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Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnJan 12th, 2018

Morning Tip Q& A: DeMar DeRozan

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst The tweet was posted at 6:06 a.m. on Feb. 17 (7:06pm, PHL time), and while there have occasionally been positive tweets sent out at that hour, this one got people’s attention for the wrong reasons. This depression get the best of me... — DeMar DeRozan (@DeMar_DeRozan) February 17, 2018 That it came from the Twitter account of a four-time NBA All-Star, whose team was en route to the best season in franchise history, only added to the confusion. But there it was. “This depression get the best of me...” DeMar DeRozan tweeted, and it surprised just about everyone, because the 28-year-old is pretty quiet most of the time. But DeRozan has been carrying a lot on his plate. Not only is trying to lead Toronto somewhere it’s never been before, but has never has as a good a chance before, either -- The Finals -- but he’s been doing it while going back and forth between Toronto and Los Angeles, where his father, Frank DeRozan, has been hospitalized for weeks. Frank DeRozan has been DeMar’s biggest coach, biggest critic and biggest champion his whole life, never being satisfied as his son rose through the ranks of basketball, from Compton High to USC to the NBA. But Frank DeRozan has suffered health setbacks in recent years -- a stroke and significant kidney problems, per the Toronto Sun -- and DeMar has gone bicoastal multiple times to be with his dad, never missing a game in the process. (Frank DeRozan was able, though, to temporarily leave the hospital last month in L.A. to go to Staples Center to see DeMar play for Team Stephen in the All-Star Game.) In his ninth season in Toronto -- he’s never asked for a trade and agreed almost immediately to a $139 million extension with the Raptors in 2016, never even looking at free agency -- DeRozan has scored less than he did last season, but is averaging a career-high 5.2 assists and gone all in on Toronto’s “culture reset,” as GM Masai Ujiri put it after the Raptors went out again in the playoffs last year. After years of resisting, arguing not without merit that he was a master of the mid-range game, DeRozan has embraced the three-pointer this season, obliterating his previous highs for attempts and makes behind the arc, and keeping the ball moving both to fellow All-Star Kyle Lowry and to the team’s emerging cast of young, talented players, who’ve helped carry the load all season. After winning Sunday (Monday, PHL time), the Raptors are an Eastern Conference best 45-17, and are closing in on home court throughout the playoffs in the East. All would seem to be great. But, as DeRozan’s social media statement made clear (and, to his credit, he acknowledged it was him and that he wasn’t hacked, and he hasn’t taken the Tweet down), life sometimes gets in the way of all our dreams. David Aldridge: So, your dad was able to come to Staples Center to see you at the All-Star Game. How was that for him? DeMar DeRozan: It was good. It was real good. He had a good time. It was cool for him to be able to come out and experience it and enjoy it. It made me feel good. He was happy about it. DA: And how is he doing? DD: Every day is one of them things where you just don’t know until he’s home. Until he gets home, that’s when I think I’ll be more comfortable, knowing, cool, you’re out of there. He’s been in there since Dec. 23. It’s March 2nd. I know just that is bothering him, being in there and wanting to get out. Just on top of that, my mom, when I was home the other day, my mom was telling me ‘this is the longest I’ve been without my husband in 30-plus years.’ Stuff like that, that’s the rough part of it. DA: So is that where your head’s at right now? DD: Without a doubt. For sure. One thing I always try to do whenever I go out there and play is try to do whatever I can, knowing I’m so far, doing something I know will make them proud, make them feel good, give them a kind of energy. That’s kind of where I’ll be with it. DA: Is it hard to compartmentalize? So many people say the court is their refuge? DD: For me, it’s easy to do, from the moment of playing to kind of lock in and focus and kind of indulge in that moment. It’s crazy you say that, because Kyle, he’s one of my closest friends, he knows me so well. A lot of times after the game, the first thing he’ll say to me is ‘back to reality.’ He knows now our night is over. Now I have to go back and get into the reality of DeMar. It’s crazy. DA: What have you heard from folks since you sent that tweet out? DD: Man, where haven’t I heard from? Honestly, the response, I can honestly say that I wouldn’t have even thought how the response, how it came out, I wouldn’t have thought I’d ever gotten anything like that. Especially me. I’ve never been one who wanted any type of attention, good nor bad. The response I got from people was so uplifting, positive, refreshing. It’s crazy. It’s crazy. But it made me feel good. You just look at certain things. People say ‘you helped me. Because if you’re going through something like this, I can get through it.’ It’s incredible. By far one of the most incredible things in my career that I’ve witnessed outside of basketball. DA: So you could be a role model in a whole different way. DD: For sure. I never looked at myself and said ‘man, I want to be a role model.’ But something like that is extremely important. It’s all walks of life. I done had high school players, college players, older people. I had one older coach that I’ve known text me and tell me, ‘if there was a player when I was young that I’d seen or witnessed who was going through something (like this), it would have helped me -- then -- not be an alcoholic.’ It was incredible to hear words like that. It’s been one of them things where I’m like, ‘damn, I’m just speaking the truth.’ It’s crazy. DA: Is there anything you’re doing formally or officially now to deal with it? DD: Nah. I think I’m going to definitely, once we’re all said and done, probably the summertime for sure, I’ll be open arms about it without a doubt. At the end of the day, it’s like it’s one of them things where you can’t play basketball forever, but if there’s something I can do that will outlast it and be helpful, be bigger than basketball, I’m all for it. It’s life. DA: So y’all are in this new position on top of the East. You’ve been good for a minute over the years, but this is the top of the top. Is the vibe different in the locker room? DD: Definitely. It’s more, we have fun with one another, but we understand it’s bigger than us all. We, all of us -- young guys, all of me. Me and Kyle always tell the young guys, ‘this opportunity doesn’t always come around that often. Take advantage of this and be all for it. Before you know it, you’re going to be 10 years in, and the opportunity may not come again. Take full advantage of it.’ And everybody understands that. We see it now, especially when we have games where we lose a game. We think we’re on a 10-game losing streak. That’s how we approach coming in the next day at practice, or the next game. It’s great to have that kind of feeling and vibe. DA: How do you know when you’re all locked in? DD: You just know. I always look at my guy Kyle, and you know he’s gonna ride or die with you. But it’s crazy when you’re able to look over at a guy like Pascal (Siakam), or Freddie (Van Vleet), or Delon (Wright), these young guys who only have a couple of years in the league, they’ve got the same look that Kyle’s got. That says a lot about the team. Because you know when those young guys go in, they’re some dogs, too. That’s the beauty of it, and it shows. DA: So, about those young guys. You know what you’re gonna do in the playoffs, and you know what Kyle’s gonna do, and Jo. But if you’re going to beat an elite team in the playoffs, the young guys are gonna have to perform. DD: Yeah. And they have. I lost count of how many games our starters haven’t even played in the fourth quarter. Against good teams, not just lower teams. There have been times where we’re playing some great teams, and the coaches come in and look at us, and we’re like, ‘nah, let them finish out the game. They’ve got this.’ It’s great to have that type of confidence in the young guys. It’s amazing. I know we get a lot of credit, but they deserve just as much credit. DA: So is this the most optimistic you’ve been going into the postseason? DD: Yeah. Because we’ve done felt the fails. We’ve been at the top, and we fell all the way to the bottom. We know what that feels like. We know what it feels like getting closer and closer. We understand the moments. That’s the beauty of failing sometimes. Nobody wants to fail, but you have to to understand what it takes to succeed. And I think that’s where we’re at mentally, and we understand what we have to do. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Significant change for PhilPop

I had a blast with my good friends Noel Cabangon and Ryan Cayabyab at the PhilPop Reveal and Listening Party. A video featuring the 30 entries was showcased during the event. The music fest continues to defy expectations by championing homegrown talents from different backgrounds and music genres.   Mr. C stressed the importance of regional inclusivity and giving voice to underrated artists. Viva Records supervised the official recording of the songs, which are available on YouTube and Spotify.   From the Top 30, only 10 will advance to the last round. They will compete on Nov. 30 in the festival's Finals Night. To vote for your bets, log on to philpop.com.ph. B...Keep on reading: Significant change for PhilPop.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

Indonesia’s presidential hopefuls woo millennials, Muslims as election in focus

JAKARTA — Indonesian President Joko Widodo launched his re-election campaign on Friday, looking to win over big blocs of millennial and Muslim voters as Southeast Asia‘s biggest economy sails into choppy waters. At next year’s election on April 17, the former furniture salesman seeks to repeat his 2014 defeat of Prabowo Subianto, a retired special forces commander, when […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

Philippines not taking shorthanded Qatar lightly

Gilas Pilipinas guards Alex Cabagnot and Matthew Wright said the Philippines can't let its guard down against an ailing Qatar side on Monday night in the Fiba World Cup Asian Qualifiers. The Qataris won't be having four of their key players, including naturalized forward Trey Johnson, due to injuries, but Cabagnot and Wright know the team still can't afford to play below par. "We're treating everybody, we're scouting everybody as how they should be. They should be respected," Cabagnot told reporters Sunday on the eve of the Philippines' closed-door duel at Smart Araneta Coliseum. "That's not our problem. We're gonna focus on whoever is going to be in their lineup. We know that there...Keep on reading: Philippines not taking shorthanded Qatar lightly.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

McVay has Rams taking it slow after opening game victory

By Dan Greenspan, Associated Press THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) — The Los Angeles Rams looked like a team that could be playing for a long time based on how they put away the Oakland Raiders in the second half of the teams' season opener. With an eye toward possibly playing into February, coach Sean McVay is willing to play the game to make sure the Rams are physically ready. McVay preemptively canceled Wednesday's practice to give his team extra time to recover from a physically taxing 33-13 win at Oakland on Monday night, planning instead to hold a walkthrough similar to what the Rams did late last season in his first year in charge. Later in the week he will be ramping up the physicality heading into the team's home opener against the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday. "We always try to do what is best for the players, and I think when you take into account what a physical game that was — that's a physical football team that we played last night — we feel like we've got the kind of team where we're mature enough to be able to handle a mental day if we feel like that's going to be best for them getting their bodies, getting their legs back underneath them for a good Thursday and Friday, and then hopefully being ready to go on Sunday against the Cardinals," McVay said Tuesday. That approach would seem to make sense after the Rams showed they can overcome a slow start against the Raiders. In addition to outscoring Oakland 23-0 in the second half, Los Angeles also had a 267-141 yardage advantage and held the ball for exactly 20 minutes. The Rams defense intercepted Raiders quarterback Derek Carr twice and did a better job of adjusting to Oakland's use of tempo and formation in their first game under returning head coach Jon Gruden, something McVay credited to the adjustments made by players and defensive coordinator Wade Phillips. "I think to be able to go through some adversity says a lot about our football team," McVay said. "When you take into account the elements, the atmosphere, some of the unknown with what they presented offensively, even some different things defensively, the way that the half ended they had a lot of momentum. I thought our guys really embodied that attitude of never flinching, never blinking, and then they came out and did an excellent job in the second half." They also showed an improved understanding of how opponents might attack a Los Angeles defense supercharged by the offseason additions of defensive lineman Ndamukong Suh and cornerbacks Aqib Talib and Marcus Peters. Oakland used a heavy dose of bruising running back Marshawn Lynch in an effort to keep the Rams from getting chances to rush the quarterback, while tight end Jared Cook was the focus of the passing game with Raiders receivers held under wraps by the star defensive backs. Despite their struggles in a 24-6 loss to Washington, Arizona has the personnel to try and replicate Oakland's approach. David Johnson is a proven asset carrying the ball or catching it out of the backfield, and tight end Ricky Seals-Jones showed signs of being a difference-maker in the passing game as a rookie. The two Cardinals targets are the kind of players the Rams might try to limit with linebacker Mark Barron, but McVay was uncertain whether he would be available after not playing against Oakland because of an ankle injury. "He's kind of day-to-day right now," McVay said. "It's such a tough thing as far as being able to really project and predict what he's going to be able to do. Whether he is going to be available or not right now I think is definitely questionable and I'll probably have a little bit more information about that as we go forward, but I thought Ramik (Wilson) did a nice job stepping up. You see Marqui Christian get a lot of reps in some of those known passing situations, and I thought both those two players were good for us last night." NOTES: Return specialist Pharoh Cooper is expected to miss several weeks because of a sprained ankle that McVay said might need to be repaired surgically. The Rams might be forced to sign a replacement for Cooper this week as his backup, wide receiver Mike Thomas, is dealing with a groin injury that McVay said could also sideline him......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

U2 cancels Berlin show as Bono loses voice

BERLIN, Germany — Irish rock group U2 was forced to cut short a concert in Berlin before thousands of fans after performing only a few songs when lead singer Bono lost his voice. “We’re so sorry for tonight’s cancellation,” the group said in a statement on its website about the Saturday night show. “Bono was […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

In Focus: 6 Fierce Femmes Every Millennial Should Aspire To Be

They inspire us to celebrate our womanhood and pursue our passions!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018

PH volleyball team to skip Asiad opening rites to focus on Thailand preps

The Philippines national women's volleyball team has decided to skip the opening ceremonies of the 2018 Asian Games scheduled Saturday night. The team, which is fresh off a training camp in Ja.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Federer, Djokovic, Halep win rain-delayed matches, reach QFs

By Joe Kay, Associated Press MASON, Ohio (AP) — Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep made quick work of their rain-delayed matches Friday afternoon and advanced to the quarterfinals of the Western & Southern Open, facing the daunting challenge of playing a few hours later in extremely humid conditions. Several days of rain turned the quarterfinals into an endurance test. Six men's and three women's singles matches were held over from Thursday because of rain. Federer — the top player left in the men's bracket after No. 1 Rafael Nadal withdrew to get some rest — needed only 72 minutes to beat Leonardo Mayer 6-1, 7-6 (6), leaving him on course for yet another Cincinnati title. He's won a record seven despite missing the tournament the last two years because of injury. Then, it was off for a little rest before an evening match against fellow Swiss player Stan Wawrinka, who advanced with a 6-4, 6-4 win over Marton Fucsovics. "Waiting around all day and hardly seeing any tennis obviously is never fun for the tournament and the fans," Federer said. "So we're happy that the tournament is back underway. Today I tried to really focus on just the one match, not thinking that there is possibly going to be two." Djokovic's match against Grigor Dimitrov was suspended at the start of the third set on Thursday night. He finished off the defending champion 2-6, 6-4, 6-4, maintaining his hopes of a first Cincinnati title. Dimitrov didn't drop a set last year while winning his first Masters title in Cincinnati. He also won his first two matches this week in straight sets, a streak that was broken by Djokovic on Thursday night before the rains came and the match was suspended with Djokovic up 2-1. "I wish it didn't rain, for sure, last night," Dimitrov said. "I just thought that even though I lost that second set, I was feeling well on the court. "Today is a completely different day. The conditions are a little bit different. So yeah, everything came into play." With each win, Djokovic gets closer to the chance he covets — another appearance in the title match. He's never won at Cincinnati, going 0-5 in title matches. It's the only ATP Masters 1000 event that has eluded him. Djokovic acknowledges he would especially enjoy winning the title, which would make him the only player to win all nine ATP Masters events. Also Friday, Juan Martin del Potro and Nick Kyrgios split two tiebreakers before Del Potro prevailed in the third set for a 7-6 (4), 6-7 (6), 6-2 win. Del Potro will face David Goffin, who upset Kevin Anderson 6-2, 6-4 to reach the Cincinnati quarterfinals for the first time in three tries. On the women's side, No. 1 Simona Halep beat Ashleigh Barty 7-5, 6-4 to reach the quarterfinals. Halep has faced the most challenges from the rain, with one match suspended overnight Wednesday in the third set and then her third-round match held over for a day as well. Barty, who lost to Halep in last week's Rogers Cup semifinals in Montreal, committed 32 unforced errors to Halep's 17. Halep is seeking her first Cincinnati championship after losing in the finals last year and 2015. ___ AP freelance writer Mark Schmetzer in Cincinnati contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

For Glaiza, singing at CCP feels like winning an award

  Not all singers are given the rare chance to perform onstage at the Main Theater of the Cultural Center of the Philippines. Quite understandably, Glaiza de Castro, lead star of the Cinemalaya film "Liway," was daunted by the prospect of gracing the same stage usually reserved for opera singers and ballet dancers. Fest organizers had asked her to render Asin's "Pagbabalik," one of the songs featured in Kip Oebanda's "Liway," at the closing/awards ceremony of the indie event last Sunday. "It was surreal," Glaiza told the Inquirer. "I felt like I had won an award that night, and it definitely made me realize that this is what I really want to do: To perform. To tell s...Keep on reading: For Glaiza, singing at CCP feels like winning an award.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 16th, 2018

Khalid ‘OTW’ to Manila

  Khalid is set to perform for his fans in the Philippines. The young singer-songwriter known for his coming-of-age R&B tunes will hold a concert on Nov. 2 at the Smart Araneta Coliseum. The one-night gig---mounted by Midas Promotions---is part of the American artist's world tour, "American Teen," which kicked off last year in support of his debut studio album of the same title (call 911-5555). Khalid, whose full name is Khalid Donnel Robinson, is behind such hit songs as "OTW," "Young, Dumb and Broke," "Location" and "8Teen." He has also produced chart-topping tunes in collaboration with other artists, including Shawn Mendes, Normani, Calvin Harris, Marshmello a...Keep on reading: Khalid ‘OTW’ to Manila.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

Simona Halep, weary and aching, reaches Montreal final

MONTREAL (AP) — A weary Simona Halep, upset over how her matches are scheduled, beat Ashleigh Barty 6-4, 6-1 on Saturday to reach the final Rogers Cup final. The top-ranked Romanian will play for the title Sunday against the third-ranked Sloane Stephens in a rematch of Halep's victory in the French Open final. Stephens, preparing for her U.S. Open title defense, beat fifth-seeded Elina Svitolina 6-3, 6-3. Halep reached the Rogers Cup final for the third time in four years. She won the last time it was in Montreal in 2016. Halep complained Friday about playing the first semifinal day after two straight night matches. She contended she has the worst schedule in the 56-player event and "this happens almost every tournament." Despite playing on only 15 hours rest, Halep was in control from the outset against the 15th-seeded Barty, eliminating the Australian in 71 minutes. "I was very sore when I woke up," Halep said. "During the match, it's not easy to run so much. But, you know, I just tried to focus on what I have to play and, to make it a little bit easier, which I did in the end, was to finish it early." Halep played four matches in three days after a night session was postponed because of rain. "I think I talked enough about it," she said. "I hope in the future it's going to be better. I was upset. I am upset. But doesn't change my performance on court." The Romanian broke Barty in the opening game and broke again for a 4-1 lead en route to taking the first set. Halap broke twice more to open the second set. "I think I played smart tennis today," Halep said. "I pushed her very back on her backhand, then I could just receive a shorter ball, an easier ball for me to open the court.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

More than 50 years into career, Rod Stewart not slowing down

NEW YORK --- More than fifty years into his career, Rod Stewart shows no sign of slowing down. When he's not on tour, he's busy at home chasing his two young sons, Aiden and Alastair, around the yard. And on Sept. 28, he will release his 30th studio album, "Blood Red Roses." While known for writing sultry songs --- from "Tonight's the Night (Gonna Be Alright)" to "You're In My Heart (The Final Acclaim)" --- Stewart's also not afraid to tackle social issues. In 1976, he broke new ground with "The Killing of Georgie (Part I and II)," about his friend who was killed because of his sexual identity. Stewart dismisses the idea of being courageous writing the first mainstream pop s...Keep on reading: More than 50 years into career, Rod Stewart not slowing down.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Music and love are the focus of Laxamana’s two film fest entries

WHEN FOUR brothers who make up a family band are forced to relocate to a remote town in Pampanga after a super typhoon destroys their home, a rich city girl passionate about music decides to help them record their songs. This is the premise of Jason Paul Laxamana’s Bakwit Boys, one of the entries in this year’s Pista ng Pelikulang Pilipino (PPP) which starts Aug. 15 in cinemas nationwide. The post Music and love are the focus of Laxamana’s two film fest entries appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Major grudge match for Garbrandt, Dillashaw tops fight card

By Greg Beacham, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Cody Garbrandt and T.J. Dillashaw have one of the UFC's most compelling feuds of recent years. This beef is rooted in betrayal and tribalism, and it led to the demolition of a once-cordial relationship between training partners. The feud persisted even after Dillashaw knocked out Garbrandt and took his bantamweight title belt last year, following months of verbal sparring and pre-fight scuffling. Their rematch at Staples Center on Saturday night is the main event of UFC 227. It's also the chance for a particularly personal victory for both men, who declined to shake hands at their ceremonial faceoff Thursday in downtown Los Angeles. "I prefer to be respectful," Dillashaw said Thursday. "I prefer to be a martial artist, so I like a respect level, but I don't mind the drama, either. I'm going to use it to my advantage." Garbrandt (11-1) and Dillashaw (15-3) actually have plenty in common. They're both well-conditioned, gifted strikers who became elite competitors at Team Alpha Male, Urijah Faber's famed gym in Sacramento. They've also both become first-time fathers in the nine months since their last bout. But they simply haven't gotten along ever since Dillashaw won the bantamweight title and also left Alpha Male in 2014. To make an epic story short, Dillashaw says he was thrown out because he wouldn't break ties with coach Duane Ludwig, who had just split acrimoniously from Faber. Several Alpha Male fighters, including Garbrandt, say Dillashaw turned his back on them. "Let him say what he wants, but that motivates me," Garbrandt said. "If you say you're going to ruin my career and basically take food out of my child's mouth, that's fine. I didn't need any more motivation with my new son, and while I'm coming off my first loss, I've been more motivated than I ever have out of any win." Any viewer of the pay-per-view show can't miss the clear contrast between Garbrandt, the rural Ohio product with prominent neck tattoos, and Dillashaw, the clean-cut college graduate with a California surfer look. But the rematch primarily is a collision of two fighters with legitimate reason to think they're the best in the 135-pound division. Garbrandt rocketed to the top of the class, winning the belt less than two years after entering the UFC. He lost his title in equally stunning fashion last November to Dillashaw, who reclaimed the strap he had lost to Dominick Cruz nearly two years earlier. During his ascent, Garbrandt appeared to be the archetype of the most compelling lighter-weight fighters. He was slick, athletic, stylistically well-rounded and powerful enough to generate knockouts — and he looked the part of a mixed martial arts star, right down to those tattoos that spread down his resplendently multicolored arms. Garbrandt's neck is covered by large wings flanking a diamond, with the words "SELF MADE" atop his sternum. He seemed ticketed for superstardom — until Dillashaw, the former Cal State Fullerton wrestler whose only losses in the last six years were on debatable split decisions, wrecked the narrative with his fists. Immediately after their bout at Madison Square Garden, Garbrandt claims he tried to quash their grudge, but Dillashaw rejected him. Dillashaw says he isn't to blame for not wanting Garbrandt around him. "You've got me by the throat before, and that pushed me overboard," Dillashaw said, recalling a past scuffle between the two. "What's changed now? Just because I slapped you upside your face, what's different? Why have you got to be fake?" While Garbrandt doesn't accept the blame for this state of affairs, he insists he has grown and changed since his wife, Danny, gave birth in March to their first child, a son named Kai. But Garbrandt also angrily declined to apologize this week for a series of racially insensitive tweets from his early 20s. "I've never felt entitled to anything in my life," Garbrandt said. "I feel like everything happens for a reason. I've been given second chances my whole entire life. ... T.J. is a tough adversary. He's skilled. He's a good competitor. He doesn't like to lose either. That's what's great about this rivalry.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

Ibrahimovic joins Ronaldo in skipping MLS All-Star Game

By Paul Newberry, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — The MLS All-Star Game will feature one of the world's most storied clubs. Unfortunately for the more than 70,000 fans expected at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Cristiano Ronaldo is not along for the ride. After Portugal's elimination from the World Cup and his transfer from Real Madrid, the five-time FIFA Player of the Year took time off rather than accompany Juventus on its American preseason tour, which includes Wednesday night's game against top players from Major League Soccer. The decision will surely be a disappointment to the big crowd that had hoped Ronaldo would make his unofficial debut while touring the United States with the Italian club that has won seven straight Serie A championships. Juventus acquired the 33-year-old from Real Madrid on July 10 in a deal his new club said was worth 112 million euros ($131.5 million) — the largest for a player older than 30 . Also sitting out the U.S. tour, which includes three other exhibitions, is Argentine striker Gonzalo Higuain. He is coming off a scoreless World Cup in which he didn't start in the round of 16 loss to eventual champion France. "Obviously these guys are world-class players," said Atlanta United's Brad Guzan, a goalkeeper for the MLS team. "With or without them, it will be a difficult game. But their names alone bring a lot of attention. It's a shame for everybody on the outside. For me, personally, hopefully it makes for an easier night." Most players take three weeks off after the World Cup. Juventus opens its Serie A schedule at Chievo Verona the weekend of Aug. 18-20 . "We are sorry not to have the Ronaldo, and Higuain as well," Juventus coach Massimiliano Allegri said through a translator. "Unfortunately, they played in the World Cup. They needed some days to rest." Ronaldo and Higuain won't be the only big names missing from the game. One of MLS' top new stars, LA Galaxy forward Zlatan Ibrahimovic, announced Monday that he's skipping the All-Star match rather than make a cross-country trip to Atlanta. The 36-year-old Swede cited the grind of playing three matches in an eight-day span, including Sunday night's 4-3 victory over Orlando City in which he scored his first MLS hat trick. Ibrahimovic ranks second in MLS with 15 goals. He played with Juventus from 2004-06. "I am disappointed to miss the 2018 All-Star game against Juventus, one of my former clubs," Ibrahimovic said in a statement. "I want to thank the fans for voting me to the team. My main focus is to score goals and help the LA Galaxy to the playoffs." The Galaxy (10-7-5) are unbeaten in nine games and have climbed to third place in the Western Conference. Per MLS rules, Ibrahimovic will also have to sit out LA's next match Saturday against Colorado, one of the league's worst teams. New York City forward David Villa also will skip the All-Star Game after missing six matches with a knee injury. Ibrahimovic and Villa were replaced on the MLS roster by Minnesota forward Darwin Quintero and New York Red Bulls midfielder Tyler Adams. Atlanta United coach Gerardo Martino, who will be guiding the MLS team, said the timing of the game does pose problems. "In reality, I recognize it's a little bit of a challenge for coaches who have players participating," Martino said through an interpreter. "Some players are coming from teams where they've played three games (in the last week). Some had a long trip to get here, like from Vancouver. I understand it's a very beautiful spectacle for the league and the United States. But I think what we have to look at in the future is to have it at a different time, either before or after the season. "We have to make sure the players arriving here in good condition are also returning to their teams in good condition." But MLS is eager to show off its most compelling success story. Atlanta shattered the MLS attendance record in its debut season, averaging 48,200 per game, and is on pace to break that mark this year at nearly 52,000 per game. The club already has the five biggest stand-alone crowds in MLS history — each more than 70,000 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. The league expects another record crowd for its All-Star Game, breaking the mark of 70,728 in Houston for the 2010 match in which Manchester United defeated the MLS squad 5-2. An extra 1,500 tickets have been put on sale to meet the demand. "It's been fantastic to see the support that the city has given the club," Guzan said. "There's not many cities around the world that have what we have here in Atlanta. I'm happy to have the opportunity to showcase this to everyone.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

PBA: Ginusto ko ang bola –- Thompson on nasty rebound over Johnson

It’s rare to hear the crowd roar over a rebound play. And fans inside the Big Dome, especially the Barangay Ginebra faithful, just witnessed one of those moments when Scottie Thompson, a 6-foot-1 guard, soared up high to snatch the rock over a wide-bodied, nine inch taller Rain or Shine import Reggie Johnson. It was a play deserving of a spot in a highlight countdown. Thompson grabbed 10 rebounds including the nasty one with just 1:37 left in the fourth quarter Monday in the Gin Kings’ Finals spot-clinching 96-94 Game 4 nail-biter over Rain or Shine that sealed the 2018 PBA Commissioner’s Cup best-of-five semifinals series at the Big Dome. With the Ginebra protecting a 93-90 lead, Elasto Painters gunner Chris Tiu shot a triple that bounced off the rim. The 290 lbs. Johnson successfully boxed out Gin Kings’ Japeth Aguilar for a spot under the basket to collar the rebound. Just when Johnson thought that he got the ball, Thompson came running down, jumped over his back and snatched the rock with one hand. One could just hear the loud collective ‘oohs’ from the crowd.                 “’Yun lang talagang tinalon ko lang ang bola kasi crucial,” said Thompson, who in the series averaged nine rebounds per game. “Ginusto ko ang bola so buti nakuha ko.” That was his ninth board. A minute after, Thompson again plucked another crucial offensive rebound that led to an LA Tenorio floater that put the Gin Kings up, 95-90. To cap up his night, Thompson sealed the win with a steal off the Elasto Painters’ inbound with just 1.4 ticks left. Thompson may have sacrificed his offense with his effort on the boards and on defense but it’s a role the University of Perpetual Help product learned to embrace. He averaged only 5.4 points in the semis series but his defensive effort earned him a norm of 1.25 steals per game.       “Ang sabi sa amin ni coach Tim (Cone) na be the aggressor lagi kasi kailangan sila ang mag-react sa amin,” said Thompson. “’Yun ang ginagawa namin especially ako, talagang yun ang ginawa ko para makatulong sa team.” And Cone praised Thompson for his work. “A few? It seemed like he was grabbing everything and jumping over everybody, jumping over Johnson, jumping over Almazan. I mean, my gosh, getting that offensive rebound. He is just... he makes me speechless, he really does,” said Cone when asked about his reaction on Thompson’s rebounding. “Those were the plays of the game,” he added. “Joe (Devance) played great, but I thought Scottie was gonna get the Player of the Game just because of the rebounds he got, because they were all super clutch. And if he hadn't gotten a couple of those rebounds, Johnson would have gotten really easy putbacks.” “He did not only denied (Johnson) the rebound, but he denied the easy putback. So he just leaves me speechless some times,” Cone continued. “His timing is otherworldly. That's the only way I can explain that, I've never seen anybody with that kind of timing. Amazing.” Now, playing against a tough opponent in sister-team San Miguel Beer in the best-of-seven Finals starting Friday, Thompson just want to focus on the thing he does best. “Ang akin lang naman stay aggressive lang. Gusto ko lang maging aggressive lagi sa offense, defense especially sa defense kasi yun ang role ko para sa team,” he said.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

ONE: Shinya Aoki says he’d enjoy a rematch with fellow former champ Eduard Folayang

Nearly two years removed from losing ONE Championship Lightweight World Title, Japanese MMA legend Shinya Aoki finds himself back on the path towards championship glory, and the next stop on his journey brings him to Manila at ONE: Reign of Kings, Friday, July 27th at the Mall of Asia Arena. In a battle of top lightweight contenders, Aoki meets Thai MMA star Shannon ’OneShin’ Wiratchai, with the winner moving one step closer to a lightweight world title shot. And while another run at the world title could be on the line, the Evolve MMA star says that his focus in the lead up to the fight will be his own progress and no one else’s. “I approach all my fights the same. I focus on myself, and my game.” Aoki shared with ABS-CBN Sports via email. “I train hard with all my training partners and coaches, whether its in Japan or at Evolve MMA in Singapore, to improve all aspects of my game to prepare myself for the bout ahead. I am confident in my abilities and am looking forward to this bout.” Adding another layer to the upcoming Aoki versus Wiratchai fight will be the fact that the Thai star revealed that he looks up to the Japanese legend. “I have been competing for a long time now so it is interesting that I am competing against someone who used to watch me growing up. When I compete I go out there to do my best as a martial artist, if my performances inspire someone to start martial arts that’s just an extra bonus.” “Shannon is a good strong opponent, I look forward to competing against him.” Aoki added. If Aoki can defeat Wiratchai in Manila, it’ll mark his first string of back-to-back wins since 2015, definitely a step in the right direction. From 2016 to 2017, Aoki went through quite a rough patch that was kickstarted with him dropping his ONE title to Eduard Folayang in Singapore, followed a grappling superfight loss to Garry Tonon and a one-sided beatdown from then-ONE Welterweight World Champion Ben Askren. Momentum shifted to Aoki’s favor in the start of 2018, as he submitted fellow former ONE champion Marat Gafurov in another grappling superfight, before getting back in the win column in MMA, choking out Rasul Yakhyaev in just one round back in May. “As a professional athlete, winning and losing is all a part of the journey.” Aoki said of his struggles and his recent run of success. “As a martial artist, all I focus on is continuing to improve and learn from the past and improve my game in all aspects. Improving a little bit every day is what martial arts is about. This is the mindset I’ve always had.” Speaking of Eduard Folayang, Aoki now is on the same boat as the Filipino MMA star, both former champions looking to regain their place at the top of the division. Folayang will also be fighting on ONE’s Reign of Kings card in Manila, against unbeaten Russian Aziz Pahrudinov. Much like Aoki, a win for Folayang moves him one step closer to another shot at the championship. If everything goes according to plan for these two former champions, their paths could cross once more, and that’s something that Aoki says he wouldn’t mind. “I am open to compete against anyone or rematch anyone. If ONE Championship wants me to face Eduard I would enjoy that. My job is to train hard to improve all aspects of my game for whoever I am facing.” Before anything else however, Aoki and Folayang will have to take care of business come fight night. For Aoki, who is, by all means, a proven legend in MMA, the learning never stops, and it’s this feeling of hunger for more that keeps the former champ motivates. “I never think of my accomplishments as enough. Every bout is a new challenge for me to take on, so I push myself to be able to handle anything that comes my way. I am always training and learning new techniques so my game is constantly improving. The martial arts journey never ends.” said Aoki.   Former ONE Lightweight World Champion Shinya Aoki meets top contender Shannon Wiratchai in a lightweight contest with massive title implications at ONE: Reign of Kings on Friday, July 27th at the Mall of Asia Arena. Catch it LIVE starting at 8:30 PM on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23!   *Special thanks to Aliya Anwar of Evolve MMA.        .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

Josh Hart matures during summer league, wins MVP

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Josh Hart wasn’t around to see the conclusion of the summer league as he was ejected from the championship game after criticizing the officials. The Lakers fell short in the title game, losing to Portland 91-73 on Tuesday night. Hart earned league MVP honors for a stellar two-week performance. He had a team-record 37 points in the double-overtime win over Cleveland in the semifinals on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time). Yet, his main takeaway from the game was that he, “missed two clutch free throws.” His performance on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) surpassed the 36-point effort by Lonzo Ball last year. “I don’t go for individual accolades,” said Hart, who finished with 12 points in the title game. “That’s never been a reason why I played this game. I play this game to win. That’s the biggest thing, I came here to win, I came here to dominate.” And while the Lakers couldn’t repeat as summer league champions, and he did anything but dominate during his disappointing appearance in the final, the 6'5" shooting guard’s evolution since the conclusion of his rookie season is what became apparent, and exactly what the Lakers needed to see. “We’ve been going since the middle of May, we focused on some things he needed to work on, talked about leadership qualities going into summer league because he was one of our veteran presence that has played legit NBA minutes, and he took all those things and carried into the three-week process here - and he was phenomenal every night,” Lakers summer league coach Miles Simon said. “I really love Josh for that because he fought to continue to play cause he’s a competitor and he’s a winner and we’re trying to build a championship mentality throughout our organization and we talk about those things every day. And Josh embodied all those things over this time.” He embodied the type of player Lakers coach Luke Walton is hoping will complement a lineup that is sure to be resuscitated with the most polarizing figure in sports - LeBron James. “Josh is a phenomenal player, I have fun watching him grow from school, it’s amazing,” said Portland’s KJ McDaniels, who scored 17 points and earned game MVP honors. “He did great leading his team every day. It’s always good going against the best guys in the league. He’s going to do great things with the Lakers.” Sidelined in March after undergoing surgery to repair a broken left hand, Hart finished the regular season averaging 7.9 points per game and grabbing 4.2 rebounds per game. He also shot 39.6 percent from three-point range, leading the team in three-point percentage. Since the offseason Simon said the focus has been to push Hart with a few aspects of his game that needed improvement: ball handling, shooting off the dribble and working off a pick-and-roll. “Nothing that he did here surprised me, it’s things we concentrated on and that he’s worked on,” Simon said. “He brings it every day to the gym in the offseason with a tremendous work ethic and you can see the payoff here in summer league. And that is going to be a great springboard for him going into training camp.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 18th, 2018