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Hottie Alert: More Smokin’ Than Ever, Kit Thompson Tries Making It As A Fashion Model In LA!

The ex-PBB star is now signed with the prestigious NTA Model Management!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnMay 28th, 2018

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 13th, 2018

LeBron s free agency decision could swing NBA s balance of power

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CLEVELAND -- These combo coronation-funerals can be tricky. Imagine the crowning of a new monarch where the royal subjects couldn’t stop chattering about the freshly deposed or deceased predecessor. Where the traditional cry of continuity and succession, “The king is dead! Long live the king!” got flipped, with what was overshadowing what is. That’s pretty much how it went Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) at Quicken Loans Arena, with the Golden State Warriors’ latest NBA championship having to share the stage with speculation, instantly revved up, about LeBron James and the choice he’ll soon make about his next employer. The Warriors are the kings, claiming pro basketball’s throne yet again by completing a sweep of James’ Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2018 Finals. But of course, James is the King, and as so many of us learned in sophomore English – thanks, CliffsNotes! – “Uneasy lies the head (of those who fret and obsess about the future whereabouts of the NBA superstar) that wears a crown.” Long live the kings! The King is ... gone? There was so much energy before, during and after Game 4 Friday (Saturday, PHL time) poured into the last game/next game conjecture about James, the Cavaliers and seismic shifts in the league’s 2018-19 landscape that even the player’s surprise reveal near the end of the night – a bruised and bandaged right hand – couldn’t derail it. Turns out, as James ‘fessed up, the sore shooting paw was an injury he had been playing with ever since Game 1 in Oakland eight days earlier. He had “self-inflicted” it in a fit of pique when he smacked a whiteboard in the visitors’ dressing room at Oracle Arena after Cleveland’s overtime loss in the series-setter, an outcome driven at least in part by some teammates’ mistakes and an arcane wrinkle in the NBA’s replay rules regarding block/charge fouls. Despite the hordes of media people chronicling every waking detail of the Finals, James had kept the injury on the down-low (along with the possibility that J.R. Smith’s nickname amongst his Cavs teammates might be “whiteboard”). The cameras zoomed in and clicked in a paparazzi frenzy of motor drives every time James raised the hand, wrapped in black tape, above the table during his postgame podium remarks. Whether a legit Page-2-the-rest-of-the-story factor in the championship series or a too-late alibi, the contused hand wound up as a sidebar to where James plans to be using it when training camps open in a few months. As of Friday (Saturday, PHL time), it had been 95 months since “The Decision,” the 2010 announcement that James made in a tone-deaf vanity TV production that he was taking his talents from Cleveland to South Beach. Nearly 47 months had passed since he broke the news of his return in a Sports Illustrated ghost-written essay, envisioning much of what actually has unfolded in the four years since. Now savvy insiders and casual observers alike presume James will be on the move again, pushed to leave the franchise he has defined in an urgent search for more and better talent with which he can compete. As in, y’know, some horses, some horses, his kingdom for some horses. James’ free-agency process next month (he can opt out of a $35.6 million deal in the final season of his current contract) is expected to dictate the market of player movement this summer like an oversized domino. It easily could swing the balance of power, if not quite at Golden State’s lofty level then immediately below it. The monster he helped create Dr. Frankenstein eventually was done in by his macabre creation, and it can similarly be argued that James has no one but himself to blame for the predicament in which he again finds himself. He set in motion the machinery of the super team, after all, when he chose to join forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in Miami eight years ago. Oh sure, the Boston Celtics in 2007-08 got there first by luring Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen to join Paul Pierce, but that was about knitting together three stars, all age 30 or older, for what would be their last best chance to win in an extremely limited run. That group won one title, went to two Finals in three seasons and was done, Allen leaving to join James & Co. with the Heat while Garnett and Pierce morphed into trade chips for Boston POBO Danny Ainge. When James, Wade and Bosh teamed up, they were in their basketball primes and their initial giddy boasts of “not four, not five, not six” championships turned off fans league-wide as much for its portent as its pretension. That crew went 4-for-4 in Finals, winning two rings before James, nudged by staleness and chafing as well as his grand plan for northeast Ohio, went home. From there, a line can be drawn through the ill-conceived 2012-13 L.A. Lakers of Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash, Dwight Howard and Pau Gasol all the way to this season’s Houston Rockets of James Harden and Chris Paul and the talent-gorged Golden State roster. James was the centerpiece as Cleveland replicated the Big Three concept around him with Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love, two younger, playoff-stymied All-Stars. The new-look Cavaliers went to the Finals in their first season together and clambered atop the basketball world to win the franchise’s first NBA title by the end of the second, becoming the first team in league history to do so after digging a 1-3 hole in the best-of-seven series. In that moment, regardless of the two Finals trips that followed, James’ bill was stamped: Paid In Full. Misguided fans might burn his jersey if he leaves again, but James burned the mortgage after that Game 7 in Oakland in 2016 as far as any remaining obligation to fulfill. “I came back because I felt like I had some unfinished business,” he said after elimination Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “To be able to be a part of a championship team two years ago with the team that we had and in the fashion that we had is something I will always remember. Honestly, I think we'll all remember that. It ended a drought for Cleveland of 50-plus years, so I think we'll all remember that in sports history.” James added: “When you have a goal and you're able to accomplish that goal, it actually – for me personally – made me even more hungry to continue to try to win championships. And I still want to be in championship mode. I think I've shown this year why I will still continue to be in championship mode.” In other words, James intends to sustain his high level of performance. He expects to win. And he presumably will do whatever – and go wherever – is necessary to achieve that. There’s no perfect fit So what does that mean for the NBA’s best player (never mind what the annual MVP balloting says in any given season)? It means this: compromise. There is no ideal situation, certainly no easy answer to the guesswork surrounding James’ looming free agency. He could transform any of the 30 teams, but not without some trade-offs for him, for them or for both. Most of them won’t be in play. Teams in markets such as Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Portland, Sacramento, the Twin Cities and so on can’t scratch James’ itches for either championship-worthy depth chart or spotlight. New York and Chicago, among the biggies, are out of synch with his timeline. Toronto? No way James is resettling his brand north of the border, and given his stated desire for teammates who have not just sufficient basketball skills but also mental toughness, well, the Raptors teams he and the Cavs have dominated do not qualify. The Boston club that stretched Cleveland to seven games in the Eastern Conference finals is built for the long haul and would have to surrender much of that to adjust to James’ career calendar. There’s a little Kyrie problem lurking there and, truth be told, the Celtics look to be on their way and are doing just fine without the 33-year-old heading, one of these years, toward decline. At some point in each of the 2018 Finals’ final three days, James spoke admiringly of the Warriors and the San Antonio Spurs title teams that blocked his path whether in Miami or Cleveland. He was at it again even as the Warriors were dousing the opponent’s locker room at The Q with Moet champagne. “I made the move in 2010 to be able to play with talented players, cerebral players that you could see things that happen before they happened on the floor,” James said. “When you feel like you're really good at your craft, I think it's always great to be able to be around other great minds as well and other great ballplayers. “That's never changed. Even when I came here in '14, I wanted to try to surround myself and surround this franchise with great minds and guys that actually think outside the box of the game and not just go out and play it.” Where might James find that now or recruit that swiftly? Hard to say. There are asterisks and “buts” everywhere: * If he were to sign with the Houston Rockets, James would be hitching his star to Chris Paul, a buddy with an injury history that’s about the mirror opposite of his own. He would be teaming up with an elite coach in Mike D’Antoni, something he’s never had (though Miami’s Erik Spoelstra was just young and unproven, on his way to big things). But it also would require another big ask of James Harden, who had to adapt last summer to Paul’s arrival and need for the ball. * If James chooses the Lakers, he has the chance to hit reset with the league’s glitziest franchise, in a market that can meet his every off-court wish and where he and his family already own one or more ultra-comfortable homes. The Lakers have young talent to help James transition into a lower-usage veteran’s role, favored status as a destination team for other top free agents and the salary-cap space to get it done this summer with the likes of Paul George or his pal Paul. But that roster might not be capable of insta-contending, which could burn a season or two when James’ clock most definitely is clicking. * If it’s San Antonio, James could link up with the elite coach in Gregg Popovich, where the winning culture is in the DNA rather than some acquired taste. The Spurs have talent, particularly if Kawhi Leonard finds happiness again there. But they might not have enough to rattle the Warriors’ cage. And for all their professed admiration, James and Popovich might both fare better by keeping their relationship long-distance vs. the 82-game grind. * If it’s Golden State? Perish the thought. The NBA might have to board up itself if competitive balance were capsized to that extent. And as Draymond Green shrewdly noted on Thursday (Friday, PHL time), if James climbed aboard, it likely would require him and several other Golden State teammates to be dispatched to parts unknown. * If James prefers to stay East, where the winning comes easier, he could pick Philadelphia. The Sixers have two foundational young stars at positions that matter most, center Joel Embiid and point guard Ben Simmons. But Simmons is a non-shooter at the moment, the antithesis of what makes a great complementary LeBron teammate. As for Embiid, James never has had to play off of and service a top center. And Philly might feel like a basketball-only move, with the hungriest and most demanding of any new fan base he would embrace. * If it’s Miami – wait, could it be Miami? Could he go second-home again? The Heat always strive to be competitive and offer a talent base deep enough for the East and lots of familiarity. But they also have players such as Hassan Whiteside and Dion Waiters whose mental approaches don’t seem to fit the model James was cooing about in Golden State and with the Tim Duncan-era Spurs. * That brings us to Cleveland, where it’s possible James might choose to remain. Staying with the Cavaliers, after leading them to four Finals and that heady 2016 title, would be the easiest choice as far as pressure to win. He owes these fans nothing anymore – in fact, had the bargain been offered to them in 2010 (“LeBron will leave and win elsewhere for four years, but will come back and deliver a championship and four Finals trips”), most would have grabbed it. Here, James and the fans who have watched him even through the interruption develop from ridiculously touted high schooler to one of the world’s most famous athletes could grow older together. Then he could partner up and buy the team from owner Dan Gilbert for a long-term future. Certainly, staying has a certain place in his and the rest of the James clan’s hearts. “The one thing that I've always done is considered, obviously, my family,” he said at series end Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “Understanding especially where my boys are at this point in their age. They were a lot younger the last time I made a decision like this four years ago. I've got a teenage boy, a pre-teen and a little girl that wasn't around as well. So sitting down and considering everything, my family is a huge part of whatever I'll decide to do in my career, and it will continue to be that.” It’s worth noting that as James contemplates his options as a modern pursuer of championship excellence, the prospect of him moving again qualifies at some level as a failure. Not just by the support system in Cleveland, where he and Gilbert have their friction and James gets snidely mentioned as the team’s unofficial GM and head coach, but by him too. He’s the one who went off to seek his “college education” in south Florida in what it takes to win, whether on the court, in the front office or in and around the seams 365 days a year, straight out of the Pat Riley handbook. The teams about which James talks so glowingly in Oakland now and in San Antonio then have cultures he covets, stability up and down the flowchart he craves. In Cleveland, for a variety of reasons, his team has been incapable of establishing and maintaining that to a lasting degree. He is part of that missed opportunity and he has to own it, no matter if he goes or stays. James is inseparable from the dynamic of the Cavaliers’ ever-changing and often melodramatic roster maneuvers. Spending big, swapping out draft picks to import current stars and supporting players, and overvaluing secondary guys like Smith and Tristan Thompson are risks the Warriors and the Spurs largely avoided thanks to shrew drafting and laudable continuity. The Cavs’ scrap heap, by contrast, is high with traded picks, scuttled plans, panic deals, short-term patches and folks such as former coach David Blatt and former GM David Griffin. And maybe James could have nurtured a little better relationship with All-Star point guard and 2016 title sidekick Kyrie Irving, enough to have kept Irving from bailing on them all with his trade demand last summer. Now he’s on the verge of casting about again, prioritizing what matters most for however long he continues to play. James is more at peace with it than he was before, particularly in 2010, and surely can enjoy the leverage he wields and the riches it delivers. But there is a burden there as well, one that could be seen as completing a circle. So many of the NBA’s greatest stars have been stuck playing and living in the Age of LeBron, right? Their paths to the Finals blocked, on one whole side of the league, by him and his? Well, LeBron James is stuck now in the Era of the Warriors, freshly swept and anxious to close the gap. What goes around comes around, though the key more pressing of the big W’s now is, where? Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

Cocolife weathers Silva s 56-point explosion

Games Tuesday: (Filoil Flying V Centre) 4:15 p.m. – Petron vs Cocolife 7:00 p.m. – F2 Logistics vs Foton   BATANGAS CITY --- Cocolife survived Smart’s Cuban reinforcement Gigi Silva’s 56 points to secure a quarterfinals twice-to-beat advantage after a hard-fought, 25-23, 25-21, 27-29, 19-25, 16-14, win Saturday in the 2018 Chooks to Go-Philippine Superliga (PSL) Grand Prix Saturday at the Batangas City Sports Center here. The Asset Managers improved to 6-3 win-loss record while handing the Giga Hitters their ninth loss in as many outings.    Serbian import Sara Klisura finished with 35 points for Cocolife while American reinforcement Taylor Milton had 20 markers. Silva pounded 53 kills and had three aces in a lost cause but landed her name in the fourth spot in the women’s world scoring record behind Polina Rahimova of Azerbaijan’s 58 points in 2015 while playing in Japan, American Madison Kingdon’s 57 (2017 Korea Volleyball League) and Bulgarian Elitsa Vasileva’s 57 (2013 Korea Volleyball League).  Silva also surpassed the 55 points of Americans Nicole Fawcett (2013 KVL) and Alaina Bergsma, who led Petron to the 2014 PSL Grand Prix crown, (2016 KVL).           Meanwhile, Foton uncorked a strong finishing kick to complete a masterful 25-21, 25-17, 21-25, 25-20 victory over Generika-Ayala. American import Channon Thompson and Dindin Manabat delivered the crucial blows to spearhead the Tornadoes to this impressive win that gave them a twice-to-beat edge in the quarterfinals. Petron and F2 Logistics, who both fashion an 8-1 card, clinched the first two quarterfinal incentives. A mid-conference replacement to American Brooke Kranda, Thompson flaunted her scoring prowess as she tallied 20 kills, six aces and a block for 27 points while Manabat chipped in 10 kills, three blocks and an ace for 14 points to star for the Tornadoes, who notched their fifth win in nine matches. Also making her presence felt was Canadian import Elizabeth Wendel, who punched 12 hits, while Serbian Katarina Vukamanovic shone in the backline with 17 of the Tornadoes’ 47 excellent digs. Pulling off an impressive win, however, didn’t come easy. After cruising to easy victories in the first two sets, the Tornadoes found themselves in trouble as Darlene Ramdin of Trinidad and Tobago and American Symone Hayden discovered their groove before watching them fall into a maze of errors in the crucial stretch of the third set. Ramdin, who played with Thompson in the Trinidad and Tobago national team, continued her inspired performance as the Lifesavers forged a 7-7 knot before the first technical timeout of the fourth set. But after the 19-all count, Thompson and Manabat sparked a spiking spree to out the Tornadoes at match point, 24-19. Although Manabat committed a service error in the ensuing play, Foton couldn’t be denied as Hayden’s attack went long for the final count. Ramdin delivered 21 hits while Hayden had 13 points for the Lifesavers, who will enter into their final game of the classifications with a 2-7 mark......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 7th, 2018

PBA Finals: Cabagnot: We want to be labeled as the paradigm of Philippine basketball

Since 2010, Alex Cabagnot has seen it all with the San Miguel franchise. In fact, along with Arwind Santos, they have both won seven titles with the team, see it shift from the Beermen to the Petron Blaze Boosters and back, and everything in between. But since the Filipino-American was traded back to the team in 2015, San Miguel has won six titles, including four straight All-Filipino crowns. Much like Santos, Cabagnot thinks it's high time to be talking about the Beermen's impact on the Philippine basketball scene, especially with the way how they have clinched some of their titles in dramatic fashion. "Nothing good comes easy. To be part of history, we have to go through some adversity. Talagang hindi nag-change yung disposition namin. We established our status quo, and ayun, we came out with the W," Cabagnot said after the post-game celebrations. The 35-year-old sniper added that their team consists of individuals that won't let anyone down, and their team's pride has always been a factor in helping them succeed. "I'm glad that something like this is first time in history, so yung sa isip ng management and the players, other than all the other external stuff, we want to be labelled as the paradigm of Philippine basketball." To be labeled as a paradigm, or a model of Philippine basketball is something tough to be accomplished, but with the way things have been going in the PBA, it looks like San Miguel has earned that distinction. With the impending arrival of number one pick Christian Standhardinger in the Commissioner's Cup, Cabagnot clarifies that it was too early to make predictions, since they have not even played with the bigman. Instead, the "Crunchman" dwelled on the difficulty of making an unprecedented feat in the local basketball scene, and thanks all those who have made it possible. "So I'm just very, very fortunate to be part of this group, to be part of history, and to be under coach Leo, especially to Boss RSA and boss Robert for giving me an opportunity to come back and make some history with the team."   -- Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 7th, 2018

Hottie Alert: Get To Know This Up-And-Coming Model-Athlete Who Easily Personifies 'PinayPower!

Let’s talk about Faith Garcia's strength and beauty—in and out!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2018

Superteams and superpowers: Basketball in 2017

The common theme in basketball as of late is rather simple: build yourself a superteam and see where it goes. 2017 saw a bunch of superteams take the court in all levels. Some panned out and some did not. Nevertheless, we live in a world of superteams. Either your favorite basketball team is one or it's not.   Warriors World For the 2016-2017 NBA Season, the 73-win Golden State Warriors, a superteam in their own right, added former Most Valuable Player Kevin Durant. Oh my goodness. The Dubs then proceeded to decimate the NBA, winning 67 games in the regular season. Golden State was even better in the playoffs, making a serious play for a postseason sweep before finishing with a 16-1 record and a second title in three seasons.   Seriously, it's a Warriors World that we live in Golden State's success has prompted other teams to try and create their own superteam. Houston snatched Chris Paul away from the Los Angeles Clippers and now the Rockets have a potent backcourt combo that also feature MVP contender James Harden. Oklahoma City completed two incredible trades that made Paul George and Carmelo Anthony members of the Thunder. Oh, OKC also has MVP winner Russell Westbrook running point. The Timberwolves also have something going on in Minnesota as Jimmy Butler joined Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins for a young and intriguing Big 3. The Eastern Conference landscape changed when Cleveland traded Kyrie Irving to Boston. The Celtics previously signed Gordon Hayward and all of a sudden, the winningest NBA franchise is in position to take over the East now and the forseeable future. Speaking of Cleveland, LeBron James is still with the Cavs and they've added Dwyane Wade of all people to join an aging but still scary superteam. The King started this whole superteam craze. Golden State just happened to perfect. We all live in a Warriors World.   Feer the Beer Over in the PBA, the Philippines' premier superteam is still pretty effective despite its stars each playing almost 40 minutes per game. A year removed from the "Beeracle Run," San Miguel made history by being only the second team to capture the Perpetual Trophy following three straight Philippine Cup titles. Then the Beermen, with the top-3 MVP candidates in June Mar Fajardo, Alex Cabagnot, and Chris Ross, plus Arwind Santos and Marcio Lassiter, ended the franchise's 16-year championship drought in the Commissioner's Cup. With the help of import Charles Rhodes of course. San Miguel had legitimate chances to win the Grand Slam of course, but the team ultimately fell short in the Governors' Cup. However, the Beermen did add 6'8" Fil-German Christian Standhardinger to the fold. Superteam.   Return of the Kings It was the perfect set up. Meralco earned the number 1 seed and was rolling all the way to the Finals. Meanwhile, the Gink Kings had to go through yet another emotional and heated series against rival TNT in the semifinals in order to have a chance to properly defend their title. The series before that? The Gin Kings had to end San Miguel's Grand Slam dreams. In the 2017 Governors' Cup Finals, Meralco was in perfect position to take The Rematch and allow the birth of a new PBA rivalry. After seven games, none of that happened and Ginebra won back-to-back titles by virtue of their quote unquote superteam. Greg Slaughter, Japeth Aguilar, Joe Devance, Justin Brownlee, LA Tenorio, Sol Mercado, and Scottie Thompson. How is that not a superteam? The Kangkong jokes sure died a slow death.   Systematic Mayhem Even in college hoops, superteams are the way to go. However, in the amatuers, you just have to recruit your way into building one. La Salle has perfected this method and the Green Archers are certainly the biggest --- and loudest and most aggressive ---- recruiters. The Taft superteam featuring Ben Mbala and co. got the Green Archers to two UAAP Finals and one championship. Only one championship because another superteam, quietly built in Katipunan with surgical, perhaps even robotic, precision, beat them this year. That's right, Big Bad Blue is once again on top of the UAAP as the Ateneo Blue Eagles scored a sensational, near-sweep of UAAP Season 80. Coach Tab Baldwin has a collection of incredible players that may not look like it on first glance but they do certainly qualify for superteam status. Dom't believe it? Maybe you will after they complete a five-peat. It could happen.   Sweep In the other collegiate league, two superteams dominated the NCAA for two separate periods in one season. First, Lyceum, the surprise superteam, made history by completing an 18-game sweep of the elimination round. However, the Pirates ran into the league's decade-old superteam in San Beda and the Red Lions ended up sweeping the Finals for yet another title. Most of the major characters from both squads will return for a new season and if a San Beda-Lyceum rematch does not happen, well, that's just disappointing isn't it?   OVERTIME 2017 also saw the rise and fall and rise of the Gilas Pilipinas program. Well sort of. The Philippines got off to a great star this year by absolutely dominating the SEABA Championships. Then, disaster struck in the 2017 FIBA Asia Cup when Gilas was embarassed by an old foe in South Korea. To end the year, the Philippine national team recovered, albeit in an ugly fashion, to take an early lead in the 2019 World Cup Asian Qualifiers. Gilas is more than capable of forming a Pinoy superteam that could compete, and even beat, the best of Asia. Let's hope we get that in 2018. Finally, 2017 also saw the Civil War PBA edition. It wasn't funny and it wasn't good. Fortunately, it seems that bright and peacuful days are ahead of our beloved league. Let's hope that's the case and let's just leave the bad memories behind this year. Time to move on and forget about that stuff. There are basketball games to be played.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 28th, 2017

Hottie Alert: Ateneo s Anton Asistio Is Making Us Want To Start Our Own Bonfire!

Get to know Chalk's choice UAAP Basketball cutie!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2017

Hottie Alert: Geoff Eigenmann On The Things About Fatherhood That Nobody Tells You About

"Clean mind, clean heart, and clean body. If all three are aligned, everything else will fall into place.".....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

Hottie Alert: Meet Carlo Sunico—Fitness Coach, Businessman, Total Eye Candy, And, Yes, Daddy

His road to fatherhood was met with fear, but it was one of the best parts!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Could Celtics lure rival LeBron James to Boston?

NBA.com staff report Teaming up with a former rival? It has a certain ring of familiarity to it around the NBA these days. But LeBron James joining the hated Boston Celtics? That seems a bit far-fetched, even in these strange, competitive days in the world's best basketball league. Even more strange is the notion of fans in Boston embracing the idea of LeBron James, a soon-to-be free agent, in green and white. Given his history of battling the Celtics, both in Cleveland and Miami, the idea of him joining forces with the Celtics in any fashion seems a bit odd. But not in Boston these days, not according to Chad Finn of Boston.com, who addresses that very topic in the aftermath of Kevin Durant winning his second straight title and Finals MVP as a member of the Golden State Warriors, the same Warriors team he battled during his final years as the face of the franchise in Oklahoma City. Making the entire topic even more intriguing is the fact that of all the teams that could potentially pursue LeBron, the team he vanquished in a road Game 7 in the conference finals last month, appears to have the assets to pull it off: The answer is a ridiculously simple one: Hell, yes, you should want LeBron James on your basketball team, always. Are you nuts? It’s the easiest Celtics-related answer since the summer of 2007 when Kevin McHale presumably asked Danny Ainge on a golf course somewhere, ‘’So do we have a deal? You’ll give me that for KG? Better say yes before I change my mind.” This is an amalgam of Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson, a guy who has gone to the NBA Finals every year this decade whether he’s playing with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh or three guys who made it to second-to-last round of cuts with the Washington Generals that one time. I know he’s annoying at times, his flights of ego always revealed whenever he refers to the Cavaliers as “my team” rather than “us.” I know it would be hard to accept him because he was a rival for so long — or hard to accept him, at least, right up until, his face beaming, that first time he stood behind a dais and held up a green and white Celtics jersey. He’s the best basketball player I’ve ever seen, a one-man Hamptons Five......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

WATCH: Kevin Durant s Finals Game 3 clutch shots

The sequel was just as impactful as the first. Once again, Kevin Durant left his mark on The Land in Game 3 of the NBA Finals, this time hitting a dagger far behind the three-point arc, to essentially clinch the Warriors' win. Many people, including many NBA players, felt a sense of deja vu in the heat of the moment, so let's see just how similar and different the two big baskets were: 2017 Finals A year ago, the Cavaliers also trailed 0-2 after dropping both games in Golden State, but looked to be in good position at home, going up by as much as seven points, 102-95, with 8:53 left in the game. JR Smith hit a big three-pointer that kept Cleveland up six, 113-107, but after that, the tandem of Curry and Durant began to find a groove. A runner by Curry got things going, then after a timeout, Durant canned a 13-foot pull-up jumper to get Golden State within two. The Cavs burned their last timeout with 1:15 to go, but Kyle Korver missed a three. Durant himself snagged the rebound, then ran down the court unhindered. He stopped just short of the three-point arc, drawing LeBron James' defense, but KD effortlessly pulled up in transition, and splashed home the triple. Durant's shot gave the Warriors the lead for good, 114-113. Both James and Kyrie Irving failed to connect on three-pointers of their own following the conversion, and Durant and Curry were able to ice this at the line, for a final score of 118-113. KD would finish with 31 points on 10-of-18 shooting, 4-of-7 from downtown, and 7-of-8 at the stripe, in addition to nine rebounds, four assists, two steals, and a block. 2018 Finals The 2018 Finals were different in the sense that Durant was carrying the offensive load for the Warriors in this game. A year ago in Game 3, Curry was good for 26 points, while Klay Thompson logged 30. This time around, Durant would finish with 43, while no other Golden State player had more than 11. Another wrinkle from today's game was that the Warriors had already wrestled control of the game. After being down by as much as 13 points, the fourth period saw eight lead changes and five deadlocks. Golden State was up four, 101-97 with 2:38 to play, following a Curry layup, and his first three-pointer of the game, but James answered with a three-pointer of his own. Durant responded by finding Andre Iguodala for a big slam, then after Tristan Thompson missed a nine-foot turnaround, Durant once again brought the ball down. Unlike last time though, when KD attacked in transition, the Warriors were looking to burn time. Durant only began to get things going when there were five seconds left on the shot clock, accepting an Andre Iguodala screen to get JR Smith switched onto him. Smith had no chance to block Durant's attempt, and his conversion made it 106-100, 49.8 seconds left. Off a timeout, James was able to score on a layup, but a Green dunk, and two Curry charities put this one away. Durant finished with a game-best 43 points on 15-of-23 shooting, 6-of-9 three-pointers, and 7-of-7 free throws. He also made it a double-double with 13 rebounds, plus seven assists and a steal. The 43 points were also a postseason-high. So, which one was better? 2017 was probably a more pressure-packed moment, and it was over LeBron James, making the moment more iconic. 2018 though was cooler, because he had done it before and because it was further back. The official records clock this shot as a 33-footer, seven feet back of his 26-foot make in 2017. Perhaps the thing to consider will be what happens next. In 2017 the Warriors were unable to make it four-four-four-four, suffering their first postseason loss that year, 137-116 in Game 4 (though of course, they'd win it in five on their homecourt). If they win it in four this time, that ultimately could make Durant's Game 3 connection more vital. BONUS: Here's the Warriors Twitter account with each shot side-by-side Look familiar? 👀 pic.twitter.com/JTj7AuBQ5a — Golden State Warriors (@warriors) June 7, 2018.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2018

Kendall Jenner caught kissing Gigi Hadid’s younger brother—report

Unlike her sisters who each have children of their own as well as a significant other, model Kendall Jenner has been happily single, her latest fling being with Anwar Hadid, younger brother of her model friends Gigi and Bella Hadid. TMZ snapped a picture of the two in what was reported to be an hours-long make-out session at a New York bar during a CFDA (Council of Fashion Designers of America) Awards afterparty. The photo shows Jenner, 22, sitting on top of Hadid, 18, as the two smooch in the dim bar. Jenner herself did not hide that they were together, posting a picture of his distinct tattooed hands on her Instagram Stories. She reportedly returned to her hotel on her own at 4 a....Keep on reading: Kendall Jenner caught kissing Gigi Hadid’s younger brother—report.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 7th, 2018

De Lima calls Calida new role model in gov t corruption

MANILA, Philippines – Solicitor General Jose Calida is the Duterte administration's "new poster boy [for] corruption," according to opposition senator Leila de Lima. De Lima said Calida is making it acceptable for public officials to make a profit out of government. She also accused Calida of ensuring that the duration ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2018

Klay Thompson plays through pain in Game 2 win for Warriors

By Josh Dubow, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Draymond Green saw Klay Thompson limping on his tender left ankle a day before Game 2 of the NBA Finals and quickly texted Nick Young to tell him the Golden State Warriors would need big minutes from the backup. But Golden State’s most durable player and understated star once again managed to play through the pain and scored 20 points to help the Warriors beat Cleveland 122-103 to take a 2-0 series lead Sunday night (Monday, PHL time). “He came out there and gutted through it,” Green said. “Even if you saw him take the first lay-up he took in warmups and ran back to the locker room. It’s like he’s not going to have it. Sure enough he did. I mean, that’s just a microcosm of who he is, one of the toughest guys if not the toughest guy I’ve ever played with. He’ll never get credit for it because he’s not going to physically beat you up. But one of the toughest, if not the toughest guy for sure.” Green might be the loudest of Golden State’s four superstars and Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant are the most accomplished. Thompson often flies a bit under the radar, just delivering lockdown defense and long-range shooting that help the Warriors thrive. He’s so consistent and always available, having played in a franchise record 100 playoff games without missing a single one, that he sometimes gets overlooked. But after Cleveland’s J.R. Smith awkwardly fell into his left leg in the first half of Game 1, sending Thompson to the locker room following the scary fall, there has been plenty of focus on if he’d be able to play. He made it back for the rest of Game 1 and scored 24 points in a 124-114 overtime win Thursday (Friday, PHL time) before the injury got worse the next day. But he still managed to play in Game 2 and shot 8-for-13, making three three-pointers to become the sixth player with 300 in a career in the playoffs. “Being on the training table for, it felt like, three straight days. That’s something I’m not used to,” Thompson said. “But at this point in the season, any means necessary. And the ankle feels great. I won’t do much tomorrow and I’ll do a little bit Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). But I’m just going to conserve all I’ve got for Wednesday because I don’t want to play with it. It’s something that you use a lot. I didn’t realize how much you use your ankle until you hurt it ...” That drew a quick quip from Curry, who has been plagued by ankle injuries throughout his career. “You should have asked me,” Curry said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

The beautiful game | Fashion

Photography by Rxandy Capinpin. Styling by Carlos Tomawis with Nina Magdalen M. Diaz. Modeled by Elisa Taylor of Elite Model Management. Make-up and hair styling by Pamm Merrera.  The post The beautiful game | Fashion appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

The beautiful game | Fashion

Photography by Rxandy Capinpin. Styling by Carlos Tomawis with Nina Magdalen M. Diaz. Modeled by Elisa Taylor of Elite Model Management. Make-up and hair styling by Pamm Merrera.  The post The beautiful game | Fashion appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

Warriors survive Cavs, LeBron’s 51 points to open NBA Finals

OAKLAND, Calif. --- Stephen Curry scored 29 points and the Golden State Warriors capitalized on a Cavaliers blunder that sent the game into overtime, withstanding a brilliant 51-point performance by LeBron James to beat Cleveland 124-114 in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday night. The game nearly over, James jawed with both Curry and Klay Thompson, then Tristan Thompson and Draymond Green tangled moments later and made contact. After replay review, Tristan Thompson received a Flagrant 2 foul and ejection with 2.6 seconds left. James was in utter disbelief as regulation ended in stunning fashion: George Hill made the first of two free throws with 4.7 seconds left after b...Keep on reading: Warriors survive Cavs, LeBron’s 51 points to open NBA Finals.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 1st, 2018

Don t worry, Warriors-Cavaliers won t last forever

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. – If you don’t like another round of Warriors-Cavaliers in the NBA Finals, just wait a few minutes, relatively speaking. Obviously that paraphrase of the old Mark Twain quote about New England weather swaps minutes for years as it pertains to this Finals IV of Golden State vs. Cleveland for the league’s 2018 championship. But this stuff flies by so fast – on the calendar, we haven’t hit three years yet since Team LeBron and Team Curry met in the 2015 Finals, with the opener of that one on June 4. And for those who still might feel bored by the sameness of the matchup, rest assured, says Golden State general manager Bob Myers. Change is coming, inevitably so. “I definitely know this is ending,” Myers said Wednesday, talking with reporters on the floor at Oracle Arena on the eve of Game 1. “I don’t need any reminders. I know a lot of people in the Bay Area think this is going to go on forever. On the record, it won’t. “It can’t. Nothing does,” Myers continued. “Especially in a sport where the competition is so great. There’s financial pressures. There’s all kinds of things – injuries, personalities, everything, that don’t allow you to... No team should last forever. It’s not good for anybody.” Fans of the Warriors and the Cavaliers would argue otherwise, but there is a reason what we’re seeing now – two franchises butting heads for the fourth consecutive time in a championship round – never has happened in the four major U.S. professional sports. Staying on top, holding teams together, overcoming injuries, coping with age and egos and constant challenges from a field of rivals can wear even on a champion. Notice how both the Warriors and the Cavaliers worked through less-than-fulfilling regular seasons and had to overcome 2-3 deficits in the conference finals to reach this stage this time. “I didn’t need a reminder from Houston to know how fragile this whole thing is,” Myers said. “That’s part of it. That’s why you’ve got to appreciate it. The notion that these things go on forever? At one point, players get older. Teams get broken up. It always happens. You never know when.” Invariably, that sizes up an executive in Myers’ position for a black hat. He is the one charged with renewal, which often means shedding players with whom fans have fallen in love through the high times. Or maybe Myers ends up as the bad guy because he doesn’t refresh the roster soon enough and a team of former champs gets old together. “My day’s coming at some point,” said Myers, one of the NBA’s acclaimed “golden boys” through this Warriors run. “Everybody gets hammered for something they do or not. It’s part of the deal. Who knows? You’d like to treat the players with respect – they’ve earned it. Our fans are very important. You just do the best you can. “I had no idea we were going to win any championships. ... Every decision, signing players, keeping a team together is difficult. Not keeping a team together is difficult. Making trades, not making trades. It’s all part of it.” So give it time. Change will come. Now, for how that relates to this Finals and its opponents, so familiar with each other and to the world, the real question ought to be: What was the alternative? Should Cleveland and Golden State have laid down and gotten out of the way of new blood just ... because? “It may not be as suspenseful as a lot of people want it to be or as drama-filled, but that's what you've got movies and music for,” Golden State’s Kevin Durant said. “I think this is a great display of basketball on the court from both sides, and if you're a real lover of the game, you can enjoy how both teams play it, even though it may be different. “It's still organic and true to the game, pure to the game. So if you enjoy basketball, I don't feel like you should have any complaints because it's a great set of players on both teams.” Cleveland star LeBron James was more blunt and business-focused. A Rockets-Celtics Finals might offer new storylines and fresh faces, but there’s always appeal – and marketability – to the defending champions taking on the game’s best player, again. And again. “You’ve got to ask Adam Silver,” James said, referencing the NBA commissioner as the fellow whose opinion matters most on the sameness of this Finals. Then he elaborated. “Teams have had their opportunities to beat the Cavs over the last four years, and teams have had the opportunities to beat the Warriors over the last four years,” James said. “If you want to see somebody else in the postseason, then you got to beat them.” Warriors guard Klay Thompson echoed that view. “I think the rest of the NBA has got to get better,” he said. “It's not our fault. “The only people I hear saying that are fans from other teams, which is natural. I don't blame them. But as long as our fan base is happy, that's all that matters.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 31st, 2018

Warriors await word on top defender Iguodala as LeBron looms

By Janie McCauley, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Klay Thompson sat on the floor in the middle of his teammates and pointed to his “2018 NBA FINALS” hat during a locker-room photo. An important face was missing from the moment: Andre Iguodala. In a postseason defined by uncertainty for the defending champions, Golden State could be without one of its top defenders as the Warriors chase a repeat title — taking on LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers in a fourth straight NBA Finals matchup. Iguodala’s status for Game 1 on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) is a question as he recovers from a bone bruise in his left knee, which caused him to miss the final four games of the Western Conference finals against Houston. Cleveland’s Kevin Love is in concussion protocol, so he might not be ready, either. Coach Steve Kerr has said Iguodala, the 2015 Finals MVP, will return when he can run without pain. The Warriors sure could use his presence against King James, who is making an eighth straight Finals appearance. “We’re still without Andre, which is a big blow for us,” Kerr said before Monday’s (Tuesday, PHL time) Game 7 at Houston. “In a different way. He’s not a scorer for us as Chris [Paul] is for Houston, but a huge component. So you go through the playoffs and things happen, and you’ve got to be able to bounce back no matter what and keep going.” Last month, Kerr became concerned his team’s defense wouldn’t return to its top form after Golden State struggled late in the regular season and even endured a particularly poor stretch in which the Warriors dropped seven of 10 games. Yet here they are in a familiar spring spot as June approaches. Once the buzzer sounded and the 101-92 Game 7 win over Houston was official, the Warriors could exhale. It hasn’t been pretty for much of these playoffs, a far cry from that remarkable, record-breaking 16-1 romp through last year’s postseason. There is clearly some relief to be back where this All-Star group expected to be all along. Stephen Curry kept the game ball tucked under his left arm long after Monday’s (Tuesday, PHL time) game, toddler daughter Ryan held in his right arm. Kevin Durant hugged general manager Bob Myers, while always-animated Nick Young beamed wearing his Finals hat and “Champions of the West” T-shirt, then enjoyed hoisting the shiny trophy. Draymond Green smooched his 1-year-old son, Draymond Jr. Back home, fireworks went off in the East Bay as everyone anticipates another battle with King James. “There’s a lot of just built-up anxiety, I guess, about this moment. When you walk off the court with a win and get this fancy hat, it’s a good feeling,” Curry said. “We had to work for it, and you’ve got to appreciate the moment. Somebody asked, ‘It’s four years in a row getting to The Finals, do you appreciate it?’ Yes, because it’s really hard. So all the smiles and embraces you have with your teammates, your coaches, it’s well deserved.” Golden State struggled to hit shots for stretches. The stars went through funks and the Warriors had to play catch up time and again — including from double-digit deficits in the final two games to beat James Harden and the 65-win Rockets on their home court after settling for the second seed in the West. James has willed his Cavs this far, saying, “I don’t know how I can compare it to other seasons because I can only think about this one in the present.” “Definitely a different team but we know everything goes and stops with LeBron James with them,” Green said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 30th, 2018