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Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnJan 12th, 2018

Morning Tip Q& A: DeMar DeRozan

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst The tweet was posted at 6:06 a.m. on Feb. 17 (7:06pm, PHL time), and while there have occasionally been positive tweets sent out at that hour, this one got people’s attention for the wrong reasons. This depression get the best of me... — DeMar DeRozan (@DeMar_DeRozan) February 17, 2018 That it came from the Twitter account of a four-time NBA All-Star, whose team was en route to the best season in franchise history, only added to the confusion. But there it was. “This depression get the best of me...” DeMar DeRozan tweeted, and it surprised just about everyone, because the 28-year-old is pretty quiet most of the time. But DeRozan has been carrying a lot on his plate. Not only is trying to lead Toronto somewhere it’s never been before, but has never has as a good a chance before, either -- The Finals -- but he’s been doing it while going back and forth between Toronto and Los Angeles, where his father, Frank DeRozan, has been hospitalized for weeks. Frank DeRozan has been DeMar’s biggest coach, biggest critic and biggest champion his whole life, never being satisfied as his son rose through the ranks of basketball, from Compton High to USC to the NBA. But Frank DeRozan has suffered health setbacks in recent years -- a stroke and significant kidney problems, per the Toronto Sun -- and DeMar has gone bicoastal multiple times to be with his dad, never missing a game in the process. (Frank DeRozan was able, though, to temporarily leave the hospital last month in L.A. to go to Staples Center to see DeMar play for Team Stephen in the All-Star Game.) In his ninth season in Toronto -- he’s never asked for a trade and agreed almost immediately to a $139 million extension with the Raptors in 2016, never even looking at free agency -- DeRozan has scored less than he did last season, but is averaging a career-high 5.2 assists and gone all in on Toronto’s “culture reset,” as GM Masai Ujiri put it after the Raptors went out again in the playoffs last year. After years of resisting, arguing not without merit that he was a master of the mid-range game, DeRozan has embraced the three-pointer this season, obliterating his previous highs for attempts and makes behind the arc, and keeping the ball moving both to fellow All-Star Kyle Lowry and to the team’s emerging cast of young, talented players, who’ve helped carry the load all season. After winning Sunday (Monday, PHL time), the Raptors are an Eastern Conference best 45-17, and are closing in on home court throughout the playoffs in the East. All would seem to be great. But, as DeRozan’s social media statement made clear (and, to his credit, he acknowledged it was him and that he wasn’t hacked, and he hasn’t taken the Tweet down), life sometimes gets in the way of all our dreams. David Aldridge: So, your dad was able to come to Staples Center to see you at the All-Star Game. How was that for him? DeMar DeRozan: It was good. It was real good. He had a good time. It was cool for him to be able to come out and experience it and enjoy it. It made me feel good. He was happy about it. DA: And how is he doing? DD: Every day is one of them things where you just don’t know until he’s home. Until he gets home, that’s when I think I’ll be more comfortable, knowing, cool, you’re out of there. He’s been in there since Dec. 23. It’s March 2nd. I know just that is bothering him, being in there and wanting to get out. Just on top of that, my mom, when I was home the other day, my mom was telling me ‘this is the longest I’ve been without my husband in 30-plus years.’ Stuff like that, that’s the rough part of it. DA: So is that where your head’s at right now? DD: Without a doubt. For sure. One thing I always try to do whenever I go out there and play is try to do whatever I can, knowing I’m so far, doing something I know will make them proud, make them feel good, give them a kind of energy. That’s kind of where I’ll be with it. DA: Is it hard to compartmentalize? So many people say the court is their refuge? DD: For me, it’s easy to do, from the moment of playing to kind of lock in and focus and kind of indulge in that moment. It’s crazy you say that, because Kyle, he’s one of my closest friends, he knows me so well. A lot of times after the game, the first thing he’ll say to me is ‘back to reality.’ He knows now our night is over. Now I have to go back and get into the reality of DeMar. It’s crazy. DA: What have you heard from folks since you sent that tweet out? DD: Man, where haven’t I heard from? Honestly, the response, I can honestly say that I wouldn’t have even thought how the response, how it came out, I wouldn’t have thought I’d ever gotten anything like that. Especially me. I’ve never been one who wanted any type of attention, good nor bad. The response I got from people was so uplifting, positive, refreshing. It’s crazy. It’s crazy. But it made me feel good. You just look at certain things. People say ‘you helped me. Because if you’re going through something like this, I can get through it.’ It’s incredible. By far one of the most incredible things in my career that I’ve witnessed outside of basketball. DA: So you could be a role model in a whole different way. DD: For sure. I never looked at myself and said ‘man, I want to be a role model.’ But something like that is extremely important. It’s all walks of life. I done had high school players, college players, older people. I had one older coach that I’ve known text me and tell me, ‘if there was a player when I was young that I’d seen or witnessed who was going through something (like this), it would have helped me -- then -- not be an alcoholic.’ It was incredible to hear words like that. It’s been one of them things where I’m like, ‘damn, I’m just speaking the truth.’ It’s crazy. DA: Is there anything you’re doing formally or officially now to deal with it? DD: Nah. I think I’m going to definitely, once we’re all said and done, probably the summertime for sure, I’ll be open arms about it without a doubt. At the end of the day, it’s like it’s one of them things where you can’t play basketball forever, but if there’s something I can do that will outlast it and be helpful, be bigger than basketball, I’m all for it. It’s life. DA: So y’all are in this new position on top of the East. You’ve been good for a minute over the years, but this is the top of the top. Is the vibe different in the locker room? DD: Definitely. It’s more, we have fun with one another, but we understand it’s bigger than us all. We, all of us -- young guys, all of me. Me and Kyle always tell the young guys, ‘this opportunity doesn’t always come around that often. Take advantage of this and be all for it. Before you know it, you’re going to be 10 years in, and the opportunity may not come again. Take full advantage of it.’ And everybody understands that. We see it now, especially when we have games where we lose a game. We think we’re on a 10-game losing streak. That’s how we approach coming in the next day at practice, or the next game. It’s great to have that kind of feeling and vibe. DA: How do you know when you’re all locked in? DD: You just know. I always look at my guy Kyle, and you know he’s gonna ride or die with you. But it’s crazy when you’re able to look over at a guy like Pascal (Siakam), or Freddie (Van Vleet), or Delon (Wright), these young guys who only have a couple of years in the league, they’ve got the same look that Kyle’s got. That says a lot about the team. Because you know when those young guys go in, they’re some dogs, too. That’s the beauty of it, and it shows. DA: So, about those young guys. You know what you’re gonna do in the playoffs, and you know what Kyle’s gonna do, and Jo. But if you’re going to beat an elite team in the playoffs, the young guys are gonna have to perform. DD: Yeah. And they have. I lost count of how many games our starters haven’t even played in the fourth quarter. Against good teams, not just lower teams. There have been times where we’re playing some great teams, and the coaches come in and look at us, and we’re like, ‘nah, let them finish out the game. They’ve got this.’ It’s great to have that type of confidence in the young guys. It’s amazing. I know we get a lot of credit, but they deserve just as much credit. DA: So is this the most optimistic you’ve been going into the postseason? DD: Yeah. Because we’ve done felt the fails. We’ve been at the top, and we fell all the way to the bottom. We know what that feels like. We know what it feels like getting closer and closer. We understand the moments. That’s the beauty of failing sometimes. Nobody wants to fail, but you have to to understand what it takes to succeed. And I think that’s where we’re at mentally, and we understand what we have to do. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Toronto s Leonard out against Clippers with right hip bruise

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Toronto’s Kawhi Leonard won’t play against the Los Angeles Clippers because of a bruised right hip. Raptors coach Nick Nurse announced the injury shortly before Tuesday night’s (Wednesday, PHL time) game at Staples Center. He says Leonard got hurt in a loss against Milwaukee on Sunday (Monday, PHL time) and the forward is listed as day-to-day. “He did go through shootaround,” Nurse said. “We were hoping he would pass the test and go, but it was a little too sore.” Leonard is averaging 26.1 points and 8.3 rebounds for the Raptors, whose 21-7 record leads the NBA. Toronto came into Tuesday’s (Wednesday, PHL time) game having lost three of four. The Raptors move on to face Golden State on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 12th, 2018

Hitmakers and Ai

Love and laughter is a perfect combination to an endearing relationship. Come February 15, set your heart to a night of love songs and a dose of fun with your favorite OPM Hitmakers: Hadji Alejandro, Rey Valera and Marco Sison, together with comedy concert queen Ai-Ai delas Alas at the Newport Performing Arts Theater. You’ll… link: Hitmakers and Ai.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Longtime friends James, Wade prepare for last meeting as opponents

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com LOS ANGELES — Friendships are never formed totally by choice, because fate demands a say-so in the process by creating the time and the place and in the curious case of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the basketball court. It was in Chicago, June of 2003, site of the NBA’s annual draft combine, the meet market for young players gathered to someday change the game, when Wade and LeBron had each other at wassup. In some ways, it was an unlikely pairing: Teenaged phenom from Akron, Ohio, fresh from the cover of Sports Illustrated and the high school prom who already had a national following; and an overlooked underdog from the Chicago suburbs who only became an acquired basketball taste weeks earlier after a searing run through the NCAA tournament. That day, Wade and LeBron went through the checkup lines for height and weight, vertical leap and whatever else the combines put rookies through and then during a break came the only measurement that counted, when one future Hall of Famer sized up the other. LeBron said: “Some things you can’t explain. Sometimes it’s just chemistry.” Wade said: “When you’re young and coming into the league, you find guys you have something in common with, then you continue to link and that’s what we did. It’s organic how we built this friendship.” Some 15 years later, the bond will endure, likely forever. The basketball part, however, ends Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) after the game when Wade, who’s calling it a career after this season, peels off his sweat-soaked Heat jersey and swaps it for a Laker top belonging to LeBron. It might qualify as the best trade of the NBA season, or at least the most emotional. "It's sweet and sour,” said LeBron, anticipating the moment at Staples Center. “The sweet part about it is I've always loved being on the same floor with my brother. And the sour part about it is that this is our last time sharing the same court.” Brother? How many folks with different blood can call each other that? True friendship is answering the phone at 3 a.m. instead of letting it ring, and reaching for the tab with longer arms, and above all, becoming a mattress when the other guy falls. Those tests were aced throughout the LeBron-Wade bromance that stretched through two Olympic teams, four years in Miami, two NBA championships and even 46 games in Cleveland together but of course was always put on hold whenever they were on opposite benches. This is best placed into proper context by Gabrielle Union, the actress and wife of Wade, who says ever so delicately about her husband in those friend vs. friend moments: “He wants to kill him. Drop three-balls on him.” Perhaps so, because as Wade says, “you always want to beat your best friend,” yet their competitive spirit is confined within the baselines and between the jump ball and buzzer. Then the teasing and bragging rights begin by text or call, almost instantly. This arrangement irked the old-school basketball culture, long cringing at the chummy ways of a new generation, believing that most if not all interaction should cease until the offseason, or even better, when careers are done. Wade and LeBron then turned up the volume on that subject when they linked up as teammates with the Heat in 2010, angering the purists and creating, at least initially, a team to be despised as well as respected. Not that Wade and LeBron regret that experience at all, or the noise that followed; this was, as Union observed, “far bigger than basketball.” The chance to be neighbors and watch their kids grow up together and celebrate championships on South Beach until well past sunrise was a priceless part of the bonding process, something neither will be able to duplicate as they begin a new phase of their relationship. The chance to let their hair down (well, Wade anyway) and loosen up, away from the crowds and the media, is something they could keep to themselves. Although: Mrs.Wade spilled a few friendship secrets the other day, with an ohmigod and a roll of the eyes. “They laugh a lot,” she said. “LeBron is silly. Dwyane is silly. They’re silly and goofy together. When they’re around each other it’s like a never-ending sleepover. That’s what it feels like when you’re in their orbit. They have an unspoken language and jokes and it’s like a show and everyone’s watching.” It helped that, in addition to being in the same sport, both LeBron and Wade became all-time greats, because like-minded and like-talented people tend to magnetize. It was LeBron who collected MVP awards and a huge social media flock at first, then Wade followed up by winning a championship first, and this created a mutual respect for each other’s abilities. It also allowed them to walk through the same exclusive doors together, for example, making a pair of Olympic teams and a batch of All-Star Games, therefore putting them in close company even before the Heat experience. From those moments, a relationship tightened. And when life threw airballs in their direction, one was there to help the other. “When I was going through the custody of my kids and that battle, he was someone I talked to constantly and told him what I was going through,” said Wade. “And vice versa, when he was going through things family-wise, I could talk to him and try to relate. You lean on guys who have similar stories and have gone through similar things in their lives to help with advice or just be there to listen.” Curiously, one of their few awkward moments happened when they became teammates in Miami initially. The transition, Wade admitted, was friction-free but not totally smooth. Superstars have egos. Adjustments were needed and were done and this was made possible by LeBron’s game, which is built on unselfish play. “It would’ve been easier if we went to a neutral site,” Wade said. “But because he came to Miami, it was my team before he got there. It was a little hard because of that, but once we got through the first year it was easy. He can play with anybody. He can go out and score or he can get 17 points and 20 assists. He knows if a guy hasn’t shot the ball in a while and how to get him going.” Their on-court chemistry was astonishing to witness at times, the best entertainment in basketball back then. They knew each other’s tendencies, spots on the floor and how to mesh. How many times did Wade toss a lob to a streaking LeBron for a dunk, or vice-versa? Along with Chris Bosh, this was one of the most productive link-ups in NBA history. Four years and four trips to the NBA Finals don’t lie. And true friendship is following your pal to Cleveland in winter, as Wade did last year in an awkward attempt to re-create the past. To this, Wade shook his head and laughed: “Yeah, yeah, you right about that.” While Wade is putting a bow on this retirement season, he marvels at his friend’s staying power and salutes LeBron’s decision to sign up with the Lakers and take on Los Angeles. “I think it’s great, something he wanted to do,” Wade said. “For a player to be able to map out his career the way he has been able to do, he’s doing it his way. This is the way he wanted, to end it here in L.A., on and off the court. His career is not over, but this is the last layer of his career.” And LeBron, reflecting on Wade’s NBA imprint, said: “D-Wade has definitely had a helluva career, obviously. A first-ballot Hall of Famer, a three-time champion and so on and so on. I mean, it speaks for itself. But what he's done for that franchise and what he's done for that community since he's been drafted has been a pretty good story.” This is curious timing, how the NBA schedule has Wade making his last trip to Los Angeles and against LeBron not long after Wade and Union, who have a home in L.A., recently welcomed a newborn daughter. The families spent Sunday (Monday, PHL time) together at the baby shower, then the farewell game tips 24 hours later. Union calls it the “end of a basketball brotherhood but the beginning of a real friendship with basketball gone” and Wade agrees. “When we first came into the league people couldn’t understand how we could be friends during the season," Wade said. "When I was in Cleveland for a game I’d go to his house the night before, we’d go to the movies and hang out and then we’d go at each other in the game. We’d laugh about that. We enjoy having a different relationship than what was done before us, but then going out and playing against him, I’d always want to whup his you-know-what. And vice versa. Just the times we shared. The moments when it’s not all been great, but to be able to have somebody to talk to and run things by. A lot of people don’t have a LeBron James to call up and say, 'Hey, I’m thinking about this, what do you think about it?’ That’s special.” What will also be special Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) is when Wade, as has been his routine after every game this season, swaps jerseys with an opposing player; this will be the 1,001st game of Wade’s dwindling NBA career. “Obviously this is something I wanted to do in my last year,” Wade said. “But of all the players in the league, LeBron is one of my closest friends so this one will mean a little more, because of the paths that we both went down as competitors against each other and as teammates. We’ll be linked together forever.” And what might be said between friends and competitors caught up in that moment? Wade offers this: “We’ll look at each other and say, 'Yo, this is it.’ It’s crazy that it happened so fast. We remember the night we got drafted like yesterday. But it comes fast. Just an ending of a chapter in both of our lives.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Futility in Phoenix wears on Devin Booker

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com He is already a star at age 22 but on this particular play, Phoenix Suns guard Devin Booker had role player instincts Sunday (Monday, PHL time) at Staples Center. The basketball bounced toward the baseline, beyond his reach, and he hustled anyway. And so the predictable happened: The ball beat him off the court and into the first row. Then the unthinkable happened: He grabbed his left leg and bent over in pain. The first player who rushed over to him yelled: “Book! Book! Hamstring?” ]It was thoughtful of LeBron James to check on Booker, even better if LeBron did this last summer as a free agent when Booker really could’ve use a hand. Instead, Booker is not only limping right now -- hopefully just temporarily for the team’s sake -- but also losing, something he has done more prolifically in Phoenix than get buckets. One of the shames of the NBA is how one of its breakout stars and franchise players is stuck on a habitually bad team, with no playoff shine in sight, and mostly invisible. Yes, only LeBron and Kevin Durant have reached 4,000 career points faster than Booker, but neither ever took Ls like this. Booker is now up to 136 in slightly over three seasons and once again the Suns, now 4-19, are on pace to be forgotten by Christmas. You could hardly blame their fans for getting their basketball fix these days by watching Duke games. All roads lead to the lottery, as it has since 2015 when Booker became one of the few draft decisions that actually worked out. But for Booker and the Suns, that’s some tough medicine, playing another 55 games, swallow many depressing nights along the way, and then pray the odds work in their favor come June. It’s fair to wonder how much of a toll this culture takes on Booker, who’s once again a player who demands a double team, averaging nearly 25 points a game and doing decently as a stand-in at point guard. Some perspective is needed, though. Booker signed a five-year, $158 million contract extension in July, giving plenty of living and den space for all the losing he takes home at night. Still, he said, "It sucks." Booker lost 58 games as a rookie, then 58 again, then 61 last year and may reach 65 or more this season. He’s lost 13 straight games twice, and the Suns once lost 28 of 30 with Booker on the floor. In an 82-game season, it shouldn’t be terribly difficult to put together, say, a four-game win streak. Booker is still waiting on that. For years the situation just wasn’t pretty in Phoenix and it’s only slightly less ugly now. Too many poor Draft picks have delayed progress and ruined the team. Former lottery picks Dragan Bender, Marquese Criss and Alex Len couldn’t earn rookie extensions and there was Phoenix's infamous point guard fetish of recent years when they went through Isaiah Thomas, Eric Bledsoe and Brandon Knight for little or nothing in return when they left. Sprinkle in some weird free-agent decisions -- like signing Tyson Chandler only to buy him out three years later -- and hilariously chasing LaMarcus Aldridge and it smacked of a team lacking both direction and a plan. Most of these moves were made by former GM Ryan McDonough and while James Jones represents a refreshing front-office change, he comes with little experience in that role. When you examine the fast-track of Booker, you get the best young scorer the league has seen since Durant and LeBron. You also get these numbers: Two, four and 47. That’s how many general managers, coaches and teammates Booker has had in less than four NBA seasons, heavy turnover storming all around him. “My whole career except for the NBA, I’ve been a winner,” Booker said. “I want to get back to that. I’m done with not making the playoffs.” Well, the circumstances say otherwise. The Suns are essentially holding tryouts for the future now, though. Chandler was the first one thrown overboard and if Phoenix could get anything for Ryan Anderson and his contract, he’d be next. For some reason Phoenix gave a head-scratching $15 million this season last summer to aging swingman Trevor Ariza. He's shooting 37.2 percent and scoring 9.9 ppg, taking minutes from young players. Among rotation players, the lone holdovers from 2017-18 are Booker, TJ Warren and Josh Jackson. Taking some advice he received from Chandler, who became a mentor, Booker believes it’s necessary for him to adopt a more forceful role on the court and in the locker room even if, from an age perspective, he needs more seasoning for that. But what are the alternatives, given the ever-changing lineup? “I’m doing more leading by example and being more vocal about it, holding people accountable and hold myself accountable too,” he said. It’s a chore trying to pick up others when, after taking yearly poundings, you need a hand yourself. This is the mountain Booker is up against. Again. “I know losing is tough on him because last year as a rookie I struggled with it,” said Jackson. “I’m just keeping my head on straight now. We show flashes but we need consistency.” Or you could say they need LeBron. And if Booker misses any extended time with a hamstring that has given him trouble before Sunday, well, as Jackson said: “Everybody knows we need him desperately. The sooner we get him back, the better.” With the possible exception of the Knicks, no franchise has splattered the concrete with the speed and consistency as the Suns. Before Booker was born, the Suns were a destination franchise, a place most players wanted to sign with, get drafted by and be traded to. The balmy winter weather was an obvious attraction but in the mid-1990s with Charles Barkley, and then 10 years later with Steve Nash, the Suns were also entertaining and won everything except a championship. Sellouts were common, the arena was a tough place for visitors and fans frolicked along with the Gorilla mascot. All this happened on Jerry Colangelo’s watch and prosperity under owner Robert Sarver is on hourglass time. At least Booker is locked up for four more years and there’s no danger of losing him, at least to another team, in the immediate future. They could lose him to frustration, though, fairly soon, especially when he sees other teams playing meaningful games and listens to other players during USA Basketball gatherings talk about what he’s missing. “I’ll do whatever I have to do,” Booker said, when asked about recruiting help in the near future. “I think Phoenix is a place where people can see the potential, see our young nucleus.” Unless there’s a reversal of fortune in the near future, Phoenix could remain a basketball wasteland and no player, not even Booker, wants to wallow in that. Problem is, until there’s a positive roster shakeup, the Suns lack enough to convince another superstar to sign up next summer or maybe even by 2020. At least when their lone star falls to the floor, as he did Sunday against the Lakers, Booker carries enough clout and respect to get a hand of a different sort from LeBron James. For now, that must do. Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2018

Robert Garcia predicts Mark Anthony Barriga will be champ

It’s not the end of the world for Mark Anthony Barriga who lost to Mexico’s Carlos Licona via a split 12-round decision for the vacant IBF minimumweight title at the Staples Center here Saturday night (yesterday morning, Manila time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2018

Barriga says ‘I’ll be back’

ven as the outcome stung like a low blow, Mark Anthony Barriga said he’s not about to question the split 12-round decision that gave the vacant IBF minimumweight title to Mexico’s Carlos Licona in a closely fought contest at the Staples Center here Saturday night (yesterday morning, Manila time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2018

Shock loss to Taipei in 2013 gives Gilas Pilipinas hope for recovery

MANILA, Philippines --- Gilas Pilipinas suffering a shocking upset at the MOA Arena actually has a precedent. Five years ago in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships, the Philippines missed out on a Group A sweep after taking a five-point loss to Chinese-Taipei in an emotionally-charged game. The Filipinos had a history of winning against Taipei but on that fateful night in August of 2013, Gilas Pilipinas took a rather disappointing loss. Still, the Philippines would recover and actually win five straight games to qualify for the 2014 FIBA World Cup. On Friday, the Philippines took another shocking upset at the MOA Arena, this time against Kazakhstan. Gilas' four-point loss has put a damper on the country's road to the FIBA World Cup in China next year. And much like the Taipei loss five years ago, key figures in the national team hope that Kazakhstan loss becomes a turning point. "Katulad ng sinabi ni Gabe [Norwood] kanina, last time na may painful loss national team natin dito [MOA Arena] was against Taipei [in FIBA-Asia 2013]," guard LA Tenorio said. "After that what happened? It became our wake-up call, mas naging focused kami and we made it to the World Cup. It might be the same situation [now]," he added. Tenorio was part of the 2013 Gilas team that won silver in the Asian Championships. He was also part of the 2014 team that competed in the World Cup. LA is actually only making his return to the national team now four years later and he's hoping that Gilas realizes that one painful loss doesn't define the race to the World Cup. The Philippines didn't exactly lose ground in these Asian Qualifiers but the team's margin for error just got slimmer. Gilas can make a play for a top two spot in a couple of days actually, all they have to do to beat Iran in its final home game. "Yun lang, we cannot afford [to lose]. Yung margin of error namin is lumiliit. But we still have a chance," Tenorio said. "We can win at least 2 of 3 [of our last games] para World Cup ulit. We focus first on Monday then we'll see what's gonna happen sa next window," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2018

MITSUBISHI MONTERO SPORT, XPANDER, PAJERO WINNERS AT AUTO FOCUS PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARDS

Now on its 13th year, the Auto Focus People’s Choice Awards (AFPCA) once again recognized the most popular automotive models in the Philippines. In the recent APFC Awards Night, Mitsubishi…READ The post MITSUBISHI MONTERO SPORT, XPANDER, PAJERO WINNERS AT AUTO FOCUS PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARDS appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsNov 26th, 2018

LeBron feels love in return to Cleveland, beats Cavaliers

By Tom Withers, Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) — LeBron James felt only love at home. Making his first trip back to Cleveland since leaving for the second time as a free agent, James was welcomed like a hero on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) and rallied the Los Angeles Lakers to a 109-105 win over the Cavaliers, who played an inspired game against their former teammate but couldn't stop him when it mattered most. James finished with 32 points, 14 rebounds and seven assists. He also scored or assisted on 11 straight points as the Lakers overcame a 99-91 deficit in the fourth quarter. The Cavs had a chance to tie late, but Kyle Korver missed a wide-open three-pointer with 17 seconds left and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope made four free throws in the final 15 to seal it for Los Angeles. From the moment he stepped back onto Quicken Loans Arena floor, his home court for 11 seasons, James was treated like a returning champion. On the night before Thanksgiving, Cleveland said thanks to the Northeast Ohio son, the one who ended the city's 52-year championship drought. "We recognize the fact that certainly this is a big night for the city of Cleveland," Cavs coach Larry Drew said before tipoff, "because a hero has come back." The Cavs, who came in an NBA-worst 2-13, didn't roll over against James and played one of their best games this season. They seemed in control up 99-91 before James, as he did some many times for Cleveland, took over and scored or assisted on 11 straight points to give the Lakers the lead. Jordan Clarkson had 20 points and Tristan Thompson 14 and 15 rebounds for Cleveland. James was the last Lakers player introduced before the game, presented with a line familiar to all Cavs fans: "A 6'8" forward from St. Vincent-St. Mary High School," said arena announcer Sean Peebles. "Welcome home! LeBron James." The crowd roared and stood as James walked out and huddled with his new teammates, who must have wondered what was in store for them. But unlike that ugly night of Dec. 2, 2010, when James returned with the Miami Heat and was subjected to non-stop booing, profane chants and a toxic, charged atmosphere of hatred unlike anything seen before or since, this was a night for celebration — and maybe more closure. James has moved on. Cleveland, too. With 8:09 left in the first quarter, James was saluted by the Cavs with a moving video tribute during a timeout. Images of James' playing days with Cleveland — highlighted by the Cavs' historic comeback to win the 2016 title — were shown along with video clips of his impact on the community, including his opening of the I Promise School in his hometown of Akron. As the crowd stood and showed its affection toward James, "Thank You LeBron" was displayed in large letters on the arena's giant scoreboard. James appeared to be touched by the presentation. He bit his lower lip while walking back onto court and pointed to all corners of the building in appreciation, his chance to reconnect with a fan base he'll always share a special, if not complicated, relationship. Wearing a flat cap, long jacket and boots, James arrived at 5:46 p.m., entering the Q through a security entrance he's passed through many times. He greeted two guards near the door with fist bumps before quickly walking past a large group of photographers to the visitors' locker room. Earlier in the day, James visited his I Promise School, a refurbished elementary for at-risk kids he founded and plans to expand. James came back to Cleveland to face a team in disarray without him. The Cavs have endured a season's worth of issues in just over a month with the firing of coach Tyronn Lue, All-Star forward Kevin Love undergoing foot surgery and the latest drama — disillusioned forward J.R. Smith being excused so Cleveland can try to trade him. TIP-INS Lakers: Coach Luke Walton is impressed with James' knack for blocking out external distractions. "The great ones have that ability," he said. "When they're on the basketball court nothing else matters, other than what they're trying to do. Their focus level seems to somehow get higher with the louder the noise gets. I don't know how. I don't know why." Cavaliers: Did not commit a turnover in the first half. ... Starting G George Hill missed his sixth straight game with a sprained right shoulder sustained on Nov. 4 (Nov. 5, PHL time). Hill has ramped up his on-court workouts in recent days and could be back soon. ... Drew said he was unaware of Smith's comments accusing the Cavs of "tanking." Drew believes his team is playing hard, and promised to nothing but coach his team to win. "To coach to lose, I don't understand that, I don't know how to do that," he said. "I don't know how anybody can do that. That's something I would never, ever do." UP NEXT Lakers: Host Utah on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Cavaliers: At Philadelphia on Friday (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2018

Young Rivero proves ‘he can play at this level,’ says Guiao

Ricci Rivero showed flashes of what he's capable of in his first foray as part of the latest national team pool when the squad took on Jordan in a tune-up game Monday night. Rivero only played in the second quarter and finished with four points but did enough to make a good account of himself despite being the youngest member of the team with Kai Sotto unavailabe due to academic reasons. "My focus is to create open shots for my teammates because all of them are capable of making shots," Rivero told reporters in Filipino. "Coach Alex also told me not to hesitate in taking the shot and if I see an open lane attack it," added Rivero, referring to guard Alex Cabagnot, who is also one of...Keep on reading: Young Rivero proves ‘he can play at this level,’ says Guiao.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

Even in Year 16, LeBron James refusing to slow down

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — LeBron James stopped worrying about his place in history long ago. His legacy has been secure for years. The argument about where he ranks, whether or not he’s the best player to ever step on a basketball court, will continue forever and there will never be a definitive answer. That is, unless he keeps doing things like this. In his 16th season, James can still make the game look absurdly easy. The latest entry on the long list of his unforgettable nights came Sunday (Monday, PHL time), when James scored 51 points and led the Los Angeles Lakers to a 113-97 win over the Miami Heat. He’s only the second player to score at least 50 in a game this deep into an NBA career; the other is Kobe Bryant, in his final game, and that was aided by 50 shot attempts. “I’ve always been a guy to let the game talk for itself, speak for itself,” James said. “My body of work speaks for itself, still to this day, 16 years in.” He paused for a second, breaking into a big smile. “If there’s ever a discussion,” James said, “games like this will make sure you figure it out.” Bryant had gone more than seven years without a 50-point game before April 13, 2016, when he went 22-for-50 and scored 60 points at Staples Center as the Laker faithful roared for his work one final time. James hadn’t gone six months since his last 50-point night; it was Game 1 of last season’s NBA Finals, the one where J.R. Smith forgot the score in the final seconds and Cleveland lost to Golden State on the way to a sweep. James was methodical on Sunday (Monday, PHL time); he was 19-for-31 from the field, 6-for-8 from three-point range, getting to 51 points on a deep three-pointer in the final seconds with the outcome already long decided. “That’s all coaching,” Lakers coach Luke Walton said. “Just great coaching. ... No, the way he sees the game, he knows what he’s doing out there.” Through 16 games, though there’s nothing to suggest that he’s going to slow down this season — or anytime soon — James is his usual sensational self. He’s averaging 28.8 points on 52 percent shooting, with 7.7 rebounds and 6.9 assists per game. No one in NBA history has ever averaged that many points in a 16th season or later. Bryant is the only player to average more than 25 points this deep into a career; he averaged 27.9 points in 2011-12, 27.3 points in 2012-13. But it’s not just the scoring. Only Steve Nash, John Stockton and Jason Kidd — three of the best point guards ever — averaged this many assists at this point in their career. “He’s the best player in the world,” Lakers guard Lonzo Ball said. Added fellow Laker Kyle Kuzma: “He could average 40 if he wanted.” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, who had James for four seasons in Miami, describes James’ game in one word: “Timeless.” “Doesn’t matter what year, doesn’t matter how old,” Spoelstra said. “Consistency is as much of a talent as any physical or mental talent. He’s five-star in all of those.” James hasn’t won an MVP award in any of the past five seasons. For as good as he’s been, for as long as he’s been that good, it’s hard to believe that his first 15 seasons only resulted in him winning that award four times. He should be in the conversation again this year, and thought he should have won the award last year. “I just go out and my love for the game keeps me going,” James said. “My ability to put in the work, and see what happens after that. I know if I put in the work and be true to the game, then everything else will take care of itself.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

Clippers snap home skid against Warriors with 121-116 OT win

By Beth Harris, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Lou Williams scored 10 of his 25 points in overtime after the Clippers blew a 14-point lead in the fourth quarter, and Los Angeles hung on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) to beat the Golden State Warriors at home for the first time in nearly four years, 121-116. Williams rallied after missing shots in the closing minutes of regulation, when the Warriors ran off 11 straight points to force overtime tied at 106-all. Montrezl Harrell added 23 points off the bench and rookie Shai Gilgeous-Alexander had 18. The Clippers snapped a seven-game skid against the Warriors at Staples Center, where they last won on Dec. 25, 2014. Kevin Durant had 33 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists for the Warriors before fouling out with 3:46 left in the extra session. Klay Thompson added 31 points, but was just 5-of-16 on three-pointers on a night without injured fellow Splash Brother Stephen Curry. Golden State lost for just the third time in 14 games. The starless Clippers improved to 6-1 at home. Thompson's three-pointer tied it 116-all in overtime, interrupting Williams' run of 10 straight points for the Clippers. Down 106-95, the Warriors closed regulation on an 11-0 run, with Thompson scoring their last eight points. His second three-pointer in the spurt tied it at 106. The Clippers crashed the boards — every player grabbed at least one — and they dominated in the paint, 62-36. Williams' three-pointer gave Los Angeles its largest lead of 101-87. They didn't go up by double digits until Harrell's basket to open the fourth. The Clippers shot 60 percent and led 64-61 at halftime. They controlled the boards, 23-13, and owned a 30-18 edge in the paint. Durant scored 21 points and had three fouls in the half for the Warriors. TIP-INS Warriors: They fell to 39-60 in regular-season games without Curry (left groin strain), who missed his second straight game. ... F Draymond Green returned to the lineup after sitting out two games with a right foot-toe sprain. ... G Shaun Livingston was back after being out seven games with right foot soreness. ... They haven't left California during a seven-game stretch that concludes Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). Clippers: Hall of Famer Bill Russell sat courtside with owner Steve Ballmer. UP NEXT Warriors: Host Atlanta on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) in the second game of a back-to-back, their third of the season. Clippers: Host San Antonio on Thursday (Friday, PHL time), their second straight division-leading opponent......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

James dunk lifts Lakers to 107-106 win over Hawks

By Beth Harris, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — LeBron James scored 26 points and dunked for the winning basket in the final seconds, lifting the Los Angeles Lakers to a 107-106 victory over the Atlanta Hawks on Sunday night (Monday, PHL time). Kyle Kuzma added 18 points for the Lakers' fifth win in six games. Kuzma's layup tied the game at 104-all with 1:34 to go. Kent Bazemore was called for a technical at the end of that play and Kuzma made the free throw for a 105-104 lead. Vince Carter dunked to put the Hawks back up 106-105. James got fouled at the other end and missed both. But the Lakers got the offensive rebound and Kuzma charged into the paint amid three defenders for a shot from the left side. It missed. James was waiting on the right, dunking for a 107-106 lead. LBJ powers it home to give LAL the lead late! #LakeShow pic.twitter.com/gBSwV1jBIy — NBA (@NBA) November 12, 2018 Taurean Prince led the Hawks with 23 points, Bazemore added 21 and Trae Young had 20 for Atlanta, which still has just one road win on the season. Alex Len's dunk started a 7-0 run that put Atlanta ahead 102-98 in the fourth. James' basket drew the Lakers within one, but then he missed two long jumpers on the same possession. The Hawks trailed by nine to start the fourth. Their first three baskets in the fourth came on three-pointers by Prince (two) and Young (one). The Lakers dominated the third, outscoring Atlanta 32-22 to take an 84-75 lead into the fourth. But Atlanta kept coming, hitting three consecutive three-pointers to start the fourth when James was on the bench for the Lakers. Len's dunk gave the Hawks a 99-98 lead, just the second time they led in the second half. James' dunk that tied the game midway through the second quarter got started with Rajon Rondo. He tossed up an alley-oop pass that Brandon Ingram batted back as he ran out of bounds to a trailing James, who provided the thunderous finish. The Hawks raced to a 9-0 lead to start the game, their largest lead of the night. The Lakers missed their first three shots and Ingram committed two turnovers. TIP-INS Hawks: They haven't beaten the Lakers at Staples Center since March 4, 2016. ... Prince was called for a flagrant-1 foul on James in the first quarter. ... C Dewayne Dedmon wasn't with the team while awaiting the birth of his first child. Lakers: James earned his 768th career victory, overtaking Reggie Miller for 21st on the NBA's all-time victories list. ... They've won five in a row against the Hawks and are 24-5 against them at home since 1991. UP NEXT Hawks: Visit Golden State on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). Lakers: Host Portland on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). The teams split their first two meetings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

LeBron, Lakers spoil Derrick Rose s 31-point effort

    MANILA, Philippines – Lebron James flirted with another triple-double and Kyle Kuzma came through the final stretch as the Los Angeles Lakers outlasted the Minnesota Timberwolves, 114-110, in NBA action at the Staples Center on Wednesday night, November 7 (Thursday, November 8, Manila time). The Lakers spoiled the game-high 31-point ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 8th, 2018

American Idol alum Jessica Sanchez performs in PHL

AMERICAN IDOL-alum Jessica Elizabeth Sanchez comes back to the Philippines for a one-night concert, bringing with her the hits that made her a finalist on the US singing show alongside songs that will showcase her vocal versatility......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsNov 5th, 2018

Rough road: Brown says 76ers not yet among East s royalty

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — At home, they can beat anybody. On the road, the Philadelphia 76ers only beat themselves. That’s what they did Sunday night (Monday, PHL time) in Brooklyn, committing an NBA season-high 28 turnovers in a 122-97 loss. A team that was expected to be among the Eastern Conference contenders is only 6-5, and the 76ers are 0-5 outside Philadelphia. “We are not, right now, at this present moment, amongst the royalty in the East and we understand that,” coach Brett Brown said. “And it’s a badge that we want. It’s in us. But at this moment, after 11 games, that’s not where we are. And that’s OK. “This group does have fight, this group does have pride and we will find a way to move on, move up, move forward and that’s my job.” The 76ers were routed at Toronto, Milwaukee and Boston, but those are three of the top teams in the conference. The loss in Brooklyn, their most lopsided of the season, was such a pitiful performance — Brown called it “unacceptable”— that the coach made sure to stress that it was an outlier for his team. The 76ers handed the Nets 39 points off their miscues, which contributed to Brooklyn’s whopping 40 more shot attempts. “It’s not Golden State. We shouldn’t lose a game to Brooklyn by that many points,” said Joel Embiid, who finished with 16 points and 15 rebounds but got only eight shots and was pulled midway through the fourth quarter. “We didn’t compete.” Brown knows the Sixers have to change their ways to have any success away from home. “To win on the road, you better not turn it over at the rate that we’ve been turning it over. You better have an incredible focus on rebounding,” Brown said. “Historically, like, those are the tenants of road wins. “And I think that togetherness, that toughness, the ability to take punches and still come out on the other side, that is part of growth. We don’t have that right now.” Philadelphia was 22-19 on the road last season, when it won its last 16 games overall and went 52-30 before reaching the second round of the playoffs behind Embiid and Ben Simmons. That strong finish has been followed by a shaky start, and players agreed with Brown’s tough talk about their effort Sunday (Monday, PHL time). But he insisted afterward the 76ers wouldn’t overreact and would move on. They’ll try to do that Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) at Indiana, another team ahead of the 76ers in the East. A victory smooths out a rough road that’s left them puzzled. “I don’t know what it is,” Simmons said, “but I think we just need to step it up.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 5th, 2018

OPENING TODAY

  All Souls Night Directed by Aloy Adlawan, Jules Katanyag; stars Andi Eigenmann, Yayo Aguila and Alan Paule   Maid who answers an ad for a temporary job discovers terrifying things about the strange family who hires her. Andi says the movie is made scarier by its "very intimate story."     Bohemian Rhapsody Directed by Bryan Singer; stars Rami Malek, Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, Mike Myers   Movie musical chronicles the rise of Queen and its iconic lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, who succumbed to AIDS-related complications in 1991 at age 45. The rock band is behind the hit songs "Another One Bites the Dust," "We Will Rock You" and ...Keep on reading: OPENING TODAY.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 30th, 2018

Lakers rip Nuggets

LeBron James had 28 points, 11 assists and 11 rebounds while leading the Los Angeles Lakers’ late rally for his first home victory at Staples Center, 128-111 over the previously unbeaten Denver Nuggets on Thursday night......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 26th, 2018

West take notice: Lakers top unbeaten Nuggets

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com LOS ANGELES -- There are foreign roads to navigate, traffic to curse and weather to bless. Change can be a mixed bag, even for LeBron James, and we haven’t yet mentioned his other new and complex surroundings, meaning, teammates to break in. There’s also a third layer to this unfamiliar skin, and this could be the most uncomfortable of them all. Yes, if LeBron and the Lakers are to deliver more than just must-see TV for insomniacs around most of the country, they must find a way to flex muscle in the Western Conference. As LeBron has already discovered, he ain’t in Kansas anymore. Actually, make that Orlando, Charlotte, Brooklyn, etc., etc., etc. For a superstar who doesn’t take nights off, well, he can’t afford to do so anyway in the West, where there’s seemingly another potential 50-game winner staring from the other bench. That’s what Thursday (Friday, PHL time) was all about, planting concern into the heads of the elite teams of the West and making them notice what’s taking place in Los Angeles. The Nuggets came into Staples Center undefeated and left with some clues about what LeBron and the Lakers can be in the near future, after they deal with the early bonding process. “Growth that’s continuing to happen,” is how Lakers coach Luke Walton described it. LeBron had his first triple-double as a Laker and given the circumstances -- no Rajon Rondo or Brandon Ingram, both suspended, for a second straight game -- they delivered their most impressive 48 minutes of the season with a 121-114 win. “The first couple of games when we fell behind, we stayed behind,” said LeBron, noting how the Lakers seized control from the Nuggets for good late. “The best teacher in life is experience.” These are the type of games he will see more frequently than he did with the Cavaliers and Heat. For someone who spent his entire career in the East, the upgrade in competition will force LeBron and the Lakers to sharpen their learning curve. Already the West shows few signs of fall-off from a year ago when 10 teams finished with winning records; because only the top eight make the playoffs, the remaining two had to go home, wishing they were in the East. It’s a small sample size so far, yet once again, it’s business as usual in the better conference: The Warriors remain the class of the conference and league, with all the usual suspects that delivered three championships in four years accounted for. OK, sure, Klay Thompson might need to dispatch his trusty dog Rocco to search for his missing jumper. But: Did you see Steph Curry drop 51 on the Wizards the other night? Well, then. What’s interesting and most frightening about the Warriors is how they’re still a few months from suiting up DeMarcus Cousins, who has advanced to light work and dropping sweat in non-contact drills. Last season’s West runner-ups, the Rockets, are obviously missing the perimeter defense and shooting of Trevor Ariza, who signed with the lowly Suns (purely a money-grab for him). Meanwhile, Carmelo Anthony is shooting 26 percent from deep and straining while trying to keep this from becoming an extension from his Oklahoma City stop. Also: James Harden is dealing with a tweaky hamstring and Chris Paul, fresh from wiping Rajon Rondo’s DNA off his face, his serving out a suspension. Yet this will not last long; already, Rockets GM Daryl Morey is up to his tricks, scheming to trade a plate of Texas brisket to the Timberwolves for Jimmy Butler. If Morey pulls that off, the Rockets will have three All-Stars in their starting five, second only to the Warriors. LeBron must beware of Rondo’s old team, which is playing like it isn’t missing Rondo as much as some folks were led to believe. The New Orleans Pelicans is flourishing with a breezy style that’s a carryover from their surprising second-round run in last spring’s playoffs, with Niko Mirotic putting up more points than Anthony Davis and ex-Laker Julius Randle fitting right in next to AD. Speaking of the unexpected, the Spurs with DeMar DeRozan off to a good start could make it 22 straight playoff appearances after all the changeover and injuries. And Pat Beverly said the Clippers are the best team in LA; take that for what it’s worth, but it shows you that nobody is rolling out the red carpet for the Lakers just because they added LeBron. The Nuggets missed the playoffs on the final regular season day last season and they’re perhaps wiser for it. Nikola Jokic is making his top-three center case and Denver’s defense is rating No. 1 in efficiency. What they saw Thursday (Friday, PHL time) was a controlled and efficient game from LeBron (28 points, 11 rebounds, 11 assists); Lonzo Ball strip Jamal Murray in the open floor for one of his five steals; former Warriors role player JaVale McGee actually getting 16 shots and doing something with it with 21 points; and highly entertaining energy from Lance Stephenson off the bench. Nuggets coach Mike Malone was an assistant from 2005-10 in Cleveland and therefore saw the LeBron Effect first-hand in those formative years. “Sure, the West is tougher,” Malone said, “but also this is his first time playing with all those guys. As he said, this will take time. It doesn’t happen overnight, just as it didn’t last year in Oklahoma City when they brought in Paul George and Carmelo Anthony and everybody thought they were going to be great right away. Playing with LeBron isn’t easy. It easy, but it isn’t easy. When we traded for guys like Wally Szczerbiak, he comes in and says `I’ve never been this open in my life.’ He had a hard to making shots because he was so open. “LeBron is bringing all those guys confidence up. Josh Hart, Kyle Kuzma, they’ll be better off for it. He’s a great player and slowly the team will round into form. My definition of greatness is, what can you do for everyone around you? Can you take them to new heights? And he has done that repeatedly throughout his career. He’s doing the same thing now in LA.” A week into the season tells us this about the Lakers: They’ve played four of their five games against playoff teams, winning only one but taking the other three well into the fourth quarter. They’re two missed LeBron free throws from a winning record. LeBron is MVP-like and sturdy as ever, and the other pieces are slowly dropping into place. Whether it’ll be good enough to make traction in a tough conference will take months to sort out. Yes, the West is better. But that’s also because the Lakers fueled by LeBron, no longer the post-Kobe pushovers, are better as well. Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 26th, 2018