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Indoor activities for when you’re rained in

The rainy days are officially here and the gloomy weather is making everyone want to stay in. I'll admit, I spent the whole day in bed yesterday and I don't regret it. But, since the rain will keep coming for the next few months, it might be a good idea to try and be productive, even at home. You might be too lazy to leave your house but there are activities that you can do from the comforts of your own home. Whether you're by yourself or with your friends and family, here's what you can do when you've been rained in. DIY projects Relive your childhood rainy days by doing some arts and crafts. You can try painting or printmaking. There are also some easy and fun DIY projects y...Keep on reading: Indoor activities for when you’re rained in.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJun 12th, 2018

BSP: Know your New Generation Coins

BACOLOD City – The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas is urging the public to familiarize themselves with the New Generation Coins (NGC) now in circulation. Six newly designed coins are currently in the daily trading activities of Negrenses released this year ranging from P10 to P.01 sentimo. The 10-piso denomination has a diameter of 27 mm, […] The post BSP: Know your New Generation Coins appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated News55 min. ago

US Congress wants continued Chinese exclusion from naval drills

A US Senate-passed bill authorizing military spending on its activities reiterated China's exclusion from a major American naval exercise, just weeks after the Pentagon disinvited Beijing from the drills that could potentially chill relations between the two powers......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated News5 hr. 41 min. ago

Go, other gov’t execs recognized for contributions to PAF

The Philippine Air Force (PAF) on Tuesday night cited several civilians and government officials, led by Special Assistant to the President Secretary Christopher Lawrence “Bong” Go, as part of its pre-anniversary activities. Air Force chief Lt. Gen. Galileo Kintanar awarded Go with a plaque of recognition for his all-out support to the 250th Presidential Airlift […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated News15 hr. 16 min. ago

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

DAR celebrates CARP s 30th year

QUEZON CITY, June 18 -- The Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) is celebrating the 30th year of the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program's (CARP) implementation with various activities fromJune 18-29.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

DAR celebrates CARP s 30th year

QUEZON CITY, June 18 -- The Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) is celebrating the 30th year of the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program's (CARP) implementation with various activities fromJune 18-29.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Araw ng Maynila: Erap to honor outstanding employees, elderly

The Manila city government has lined up several activities for the week-long commemoration of the 447th Araw ng Maynila......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Oil fuels China building frbackslashenzy in WPS

PRESIDENT Rodrigo Duterte said on Saturday that the search for oil to fuel its industrialization was the reason behind China’s activities in the West Philippine Sea (WPS). “China, for all of its, whatever, posturing there is, is also interested in oil,” the President said in a speech during the Eid’l….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Experience unique activities this Father’s Day at Ortigas Malls

Father’s Day is almost here, and what other way to celebrate the most special man in the family than to bring him to Ortigas Malls!.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Duterte: Search for oil fueling China s activities in West Philippine Sea

DAVAO CITY - President Rodrigo Duterte said on Saturday that the search for oil to fuel its industrialization was the reason behind China's activities in the West Philippine Sea. 'China,.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Police look for new leads in priest slay

Police are tracing the activities of the arrested suspect in the shooting of Catholic priest Richmond Nilo in Zaragoza, Nueva Ecija, in the hope of finding leads to the identities and whereabouts of the other suspects as well as their motive......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

As Saudis wilt on field, kingdom pursues soccer power grab

By Rob Harris, Associated Press MOSCOW (AP) — The Saudis have ambitions to seize control over parts of international soccer. Losing 5-0 by Russia in the World Cup opener shows they might have bigger problems at home. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had to endure the humiliation in the stadium on Thursday, with Saudi Arabia's mauling in Moscow coming at the hands of a side just below the Saudis in the FIFA rankings. Coach Juan Antonio Pizzi studiously sidestepped a question about whether his federation had been distracted lately. But it has. Just when the Saudis had a first World Cup appearance in 12 years to prepare for, the federation has been mounting a power grab of soccer far beyond the kingdom. What appears the creation of just another bureaucratic institution within the sport could actually have wider ramifications. On its face, the establishment of the South West Asian Football Federation by the Saudis, including the United Arab Emirates and Pakistan, to help to develop the game appears a benevolent undertaking, especially when the existing regional governing body is so vast. "Football is about growth and if you don't grow economically, socially, technically, you will not be moving," Saudi federation president Adel Ezzat told The Associated Press. "It's not enough for us to be in the World Cup. "We have a vision that an Asian country will win the World Cup one day, but there must be a start for that. Football is underdeveloped in many areas in Asia." Is the Asian Football Confederation to blame? "Ambitions have to be higher than winning the Asian Cup," Ezzat said. Confederation president Sheikh Salman, a Bahraini, said he "had no objection to the creation of SWAFF as long as it remains as a football body outside of the AFC's zonal structure." Scratch deeper below the surface and the true objectives of the new body seem a little cloudy. It is unclear why SWAFF is required when there are already regional offshoots of the AFC, including the West Asian Football Federation, which is led by Jordan's Prince Ali bin Al-Hussein who resisted an attempt by the Saudis to seize power of his organization before the new regional force emerged. "It will help Asia and it will help FIFA," Ezzat told The Associated Press. "We don't see anything wrong creating that connection between the south and the west. Football needs to grow." Ezzat maintained that SWAFF had followed the right legal steps to avoid breaching the rules of world football's governing body. Ezzat said FIFA governance committee head Mukul Mudgal had been dispatched by FIFA President Gianni Infantino to the SWAFF meeting on May 31 in Jeddah. The Indian judge denied he was in attendance. SWAFF said the founding members also include Pakistan, Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bahrain, Maldives, Yemen, Oman and Kuwait. Oman Football Association General Secretary Said Othman Al Bulushi told the AP his nation was waiting to assess the statutes and legality of the body within FIFA before confirming its membership. The entire Gulf is not in SWAFF. Take a look at the map and three countries in particular are missing: Iran, Qatar and Yemen. "It's not about the geographic map," Saudi federation president Adel Ezzat said. "It's about zones." Could it also be about politics? For three years, a Saudi-led coalition has been trying to drive out Iranian-aligned Shiite rebels known as Houthis from Yemen to break the civil war in the Arab world's poorest nation and restore the exiled government. Across the Gulf, the Saudis are part of a quartet, including the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain, which has spent the last year putting the squeeze on Qatar. Diplomatic ties with the energy-rich country have been severed amid allegations that Qatar supports extremist groups in the region, which Doha denies. The Qataris, though, have plowed ahead with preparations to host an event that will put them at the center of the world's attention: the next World Cup in 2022. Ezzat won't discuss Qatar, or the 2022 World Cup. Turki Al-Sheikh, head of Saudi Arabia's General Sports Authority, has been less circumspect, demanding earlier this year that Qatar be stripped of the hosting rights if corruption around its bid was proven. For now, in Saudi sights is Qatar's flagship sports network, which owns exclusive Middle East and North African rights to the World Cup. The BeIN Sports coverage of the Russia World Cup opener was watched across Saudi Arabia — but on a pirate channel. The beoutQ signal is transmitted by a Riyadh-based satellite provider, whose largest shareholder is the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Still, the BeIN coverage was seized on by Al-Sheikh to threaten legal action against the network for "wrongdoings against KSA, its sports and officials, and for exploiting sports to achieve political goals." In a tweet, Al-Sheikh added Friday that this "proves Saudi authorities' true stance when banning this network from airing on its soil." Soccer's world body, though, is finally intervening. FIFA said it is "exploring all options to stop the infringement of its rights, including in relation to action against legitimate organizations that are seen to support such illegal activities." What FIFA would not say is whether Infantino raised Qatar's concerns when he watched the opener in the Luzhniki Stadium alongside the Saudi crown prince. Infantino has been a keen visitor to Saudi Arabia over the last year, including meeting King Salman, as intrigue has swirled about the country's role in a consortium's plans to underwrite $25 billion to launch a vastly expanded Club World Cup and an international Nations League. "He knows for a fact the importance of Saudi Arabia in the region," Ezzat said. "That's why I believe he is paying a lot of attention to Saudi Arabia. ... That's a very important sign. (FIFA) know this country can play a very important role in the development of football." Infantino, though, said he believed the backing for the new competitions was "not part of a wider Saudi sports grab." The proposals have stalled because of opposition within the council to Infantino's secrecy over the financial backers. Growing football is part of a sweeping "Vision 2030" plan to wean Saudi Arabia off its near-total dependence on oil money. Prince Mohammed is trying to push Saudi Arabia to become a more cosmopolitan nation that appeals to international investors. Ezzat wants to create new soccer competitions under the auspices of SWAFF and invite countries to participate from beyond the region — particularly Europe. "The country is going through an important change," Ezzat said. "Football can be a catalyst for change. The FIFA president I'm sure knows this very well. ... My country can play an important role in football." Just not the Saudi national team at the moment......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

Citi employees show they care during 13th annual Global Community Day

In its 13th year, this tradition of giving back has grown from strength-to-strength with more than 5,500 employees and their families taking part in 29 volunteer activities organized over five weekends in Metro Manila and Cebu......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

Pompeo talks North Korea, South China Sea with China’s Xi

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo conveyed US resolve for “complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization” of the Korean Peninsula with Chinese President Xi Jinping, the State Department said, as well as concerns about Chinese activities in the South China Sea. Pompeo talks North Korea, South China Sea with China’s Xi Secretary of State Mike Pompeo conveyed… link: Pompeo talks North Korea, South China Sea with China’s Xi.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 15th, 2018

LLDA orders closure of 2 firms engaged in illegal reclamation in Taguig

  MANILA, Philippines – The Laguna Lake Development Authority (LLDA) on Thursday, June 14, ordered the closure of two construction companies for illegal reclamation and garbage dumping activities on shore land in Taguig City.  In a statement, the LLDA said General Manager Jaime Medina served the cease and desist ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Edsa Shangri-La, Manila

Escape to a tropical sanctuary with the family without leaving the city and spend an intimate weekend retreat at your urban oasis this whole month of June. Dads can enjoy well-deserved relaxation while the children get busy with fun-filled kiddie activities. Overnight accommodation starts at Php7,200++, inclusive of buffet breakfast at HEAT for two (2)… link: Edsa Shangri-La, Manila.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018

Push for protocols on fishing in Panatag, government urged

Acting Chief Justice Antonio Carpio called on the Duterte administration to push for protocols with China on fishing activities in Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018

What are they up to?

WE ARE always perplexed by the behavior of politicians. Take the recent barangay polls. Are not the political activities of the barangays off limits to elected public officials? Of course, but we have seen that the politicos could not restrain their impulses and went ahead to insure that their favorite candidate was elected. Nobody among […] The post What are they up to? appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018

Militants rain on Duterte’s first Indepence Day rites

A MILITANT group rained on President Rodrigo Duterte’s first Independence Day parade as the country’s leader. As Duterte began his speech at the 120th celebration of Philippine independence at the Museo ni Aguinaldo in Kawit, Cavite, members of Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) – Southern Tagalog interrupted him with shouts of “Huwad na Kalayaan! Hulyo a-dose!” [...] The post Militants rain on Duterte’s first Indepence Day rites appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018

Young PH reps begin World Cup experience

Filipino young ambassadors AJ Boy Victoriano and Matteo De Venecia have started joining the activities in the 6th Gazprom Football For Friendship (F4F) International Programme, which officially kicked off on Saturday in Moscow, Russia. The twelve year-old Socceroo FC players took part in the opening ceremony along with other hundreds of participants from 211 countries. [...] The post Young PH reps begin World Cup experience appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018