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Hot Stuff: Be Amazed At How Fine Thespian Fred Lo Transforms Into Your Fave Characters!

This Lifestyle Hotshot is a Disney Prince in life!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnMay 15th, 2018

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

Youth-oriented flick shines light on millennials

  Ace filmmaker Jose Javier Reyes is one of my fave interviewees because he never gives "show bizzy" answers. He tells it like it is, and I totally enjoy our off-the-record chats. If only we could write a book about the explosive stuff that both of us are privy to. Direk Joey is at the helm of Regal Entertainment's "Walwal," which opens on June 27. It is topbilled by heartthrobs Elmo Magalona, Jerome Ponce, Kiko Estrada and Donny Pangilinan. Walwal is a slang term derived from the phrase "walangpakialam" and its English translation is "to get wasted," from drinking too much booze. It reminds me of one of my fave quotes by Charles Baudelaire, which goes, "One should alwa...Keep on reading: Youth-oriented flick shines light on millennials.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 8th, 2018

Inclusive musical ‘Ding, Ang Bato!’ gets people talking about Darna; last show today

Darna, Mars Ravelo's costumed superheroine much like the US Marvel Comics characters, has been reincarnated as a dance musical in College of Saint Benilde's "Ding, Ang Bato!" The title refers to Ding, the brother and sidekick of Narda, the human alter ego of the superheroine Darna. The "bato" is the magic stone which transforms Narda into a "bahag"-clad Darna. Although "Ding, Ang Bato" is produced by CSB's dance program in collaboration with other programs, the school tries to professionalize it with illustrious names in the production team ---Cris Millado for the libretto and direction, Denisa Reyes and France-based choreographer Ernest Mandap, Ejay Yatco and Jef Flores for music, Jo...Keep on reading: Inclusive musical ‘Ding, Ang Bato!’ gets people talking about Darna; last show today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 18th, 2018

Lifestyle Hotshots: This Baby-Faced Cosplayer Is Actually A Very Talented And Respected Thespian!

Meet chinito cutie Fred Lo, set to conquer in Hong Kong Disneyland!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 15th, 2018

Hot Stuff: Young Artist Jappy Agoncillo Puts Us In An Artsy Mood With His Guns And Graffiti!

Are you in need of an artsy boost? Take a look at some of our fave artworks of this ABS-CBN Lifestyle Hotshot!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 1st, 2018

Marvel considering an ‘Eternals’ film

  With the battle between Thanos and the Avengers coming to a head in this week's "Avengers: Infinity War", Marvel is in the process of tying up Phase Three of its Marvel Cinematic Universe plan. "Ant-Man", "Captain Marvel", 2019's untitled "Avengers" film, and a sequel to "Spider-Man: Homecoming" are "taking up 90 percent of our time," Feige told TheWrap. The other 10 percent is going towards future projects. "Some of that is you can take cues from everything we've done in the 22 movies before those, which is sequels to existing characters, new interpretation of existing characters and trying whole new swings with stuff that most people never heard of," Feige explai...Keep on reading: Marvel considering an ‘Eternals’ film.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 25th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 19th, 2018

American Ballet’s Stella Abrera debuts tonight

  Filipino-American ballet dancer Stella Abrera was in fine form during rehearsals at Maybank Theater on April 3. The principal dancer of the prestigious American Ballet Theater (ABT) performed a pivotal scene from "Romeo and Juliet" with Korean danseur Joowon Ahn. It was the first time the two characters were alone. They were tentative, playful. The scene ended with a kiss, and Abrera slowly broke into a smile that left the audience believing again, at least for that moment, in true love. Abrera is in the country for two shows at Maybank Theater---tonight, and tomorrow night, April 7. With her are eight top ABT dancers: Gillian Murphy, Isabella Boylston, Blaine Hoven, ...Keep on reading: American Ballet’s Stella Abrera debuts tonight.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 6th, 2018

Face to face with American Ballet’s Stella Abrera

Filipino-American ballet dancer Stella Abrera was in fine form during rehearsals at Maybank Theater this Wedneday, April 3. The principal dancer of the prestigious American Ballet Theater (ABT) performed a pivotal scene from "Romeo and Juliet" with Korean danseur Joowon Ahn. It was the first time the two characters were alone; they were tentative, playful. The scene ended with a kiss and Abrera slowly broke into a smile that left the audience believing again, at least for that moment, in true love. Abrera is in the country this week for two shows at Maybank Theater, with eight top ABT dancers: Gillian Murphy, Isabella Boylston, Blaine Hoven, Roman Zhurbin, Arron Scott, J...Keep on reading: Face to face with American Ballet’s Stella Abrera.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2018

‘Freedom and Crime’ by Jun Ledesma

Letters From Davao:  AM NOT SURPRISED when some quarters are exploiting to the hilt the order of the Securities and Exchange Commission to shut down the operations of Rappler.The bannered story warns of the muzzling of the press. Rappler itself, quoting Presidential Spokesman Harry Roque, wrote that if Duterte wants to close the media establishment they could have just sent the military. Of course it is the usual Rappler’s furtive way of saying it which is very characteristic of this media outfit.  But this is not about press freedom. It is about media ownership which, under Philippine laws, should be 100% owned by Filipinos. For years since the inception of Rappler, the impression was that it is fully owned by Pinoys. There are Filipinos  with extra money to spare who invested money in Rappler in the hope that they can support an independent media outfit. As every body knew, the big media establishments are tools used by the wealthy and famous to protect their interest from political predators but they end up using the muscle of the press to either promote or destroy politicians and their adversaries.  Not until SEC ordered the closure of Rappler that it came out in the open that  the notorious ON OMIDYAR had wormed its way in and into the heart and brain of Rappler. The characters behind these outfits are shrewd but not wise enough their own disclosures in their PDRs gave them away. The Philippine Deposit Receipts which Rappler through its holding company issued explicitly granted ON OMIDYAR to have a say in the operations and business of Rappler.  Ma. Ressa’s attention was called by SEC on this critical item but it appears that she was not paying attention or might have thought she can deal with the problem anyway.  Looks like she sat on the problem that even the  members of the 5-man Commission who, except for one,  are all appointees of ex-Pres. Noynoy Aquino have reach a point of decision.  As the story unravels, again it showed that there was an attempt to correct the provisions in the PDRs by submitting ON OMIDYAR’s waiver on its right to intrude into the conduct of business of Rappler. Again Rappler showed its cavalier attitude, it submitted the waiver document which was not even notarized.  Obviously even the Aquino-controlled SEC cannot take the lackadaisical attention of Ma. Ressa. It revoked the SEC registration of Rappler.  Even as it had been axed, Ressa and Pia Ranada fought back, the later calling Pres. Rodrigo Duterte names as if they reign supreme and they alone know what freedom of the press means. To add to her dramatics Pia intoned  that she is prepared to go to prison for exercising her rights of free expression. She forgot that It was Duterte who, early in his presidency signed an EO on Freedom of Information.  Ressa and Ranada wailed their press freedom had been curtailed. But such is not the case. Every word that they say saw print and broadcasted in nearly 2,000 media outlets in the Philippines and not counting the social media. The revocation of Rappler’s permit is not about freedom of the press but its violation of the constitution which succinctly underlines that media establishment must be 100% Filipino owned.   In hindsight the Duterte government was even too kind to Rappler even as it was the leading media organization that demonize Duterte in every turn. I had seriously doubted its overtures that brag it stands for truth and fairness. During the senate hearing on extra-judicial killing allegedly carried out by the Davao Death Squad which Sen. Leila De Lima and Sen. Antonio Trillanes claimed was organized by Duterte, Rappler simply swallowed what witnesses Matobato and Lascanas said.  In 2009 when as CHR Chair De Lima conducted a probe on EJK the number of victims she alleged then was less than 300. The probe lasted for months with nary a piece of evidence was found to indict Mayor Duterte. She pursued her quest to pin Digong when she became Justice Secretary but again she failed. When she became senator she became even more aggressive she placed a bungling Matobato in the witness stand. But Matobato was flawless in his delivery when he was interviewed by Time Magazine. It was unmistakable he was reading from an idiot’s card. He proudly state that as member of DDS he killed and buried more than 200 persons in an abandoned quarry. Yet he cannot find the grave of his victims.     When it was the turn of Lascanas to testify in the senate inquiry, he casually said that they buried more than 2,000 EJK victims in the same quarry.  Between the two perjured witness they  confessed to the  killing of over 2,200 victims of EJK which they buried, they said, in the abandoned quarry. It is simply a classic fantasy. A manslaughter of such magnitude cannot escape notice especially when that narrow piece of land is just about four kilometers from city hall and so adjacent to a number of housing subdivisions. Nevertheless, if they were so sure then why cannot they find a single piece of viable evidence.   In all these occasions Rappler gave the hearings liberal space and took the testimonies of the witnesses as the biblical truths. Both Rappler and Time Magazine adopted exactly the same flawed statistics which in their recent count had reached 13,000 EJK victims. I am based in Davao and frankly I am amazed […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJan 27th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Superteams and superpowers: Basketball in 2017

The common theme in basketball as of late is rather simple: build yourself a superteam and see where it goes. 2017 saw a bunch of superteams take the court in all levels. Some panned out and some did not. Nevertheless, we live in a world of superteams. Either your favorite basketball team is one or it's not.   Warriors World For the 2016-2017 NBA Season, the 73-win Golden State Warriors, a superteam in their own right, added former Most Valuable Player Kevin Durant. Oh my goodness. The Dubs then proceeded to decimate the NBA, winning 67 games in the regular season. Golden State was even better in the playoffs, making a serious play for a postseason sweep before finishing with a 16-1 record and a second title in three seasons.   Seriously, it's a Warriors World that we live in Golden State's success has prompted other teams to try and create their own superteam. Houston snatched Chris Paul away from the Los Angeles Clippers and now the Rockets have a potent backcourt combo that also feature MVP contender James Harden. Oklahoma City completed two incredible trades that made Paul George and Carmelo Anthony members of the Thunder. Oh, OKC also has MVP winner Russell Westbrook running point. The Timberwolves also have something going on in Minnesota as Jimmy Butler joined Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins for a young and intriguing Big 3. The Eastern Conference landscape changed when Cleveland traded Kyrie Irving to Boston. The Celtics previously signed Gordon Hayward and all of a sudden, the winningest NBA franchise is in position to take over the East now and the forseeable future. Speaking of Cleveland, LeBron James is still with the Cavs and they've added Dwyane Wade of all people to join an aging but still scary superteam. The King started this whole superteam craze. Golden State just happened to perfect. We all live in a Warriors World.   Feer the Beer Over in the PBA, the Philippines' premier superteam is still pretty effective despite its stars each playing almost 40 minutes per game. A year removed from the "Beeracle Run," San Miguel made history by being only the second team to capture the Perpetual Trophy following three straight Philippine Cup titles. Then the Beermen, with the top-3 MVP candidates in June Mar Fajardo, Alex Cabagnot, and Chris Ross, plus Arwind Santos and Marcio Lassiter, ended the franchise's 16-year championship drought in the Commissioner's Cup. With the help of import Charles Rhodes of course. San Miguel had legitimate chances to win the Grand Slam of course, but the team ultimately fell short in the Governors' Cup. However, the Beermen did add 6'8" Fil-German Christian Standhardinger to the fold. Superteam.   Return of the Kings It was the perfect set up. Meralco earned the number 1 seed and was rolling all the way to the Finals. Meanwhile, the Gink Kings had to go through yet another emotional and heated series against rival TNT in the semifinals in order to have a chance to properly defend their title. The series before that? The Gin Kings had to end San Miguel's Grand Slam dreams. In the 2017 Governors' Cup Finals, Meralco was in perfect position to take The Rematch and allow the birth of a new PBA rivalry. After seven games, none of that happened and Ginebra won back-to-back titles by virtue of their quote unquote superteam. Greg Slaughter, Japeth Aguilar, Joe Devance, Justin Brownlee, LA Tenorio, Sol Mercado, and Scottie Thompson. How is that not a superteam? The Kangkong jokes sure died a slow death.   Systematic Mayhem Even in college hoops, superteams are the way to go. However, in the amatuers, you just have to recruit your way into building one. La Salle has perfected this method and the Green Archers are certainly the biggest --- and loudest and most aggressive ---- recruiters. The Taft superteam featuring Ben Mbala and co. got the Green Archers to two UAAP Finals and one championship. Only one championship because another superteam, quietly built in Katipunan with surgical, perhaps even robotic, precision, beat them this year. That's right, Big Bad Blue is once again on top of the UAAP as the Ateneo Blue Eagles scored a sensational, near-sweep of UAAP Season 80. Coach Tab Baldwin has a collection of incredible players that may not look like it on first glance but they do certainly qualify for superteam status. Dom't believe it? Maybe you will after they complete a five-peat. It could happen.   Sweep In the other collegiate league, two superteams dominated the NCAA for two separate periods in one season. First, Lyceum, the surprise superteam, made history by completing an 18-game sweep of the elimination round. However, the Pirates ran into the league's decade-old superteam in San Beda and the Red Lions ended up sweeping the Finals for yet another title. Most of the major characters from both squads will return for a new season and if a San Beda-Lyceum rematch does not happen, well, that's just disappointing isn't it?   OVERTIME 2017 also saw the rise and fall and rise of the Gilas Pilipinas program. Well sort of. The Philippines got off to a great star this year by absolutely dominating the SEABA Championships. Then, disaster struck in the 2017 FIBA Asia Cup when Gilas was embarassed by an old foe in South Korea. To end the year, the Philippine national team recovered, albeit in an ugly fashion, to take an early lead in the 2019 World Cup Asian Qualifiers. Gilas is more than capable of forming a Pinoy superteam that could compete, and even beat, the best of Asia. Let's hope we get that in 2018. Finally, 2017 also saw the Civil War PBA edition. It wasn't funny and it wasn't good. Fortunately, it seems that bright and peacuful days are ahead of our beloved league. Let's hope that's the case and let's just leave the bad memories behind this year. Time to move on and forget about that stuff. There are basketball games to be played.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 28th, 2017
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2017

‘Thor: Ragnarok’ really rocks

WITH his long blond hair and magic hammer, the Mighty Thor has always been one of Marvel Comics' iconic characters. Thor has some serious history, the creation of Stan Lee, Larry Lieber and Jack Kirby in 1962 based on the Norse god of thunder. It was a no-brainer to bring Thor to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) with Chris Hemsworth taking on the Odinson's mantle in 2011's "Thor," two "Avengers" films and 2013's "Thor: The Dark World" to generally good reviews and positive box office. This is, after all, literally the stuff of opera and mythology. But the drama may have been too much. Visually striking and epic, "Thor: The Dark World" was also so grim and serious to the point o...Keep on reading: ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ really rocks.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 19th, 2017

Less time, fewer timeouts among adjustments for NBA coaches

em>By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press /em> NEW YORK (AP) — Mike D’Antoni ran an offensive system known as seven seconds or less, so he likes things fast. Good thing, because NBA coaches find things come at them more quickly this season. They are losing time and timeouts, with fewer days to prepare before the regular season and fewer chances to talk things over during games. Throw in new rules legislating how they can rest players, and there are plenty of adjustments even for veteran coaches. “I think it’s good,” said D’Antoni, the NBA coach of the year with Houston last year. “Take stuff out of coaches’ hands, because we just screw it up anyway. So it’s better for the players.” Among the changes: — Next Tuesday's (Wednesday, PHL time) start is the NBA’s earliest since 1980. It’s a week earlier than normal, with the maximum number of preseason games cut from eight to six. — Timeouts are reduced from 18 to 14, with each team having seven. They will be limited to two during the last three minutes of games, instead of the previous rule that permitted three timeouts in the final two minutes. — Teams can be fined $100,000 or more for resting healthy players during national TV games, and are discouraged from resting multiple healthy players in the same game or sitting them in road games. — Halftime will be 15 minutes for all games — and the league plans to be diligent about starting the clock as soon as the first half ends. There previously was a minute or two longer for national TV games, and sometimes the clock wouldn’t start until all players had cleared the floor. That change caught the attention of D’Antoni, who noted that in some arenas there is a longer walk from the benches to the locker rooms. “So instead of showing 10 clips at halftime, you might only be able to show two or three,” D’Antoni said. Byron Spruell, the NBA’s president of league operations, said the goal wasn’t to shorten the length of games, which run about 2 hours, 15 minutes. He said the league wanted the games to have a better flow, and worked with the coaches and Competition Committee, which includes some coaches, during the summer on the changes. Spruell said coaches were fine with the removal of the under-9 minute timeouts in the second and fourth quarters, feeling they came too soon after the quarters started. There will now be two mandatory timeouts in each quarter, at the under-7 and under-3 minute marks. Even at the end of games, coaches acknowledged there were too many stoppages. “As a head coach you always want more timeouts. You want to have that flexibility at the end of the game to be able to help your team,” Miami’s Erik Spoelstra said. “But when I’m watching games, I want there to be less. I do. I want there to be less timeouts and for the games to go a little bit quicker, particularly at the end. You want to just see the action.” All timeouts will now be 75 seconds. Full timeouts were formerly 90 seconds. “Before you have the little pow-wow for a long timeout, the coaches try to get reacquainted and figure out where you’re going to eat dinner,” D’Antoni joked. “But now you’ve got to go in and actually coach.” Spruell said the league didn’t get a lot of pushback from coaches on the suggested changes, even coming around on the resting rules. “I’m just happy Adam Silver gave us some good guidelines to follow when it comes to that so we don’t feel like we’re cheating our fans,” Memphis coach David Fizdale said. “That was one good thing that came out of the coaches’ meetings, Adam Silver’s leadership on that.” Player health was one reason for the shorter preseason. By adding the extra week to the regular season, the league reduced back-to-back games and has no teams playing four in five nights for the first time. Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek said the shorter preseason wouldn’t matter to most teams, since they usually run a similar system from year to year unless there was a coaching change, and there were none. His team is different. The Knicks are largely scrapping the triangle offense they ran when Phil Jackson was president and redefining roles with leading scorer Carmelo Anthony traded. They’ve had a number of nagging injuries and may not see some combinations play together until the games count. “It’s one of those years that maybe you wish there was eight exhibition games, but it is what it is and we just have to work,” Hornacek said. There’s also a change for general managers in the form of an earlier trade deadline. Previously the Thursday (Friday, PHL time) after the All-Star Game, now it’s the Thursday (Friday, PHL time) 10 days before it. Spruell said in discussions with GMs, they felt that would benefit the traded players, who would have the break to acclimate themselves to their new cities. So there’s plenty that’s new, but Spoelstra said they will all catch on. “Whenever there’s rules changes, regardless, players or coaches, you eventually adapt and we’ll do that as well,” he said. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Girl hit by foul ball at Yankees game gets game's attention

em>By Larry Neumeister, Associated Press /em> NEW YORK (AP) — It might be the shot heard around the baseball world: the rocket-like foul ball that hit a young girl at a New York Yankees game. In the hours after the girl was struck in the face by the 105-mph screamer, the game's commissioner vowed to push harder for all teams to extend protective netting to the end of the dugouts and the Cincinnati Reds committed to do just that by next year. Several legal observers of baseball, which has long been shielded from lawsuits over fan injuries, saw it as a potential game changer. 'America's pastime is breaking America's heart. That little girl, that's everyone's daughter,' said lawyer Bob Hilliard, who represents fans in a California lawsuit that seeks class action status to sue on behalf of 1,750 fans hit by balls and bats at games each year. The line drive off the bat of Yankees slugger Todd Frazier on Wednesday hit the girl in the face in less than a second, and the game came to a halt as she was treated in the stands. Frazier and other players from the Yankees and Minnesota Twins kneeled in prayer, and many fans were in stunned silence or in tears. The toddler remained hospitalized Thursday. Her father said soon after she was hit, 'She's doing all right. Just keep her in your thoughts.' In a statement Thursday, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred called the events 'extremely upsetting.' 'Over the past few seasons MLB has worked with our clubs to expand the amount of netting in our ballparks,' Manfred said. 'In light of yesterday's event, we will redouble our efforts on this important issue.' About a third of the 30 major league teams, the Yankees not among them, have at the commissioner's urging extended the netting to at least the far end of the dugout. The Reds have promised to do it by next season's Opening Day. Hilliard's lawsuit seeks to go further, to force clubs to extend protective netting from foul pole to foul pole. But like other lawsuits over decades, it was tossed out. An appeal is set to be heard in San Francisco in December. 'A day at the ballpark should not be a game of Russian Roulette, especially for children injured by projectiles in disturbingly disproportionate numbers,' lawyers wrote in court papers seeking the lawsuit's reinstatement. Most of the fans struck by balls and bats at games each year suffer minor injuries, but a few have been critically injured or killed. The more tragic results include a 14-year-old boy who died four days after he was hit on the left side of his head at Dodger Stadium in May 1970 and a 39-year-old woman who died a day after she was struck in the temple by a foul ball at a San Angelo Colts game in 2010. But fans may be unaware of the stark legal reality of baseball: Successfully suing teams over such cases is nearly impossible. The fine print on every baseball ticket comes with a disclaimer that the bearer 'assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game.' For the last century or so, baseball has been virtually immune from such lawsuits because of what has become known as the Baseball Rule. Ed Edmonds, a retired professor of law at Notre Dame Law School who co-authored 'Baseball Meets the Law,' said at least two states, Idaho and Indiana, have turned away from automatic application of the Baseball Rule. But four other states, Arizona, Colorado, Illinois and New Jersey, passed legislation protecting teams from lawsuits. New York real estate executive Andy Zlotnick, who unsuccessfully sued the Yankees after he was hit in the face by a ball at a game six years ago, said he required major reconstructive surgery and still has throbbing pain in his cheek, numbness in his lips and gums, double vision and retina damage. He said he has not gone to a game since. 'Nobody should go to a ballpark and come out without an eye or disabled,' he said. 'Enough is enough.' ___ em>Associated Press writers Fred Lief, Ben Walker, Ron Blum and Howie Rumberg contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 21st, 2017

Motoring: British and bespoke

NOT THAT Aston Martin is off the rack; far from it, really. With only around 4,000 deliveries worldwide a year this independent, exclusive brand from Gaydon, England qualifies as haute couture. But, as the nature of fine stuff goes, an Aston Martin can be tailored to suit individual tastes and whims, turning it into a truly bespoke piece that isn't far removed from any Savile Row produce......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsApr 18th, 2017

Hot Stuff: These Must-Have Reads From ABS-CBN Books Are On Sale On Shopee!

Don’t miss the chance to grab exclusive bundles at 20% on these best-selling books!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated News11 hr. 33 min. ago

Formula E paves way for electric cars on and off racetrack

By Terrin Waack, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Unplug and go. Filling up a car is as simple as that, even if it's not gas flowing through the nozzle. Electricity is efficient. Formula E, a global electric auto racing series, steers the way — toward the future of not only its sport but also its industry. "You don't realize it," Mahindra Racing team principal Dilbagh Gill said, "but the second car from today that you're going to buy is going to be an electric car." America is one of Formula E's biggest targets. So, for the second consecutive time since the series' inception in 2014, Formula E took on the Brooklyn streets for a season-finale doubleheader of its 12-race schedule. The track length is 2.373 kilometers with Lower Manhattan in the backdrop as well as the Statue of Liberty. Techeetah's Jean-Eric Vergne became the fourth different driver to win the championship and Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler took home the overall team title. Confetti at the finish line marked the end of an era. In January, Formula E unveiled its new Gen2 car for next season. The current cars have a maximum power of 200kW, limited to 180kW during races, and they top out at 225 kph (140 mph). This model has been around since the series started and requires a mid-race car change because the battery runs out. The Gen2 car will run faster and longer. No more swaps. Performance has basically been doubled in just four years without changing the battery's fundamental chemistry. "I don't know if you remember before Formula E started, there was this whole perception that lithium batteries were a little bit dangerous — they were prohibited on airplanes, they caught fire on mobile phones," Panasonic Jaguar Racing sporting manager Gary Ekerold said. "Since we've run Formula E ... absolutely fine. Batteries are proven to be safe." But they're still monitored. A dielectric — non-conductor — fluid in the battery keeps it cool while the car runs. There's also a battery management system that constantly records data, monitoring temperature and voltage. When the car is charging, dry-ice blowers — Super Chillers — connect to the car and prevent overheating. It takes less than an hour to recharge a drained battery. "It's going to start reaching a stage where the time it takes to fill up your gas — 4 minutes and 40 seconds on average — is going to be the time it takes to charge your car," Gill said. Teams are given identical batteries. The chassis, or bodies, of the cars are also the same. Where teams can get creative are places such as the electric motor, inverter, powertrain and gearbox. Manufacturers get involved here. Everyday car names occupy pit lane. Audi and Jaguar already have teams. Nissan and BMW will next season. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche are joining for season six. "This is like a playground for them," Mahindra Racing driver Feliz Rosenqvist said. "When you get to the competitive side, you can always find new ways that maybe you wouldn't do on a normal car. You push the software and hardware." The steering wheel, which has a programmable screen, is also fair game. Things can get technical when the car gets broken down into specific parts and technology is thrown into the mix. But the basics remain: Energy is how far. Power is how fast. "It's still a racing car," Panasonic Jaguar Racing driver Mitch Evans said. "It looks like a racing car. It drives like a racing car." It just doesn't sound like the normal racing car. The roar of a combustion engine is missing. "That's normally like a sensor for your driving — how quick you're going, how you hear the revs — and now you can only hear the wind," Rosenqvist said. "It's more like riding a bike. As you increase your speed, you just start hearing wind." To spectators, the whizzing equates to an amplified toy car, go-kart or scooter. All electric, of course. It's not that disruptive to the public. Electric cars are the way of the future. They're already racing on city streets. They go rain or shine — only stop for thunder or lightning. And they're much better for the environment. "Your whole life runs on a battery," Gill said. "The time is now.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News14 hr. 59 min. ago

Pacquiao still has it

KUALA Lumpur---Young again, Manny Pacquiao was in ebullient form Sunday after he leapt back into the global boxing spotlight with a seventh round knockout of World Boxing Association welterweight champion Lucas Matthysse. Pacquiao will be 40 in December but was beaming as he told reporters afterwards: "Do I look 39? "At 39 years old, I'm still OK, I'm still fine. When you see me in training, you can tell I'm like 28, 27 years old," Pacquiao said. "You cannot say I'm 39 years old! You can say I'm 28, 27 years old." Pacquiao certainly seemed to have been drinking from the fountain of youth as his speed, agility, lightning quick movements and punching power magically returne...Keep on reading: Pacquiao still has it.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News18 hr. 20 min. ago