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How Andi has found the ‘best version’ of herself

It's fun to fall in love on an island," a sun-kissed Andi Eigenmann gushed about her "unexpected" romance with Siargao-based surfing champ Philmar Alipayo. "It's paradise!"   The 28-year-old actress, who has been dividing her time between Manila and the scenic Siargao Island, related that one of the things she admired most about her boyfriend was that he inspired her to be the "best version" of herself.   "That was what really captured my heart. He showed me that I could live my life, be young and free and, at the same time, nurture my relationship with my daughter (Ellie). I'm with someone who supports me," she told reporters at a recent press conference for th...Keep on reading: How Andi has found the ‘best version’ of herself.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerOct 18th, 2018

FALSE: This is a photo of Pope Francis meeting President Duterte

CLAIM: A photograph that has been shared thousands of times on social media claims to show Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte meeting Pope Francis. The claim is false; a reverse image search found that the picture is a doctored version of a photo showing Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg meeting Pope ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2019

Alonso turns focus to final leg of motorsports Triple Crown

By Jenna Fryer, Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Fernando Alonso raced into retirement from Formula One dedicated to winning the final leg of motorsports' version of the Triple Crown. The Indianapolis 500 is the missing piece on his resume, one he intends to add in May. But Alonso has been considering his future for quite some time, and his November retirement from F1 has opened his schedule to race in anything he wants. After anchoring Wayne Taylor Racing to a victory in the Rolex 24 at Daytona, the Spaniard was coy about his future. "The aim is to do something unprecedented in motorsport," Alonso said Sunday after picking up his new Rolex watch. Not very specific, but a clue that Alonso is open to any and all ideas in this new chapter of his career. "Right now full focus is on the Indy 500," he said. "But yeah, I'm thinking I'm trying to do something more, maybe in different disciplines. I need to think, I need to plan, I need to make sure that I'm competitive, to have the right people, the right teams, and the right preparations. "Whatever adventure is next, I will not do it if I'm not competitive or I don't have a shot for winning. I need to be very calm and clever with the decisions for the future." The plan was put in motion two years ago when the two-time F1 champion persuaded his McLaren team to let him skip the Monaco Grand Prix and instead race the Indianapolis 500. Alonso had twice won in Monte Carlo — perhaps the toughest leg of the Triple Crown — and now he wanted to kiss the bricks at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. He had never driven an Indy car before and had never raced on an oval, yet he was in contention to win his inaugural Indy 500 until a late engine failure. His sights next turned to 24 Hours of Le Mans, with a sports car racing debut in last year's Rolex 24 as the warmup. Alonso announced he would race at Le Mans the morning after he finished his first Rolex, and six months later he won in France to move closer to the Triple Crown. His attention turns now toward the Indy 500, but with the freedom to pick and choose what he wants to do, Alonso is studying every opportunity. A five-year losing streak in F1 had pushed him to the fringes of that series, and although he remains one of the most popular drivers in the world, some began to wonder if his skills had slipped at the tail of his 17-year F1 career. What he has done moonlighting in different disciplines has proven his talent has not wavered and that as he prepares to turn 38, Alonso still rates among the best drivers on the planet. "Whenever you put a guy in a different car on a different track, normally it takes four or five laps for them to get (comfortable)," said Rolex winning team owner Wayne Taylor. "I remember his first split on the first turn was as quick as everybody. I thought, 'How are we going to manage this?' He was just terrific." Alonso did the heavy lifting for Taylor at Daytona, a race stopped twice for the first time in history for rain, then called shy of the 24-hour mark because conditions were too treacherous for drivers to be on the track. Two of Alonso's three stints in the car were during the rain, in part because F1 had made him the most experienced driver on the Taylor lineup in wet conditions, and because he had the control and steadiness to manage the risks versus reward in a torrential rainstorm. Alonso found the limited visibility and standing water on the track to be the most dangerous conditions of his career, and he had had more than enough when he saw the pace car driver hydroplane and nearly crash when he was following under caution. But he didn't turn a single wheel wrong and drove the Cadillac DPi to the lead every time he was on the track to win the Rolex in his second try. He noted after that that his sports car career was exactly a year old and continued to hint at his future. Although he did a car swap with seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson in November and ran exhibition laps in a stock car, Alonso said at Daytona that NASCAR events are not currently on his radar. He is competing this year in the World Endurance Challenge — he won in his series debut last season in the Six Hours of Spa — and quipped he has so many plans he may need to return to F1 to lessen his load. There are plenty of opportunities for Alonso all over the world, and his next big announcement could be next year's Dakar Rally in Paris. Alonso's win in Daytona made him the third F1 champion to win the Rolex, joining Phil Hill and Mario Andretti. He seemed envious of the drivers before his time who could race all over the world in any sort of formula, and proving that it can still be done might be what Alonso does next. "I think to win in different series, in different disciplines of motorsport which are quite specific, you need to probably be born with that talent and grow up with that knowledge of that series," he said. "Like oval racing, like IndyCar and things like that — to come there and try to be competitive or winning is something that I think in motorsport is quite difficult. "I think in the past it was a little bit more open, motorsport in general. But now every series became very, very professional, and you need to take full dedication to each series, each driving style and things like that. I think hopefully soon I can tell you more of the plans.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 28th, 2019

Lisa Macuja-Elizalde’s ‘Cinderella’ is a generous spell of stage magic

After retiring from the stage, Lisa Macuja-Elizalde, artistic director of Ballet Manila (BM), found her voice in choreography. Backed by a strong creative team, she undertook the enormous task of creating her version of the popular fairy tale, "Cinderella," in 2016. This year, it was restaged at the Aliw Theater, playing to a full capacity audience of over 2,400 for the last show. It has been Elizalde's vision to make ballet, an arcane art, appreciated by people who have no understanding or appreciation of the culture. Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev's score can sound profound at times to the uninitiated. Hence, Elizalde worked with arranger Roy del Valle who picked up the salie...Keep on reading: Lisa Macuja-Elizalde’s ‘Cinderella’ is a generous spell of stage magic.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 9th, 2018

Man says he will prove he didn t kill Michael Jordan s dad

By Martha Waggoner, Associated Press LUMBERTON, N.C. (AP) — For more than 25 years, the man identified as the triggerman in the death of Michael Jordan's father has repeatedly declared his innocence in the murder. Now he's going before a judge to lay out evidence he says proves that although he helped dispose of the body, he didn't kill James Jordan in the early-morning darkness one July day in 1993. "I had nothing to do with this man losing his life, period. I wasn't connected to the murder. I came in after he was already dead. ... The way I look at it is: I denied his family the right to a proper burial because of what I did," Daniel Green said last week in an interview at the Lumberton Correctional Institution in Robeson County, the same county where Jordan was killed. Jordan was killed July 23, 1993. His body was found 11 days later in a South Carolina swamp. It wasn't identified until dental records confirmed it was James Jordan. His body had been cremated except for his jaw and hands, which were saved for identification. On Wednesday, Green goes to court, where defense attorney Chris Mumma and prosecutors from the state attorney's general office will argue whether he deserves an evidentiary hearing that could lead to a new trial. Mumma says this is the first time a judge will hear all evidence gathered by the defense. The state Court of Appeals upheld his conviction in 1996, as did the state Supreme Court in 1999. Green was convicted of first-degree murder. His friend, Larry Demery, testified that Green pulled the trigger and killed Jordan in a roadside robbery gone wrong. Both are serving life sentences. Green, 44, was 18 when Jordan was killed. He's probably best remembered for a video in which he rapped while wearing an NBA All-Star ring and gold watch that Michael Jordan gave to his father. Green says he got the jewelry while disposing of the body. Superior Court Judge Winston Gilchrist will hear the arguments in Lee County court in Sanford. Defense filings make various claims. Several people say they saw Green at a family cookout at the time Jordan was killed. Other issues deal with blood-evidence testimony, the handling of Jordan's shirt, and ineffective trial and appellate counsel. Green said Demery left the cookout to meet someone for a drug deal and he refused an invitation to accompany Demery. Green said he was just out of prison for a conviction that was later vacated, and a girl "was kissing on" him so there was no way he'd abandon that opportunity. Demery returned hours later, Green said, and told him he approached Jordan at a motel parking lot because he mistakenly thought Jordan was the drug connection he was supposed to meet. He said Demery told him the two had an altercation and Demery killed Jordan. If that's true, then much of what people think they know about the murder is wrong, starting with the notion that James Jordan was killed as he slept in his parked Lexus along Interstate 95. "I don't think anybody knows the truth about what happened to James Jordan - the state or the defense," Mumma said. Attorney Hugh Rogers, who represented Demery, said no physical evidence tied either man to the shooting. "It became 'he said, he said,'" Rogers said. "I guess looking at the various versions each one gave, once Larry got to his ultimate version, there was more corroboration there than there was to Daniel's ultimate version." Green said he and Demery became friends in third grade, when they got into a playground fight and a teacher made them apologize and read books together. When he found out Demery had accused him, Green said, he couldn't believe it. As he wore the jewelry and drove around in the red Lexus, Green said he thought he was using the possessions of a drug dealer. He believes he learned he had helped dispose of the body of James Jordan when he read that in news stories. By that time, Michael Jordan had helped the North Carolina Tar Heels win the 1982 NCAA championship and led the Chicago Bulls to three NBA titles. He would win three more titles with the Bulls; he now owns the Charlotte Hornets. A spokeswoman for Michael Jordan declined to comment on Green's attempt for a new trial. In addition to evidence in the defense filings, Green's lawyers will contend that no one was convicted of actually killing James Jordan. Demery accused Green, but jurors found in the sentencing phase that Green didn't kill or intend to kill Jordan, and didn't plan to use deadly force. The state attorney general's office says jurors' opinions at sentencing aren't relevant to the conviction of first-degree murder under the felony murder rule, which means someone died during the commission of another crime. The district attorney who prosecuted Green said he doesn't believe it matters who shot Jordan, although he's confident the evidence showed Green pulled the trigger. "If you ask me who killed James Jordan, I'm going to say Daniel Green and Larry Demery," said Johnson Britt, who retires at the end of the year......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

Entire city helps 3-year-old boy find his missing P2 million-worth hearing aid

An entire city in Henan province, China aided a three-year-old's family in searching for the boy's expensive missing hearing aid. After an article about the missing hearing aid worth $40,300 (around P2.1 million) was published on Monday, Oct. 22, the city of Zhengzhou helped the child's family find the missing cochlear implant. The said device was found outside a supermarket by an unidentified woman, as reported by Dahe Daily viaSouth China Morning Post yesterday, Oct. 24 The woman picked up the implant; she initially had no idea what it is for and brought it home. When she stumbled upon the online version of the said article, which had gone viral, she immediately contacted the child...Keep on reading: Entire city helps 3-year-old boy find his missing P2 million-worth hearing aid.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 25th, 2018

DOCUMENT: Final version of Consultative Committee draft constitution

MANILA, Philippines (UPDATED) – The Consultative Committee released the final version of its draft constitution on Tuesday, July 17. The complete copy, found below in downloadable form, incorporates the changes President Rodrigo Duterte asked for during his meeting with the 22-member committee on July 9. The major changes are ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

MacBook Pro keyboards may have gotten a secret upgrade

The latest MacBook Pro may be hiding a secret fix that users have been complaining about for some time now. The 2018 version of the MacBook Pro, which will be released before the week ends, found its way onto the hand of gadget repair specialists iFixit. Before publishing their customary teardown video for new devices, their gadget experts found an interesting rubberized layer underneath the keycaps of the keyboard, according to a statement. It was a curious find considering the Apple description of its new MacBook did not mention making any technical changes to the keyboard. They merely said it's "an improved third-generation keyboard for quieter typing." On the other h...Keep on reading: MacBook Pro keyboards may have gotten a secret upgrade.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018

Beta version of iOS 12 hints at new iPad with Face ID this fall

An iOS 12 discovery made by a well-known developer suggests that Face ID may be coming to the iPad. The upcoming version of Apple's operating system, iOS 12, expected in September, is already in the hands of developers and beta testers, one of whom has found a clue that points to the brand's face recognition technology making its way to iPads. It was developer Steve Troughton-Smith who found a hidden version of AvatarKit designed to support a larger screen, supposedly a tablet, and tweeted his discovery on July 3. The AvatarKit is the technology used to create 3D avatars, which provides iPhone X users with their Animojis. And the reason why it is currently only available to ...Keep on reading: Beta version of iOS 12 hints at new iPad with Face ID this fall.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

The Golden State Warriors cannot relax now, or else

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Learn from your mistakes, Golden State. Learn from how one got away in 2016. Learn from how sleepwalking through the third quarter on Sunday night (Monday, PHL time) made Game 2 of this series much more interesting than it ever should have been, at least until Stephen Curry went wild in the fourth quarter. Learn from Boston, both this year and six years ago. Learn from what cost San Antonio a title in 2013, too. Don’t give LeBron James hope. Or else. Golden State leads these NBA Finals 2-0, after a 122-103 win put the defending champions two wins away from what would be their third title in the last four seasons. Only four teams have ever wasted a 2-0 lead in the finals — and Golden State is one of them, letting a championship ring slip away against James and the Cavaliers two years ago. The series shifts to Cleveland for Game 3 on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time). James looked exhausted when Game 2 was over, but he’ll be somewhat rested by then. And he will most definitely be fueled by a boisterous home crowd that will want to both give him an immediate lift — and make one last series of impressions before he goes into free agency and considers leaving the Cavaliers again next month. Game 3 is everything for the Cavs. If they go down 3-0, series over. Game 3 has to be everything for the Warriors as well. They know it, too. “I think because we’ve been here several times, I don’t think I’ll need to say much,” Golden State coach Steve Kerr said. “Guys in the locker room, they already know that.” They better. Boston had James in a 2-0 hole this year, then lost Games 3 and 4 in Cleveland and wound up falling in seven. The Celtics had him and the Heat down 3-2 in the Eastern Conference finals in 2012, and couldn’t finish. The Spurs led 3-2 in the 2013 NBA Finals, had a 10-point lead in the fourth quarter of Game 6, and came undone. The Warriors led 2-0 and 3-1 in 2016. This is not the same Golden State team (Kevin Durant helps). This is not the same Cleveland team (Kyrie Irving would really help). But the Warriors would be foolish to not remember that series, not to remember the ultimate cautionary tale. They’re saying all the right things. “It’s nothing to feel happy about being up 2-0,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said. “This [Cleveland] team plays great at home and we expect their other guys to play better at home too, not just LeBron. So we’re not going to relax at all because this team’s been down and out before and counted out by the media. We’re not going to focus on that. We’re just going to focus on what we can do to win Game 3.” This series at times has been the Cavaliers versus the cavalier. Golden State was fortunate to win Game 1, and realized as such. The Warriors should have been up much bigger than 13 at halftime of Game 2, and found themselves in a dogfight instead of a victory lap in the third quarter when the Cavs got within five on a number of occasions. It took things like JaVale McGee going 6-for-6 and David West stepping up in a critical late-third-quarter moment to hit his first three-pointer in seven months to help the Warriors keep the Cavs at bay Sunday, until Curry ran wild late on his way to a NBA Finals record nine three's and turn the game into a rout. It took James, grotesque-looking eye and all, playing like his version of a mere mortal — 29 points, 13 assists, nine rebounds, 10-for-20 shooting. “It was too easy for them,” Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said of the Warriors. Give Golden State credit. They adjusted nicely against James after his 51-point barrage in Game 1. They took a page from the 2014 Spurs — who beat James in five games in the NBA Finals that year, the end of his Miami era — and routinely picked him up 30 to 40 feet away from the basket. Do that, and more often than not James will say that giving up the ball is the right play. The Warriors welcome that. They want the other Cavs to have to beat them. The formula worked Sunday (Monday, PHL time). They just have to do it twice more to win another title. And just like the Warriors on the not-wanting-to-relax front, James said he hopes the Cavaliers continue feeling uncomfortable as well. “Just because we’re going home doesn’t mean we can relax,” James said. “This is the last team in the world you want to relax against. They’ve proven they can win on someone else’s floor, no matter if it’s through adversity as people may call it like when they were going through the Rockets series or whatever the case may be.” It’s often been said, even by James himself, that a series doesn’t really start until one team wins on the other’s home floor. All Golden State has done so far has hold serve. That’s true. But by the close of business Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time), we’ll know if this is a series or not. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

SSPC opens $51-M facility in Clark for production of latest multimedia cards

SFA SEMICON Philippines Corp. (SSPC) opened its $51-million manufacturing facility in Clark Freeport Zone, Pampanga yesterday, where it plans to start producing the latest version of embedded multimedia cards (eMMC) found in tablets, smartphones, and GPS tracking systems. In a disclosure to the stock exchange on Tuesday, SSPC said the new facility forms part of […] The post SSPC opens $51-M facility in Clark for production of latest multimedia cards appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

Incubus ‘in a rocking mood’ for PH show

  If you were to tell a 15-year-old version of Mike Einziger that Incubus, the rock band he formed with high school pals Brandon Boyd and Jose Pasillas, would go on to produce numerous hits, sell more than 20 million albums, travel the world and continue making music for 27 years, he would have told you that you were crazy. "When we first started, we had no idea what we were doing. But personally, I knew I could do this thing for the rest of my life, because I truly enjoy creating, playing and recording music---everything about it. And we feel lucky and privileged to have found such an amazing audience," he told the Inquirer in a recent phone interview arranged by MCA Musi...Keep on reading: Incubus ‘in a rocking mood’ for PH show.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 31st, 2018

Finding salvation in a bowl of ramen

By Joseph L. Garcia, Reporter SALVATION FROM the woes of the world can be found in a bowl of noodles. Each country has its own version of noodles and meat cuts suspended in broth, serving as palliatives for conditions ranging from drunkenness to despair. Rarely has a bowl of noodles achieved such a cultural impact […] The post Finding salvation in a bowl of ramen appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsDec 20th, 2017

Bob Arum hails Jerwin Ancajas the next Manny Pacquiao

MANILA, Philippines — It seems Top Rank Inc. Bob Arum has found himself the next version of Manny Pacquiao......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 6th, 2017

Ancajas the next Pacquiao, says Arum

MANILA, Philippines – It seems Top Rank Inc. Bob Arum has found the next version of Manny Pacquiao......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 6th, 2017

The Gravy TRAIN is leaving and common sense isn’t in it

Otto von Bismarck once said that “laws are like sausages. Better not to see them being made.” No one would agree more than observers of the ongoing TRAIN legislation. The just released Senate version illustrates the point. New ingredients surreptitiously found their way into the mix, diluting the DoF’s otherwise carefully thought-out recipe. Package 1 […] The post The Gravy TRAIN is leaving and common sense isn’t in it appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2017

How Running May or May Not Help the Heart – New York Times

If 50 men run 3,510 marathons over the course of three decades, will their heart health suffer or improve? A new study delving into precisely that questionconcludes that the answer is simultaneously reassuring and complicated, with long years of endurance training seeming not to harm runners’ hearts, but also not necessarily to benefit them in the ways that the runners themselves probably expected. Over the past 40 years or so, attitudes about the effects of strenuous exercise on the heart have whipsawed. At one point, many people believed that endurance exercise would be a panacea for heart problems. A 1977 report in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, for example, intimated that marathon running and a healthy diet would immunize runners completely against atherosclerosis, or the buildup of plaques in the arteries that is the hallmark of heart disease. But after some runners died of heart attacks, including, famously, Jim Fixx, the author of “The Complete Book of Running,” in 1984, many scientists, physicians and athletes began to worry that long-term, strenuous exercise might actually be bad for the heart. In support of that idea, a few studies in recent years have found that the hearts of lifelong male endurance athletes may contain more plaques or other signs of heart problems, such as scarring, than the hearts of less-active men of the same age. A small study presented at a recent meeting of the Radiological Society of America, for instance, found that among a group of middle-aged male triathletes, those who most often trained and competed showed slightly more scarring inside their hearts than the other athletes. But, adding still more complexity to the issue, other recent studies have indicated that, even if longtime endurance athletes do develop heart problems such as atherosclerosis, their version of the disease may be different from and more benign than the types of heart disease that develop in less active people. It was in hopes of bringing more clarity to the increasingly tangled question of how endurance training affects hearts that researchers from the University of Minnesota, Stanford University and other institutions decided, for the new study, to zero in on a unique group of runners: men who had participated in at least 25 consecutive Twin Cities marathons in Minneapolis-St. Paul. These 50 runners, identified by marathon participation logs, turned out to have completed, collectively, 3,510 marathons, with each runner, individually, having finished anywhere from 27 to 171 of the races. The men obviously were experienced endurance athletes. They had trained for at least 26 years, and some for more than 50. Many had started competing in high school or earlier, but others had come to the sport much later, often, the researchers report, in hopes of ameliorating the effects of past lifestyle choices, such as smoking or junk food diets. Most were lean at the time of the study, but a few qualified as overweight, based on their body mass indexes. Most ran 30 miles per week or more. The researchers had each of these runners fill out detailed questionnaires about their training routines, as well as their general health history and habits. Then they scanned the runners’ hearts to look for atherosclerosis. Sixteen of the runners proved to have no plaque in their arteries at all. The rest had some deposits, with 12 displaying slight amounts, another 12 moderate levels, and 10 having worrisomely large deposits of plaques. When the scientists compared the men’s running histories to their scan results, however, they found little relationship between how much they had run overall and how much plaque they had in their arteries. Those men who had run the greatest number of marathons did not tend to have less, or more, arterial plaque than the men who had run fewer races, indicating that extreme running itself had not increased the severity of heart disease. On the other hand, a history of heavy smoking and high cholesterol was linked to greater levels of plaque, especially in the men who had begun running later in life. The good news was that these findings suggest that years of hard running had not harmed the men’s hearts, says Dr. William O. Roberts, a professor of family and community medicine at the University of Minnesota, who led the study, which was published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Indeed, all that running probably helped to keep some runners’ arteries clear. But the exercise also had not inoculated those with a history of unwise lifestyle choices, especially smoking, against developing heart disease. “You can’t just outrun your past,” Dr. Roberts says. Of course, this study was relatively small and focused on Caucasian men with the physical, economic and psychological wherewithal to run competitively for years. Whether the results apply equally to other people and other sports is unclear. (Dr. Roberts and his collaborators published a small study earlier this year of female marathon runners that found almost no plaques in their hearts.) This type of study also can show only relationships between running and heart health. It cannot prove that running directly caused any changes in the heart. Still, the results may help to quell some runners’ and their families’ worries about the cardiac demands of long-term training. But if you misspent your youth smoking and eating poorly or have a family history of cardiac disease, you might want to talk with your physician about having your heart assessed, Dr. Roberts says, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

UAAP 81 Football: UST demolishes DLSU on opening day

Season 80 runners up University of Santo Tomas wasted no time in getting on the board, as the Growling Tigers demolished De La Salle University, 3-1 on opening day of the UAAP Season 81 Men's Football Tournament, Sunday afternoon at the FEU-FERN Football Field in Diliman, Quezon City.  Armed with 13 rookies, the Green Archers were looking to make a statement early in the season, and early in the match, it looked like they were primed for a big win after one of those new faces, John Rey Lagura, connected on his first UAAP goal to put DLSU ahead, 1-0 in the 14th minute.  The Green Archer advantage didn't last too long, as Conrad Dimacali responded in the 17th minute to help the Growling Tigers pull even  UST moved into the driver's seat heading into the midgame break, thanks to a 36th minute conversion from Juan Villanueva to make it 2-1.  Action picked up in the second half, as De La Salle looked to rally back, but instead it was UST who found the back of the net once again, with rookie Glen Ramos also hitting his first UAAP goal to put the Growling Tigers ahead, 3-1.  DLSU attempted once last push, but yielded no results, as UST coasted to a big opening day victory.  "Every tournament, especially sa UAAP, mas maganda talaga na makakuha ka kaagad ng three points, pero nag-start kami kanina na masiyadong mababa yung laro namin, medyo yung fitness namin, hindi kami makahawak ng bola," explained UST head coach Marjo Allado after the match. "La Salle is very dangerous in transitions, and buti na lang, yung dalawang free kicks namin, na-convert namin kanina."  "So far, it's a good result for the UST Men's Team sa opening game," Allado added.  While it was a big win, Allado isn't completely happy with the result, noting that he felt his boys were a bit off.  "Naka-score kami ng three goals, pero my concern is yung laro namin kanina, this is not how we play eh. Siguro first game, parang naninibago lang yung mga players, especially yung ibang rookies."  UST opens the season with a win and three points. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News2 hr. 14 min. ago

P457-M worth of cocaine found on shores

P457-M worth of cocaine found on shores.....»»

Category: newsSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated News6 hr. 27 min. ago

Albayalde confirms drugs in Dinagat waters are cocaine

BAGUIO CITY, Philippines --- Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Oscar Albayalde has confirmed that the blocks found floating near the shoreline of Cagdianao town in Dinagat Island province are cocaine.   Albayalde said that the blocks --- weighing around 88 kilograms --- were actually recovered in two instances. The first came when a fisherman found the drugs as reported on Friday, and another case where the illegal substances were brought by the water current to the shores.   "I talked with the regional director there, seemingly nag-positive doon sa test as cocaine substance 'yong mga na-recover nilang blocks or bricks kung tawagin, na nag-total ...Keep on reading: Albayalde confirms drugs in Dinagat waters are cocaine.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News9 hr. 1 min. ago

Sex abuse survivors spell out Catholic Church challenge

VATICAN CITY --- As the Vatican prepares to host a global child abuse summit on the protection of minors, victims' associations are calling for concrete steps from the Catholic Church to end paedophilia. While Pope Francis has sought to play down expectations from the summit, here are the main demands from victim groups: Oust abusers or their protectors Zero tolerance for sexual abuse by clerics should be "written into universal church law by the end of the summit," says Ending Clerical Abuse (ECA). The organisation, which brings together activists and survivors from more than 17 countries, said any cleric found to have abused a child or covered up abuse -- regardless of ...Keep on reading: Sex abuse survivors spell out Catholic Church challenge.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News9 hr. 1 min. ago