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Investigate Cavite doctor’s slay, NBI told

MANILA, Philippines - Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre II yesterday ordered the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) to conduct a separate probe on the.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJul 17th, 2017

Medical execs condemn Cavite doctor’s slay

MANILA, Philippines -  The medical community has condemned the killing of a government doctor in Cavite last week......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 16th, 2017

Duterte to Callamard: ‘If you investigate me, I will slap you’

President Rodrigo Duterte has threatened to slap United Nations (UN) Special Rapporteur Agnes Callamard if she would investigate him for the alleged extrajudicial killings in the country. "Kaya sabi ko kay Callamard, kung imbestigahin mo ako, sampalin kita," Duterte said in a speech before the Filipino Community in Vietnam on Thursday night. "I will slap her in front of you. Why? Because you are insulting me. Why? Because you yourself do not believe in the research of your own organization. You are f*c*i** me and I do not want it," he added. Callamard again earned the ire of Duterte after the she reportedly consulted a doctor who said drugs are harmless. "Nagdala siya ng ...Keep on reading: Duterte to Callamard: ‘If you investigate me, I will slap you’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 10th, 2017

Justice told to look into teen’s slay

Justice told to look into teen’s slay.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 17th, 2017

Robredo backs Parojinog slay inquiry

VICE President Maria Leonor “Leni” Robredo is supportive of the call to investigate a pre-dawn raid in Ozamiz City, which killed Mayor Reynaldo “Aldong” Parojinog Sr., his wife Susan, and 13 others on Sunday. Robredo issued the statement on the sidelines of her consultation trip in Navotas City for her office’s anti-poverty program, “Angat Buhay”. [...].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2017

Health groups demand justice for slain Cavite doctor - Bulatlat

Health groups demand justice for slain Cavite doctor - Bulatlat.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsJul 15th, 2017

Health groups demand justice for slain Cavite doctor

Health groups demand justice for slain Cavite doctor.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsJul 15th, 2017

Cavite doctor slain in ambush

Cavite doctor slain in ambush.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 12th, 2017

Probe disappearance of Indonesian Navy men, NBI told

MANILA, Philippines - Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre II has instructed the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) to investigate and build up the case o.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 17th, 2017

May to tackle Trump over ‘evidence’ leaks – BBC News

Theresa May is to raise concerns with Donald Trump after evidence from the Manchester Arena bombing was apparently leaked to US media. UK officials were &'8220;furious&'8221; when photos appearing to show debris from the attack appeared in the New York Times. Monday night's attack at Manchester Arena killed 22 people &'' including children &'' and injured 64. Eight men are now in custody following the attack, carried out by suicide bomber Salman Abedi. The prime minister is expected to raise the issue of the leak with the US president when they meet at a Nato summit later. Details about Abedi's identity had already emerged in the US media less than 24 hours after the explosion and against the UK's wishes. Home Secretary Amber Rudd said she was &'8220;irritated&'8221; by the disclosure of Abedi's identity and had warned Washington &'8220;it should not happen again&'8221;. However, the pictures of debris &'' which appear to show bloodstained fragments from the bomb and the backpack used to conceal it &'' were subsequently leaked to the New York Times, prompting a furious response from within Whitehall and from UK police chiefs. BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera says UK officials believe that US law enforcement rather than the White House is the likely culprit for the leaks. The meeting between Mrs May and Mr Trump, at a Nato summit in Brussels, will take place as British police continue to investigate an alleged &'8220;network&'8221; linked to Abedi. Early on Thursday morning, detectives carried out a controlled explosion as they searched a property in the Moss Side area of Manchester. Two men were also arrested following a search of an address in the Withington area of Greater Manchester. In total, eight men, including Abedi's older brother, and a woman have been arrested in a series of raids across Manchester, Wigan and Nuneaton. The woman was subsequently released without charge in the early hours of Thursday. Meanwhile, Abedi's father and a younger brother have been detained by militia in Libya. A Whitehall source described the second US leak as &'8220;on another level&'8221;, and told the BBC it had caused &'8220;disbelief and astonishment&'8221; across the British government. The source said the the issue was &'8220;being raised at every relevant level by the British authorities with their US counterparts&'8221;. The UK's National Police Chiefs' Council described the &'8220;unauthorised disclosure&'8221; as a breach of trust which had potentially undermined a &'8220;major counter-terrorism investigation&'8221;. Counter-terrorism detectives have spoken in the past about how important it sometimes is the names of suspects do not make it into the media. A delay of around 36 hours, before the public know who they are investigating, can allow them to arrest known associates of the suspect before they know police are looking for them. Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said the leaks had worried him &'8220;greatly,&'8221; and he had raised them with the US ambassador. Mr Burnham told Newsnight a decision had been taken to adopt a &'8220;cautious approach&'8221; to making information public, &'8220;and yet the first reports were coming seemingly out of the United States&'8221;. Abedi's identity was first reported in the US &'' with American TV networks CBS and NBC naming him as the suspect. In other developments, the government has announced that a minute's silence will be held at 11:00 BST on Thursday in remembrance of those who lost their lives or were affected by the attack. The Conservatives and Labour are to resume local general election campaigning on Thursday, and national campaigning on Friday. Eight men and one woman have been arrested in the UK since Monday night, including Abedi's older brother Ismail, 23, although the woman has since been released. Younger brother Hashem, 20, was held by militia in the Libyan capital Tripoli, as was their father. Speaking on Wednesday afternoon, Greater Manchester Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said: &'8220;I think it's very clear that this is a network that we are investigating. &'8220;And as I've said, it continues at a pace. There's extensive investigations going on and activity taking place across Greater Manchester, as we speak.&'8221; As part of their investigation, police raided a block of flats near Manchester Piccadilly station in the city centre, requiring them to carry out a controlled explosion and briefly close the railway line. Police carried out another controlled explosion in the early hours of Thursday morning at an address in the Moss Side area of Manchester. Some of the victims had been making their way outside at the end of the gig when Abedi detonated his &'8220;nuts-and-bolts&'8221; bomb. Others had been waiting in the foyer to pick up children and family. A serving Cheshire police officer &'' off-duty at the time &'' was among those killed. She has not yet been named. The victims include 14-year-old Sorrell Leczkowski, from Leeds, whose grandmother is critically injured in hospital. Others who died are mother-of-three Michelle Kiss, Nell Jones, 14, eight-year-oldSaffie Roussos, Alison Howe, Lisa Lees, Jane Tweddle-Taylor, 51, Martyn Hett, 29, and Olivia Campbell, 15. Kelly Brewster, 32, John Atkinson, 28, Georgina Callander &'' thought to be 18 &'' and Marcin and Angelika Klis, a Polish couple from York, have also been named. South Shields couple Chloe Rutherford, 17, and Liam Curry, 19 have been named among the dead. Family members paid tribute to the teenagers and in a statement issued by police said: &'8220;They wanted to be together forever and now they are.&'8221; Of the 64 injured, [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMay 29th, 2017

Task force to probe Sorsogon board member’s slay

LEGAZPI CITY, Philippines – A task force has been created to investigate the killing of Sorsogon Sangguniang Panlalawigan member Pedro Ravanilla......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 12th, 2017

Why do airlines overbook? – BBC News

A common overbooking problem on a United Airlines flight on Sunday ended with a man being bloodied and dragged from his seat and an already troubled airline earning more bad press. How did it all go so wrong? Overbooking on flights happens all the time. Empty seats cost airlines money, so they offset the number of passengers who miss flights by selling too many tickets. In this case, the problem arose because United decided at the last minute to fly four members of staff to a connection point and needed to bump four passengers to make way for them. When there's an overbooking issue the first step is to offer an inducement to the passengers to take a later flight. On Sunday passengers were offered $400 (£322), a hotel room for the night, and a flight the following afternoon. When no-one took the offer, the amount was upped to $800. Still no-one bit, so a manager boarded the flight and informed passengers that four people would be selected to leave the flight. That selection is based on several factors, but frequent fliers and higher fare-paying passengers are given priority to stay aboard, a spokeswoman for United confirmed. A couple who were selected agreed to leave the plane voluntarily. A third passenger, reportedly the wife of the man who was forcibly removed, also agreed. The man, who said he was a doctor and had to see patients in the morning, refused. At this point, the airline could have identified another passenger for removal or raised its offer anywhere up to a maximum of $1,350. Erin Benson, a spokeswoman for United, could not confirm whether other passengers were sought. She did confirm that no offer was made above $800, but could not comment on why. According to eyewitnesses, the man who refused to be ejected said he was a doctor and he had appointments to keep the following day, though this has not been confirmed. This was a Sunday night flight; the next flight on offer didn't leave until 15:00 on Monday. An eyewitness said the man was &'8220;very upset&'8221; about the possibility of being bumped and attempted to call his lawyer. An airline manager told him that security would be called if he did not comply. At this point, security officers came to speak to him, first one then two more. As the video shows, their conversation ended with the man being yanked from his seat onto the floor and dragged off, blood visible on this face. United is technically within its rights to forcibly remove the man for refusing to leave the flight, and the step is part of the airline's carriage guidelines, but such instances are extremely rare. Of the 613 million people who flew on major US carriers in 2015, 46,000 were involuntarily denied boarding, according to data from the Department of Transportation &'' less than 0.008%. The majority of those would have been informed before they boarded the flight, said Charles Leocha, the founder of passenger advocacy group Travelers United. He could not remember seeing a passenger violently dragged off a plane. &'8220;It turned my stomach,&'8221; he said. Removing passengers at the last minute to make way for staff was also highly unusual, he said. Staff transport should be identified ahead of time and factored into bookings. US fliers have become resigned to chronic delays and poor service, according to Mr Leocha, and a lack of readily available information about their rights meant they were too dependent on the airline managers in situations like these. &'8220;Our expectations have been driven so low that passengers have begun to accept it,&'8221; he said. &'8220;What they shouldn't have to accept is being dragged off the flight to make way for an employee.&'8221; Oscar Munoz, CEO of United, said in a statement: &'8220;This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United. I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers.&'8221; Mr Munoz said the airline would review the event and &'8220;reach out&'8221; to the passenger, though a spokeswoman could not confirm whether United was in touch with him yet. One of the security officers involved in the incident was suspended on Monday afternoon, pending a review, said the Chicago Department of Aviation in a statement. The actions of the officer were &'8220;obviously not condoned by the Department&'8221;, the statement said. Whatever happened on the flight &'' and the details will undoubtedly emerge in the coming days &'' it was a bad day for United, Mr Leocha said. The airline had only recently been at the centre of another controversy, when a fortnight ago it refused to let two girls board because they were wearing leggings. &'8220;This isn't really a lesson for passengers it's a lesson for airlines,&'8221; he said. &'8220;The only lesson here for passengers is when security get on throw up your hands, because otherwise you're going down the aisle with a fat lip.&'8221;( Oscar Munoz, CEO of United, said in a statement: &'8220;This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United. I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers.&'8221; Mr Munoz said the airline would review the event and &'8220;reach out&'8221; to the passenger, though a spokeswoman could not confirm whether United was in touch with him yet. One of the security officers involved in the incident was suspended on Monday afternoon, pending a review, said the Chicago Department of Aviation in a statement. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

Passenger dragged off overbooked United flight – CNN News

A man's refusal to give up his seat on an overbooked United Airlines flight led to a disturbing scene Sunday that has travelers up in arms over airline policies. The Department of Transportation said it will review the incident, in which a passenger was forcibly removed from the Louisville, Kentucky-bound United flight 3411 at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. The incident has prompted one security officer's suspension and created a publicity nightmare for United. Several passengers recorded the incident on their phones and posted video on social media showing three Chicago Department of Aviation security officers dragging the man, who has not been identified, down the aisle by the arms and legs while other passengers shout in protest. He continued to resist after he was removed and ran back onto the airplane, face bloodied from the encounter. &'8220;It was very traumatic,&'8221; passenger Jade Kelley said. She did not witness the entire event but she said the sound of the screams still haunt her. &'8220;It was horrible. I had trouble sleeping last night and hearing the video again gives me chills.&'8221; The incident sparked criticism of a system that allows airlines to involuntarily boot passengers from flights. United was acting within their rights and following policy. Then, the situation turned physical. United asked passengers to give up their seats voluntarily for compensation. Four crew members needed to get on the flight in order to work another one in Louisville or else that flight would be canceled, airline spokeswoman Maddie King said. When no one volunteered, the airline was forced into an &'8220;involuntary de-boarding situation,&'8221; airline spokesman Charlie Hobart said. United weighs a number of factors to determine which passengers would leave the flight, such as connecting flights and how long the delay will leave the customer at an airport, Hobart said. United employees explained the situation to the man several times, Hobart said. When he refused they followed Department of Transportation protocol and called local law enforcement to forcibly remove him from the plane. Passenger Tyler Bridges said the request for volunteers came after everyone had boarded. It was easy to understand why no one responded &'8212; it was Sunday night and the next flight was not until the following afternoon, he said. Bridges said two officers tried to calmly talk the man out of his seat before a third approached him in an aggressive manner. The officer told him he had to get off the plane, and when he resisted, the officer grabbed him out of his seat and carried him out with the other officers. The man hit his head on an armrest, Bridges said. He yelled that he was a doctor and that he was being profiled for being Chinese. The scene left everyone unsettled, including children who started crying, Bridges said. &'8220;It was pretty shocking that it got to the level that it got to. In part that's the man's fault, when the police came on he shouldn't have resisted, he should have just left. But it was a pretty unbelievable scene with them grabbing him and pulling off,&'8221; he said. Overbooking is not illegal, and most airlines do it in anticipation of no-shows, according to the US Department of Transportation. If no one volunteers, the airline can select passengers for removal based on criteria such as check-in time or the cost of a ticket, according to the US Department of Transportation's Fly-Rights. In an internal memo, CEO Oscar Munoz said the crew members approached the gate agents after the flight was fully boarded and said they needed to board the flight. They sought volunteers before commencing &'8220;involuntary denial of boarding process,&'8221; offering up to $1,000 in compensation. When approached, the passenger &'8220;raised his voice and refused to comply with crew member instructions,&'8221; Munoz said. He grew &'8220;more disruptive and belligerent&'8221; with each request, leaving agents with no choice to call security officers. He continued to resist even after he was removed, running back into the plane, Munoz said. Passengers shot video of him with blood streaming down his face. &'8220;Our employees followed established procedures for dealing with situations like this. While I deeply regret this situation arose, I also emphatically stand behind all of you, and I want to commend you for continuing to go above and beyond to ensure we fly right,&'8221; he said. &'8220;I do, however, believe there are lessons we can learn from this experience, and we are taking a close look at the circumstances surrounding this incident.&'8221; Munoz issue a statement calling the incident &'8220;upsetting&'8221; and apologized &'8220;for having to re-accommodate&'8221; customers. &'8220;Our team is moving with a sense of urgency to work with the authorities and conduct our own detailed review of what happened. We are also reaching out to this passenger to talk directly to him and further address and resolve this situation,&'8221; The Chicago Department of Aviation said in a statement that the incident &'8220;was not in accordance with our standard operating procedure and the actions of the aviation security officer are obviously not condoned by the Department.&'8221; That officer has been placed on leave effective today pending a review of the situation, the statement added. The four crew members did indeed board the plane, and it wasn't pretty, Bridges said. Passengers berated them, told them they should be ashamed of themselves and embarrassed to work for this company. &'8220;They just sat down quietly, it was super tense on the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

Russia says deadly Syrian airstrike targeted chemical weapons factory – CNN News

Russia's defense ministry is blaming a Syrian airstrike on a &'8220;terrorist&'8221; ammunition depot for the deaths of dozens of people in what has been described as a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria's Idlib province. At least 70 people, including many children, died Tuesday after suffering symptoms of chemical poisoning, including foaming at the mouth and suffocation. According to a statement posted Wednesday on the Russian ministry's Facebook page, the strike hit &'8220;workshops, which produced chemical warfare munitions&'8221; in the eastern outskirts of the Khan Sheikhoun town. Activists said the Syrian regime dropped a chemical bomb and was responsible for the killings, leading the United Nations to replace a scheduled Security Council session for Wednesday morning with an emergency meeting. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's military denied using chemical weapons and blamed rebels for the carnage. Eyewitnesses said the attack's aftermath was nightmarish and unlike anything that they had previously seen. Feras al-Jundi, a physician who was an early responder in the town of Khan Sheikhoun in Idlib told CNN that, upon entering the hospital where many victims were taken, &'8220;there were many, many atrocious things to see.&'8221; He described seeing whole families who had died, corpses of those who had perished instantly in the attack, and also the dying breaths of those who the medical teams were unable to save. &'8220;I have never in my life seen anything like that,&'8221; he told CNN's Christiane Amanpour. &'8220;The view was heartbreaking. It makes you (cry) blood.&'8221; He added he didn't see anyone who looked like a combatant among the dead. As an EU-UN chaired conference on Syria's future got underway in Brussels, the United States, Great Britain and France circulated a resolution to be presented at an emergency session at the United Nations Security Council condemning a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria. If the resolution goes to a vote, it is likely to face a veto threat from Russia. The move is seen as forcing Moscow to be shamed by supporting the Assad regime even as it's again suspected of a chemical weapons attack. Arriving at the EU-brokered conference in Belgium, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said of the suspected gas attack in Syria that he has &'8220;seen absolutely nothing to lead us to think that it is anything but the regime.&'8221; France's Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development, Jean-Marc Ayrault, will use the Brussels meeting to &'8220;reaffirm that the international community must remain mobilized in the face of the tragic situation in Syria after six years of war,&'8221; according to a statement from his ministry. At the conference, which runs from April 4 &'' 5, he will &'8220;underscore the urgent need to implement a political transition in Syria,&'8221; the statement says. But Feras, the doctor who witnessed the aftermath of the attack, says the mood on the ground in some parts of Syria is frustration that the international community is not holding the Syrian regime to account for its atrocities. &'8220;I feel frustrated, because of the international community and the UN that have not forced the regime to abide by the Security Council resolution but&' has been watching and doing nothing, which has allowed the regime to keep bombing the people with cluster bombs, scud missiles and now gas.&'8221; US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley condemned the attack but previously had said that Assad's ouster was not a priority for the Trump administration. &'8220;Do we think he's a hindrance? Yes. Are we going to sit there and focus on getting him out? No,&'8221; she said last week. The Syrian Coalition, an umbrella opposition group, referred to the suspected chemical attack as a &'8220;crime similar to that in Eastern Ghouta in 2013 that the international community allowed to pass without accountability or punishment.&'8221; That attack tested the resolve of then-President Barack Obama in the face of atrocities committed by the Assad regime. Referring to the 2013 attack, McCain told CNN: &'8220;We've seen this movie before, it was when Barack Obama said they would have a red line, they crossed it and he did nothing. Bashar Assad and his friends, the Russians, take note of what Americans say.&'8221; The Ghouta attack prompted Obama to ask Congress to authorize military action against Syria in 2013. Shortly after, Syria agreed to a Russian proposal to give up control of its chemical weapons, leading Obama to retreat from threats of military action. White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters Tuesday that the attack is a &'8220;consequence of the past administration's weakness and irresolution.&'8221; Khaula Sawah, board member and former CEO of the Union of Medical Care and Relief Organizations (OUSSM), another umbrella organization, said that her field team in Idlib had received reports of whole families discovered dead, and were expecting the body count to rise. She said that her field team had reported that, while nerve gas cannot be confirmed at this time, based on the symptoms of the patients, doctors believe that this is some form of organophosphate nerve agent. &'8220;The symptoms rapidly developed within minutes, including redness of eyes, foaming at the mouth, contracted pupils, severe dyspnoea (labored breathing) or shortness of breath and suffocation,&'8221; she told CNN. &'8220;The symptoms progressed so rapid that fatality occurred within 10 minutes. If there were no supportive care or ICU, people were dying.&'8221; She said that a decontamination point had been set up for victims before taking them to Turkey to receive [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 5th, 2017

Man arrested over vandalism of Fort Collins, Colorado mosque – CBS News

Police arrested a suspect in connection with the vandalism at a mosque near Colorado State University, a case they are investigating as a hate crime. Joseph Scott Giaquinto, 35, was arrested on suspicion of criminal mischief, third-degree trespass, and bias-motivated crime, according to CBS Denver. Police had asked for the public’s help in identifying the person who overturned benches, broke windows and threw a Bible into Islamic Center of Fort Collins, which is about 60 miles north of Denver. A police spokeswoman told the newspaper that she did not have details on how police came to identify Giaquinto as the suspect. Police released two clips of surveillance video that captured the vandalism at the Islamic Center of Fort Collins before dawn Sunday. In one, a man is shown picking up a paving stone and walking away. In another clip, he kicks a door. The center’s president, Tawfik Aboellail, said the man tried to break into the mosque about 4 a.m. Sunday, but he did not get inside. The vandalism prompted the center to cancel religious classes for children that morning, but it has also led to an outpouring of support. The Coloradoan reports that congregants from Plymouth Congregational Church visited after their morning service, and later about 1,000 people gathered at the mosque for a rally of support organized by a rabbi Sunday evening. Many have also been making donations online to pay for repairs and improved security. CBS Denver reports that at least $20,000 had been donated as of Monday evening, which the mosque said would go toward repairs and hiring security. The Council on American-Islamic Relations had urged police to investigate the case as a possible hate crime. Police Chief John Hutto, who attended the support rally, said the incident has a “very real impact on our Muslim friends and neighbors.” “We will not tolerate acts of hatred in our community, and I hope this arrest sends that message loud and clear,” Hutto said in a statement. “While the building can be repaired, this incident caused deeper hurt that won’t just go away. I urge all of our citizens to continue showing the kind of support and acceptance demonstrated at the Islamic Center rally on Sunday night.” The vandalism comes about a month after someone threw a rock through a window at a mosque in the Denver area. The incident at the Colorado Muslim Society was also captured on surveillance video, but no one has been arrested. Investigators in the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office have exhausted their leads, spokeswoman Julie Brooks said Monday. 57&'160;total views, 57&'160;views today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 28th, 2017

5 dead in vehicle, knife attack at British Parliament – The Japan News

A knife-wielding man went on a deadly rampage in the heart of Britain’s seat of power Wednesday, plowing a car into pedestrians on London’s Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer to death inside the gates of Parliament. Five people were killed, including the assailant, and 40 others were injured in what Prime Minister Theresa May condemned as a “sick and depraved terrorist attack.” Lawmakers, lords, staff and visitors were locked down after the man was shot by police within the perimeter of Parliament, just meters from entrances to the building itself and in the shadow of the iconic Big Ben clock tower. He died, as did three pedestrians on the bridge, and the police officer. A doctor who treated the wounded from the bridge said some had “catastrophic” injuries. Three police officers, several French teenagers on a school trip, two Romanian tourists and five South Korean visitors were among the injured. Police said they were treating the attack as terrorism. There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Metropolitan Police counterterrorism chief Mark Rowley said police believed there was only one attacker, “but it would be foolish to be overconfident early on.” He said an unarmed policeman, three civilians and the attacker died. Forty others, including three police officers, were injured. Islamic extremism was suspected in the attack, Rowley said, adding that authorities believe they know the assailant’s identity but would not reveal it while the investigation was ongoing. The threat level for international terrorism in the U.K. was already listed at severe, meaning an attack was “highly likely.” Speaking outside 10 Downing St. after chairing a meeting of government’s emergency committee, COBRA, May said that level would not change. She said attempts to defeat British values of democracy and freedom through terrorism would fail. “Tomorrow morning, Parliament will meet as normal,” she said. Londoners and visitors “will all move forward together, never giving in to terror and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart.” U.S. President Donald Trump was among world leaders offering condolences, and in Paris, the lights of the Eiffel Tower were to be dimmed in solidarity with London. London has been a target for terrorism many times over past decades. Just this weekend, hundreds of armed police took part in an exercise simulating a “marauding” terrorist attack on the River Thames. Wednesday was the anniversary of suicide bombings in the Brussels airport and subway that killed 32 people last year, and the latest events echoed recent vehicle attacks in Berlin and Nice, France. In the House of Commons, legislators were holding a series of votes on pensions when deputy Speaker Lindsay Hoyle announced that the sitting was being suspended and told lawmakers not to leave. Parliament was locked down for several hours, and the adjoining Westminster subway station was shuttered. Conservative lawmaker Tobias Ellwood, whose brother was killed in the Bali terror attack in 2002, performed first aid on the wounded police officer, who later died. About 10 yards away lay the assailant. “I tried to stem the flow of blood and give mouth to mouth while waiting for the medics to arrive but I think he had lost too much blood,” Ellwood said. “He had multiple wounds, under the arm and in the back.” The attack began early Wednesday afternoon as a driver in a gray SUV slammed into pedestrians on the bridge linking Parliament to the south bank of the River Thames. Former Polish foreign minister Radek Sikorski was in a car crossing the bridge when he heard “something like a car hitting metal sheet” and then saw people lying on the pavement. “I saw one person who gave no signs of life. One man was bleeding from his head. I saw five people who were at least seriously injured,” Sikorski told Poland’s TVN24. Ambulances arrived within minutes to treat people who lay scattered along the length of the bridge. One bloodied woman lay surrounded by a scattering of postcards. Police said one injured woman was pulled from the river. The car crashed into railings on the north side of the bridge, less than 200 meters from the entrance to Parliament. As people scattered in panic, witnesses saw a man holding a knife run toward the building. “The whole crowd just surged around the corner by the gates just opposite Big Ben,” said witness Rick Longley. “A guy came past my right shoulder with a big knife and just started plunging it into the policeman. I have never seen anything like that. I just can’t believe what I just saw.” The attacker managed to get past a gate into Parliament’s fenced-in New Palace Yard, a cobbled courtyard in the shadow of the Big Ben clock tower. Daily Mail journalist Quentin Letts said a man in black attacked the police officer before being shot two or three times as he tried to storm into the building. “As this attacker was running towards the entrance two plain-clothed guys with guns shouted at him what sounded like a warning, he ignored it and they shot two or three times and he fell,” Letts told the BBC. The attacker fell to the cobbles just yards from the entrance to 1,000-year-old Westminster Hall, the oldest part of the parliamentary complex, busy with visitors and school groups. Beyond that, a corridor leads to the building’s Central Lobby, flanked by House of Commons and House of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2017

Republicans lose patience with FBI on Russia, Trump campaign ties information – CNN News

Top Republicans in Congress expressed their dissatisfaction Wednesday about getting answers from the FBI, as lawmakers trying to investigate Russia's meddling in the US election say they've continued to see no evidence of President Donald Trump's claim that he was wiretapped by his predecessor. The FBI's decision to brief the Senate Judiciary Committee comes after the committee's Chairman, Sen. Chuck Grassley, threatened to not schedule a vote for Rod Rosenstein to be deputy attorney general unless his panel got the FBI briefing he and the committee's top Democrat, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, requested weeks ago. Grassley &'8212; a stalwart Republican with a powerful post &'8212; expressed his exasperation the FBI hours before a private meeting at the Capitol with Comey. He called the scheduled meeting a &'8220;positive step,&'8221; but also added: &'8220;I don't want to say that's enough at this point.&'8221; Grassley said he was frustrated that officials haven't been as forthcoming as lawmakers would like, and said his committee hasn't been given the respect it deserves for its oversight of the executive branch. &'8220;That's very irritating,&'8221; Grassley told CNN. He wasn't the only Republican venting his displeasure: Sen. Lindsay Graham, who sits on a subcommittee that's seeking FBI answers, said earlier that he would subpoena the agency for information if it wasn't provided to him and fellow subcommittee member Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse. &'8220;We wrote a letter &'' Sen. Whitehouse and myself &'' wanting to know if there's evidence of a warrant issued by the Trump campaign,&'8221; the South Carolina Republican told CNN's Chris Cuomo on &'8220;New Day. &'8220;He hasn't answered that letter or confirmed if there's a real investigation of the Trump campaign.&'8221; &'8220;He needs to answer the letter and give the nation some information about what's going on here,&'8221; Graham said. Whitehouse and Graham said later Wednesday they had received a letter from the FBI saying they would respond to their questions next week in a classified letter. It was also announced Wednesday that Comey will testify at the House Intelligence Committee on March 20 hearing and there will be a second hearing in the committee March 28, the committee's chairman said. In a Fox interview with Tucker Carlson Wednesday, the President defended his decision to tweet about wiretapping before producing evidence by hinting &'8212; again without evidence &'8212; that more information will emerge in the weeks to come, presumably proving his point. &'8220;Wiretap covers a lot of different things,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;I think you're going to find some very interesting items coming to the forefront over the next two weeks.&'8221; House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes said he does not believe Trump's claim that Obama wiretapped him, but said it's possible Trump communications may have been gathered in &'8220;incidental&'8221; intelligence collection. &'8220;I don't believe Trump Tower was tapped,&'8221; Nunes told reporters Wednesday. &'8220;We don't have any evidence that that took place and, in fact, I don't believe &'8212; just in the last week of time, the people we've talked to &'8212; I don't think there was an actual tap of Trump Tower,&'8221; Nunes said at a news conference in reference to the claim originally made by Trump several weeks ago. Nunes and Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said they want to see any evidence of wiretapping by their March 20 hearing or they may also issue a subpoena for the records. Asked if he had seen any evidence that Trump aides spoke with Russian officials other than Russian ambassador to the US Sergey Kislyak, Nunes said, &'8220;Not that I'm aware of.&'8221; But Schiff added: &'8220;I wouldn't answer that question as categorically as my colleague. We're not privileged to talk about the contents of the investigation but, you know, I think we need to be very precise when we talk about this. And I just don't think that we can answer it categorically in this forum.&'8221; Nunes and Schiff also sent a letter to the FBI, CIA and National Security Agency demanding information on the leaks regarding Russia's contact with Trump advisers by Friday. The two leaders of the House investigation said their work has been stalled so far by trouble accessing computers used by the director of national intelligence &'8212; Schiff said he has been taking handwritten notes when he views evidence. The two have not yet interviewed former national security adviser Gen. Michael Flynn and declined to say whether he would appear at a public hearing. Schiff added that he is very concerned about Trump adviser Roger Stone's admission that he communicated with &'8220;Guccifer 2.0&'8221; &'8212; who was later determined by intelligence agencies to be a Russian hacker or group of hackers. Stone has described his contact with Guccifer as limited to a &'8220;brief exchange with him on Twitter&'8221; and any suggestion otherwise, he told CNN, is &'8220;a fabrication.&'8221; The White House has vacillated on Trump's claims in the last two days. Press secretary Sean Spicer said Monday that Trump did not mean literally that Obama personally wiretapped him. But on Tuesday, Spicer said Trump was &'8220;extremely confident&'8221; he would be vindicated by the evidence. &'8220;I think there's significant reporting about surveillance techniques that existed throughout the 2016 election,&'8221; Spicer said, without providing any examples. &'8220;He feels very confident that what will ultimately come of this will vindicate him,&'8221; Spicer said. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Wednesday he never gave Trump any reason to believe the GOP candidate [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 16th, 2017

Hontiveros, Ejercito seek probe into slay of doctor to the barrio

Hontiveros, Ejercito seek probe into slay of doctor to the barrio.....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsMar 7th, 2017

Cruz, Sanders face off on Obamacare – CNN News

Sen. Ted Cruz urged fellow Republicans Tuesday to quickly &'8220;honor the promises&'8221; the party made over the years to repeal Obamacare. &'8220;2010, 2014, 2016, I believe were a mandate from the voters. We're tired of the premiums going up. We're tired of deductibles going up,&'8221; Cruz said at a CNN town hall debate with Sen. Bernie Sanders over the future of Obamacare. &'8220;Should Congress move swiftly to repeal Obamacare? Absolutely.&'8221; Cruz and Sanders &'8212; two senators with diametrically opposed views of government's role in health care &'8212; faced off at the debate moderated by CNN's Jake Tapper and Dana Bash and featuring questions from an audience consisting of both defenders and critics of the Affordable Care Act. Cruz's call on his party to &'8220;repeal every word of Obamacare&'8221; came as the GOP is grappling with how quickly to repeal the law. The party hasn't yet reached a consensus on an alternative to the law. President Donald Trump said Sunday that a replacement plan may not be rolled out until next year. The GOP's incredible, shrinking Obamacare repeal The town hall debate underscored the many challenges surrounding efforts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act &'8212; a sweeping health care law that covers some 20 million Americans. The evening began with each lawmaker laying out starkly different views of the controversial law. &'8220;If you are one of 20 million Americans who finally has received health insurance, forget about it &'8212; you're gone,&'8221; Sanders warned about repealing Obamacare. &'8220;That means when you get sick, you ain't gonna be able to go to the doctor. And when you end up in the hospital, you'll be paying those bills for the rest of your life, or maybe you'll go bankrupt.&'8221; Cruz, a Texas Republican who made his name in national politics by fiercely opposing the health care law, said former President Barack Obama made a series of promises that were broken. &'8220;If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor,&'8221; Cruz said. &'8220;Millions discovered that was not true.&'8221; Several policy questions are at the center of the ongoing battle about reforming Obamacare, including the popular provision to protect people with pre-existing conditions and the controversial mandate that nearly all Americans get coverage. Republican lawmakers are also wrestling with how to live up to their promises to make Obamacare more affordable and to reform Medicaid. The CNN debate highlighted how Republicans and Democrats fundamentally disagree on many of these issues. One woman in the audience, Neosho Ponder, spoke about her fight against breast cancer and said she was undergoing radiation treatment. Ponder expressed fear that without Obamacare, she wouldn't be able to afford health insurance. Cruz insisted that Republican lawmakers support prohibiting insurance companies from canceling coverage for someone just because they are sick. All GOP proposals that have been introduced to replace Obamacare with, Cruz said, &'8220;prohibit companies from jacking up the insurance rates because they got sick or injured.&'8221; Ted, I cannot believe what you just said. It's a direct contradiction of everything you ran for President on,&'8221; he said. &'8220;What Ted has said is he wants to get rid of all federal mandates. Did you say that a hundred times?&'8221; &'8220;I didn't say it once,&'8221; Cruz said. &'8220;Virtually all of the Republican legislation that has been filed — that the Democrats have opposed — maintains a continuity of coverage.&'8221; The issue of pre-existing conditions came up again when Maria Shahid Rowe, a woman who is five-months pregnant, said she was worried she wouldn't be able to get health coverage without Obamacare. Cruz responded that Democrats are mandating that people get &'8220;every coverage on earth &'8212; and it sounds really good.&'8221; However, &'8220;you should get the policies that meet your needs,&'8221; he said. Sanders shot back that before Obamacare, Shahid Rowe's pregnancy would have been treated as a pre-existing condition. &'8220;What Ted is really telling you is they will not guarantee coverage for you.&'8221; Another woman in the audience, Melissa Borkowski, told Sanders she simply can't afford the health services she needs. Burkowski recently had an abnormal Pap smear, but said she couldn't get additional tests because she hasn't met her out-of-pocket deductible. Her fear: that she may now have undiagnosed cancer. Sanders, who repeatedly stressed that Obamacare was far from perfect, said it is &'8220;totally absurd&'8221; that Borkowski has such an &'8220;outrageous deductible.&'8221; &'8220;If you were in Canada, you know what? You would get the health care that you need,&'8221; he said. &'8220;The idea that we have policies like that, like the one you describe, is clearly an outrage.&'8221; Cruz lamented that coverage choices have gone down &'8220;dramatically&'8221; since Obamacare became law. The senator, whose Canadian birthplace became a political controversy during his 2016 presidential run, also added: &'8220;Bernie mentions Canada quite a bit. I know quite a bit about Canadian health care. I was born there. You know Bernie, that may be the best argument against your position. Look what it produced.&'8221; Sanders joked as he gestured at Cruz: &'8220;Look what the result is.&'8221; Another key pillar of Obamacare that came up was the so-called &'8220;employer mandate&'8221; &'8212; the law's requirement that small businesses employing 50 or more workers to provide healthcare for its employees. LaRonda Hunter, who owns five hair salons in Texas, said she can't afford to provide coverage to her employees because of low profit margins and that the Obamacare rule is preventing her from growing her business. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2017

Tetanus alert: ’Cracker victims told to see doctor

MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Health (DOH) yesterday reminded those who sustained even minor injuries from firecrackers to see a doctor to prevent.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 2nd, 2017

Probe Cavite fish kill, BFAR urged

MANILA, Philippines – A fisherfolk group has urged the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources  (BFAR) to investigate a fish kill in the coastal waters of.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 18th, 2016