, not flinching. I crouched behind a wheel until those tires were used to race us back toward a shelter. Seven years ago, it would have been mere minutes before that Taliban rocket team was bombed in retaliation by US forces protecting a thousands-strong base. But in 2017, the US Marines here &'8212; all 300 of them &'8212; seem oddly vulnerable. They don't leave the wire much, mostly just to train and advise, leaving the fighting to the Afghans. Yet all the same, three separate rocket attacks hit their bases in three days &'8212; two near us &'8212; one injuring 10 Afghan soldiers, and another an 8-year-old boy. This is the painful reality of Afghanistan 2017. The country is in one of the most violent periods of its recent history, and its challenges are deepening. But the sense of exhaustion, of solutions long having lost their sparkle, pervades. And as President Trump weighs his first move in America's longest war, its 15 years make it absolutely nothing new to many of the Marines currently at its sharp end. Here's how one hardened, normally optimistic Marine commander, Col. Matthew Reid, talked about lost friends. &'8220;I don't think I've ever bothered to count. Too many, between here and Iraq,&'8221; he said. &'8220;A lot of blood in the ground.&'8221; Born on September 11, Reid is back in Afghanistan's Helmand Province for the second time. He quips that the 300 Marines he works with now are the number that &'8220;ran the chow hall&'8221; when he was last there in 2010. I asked: How does it feel to have to go at it all over again? &'8220;Discouraging,&'8221; he said. &'8220;There is a definite feeling of a sense of obligation to get this right because of those who have gone before us.&'8221; The Helmand district of Nawa was retaken last week by Afghan National Security Forces, yet at about the same time nearby Gereshk district was attacked by the Taliban, with multiple checkpoints hit, and at one point six overrun. Things are better, but not good. Helmand will probably never be good any time soon, but the Marines' presence and massive aerial firepower have arguably stopped the entire opium-rich region from being swallowed by the Taliban But the Marines are only one part of the picture in a country where, according to the US government's own auditors, the Taliban influence or control about half the land. ISIS too, intermittently rises, and then, after coalition airstrikes, falls &'8212; competing to be the most extreme actor in a crowded marketplace. The government in Kabul is weak, ridden by conflict and rivalry between senior players. And the West's ideas for stabilizing the country are running out But really it is the mood in the capital which tells you things are still slipping, yet again. Long-term Afghan friends discussing for the first time how they might leave. A top executive saying his employees are leaving their large, high-profile Afghan company to protect themselves from possible attack at their central offices. This is not a time for optimism. There is no sign the Taliban are weakened, even though one Afghan official told me hundreds of mid-level leaders have been taken out in raids over the past year. Their leadership is more radical than ever, and they are likely to see handsome funds from a productive opium harvest, possibly boosted by a new poppy seed that blooms more quickly, massively increasing production. Afghanistan's bleed is slow, and perhaps hidden or ignored by much of the world, but happening all the same. Take this final anecdote from our visit to Helmand, when the Marines took us to a remote outpost where they were advising the Afghan army. We were there to see them pull out, removing themselves from a flat stretch of what Colonel Matthew Grosz called &'8220;Taliban country&'8221; &'8212; a main thoroughfare between insurgent strongholds. But their advisory mission seemed to have run into one issue: There weren't many Afghans to advise. A US Marine stands at the back of a Chinook helicopter en route to Shorsharak. On paper there were 500 Afghan troops, and 45 US marines. But as Grosz told me: &'8220;There's 200 assigned right now.&'8221; By &'8220;assigned,&'8221; he meant that there were 200 who had existed, physically at the base. But even that was optimistic, as another hundred had never shown up while the Marines were there. In fact, of the hundred they had seen, some were on operations or on patrol. So really there were fifty to a hundred Afghan soldiers at the base, almost enabling one-to-one Marine mentoring sessions. As we sat in the Helmand runway bomb shelter, waiting for the &'8220;all clear&'8221; after the rocket attack, I overheard two young Marines chatter about 9/11 as though it was a moment of historical import rather than something they had seen live on TV. That's because for them, it is something their parents mourned when they were probably five or six. Fifteen years of war sounds exhausting until you remember that for Afghans, [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 24th, 2017

Libyan-Canadian cleric linked to Manchester bomber plans return to Canada to clear his name – CBC News

A Libyan-Canadian cleric linked in U.S. and British media reports to Manchester bomber Salman Abedi says he will return to Canada in weeks with the intention of clearing his name. Abdul Baset Egwilla was an Ottawa-based imam until his return to Libya in 2007. In an exclusive interview with CBC News over Skype, Egwilla denied any connection to Abedi. &'8220;I challenge whoever accuses me of such a connection to produce evidence, such as a time, date and place where I met with the suicide bomber,&'8221; Egwilla said. CBC News has agreed not to disclose Egwilla's current location due to concerns for his safety, as he is the subject of death threats in Libya. Salman Abedi, 22, was identified on May 23 as the suicide bomber who killed 22 people and wounded more than 60 others, including children, at a pop concert in Manchester. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack. The bomber's father, Ramadan Abedi, who denies his son was a member of ISIS, has since been arrested by Libyan counter-terrorism officers. U.S. and British media reports, citing anonymous sources, have claimed a link between Salman, his father and Libyan-Canadian cleric Egwilla. A senior American official told the New York Times on May 24 that Salman Abedi &'8220;had links to a radical preacher in Libya&'8221; identified as Abdul Baset Egwilla, and that Egwilla's son had died fighting for ISIS. Egwilla's son did die in 2016, but Libyan news reports and a martyrdom notice at the time said he was killed fighting for the Omar Mukhtar Brigade, a Libyan Islamist militia that is not a listed terrorist organization. The Times newspaper in the U.K. reported May 27 that Ramadan Abedi was an associate of &'8220;extremist Canadian-Libyan preacher&'8221; Egwilla, and that the Libyan-Canadian is believed to have radicalized Ramadan's son, Salman Abedi. The father would regularly meet with Egwilla at Friday prayers in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, in 2015, added the Times, citing a resident of the city who asked not to be named. The Greater Manchester Police Force would neither confirm nor deny to CBC News that Egwilla is under investigation for possible involvement in the Manchester bombing. Egwilla, who has been absent from Libya for several months since fleeing a plot to assassinate him, said he has never, to his knowledge, met either Salman or Ramadan Abedi. &'8220;I am a public figure, I appear in the media. I show up in mosques and preach to a multitude of people. People know me, but I do not know them,&'8221; Egwilla said. &'8220;And if I met him once or twice before, it could be that he changed his beliefs later on, but I never met him in the first place,&'8221; Egwilla said of the Manchester bomber. Declassified documents released by Canada's Integrated Terrorism Assessment Centre in 2014 flagged a YouTube video in which Egwilla is seen &'8220;promoting violent jihad in Libya.&'8221; &'8220;In the video, Egwilla urged an audience of Libyan Islamist fighters to take part in jihad, stating that 'jihad is simply and easily accessible, and does not require moving as in the past, as it was for Afghanistan and Iraq,'&'8221; the report said. Egwilla says that call to jihad was made to recruit people to fight specifically against a militia led by a former general in Moammar Gadhafi's regime, and not a call to support the global jihadi movement. &'8220;I spoke about jihad only through Fajr Libya Dawn (a rebel militia alliance) and only when [Moammar Gadhafi] suppressed peaceful demonstrators and bombed them with anti-aircraft weaponry,&'8221; said Egwilla. &'8220;This was unjust and an act of tyranny.&'8221; Egwilla said people claiming to be with the government of Canada have attempted to reach out to him using the app Viber, though he says he has never agreed to an interview. Egwilla said he intends to speak to authorities to clear his name when he returns to Canada. After seven years in Ottawa, Egwilla left Canada for Libya in 2007, when Gadhafi's regime began sending signals that it would not persecute returning dissidents. ​ He began working at a Tripoli religious radio station and associated with a group of clerics that included Sadiq al-Ghariani, who today is the country's Grand Mufti, the top religious leader, and a strong supporter of Islamist militias. When rebellion broke out in 2011, Egwilla was a prominent supporter, and after the fall of Gadhafi's regime, was promoted to be the administrative director for the mosques in Tripoli. He said he became a prominent imam and broadcaster. In 2014, as splits emerged between liberals and Islamists over the direction post-Gadhafi Libya should take, Egwilla identified with the &'8220;Libya Dawn&'8221; coalition of Islamist militias that seized Tripoli from the UN-backed government. Libya Dawn soon found itself involved in a war with the secular forces of Gadhafi-era general Khalifa Haftar, and Egwilla's Ottawa-raised son Owais joined one of the Islamist militias battling Haftar. Owais died in combat in March last year. It was reported in some quarters that Owais Egwilla had died fighting for Islamic State. In fact, martyrdom notices posted at the time of his death show him as a member of the Omar Mukhtar Brigade, an Islamist militia that was part of the coalition that fought Islamic State and drove it out of its Libyan stronghold in Sirte. Egwilla says he fled Libya eight months ago following the kidnapping and murder of fellow cleric Nadir al-Omrani by assassins of the Madkhali sect of Sunni Islam. Madkhalis, followers of a school of thought founded by a Saudi cleric, have become increasingly active in Libya. Like Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, Madkhalis in Libya have destroyed ancient shrines and manuscripts they deem un-Islamic and they consider voting to be heresy. In a videotaped confession seen by CBC News, one of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2017

12 arrested in London s night of terror; IS claims attack

LONDON — British police arrested a dozen people Sunday in a widening terrorism investigation after attackers using a van and large knives turned a balmy even.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 5th, 2017

Police arrest 12 after night of terror in heart of London

LONDON — British police arrested a dozen people yesterday in a widening terrorism investigation after attackers used a van and large knives to kill seven peo.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 4th, 2017

The World: Indonesian police launch raid as Jakarta attacks linked to ISIS

JAKARTA -- Indonesia's anti-terrorism unit raided the home of a suspected suicide bomber on Thursday as authorities linked attacks that killed three police officers at a Jakarta bus station a day earlier to the Islamic State militant group......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMay 25th, 2017