Advertisements


Hear them growl: The Pinoy bear community raises its voice

MANILA, Philippines – By the time the Bearytones took the stage at Metro Manila Pride on June 30, a good number of the event’s record-breaking 25,000+ attendees had already pooled by the stage to watch the show. In terms of diversity, the crowd had it all. It was Pride after all, and ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerJul 11th, 2018

LA Clippers fans celebrate win, Pinoy culture in Filipino Heritage Night

As the injury-plagued Los Angeles Clippers topped the Atlanta Hawks via a game-winning three-pointer by C.J. Williams, 108-107, Filipino fans in attendance had a deeper reason to celebrate. Despite the heroics of the remaining Clippers players, the real star of the night was Philippine culture, as the LA squad celebrated Filipino Heritage Night (Tuesday PHL time). Who you got tonight, me or @djeman? @LAClippers 🙌🏾 #filipinoheritagenight pic.twitter.com/cWqQ2bcVcl — apl.de.ap (@apldeap) January 8, 2018 Tonight's Starting 5️⃣ 🇵🇭» @j3vans1_ 🇵🇭» @TeamLou23 🇵🇭» @C_Will21 🇵🇭» Wesley Johnson 🇵🇭» @DeAndre#FilipinoHeritageNight pic.twitter.com/tRpwf0f41a — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2018 From before tip-off, to the post-game festivities, the annual Clippers Filipino Heritage night presented an All-Star cast. #ClipperNation, stay in your seats for tonight’s halftime performance by @apldeap.#FilipinoHeritageNight 🇵🇭 pic.twitter.com/wl0cGA605d — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2018 Jessica Reynoso of The Voice Philippines kicked off the night with the U.S. national anthem, and in between timeouts Filipina Clippers Spirit Dancer Kyla made sure the Staples Center was beaming with Pinoy Pride. Celebrity b-ball game! Team @djeman vs Team @apldeap. Who you got?#FilipinoHeritageNight 🇵🇭 pic.twitter.com/B5sFF1c21M — LA Clippers (@LAClippers) January 9, 2018 Allan Pineda or Apl de Ap of the pop group Black Eyed Peas not only got the crowd going during halftime, he was also part of the Filipino celebrity game that drew cheers from rising star Kobe Paras, who also attended the festivities. "Just proud to be Pinoy and our people representing LA," said the musician. "It’s great to be here to celebrate our heritage. Just introducing our culture around the world." Indeed, it was definitely a win for both the Clippers, and for the Filipino community in L.A......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

PVL: I don’t care –- Almadro on bashers

Ateneo-Motolite head coach Oliver Almadro isn’t bothered with the flak he received from fans on social media after giving Deanna Wong a tongue-lashing Saturday in a straight sets loss to BanKo in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference. “I don’t care!” Almadro quickly answered even before reporters could finish their question about him trending on social media as he entered the pressroom for a post-game interview Sunday. Twitter went abuzz Saturday night following a clip during Ateneo-Motolite’s timeout where the very animated Almadro lashed out at Wong as the Lady Eagles trailed the Perlas Spikers, 7-11, in the third set with BanKo controlling the match, 2-0. Grabe naman. pic.twitter.com/H3CtjifrnI — PINOY BALIBOLISTA (@pinoybalibol) November 10, 2018 Fans went to social media to express their criticisms on Almadro. But the mentor, who steered the Blue Eagles to three straight UAAP titles, just brushed everything off.      “Few people don’t matter for me, what’s important for me is I use them as our strength,” said Almadro, whose squad recovered from a 24-26, 22-25, 16-25 loss to the Perlas Spikers with a 25-23, 16-25, 25-14, 25-20 win over Adamson-Akari. “I use them as a creative criticism for me and of course I don’t put energy in the things I don’t have control rather I put all my energy at things I have control, which is my team so yun ang importante.” Almadro said that even before the game his team was already dealing with off-court issues. “Natatawa ako kasi hindi naman nila alam ‘yung problema namin e, we have internal problems prior to the match medyo pagod kasi kami. Maraming players ang hindi dapat a-attend yesterday because of biglaang ‘Binhi’ it’s a school activity so talaga three players, four players will not come yesterday so everybody’s bothered,” he explained. “So they don’t know Deanna is bothered, everybody’s bothered pero good thing, Ateneo community, Ateneo professors, Binhi for mentors are really supporting the program so they opted to finish the Binhi earlier so nakapunta lahat pero of course bothered.” The mentor admitted that he took some time reading the fans’ reactions but kept firm on his action to discipline the UAAP Season 80 Best Setter.    “I read all of that but what matters for me sabi ko nga I will sacrifice my kindness so that my players will know what is right or wrong because life is cruel if you will just be kind all the time, they will not understand what is right or wrong,” he said. “As a parent sometimes I have to sacrifice kindness because life is cruel in the end because they have to know is right or wrong.” He scolded Wong, Almadro added, so that the playmaker will know her mistakes for her to address it. Wong only had 13 excellent sets out of 64 attempts against BanKo with five markers and seven digs. To make amends for her subpar performance, Wong tallied 28 excellent sets with four markers against the Lady Falcons. “Now Deanna is in the right position now. Deanna is gambling with the set now. We are receiving right today, so ibig sabihin we learned yesterday,” Almadro pointed out. Upon learning about the bashing he received, Wong apologized to Almadro, who then told his ward not to worry about it. “Deanna cried to me ‘coach sorry’. Bakit ka magso-sorry? It's my job,” he said. “And it’s your job to play now what's important is kaya mong bitbitin yun kaya mong dalhin.” “And what did she do now? She played well, it’s because hindi kami nagpapa-bother sa mga nandiyan. What’s important for us are those who believe in us, those who fight for us win or lose,” Almadro added. “I will always reiterate to my players right motivation, right motivation every time because ‘pag pinasukan ng wrong motivation ang utak mawawala sa pwesto, hindi kikilos. It’s because walang meaning sa ginagawa so kailangan talaga right motivation.” Almadro still gave some kind words to his bashers.   “Those who do not support us when we lose, it’s okay with us. We still pray for them,” he said.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 11th, 2018

MAJOR POINT: Finding Family Away From Home

I’ve been in the Philippines now for over 21 years. I can’t believe it has been that long, but I just checked my passport stamp the other day and sure enough my arrival stamp says August 2, 1997. So many things have happened since then that it puts me in this weird nostalgic state of mind thinking back to how I was back then. I had no idea what was in store for me when I decided to try my luck in professional basketball in the Philippines. I thought I knew. I thought I knew everything, but I really had no clue. I was recruited by a Filipino agent living in the United States to come to the Philippines to play basketball. This made me feel pretty special. I had put together a solid playing resume in high school and college and had played a year professionally in Denmark. I thought I would come to the Philippines, play basketball for 11 years, retire, go back to Michigan and get into coaching. That was my plan. It was pretty simple to me. I never thought about the people I’d meet or the relationships I’d build during my stay in the Philippines. And even though I knew nobody in the Philippines, I didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to go to the Philippines to play basketball. There were a few things I underestimated when I came to the Philippines back in 1997. Being from Michigan, the heat was a often times painful adjustment to get used to. I had never lived in a big city before, so Manila and its traffic was also something to get used to. I don’t speak Tagalog, so getting around that can still be difficult at times. The style of play here in the Philippines is different than I was used to, so I had to get used to that. But, the biggest adjustment for me was that I knew absolutely no one when I came to the Philippines. I had no friends. My mom is from Lawaan, Eastern Samar. She had only been back once since she had left the Philippines in the late 1960s. Most of my relatives on her side of the family still live in the province. So while, I have family in the Philippines, I don’t have any relatives in Metro Manila. So, here I was, on the other side of the planet with no family and no friends. Like most people, I like having friends. I had always had a close group of friends in high school and college. Playing a year in Denmark, not having my friends around was probably my biggest adjustment and I went through a rough period of homesickness there. Now that I was in the Philippines, I was in a different, but also similar situation. In my early years here in the Philippines, I played for two great teams. My first team was Tanduay Rhum. My first coach was Alfrancis Chua and my first boss was Boss Bong Tan. Both of those guys took great care of me. After four years with them, I was then traded to Barangay Ginebra. My boss there was Boss Henry Cojuangco. He also took great care of me. I had many great teammates through the years, including my years on those two teams. My teammates were very welcoming of me and I enjoyed my time on the court with those guys. However, when practice ended. My teammates would go back to their friends, family and responsibilities and I would go back to an empty condo unit. Everyday I would have practice in the morning from 9-12. After practice, I’d eat and then go find a gym to workout in. By the time I was done with my workout at 3 or 4 in the afternoon, I would then have to figure out what to do from 3 or 4 until the time I went to bed around 10 or 11. I thought a lot differently back then than I do now, so most of that time was wasted. I spent a lot of that time alone, bored, in front of the TV, just waiting for the day to end, so I could get up and do it again the next day. Although I was living my dream of playing professional basketball, it was strange for me to be living that life day after day after day. My first couple of years here, I didn’t have a car. I didn’t know my way around Manila. I didn’t know anybody outside of my team. I was living in Quezon City in a non-walkable area. It was a grind. I often wondered how long I could continue to stay on that type of grind. It wasn’t until after 18 months of living that way that I started to meet other Filipino-Americans that were going through similar experiences. In the late 1990s, the PBA landscape was much different than it is today. One thing that was a lot different, was there weren’t as many Fil-Ams as there are today. Having Fil-Am players playing in the PBA was still a new thing. There was a novelty about us. We were the new kids in school, in a way. Guys like Jeff Cariaso, Andy and Danny Seigle, Nic Belasco, Ali Peek, Noy Castillo, Rudy Hatfield and myself had played college basketball in the United States. The basketball fans here in the Philippines didn’t know who we were before we went high in the PBA Draft and then started playing in the PBA. Most of us were the only Fil-Americans on our teams. Upon meeting them, I found out that these guys were living the similar grind I had been going through. It’s hard to explain, but after meeting some of the other Fil-American basketball players, my life instantly got better. It was so refreshing to hear about their experiences. Although, we were all different and from different areas of the US, we were basically going through the same thing at near the same stage of our lives. We were all out here on our own trying to make it in professional basketball in country that was new to us. I found comfort in learning that other people were struggling with similar things that I was struggling with. There is always pressure to win in professional sports. My new friends helped me deal with that pressure. Learning about other peoples experiences in similar situations, having an outlet and having fun with new friends off of the court, helped bring balance to my life. I related to those guys. I smiled and laughed more when I was around those guys. Two guys in particular that helped me were Jeffrey Cariaso and Andy Seigle. Both of those guys are older than me and had been in the country and the PBA before I was. I looked to both of them for advice and valued their opinions. Jeff is from San Francisco was drafted in the PBA in 1995. By the time I had met Jeff in 1999, Jeff had won the PBA Rookie of the Year, had won multiple championships and was a multiple time PBA All-Star. Jeff was always a guy I respected for the way he handled himself on the court and off of it. Jeff was also a leader in the Fil-Am community here, organizing dinners and get togethers. Even today, it is nice to be able to message Jeff and he is still always willing to listen or give advice. Jeff will always shoot you straight. A friend like him is hard to find. Andy was the number one overall pick in the 1997 PBA Draft. At 6 for 10 Andy was the first Fil-Am from my generation to have big expectations put on his shoulders the very first day he stepped on a PBA court. Dealing with that pressure must have been tough, but Andy was one of the most accommodating, giving people I have ever met. Whenever he was doing something, he would invite me. Random days out of the blue, he would invite me to his house to have dinner with his family. Andy would host dinners at his house for holidays, where families from different teams would get together to celebrate. I was fortunate enough to eventually play with Andy at Ginebra, where we won three championships together. Having him in practice and as a friend made my life better in the Philippines. Just as Jeff and Andy helped me, I also tried to help new Fil-Americans that came to the Philippines after me. Rudy Hatfield came to Tanduay a couple of years after I had been there and I tried to show him the ropes. We became very close friends. When Jimmy Alapag and Harvey Carey were new to the country in 2002 and 2003, respectively, I tried help where I could. I can’t say I ever really mentored anybody, but I always tried to listen, and share. Even if I can only help you laugh or smile more, I know that can help. Those guys have also become close friends of mine. I know they have also helped others that have come after them. Since Alapag and Carey arrived, there have already been a couple generations of new Filipino American basketball players. I still see the younger Fil-Ams from different teams hanging out together. While I’ve heard that some people view that as Fil-Ams trying to separate themselves, I don’t believe that is true. Just like guys from the same province or same school are more likely to hang out together, young Fil-Ams are more likely to hang out together. It’s a natural thing to gravitate to things and people you relate to and have something in common with. It’s not the easiest thing to do, to go to a foreign country where you have no family and friends to start a new career. I know. I’ve been there. A lot of things have changed for me since 1997, when I first came to this country. I am now married and have two small children of my own. My wife, kids and her family provide my support system now, as I do for them. However, there was a time and a long time where I didn’t have that. My Fil-American friends were my family and support system. And while that wasn’t ideal, I was always taught to do the best with what you had. I’m thankful for what I had. Eric Menk played in the PBA from 1999 to 2016. Menk is a four-time PBA champion, three-time PBA Finals MVP and one-time PBA MVP (2005). He currently writes for ABS-CBN Sports weekly. Menk also has his podcast Staying MAJOR as welll as his own YouTube channel ......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018

Nike celebrates Manila s basketball culture with Battle Force Manila , Iconic Air Force 1

This season, Nike celebrates the undeniable passion of basketball through Battle Force Manila - the ultimate expression of basketball culture within its community in Manila. With Battle Force Manila, Nike calls on Filipinos to be bold and let their passion manifest through basketball, dance, rap and art by giving them an arena where hard work, competition, creativity and self-expression can shine.  Battle Force Manila kicks off with a series of activities helmed by selected iconic personalities who have their passion and influence spread to their communities, inspiring people to let their inner potential and ambition shine through.    The line-up of these iconic personalities – Katrina Guytingco and Thirdy Ravena for basketball, Gab Valenciano and AC Lalata for dance; Loonie for rap and Kayo Casio for art - will enable participants with crafty tips and motivation through a series of videos that will be released, to refine their talent and prepare to battle. The battles will culminate in a grand finale where finalists will showcase the results of their hard work, grit and determination and battle it out to emerge as champions of basketball, dance, rap and art. This year, the brand calls for greater participation among women in all the battles with their sheer presence and growing voice of strength and empowerment in their communities. In support of this rallying cry particularly in sport, female ballers will experience training programs tailored especially for her at the Nike Hyper Court for the first time ever, alongside other activities to compete in and unleash her love for the game.   At the heart of Battle Force Manila is the iconic Air Force 1, serving as a source of inspiration with its legacy immortalized in the basketball arena. This year, Nike commissioned Blank Canvas Collective – an invitation to a curated group of creatives - Kayo Cosio, Lari Gazmen, Jade Suayan and Quiccs - to showcase their labour of love of basketball culture through reimagined expressions of the iconic sneakers. Tribute to the Nike Air Force 1 will continue throughout the month with a new unique design dropping every Friday for the entire month.  “Basketball is an integral part of Filipinos’ lives. With Battle Force Manila, Nike celebrates how the game has influenced the culture and lifestyle of athletes, artists, dancers and musicians; on and off the court,” says Jino Ferrer, Country Marketing Manager of Nike Philippines. “With the talent and influence of local iconic personalities, the reimagining of the Air Force 1 alongside our call-out for a stronger participation of women this season, we aim to invoke self-expression while pushing boundaries of ambition and creativity.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

NBA Asia Managing Director Levy: We don t take the Pinoy fanbase lightly

The Philippines is unique, among the countries Scott Levy, NBA Asia Managing Director, handles. Tasked to oversee the development and expansion of the NBA's strategic initiatives in Asia (with the exception of Greater China and India), the Philippines is a different situation for Levy, compared to say, Thailand, or Malaysia. Unlike other countries in the region, basketball is well-engrained in the local Philippine culture, as is the NBA. In that regard, the job is easy. But diehard fans, and this country is full of diehard NBA fans, want different things, and want much more of it. And Levy and the rest of the NBA Asia office know it's important to keep them happy. Speaking to reporters as part of a roundtable Q&A session, Levy admitted that satisfying Philippine demand continues to be the biggest challenge. Citing the league's local TV partners, which include ABS-CBN, Solar, and FOX, as well as the implementation of League Pass via mobile companies Smart and Globe, Levy said, "We want to make sure that there are enough games, and that there are enough outlets [to get those games], that people can continue to interact and really get to know [the NBA] beyond maybe what the scores are. "We want to bring more players here, bring the real experiences. So we bring NBA players during the year, we bring NBA legends (the league directly brings around 3-4 players and legends to the country each year), we have dance teams, we have mascots [so that] people can get very close to the game." This differs very much from other countries in Asia. Whereas in other countries, NBA Asia devotes resources to growing the game, often teaming up with local governments' sports ministries, there's no need to teach the basics here. "That just means we take a higher level approach to coaching and make sure that there's another step that they may [take]," said Levy, who cited the example of bringing in Fil-Am coach Erik Spoelstra of the Miami Heat into the Philippines to help impart higher-level coaching techniques. Because the country is further down the line in terms of hoops techniques, the league's Jr. NBA program which is presented in the Philippines by Alaska, has played a huge role in recent years. "Nearly two million kids have come through the program...to improve their skill level. Many of our players have moved on to play in the UAAP, in the NCAA. Some are now in the PBA. So we want to contribute to the existing strength of the basketball community here," Levy said. It hasn't always been smooth sailing though. Recently, ventures like the NBA Cafe and the NBA Stores in the Philippines saw their licenses expire and close. For Levy though, it's similar to the familiar "shoot your shot" maxim in hoops. "We're willing to try things and if they're successful, great, we'll continue them," he said. "But if we think there are better ways to engage, we'll do that." Levy added that while the physical stores may be gone, fans can still purchase NBA merch through NBAStore.com, and other places like Nike, Toby's and Titan. Levy also applauded how knowledgable local fans are with regards to players and teams. While it's often thought that a large chunk of Pinoy fans are Lakers fans, Levy said that when you look at the data, it's winning teams that are able to capture the attention of Filipinos, with the obvious exception of teams in areas with large Filipino communities, such as San Francisco and the Golden State Warriors. "For me, here in the Philippines, we don't have to do much more than just make sure the players and the teams are exposed, because Filipino fans understand great play, and they understand great players. And when teams win, or players do amazing things, they become popular here," he said.   Looking ahead to the future, Levy believes that mobile will still be the way to go, though with a caveat. "As the streaming speeds continue to improve...then we'll be able to deliver more content," Levy said. "We'll continue to adjust the delivery of our product as the speeds improve." He added that the league wants to look into more basketball mobile games, even locally or regionally developed ones, to help educate fans on players and give them more ways to interact. To sum it up, Levy once again reiterated that the Philippines is "incredibly important," to the Association. "It probably is the market with the highest fan affinity for basketball, and that's daunting. To satisfy everybody, that's a full-time job. "We don't take the fanbase here lightly. We are focused on making sure that everybody is happy with what they have available and we're listening for the things that we need to do better."   Without a doubt, that's music to the Philippine fans' ears. SIX SHOTS Here are six other topics Levy touched on during the interview: 1. On the Philippines hosting another NBA Global Games "The challenge with [the Global Games] is always, there's 15,000 people in that building, and there's a hundred million Filipinos that we're trying to engage around the NBA. So while the games are great, we are really spending our time figuring out how we can engage a hundred million Filipinos. "But it's always in consideration and hopefully at some point in the future, we'll be able to bring the game back here again." 2. On the impact of a full-Pinoy player making it in the NBA "That question has always perplexed me, because the fanbase here is so strong already. I mean clearly Jordan Clarkson is very popular here, but he's not the most popular NBA player [in the Philippines]. So would a Filipino player be the most popular player? If he was the best player in the NBA, he'd probably be the most popular player, but if he's not, I think Filipinos will follow that player, and will continue to follow the best players in the NBA because that's the expectation here in the Philippines - 'I'm looking for the best players and the best teams and that's who I want to follow.' "But [by] the number of people who are playing in this country, I think it's just a matter of time before we have multiple local Filipinos playing in the NBA. It's definitely going to happen. The game is getting better, the coaches are getting better, the level of talent in the PBA continues to go up, and there are more Filipino players coming to the US and playing in university [NCAA] so it's definitely going to happen." 3. On the passing of FIBA Secretary General Patrick Baumann "I personally knew Patrick and there was nobody that spent more time and energy and basically dedicated their life to the sport of basketball and had such a great impact on the sport of basketball around the world. It’s a tragic loss. Personally, I will miss Patrick and he worked very closely with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver and Deputy Commissioner Mark Tatum. They had just seen him in a FIBA conference in Xi’an, China a few days before and typically with Patrick he was off in Argentina in another basketball event. I mean, he just, he was tireless in his efforts and he had tremendous success and it’s a tremendous loss to the entire basketball community." 4. On the NBA expanding the game towards female fans in the Philippines. "[For the Jr. NBA PH program] our goal is always 50-50, boys-girls. We haven’t yet achieved that here in the Philippines but again, working closely with the schools, working with Alaska, working with SM...the percentage continues to increase. I'm not exactly sure what the [numbers are] last year, but it's still too low. "I think that’s why it’s a little bit of frustrating here. In countries like Thailand and Indonesia, where, well Thailand has more than 50 percent girls, and in Vietnam and Indonesia it’s over 40 percent right now. So, again, our goal is 50-50. This sport is gender neutral, we bring WNBA players into market, we’ve done that many times already and now we’re going into schools to really try to encourage young girls to play the game." 5. On giving tips to local leagues to become more successful "We’re not here to dictate how a league should be run. What we’re trying to do is understand where we can be helpful, if they’re looking for assistance in building an arena, we’re happy to help with that. If they’re looking [at] how to enhance ticket sales, how to expand the live in-arena experience. Whatever it is that they may ask for our assistance, we are here to help. We support local basketball in every way we can but we’re not being prescriptive in saying this is how you should run a league in the Philippines. There’s way more knowledge on the ground here in the country than we have about what’s successful here." 6. On sports stars from other leagues interacting with NBA players "Our players are incredible. They are global icons, they’re incredible on social media which continues to grow their fanbase….because our players are active on social and they’re interested, personally interested in fashion and technology and gaming, and music and they have relationships with Jay-Z and with Usher, with every other top performer and other athletes are also interested because they’re fans. So when we do an event in London, we get calls from players on Chelsea, and on Tottenham and on Liverpool and on Man U and say “Hey, we wanna come to the game because we wanna see these athletes play. "So, anytime there is an athlete that is a fan of the NBA we will look to engage them. We work with all other sports leagues and we’re also fans. Our players are fans. There’s an opportunity to go to Camp Nou in Barcelona, our players want to be there. So, this is more driven by the players, their personal interests in other sports and other athletes and luckily our athletes are generally pretty popular around the world, and we’ll encourage that engagement and facilitate some particularly social media moments where Neymar comes into the locker room and exchanges a jersey with Steph Curry. We had Ronaldinho wearing a Carmelo Anthony jersey, dribbling a basketball on his head. All these moments are really special for the crossover fans from one sport to another. But it’s really driven by our players’ personal interest or other athletes’ personal interest in basketball.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 25th, 2018

Surviving tuberculosis

  NEW YORK, USA – When you hear that someone has tuberculosis (TB), you might instinctively distance yourself from that person, fearing that you would be infected. Or you may inadvertently size up the person to see if they bear any signs of being dirty or poor. TB, a bacterial infection ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

NCAA Season 94: Rolly, you will be missed

NCAA coaches and stars were one in saying that the passing of Rolly Manlapaz, considered as the voice of the college basketball, was a great loss in the tight-knit community. The former disk jockey and longtime UAAP and NCAA basketball barker, who also saw stints in volleyball games passed away Thursday after a bout with ALS. He was 58. “I just love the way he calls games,” said Lyceum of the Philippines head coach Topex Robinson. “Sometimes he makes it look like spooky by that sound but then again basketball will never be the same without that voice.” Manlapaz’s last stint with the NCAA was two years ago in Season 92 and called his last game four months ago in UAAP Season 80 women's volleyball Finals. His career spanned for two decades.  “I’m sure he will be remembered not only by the NCAA but by the whole basketball community,” he added. The voice that defined college and amateur basketball in this generation made even the most boring or one-sided game lively with his jewel of a voice and antics why calling out plays. Manlapaz can make an exciting game even more colorful, adding a different flavor and flare that only the stadium legend can deliver. Manlapaz also endeared himself with players and coaches by calling out their full name instead of their nicknames. “Sayang mami-miss namin ang mga sigaw niya dito sa Arena especially when he calls me Teodorico not Boyet. We’re gonna miss them,” said San Beda coach Boyet Fernandez. But Manlapaz’s greatest contribution in the game was his knack of baptizing players with lasting monikers. One of the cagers that got that honor was reigning NCAA Most Valuable Player CJ Perez.  Manlapaz gave Perez the moniker ‘Baby Beast’ when he was still playing for San Sebastian College’s high school team. Perez got the moniker for showing the same aggressiveness and tenacity of former Stag and now PBA star Calvin Abueva while wearing the same No. 7 jersey.  “Kay Sir Rolly nanggaling yung ‘Baby Beast’ na yun, noong FilOil pa lang ata yun,” Perez said. “It’s an honor na naging part siya ng mga league dito. Sobrang happy kami na nabibigyan kami ng moniker dahil sa kanya. Lumalabas ang pangalan namin dahil sa kanya.” San Beda’s Robert Bolick also shared his feelings on the passing of a friend. “Nagulat nga ako na ganyan ang nangyari akala ko naging OK na siya,” he said. “Nakaka-miss ‘yun kasi nakakagana maglaro ‘yun eh.” “Kaya ngayon ayoko na magganun-ganun (na layup). Dati kapag gumaganun ako siya kaagad yung, “Oh dipsy doo!” Ngayon medyo di na siya ganoon kasaya, nawawala ang saya,” he added. Manlapaz according to Bolick made any player perform better with his adrenaline-pumping calls. “Kahit sa UAAP ganoon ‘yan eh. ‘Pag tinawag nya ang pangalan mo parang feeling mo nasa NBA ka eh,” he said. “Maganda ang feeling kapag pumasok ka sa court. Nakakapagpaganda ng laro. Barker yun ang trabaho niya.” Bolick also remembered all the fun moments he had with Manlapaz. “Kahit noong La Salle pa ako kahit nasa bench lang ako tinatawag pa rin nya ako. Di ko nga alam eh (kung bakit ako tinatawag),” joked Bolick, drawing laughter from reporters. “Talagang may pinagsamahan din kaming dalawa. May koneksyon din kami.” “Nu’ng sa La Salle noong nag-championship kami sa UST, kapag nagwa-warmup kami ako pa rin tinatawag niya. Di ko nga alam, di naman ako naglalaro,” he continued. “Nahihiya tuloy akong mag-warmup.” “Nakaka-miss talaga yun and hopefully nasa magandang lugar na siya.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles          .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018

More than 4 million Pinoy staying in US: Census Bureau

By Jon Melegrito/Manila Mail – The U.S. Census Bureau announced in its latest American Community Survey (ACS) data that there are now 4,037,564 Filipinos in the United States. According to the data, there are an estimated 21,646,070 Asian Americans in the United States, and Filipino Americans make up the Read more ».....»»

Category: newsSource:  thepinoyRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Korina Sanchez draws flak for K-pop comment

MANILA, Philippines – Until recently, Korina Sanchez was the woman who made K-pop fans cringe-laugh after she responded with “annyeonghaseyo (hello)” to a compliment from Momoland, but her recent comments on the Pinoy K-pop community have sparked more than just laughs. In a Facebook post shared after the September 1 concert ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

LOOK: Nietes, Palicte hold meet and greet for Filipino community in LA

Before Donnie Nietes and Aston Palicte battle for the vacant WBO Super Flyweight World Championship, the two Pinoy contenders shared some time with the Filipino Community in Los Angeles, California.  Longest-reigning Filipino boxing world champion Nietes and upstart contender Palicte held a meet and greet at the Filipino American Community Center, roughly two weeks before they're scheduled to share the ring in a featured world title bout at the SuperFly 3 card at The Forum in Los Angeles.  Nietes and Palicte were joined by other Filipino boxing personalities such as Louisa Hawton and Mercito Gesta.  Hawton, a Fil-Australian, will also be fighting on the SuperFly3. She will be taking on Brenda Flores for the vacant WBC Women's Minimumweight World Championship.  Nietes and Palicte will be the second all-Filipino world title bout this year, months after Jerwin Ancajas defended his IBF Super Flyweight World Championship against Jonas Sultan.  SuperFly3 happens on September 8th at The Forum in Los Angeles, California.     .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 27th, 2018

NCAA: Jed Mendoza’s cry just may be a rallying cry for JRU

The cheers rained down on Jose Rizal University as it scored its first win – on the basketball court, that is – on Friday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. Struggling for all of the first round of the NCAA 94 Men’s Basketball Tournament, those cheers was all Heavy Bombers top gun Jed Mendoza wanted to hear. “Alam ni Lord, alam ng team na gustong-gusto kong manalo. Every game naman, binibigay ko lahat,” he said. Mendoza and his teammates lost all of their first seven games before a league ruling overturned one of their losses and turned their 0-7 record to 1-6 last Thursday. A day later, Mendoza and his teammates were celebrating their first win – on the basketball court, that is. That is even truer as throughout their terrible start to the season, Mendoza has been at the receiving end of heavy criticism. And so, when that final buzzer sounded, the third-year guard could only let out all those tears. “Parang nabawasan ako ng tinik sa dibdib talaga. Ngayon kasi, pag sinabi na JRU, ako nagre-represent e as captain ball and superstar,” he shared. He then continued, “Parang pag binabatikos yung team, ako kaagad e,” he shared. That was why from start to finish of their school hymn, he was crying and pointing at the JRU crowd. “Hindi na para sa akin ‘to, para kay Lord na ‘to, para sa team, para masuklian ko yung binibigay nila coach. Nahihiya na rin kasi kami sa JRU community na todo-suporta pa rin sila,” he said. While he was doing that, his father figure on the team was fighting back tears of his own. “Hindi ako naiyak sa panalo e. Dito ako naiyak,” head coach Vergel Meneses told reporters, referring to Mendoza who was sitting beside him in their first post-win interview in the season. He then continued, “Nakita kong gustong manalo talaga e. I hope yung ibang players ko, madala rin yun.” All season long, coach Vergel has been preaching patience and perseverance for his rebuilding crew. “Nakita ko pa lang sa Filoil (Preseason), prangka na ako sa kanila at sinasabi kong swerte na tayong manalo ng tatlo o apat,” he shared. That is exactly why the Philippine basketball legend, always the competitor, changed up his coaching style for this season. For example, in one instance in the endgame, Mendoza was forced into a turnover which then led to a timeout for Emilio Aguinaldo College. Instead of giving him a scolding, however, the usually fiery coach Vergel just kissed him on the head. All of this, the Heavy Bombers’ mentor understood, will just be part of their process. “We take all the criticism as a challenge. Naging constructive criticism na lang that will help us,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

Rufa Mae Quinto as your Waze voice? Here s her audition piece

MANILA, Philippines – A year ago,  CNN Philippines ran an informal online poll, asking followers which Filipino celebrity they'd want to see (or hear?) as the Waze navigation voice.  While no real winner was proclaimed, many people said they wanted comedienne Rufa Mae Quinto to be their Waze navigation ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

Four Filipino classic films to be shown at SF Main Library

SAN FRANCISCO -- For the celebration of the Centenary of Philippine Cinema, 2017-2019 and the 25thAnniversary of the Filipino Arts & Cinema International (FACINE), one-time screening of four Philippine classic films will be held at the Latino/Hispanic Community Room, Lower Level/Main Library, 100 Larkin Street, San Francisco. Co-presented with the Film Development Council of the Philippines (FDCP), Jo Atienza, and the Filipino American Center (FAC) of the San Francisco Public Library, the special program, PINOY KLASIKS, will screen Manuel Conde's Genghis Khan, 1950; Richard Abelardo's Mutya ng Pasig(Pasig Maiden), 1950; Ishmael Bernal's Pagdating sa Dulo(At the Top), 1971; and Lin...Keep on reading: Four Filipino classic films to be shown at SF Main Library.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

THE RISE OF VOICE: Globe Labs, Nexmo team up to deliver powerful solutions to SEA market

GLOBE Labs, the innovative developer community of Globe Telecom, in partnership with Nexmo (part of Vonage (NYSE:VG), a global business cloud communications leader, have teamed up to deliver powerful voice solutions to the Philippine market and the rest of Southeast Asia. These readily-available and highly-reliable voice solutions will enable businesses and enterprises to boost operational […] The post THE RISE OF VOICE: Globe Labs, Nexmo team up to deliver powerful solutions to SEA market appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJul 26th, 2018

National strike set in Israel over law denying gay couples right to surrogacy

Israel is set for nationwide strike action on Sunday over new legislation denying surrogacy to gay couples, with a trade union urging employers to let their staff join the walkout. The move comes after parliament on Wednesday approved surrogacy for single women or those unable to bear children -- without granting the same right to same-sex couples or single men. Previously, only heterosexual married couples were able to use a surrogate. The Histadrut labour federation has backed strike action, urging its members to support workers who want to take part. "The struggle for the equal rights of the LGBT community is an important one facing Israeli society," it said in a statement...Keep on reading: National strike set in Israel over law denying gay couples right to surrogacy.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

BanKo Perlas: Explosive on and off the court

While BanKo Perlas methodically pounded PayMaya into submission at the start of their Premier Volleyball League Reinforced Conference semifinals Sunday, its throngs of fans, predominantly newcomers to the sporting scene, were filliing the inside of the Filoil Flying V Centre with their thunderous cheers and screams.     This new breed of fans were already serving strong notice during the Perlas Spikers’ final quarterfinal outing against the Petro Gazz Angels last June 23 also at the San Juan Arena.       Pitting clappers and lungs that would put to shame the nation’s most popular belters against the drum-assisted cheers of the other side, they, numbering only about 50 (see above photo), effortlessly overwhelmed their counterparts by the sheer volume of their collective voices, which could only be described as ear-splitting, to say the least.       To think that they are generally office workers who are supposed to be decorous and prim and proper! How could they shout, scream and shriek that loud?       Following the Perlas Spikers’ merciless 25-19, 25-19, 25-19 thumping of the Angels that gave them a sweep of the six-team quarterfinals and the no. 3 seed in the semifinals, a fanatic member of ALYfinity, Creamline’s Alyssa Valdez’ fiercely loyal fan club, overheard at the exits BanKo fans telling one another that they would fill the Arena in their team’s next games.       This Alyssa fan was also overheard quickly spreading the word around to her fellow ALYfinity members: “Hoy, pupunuin daw ng mga taga BanKo Perlas ang Arena sa susunod nilang laro.”       “Tingnan natin,” replied a disbeliever.       True enough, BanKo Perlas supporters were almost all over the box and ringside sections of the 5,000-seat San Juan Arena at the opening of the semifinal playoffs, 500 of them coming from the BPI head offices on Ayala and the BanKo main office in Greenhills in tees with BanKo Perlas emblazoned across the upper front sides.        They occupied three whole sections of the box seats, sat side by side with or behind or in front of fans of PayMaya and Pocari Sweat, failing to penetrate only the section taken over by ALYfinity.       When they collectively banged clappers against clappers, they produced sounds that rumbled across the playing venue.       Being newbies, they have yet to execute the wave. It will be a sight to behold if they finally do it, said a volleyball aficionado.       Word is around that BanKo Perlas is here to stay in the PVL.       That could only mean the volleyball community would see – and hear -- more of the BanKo Perlas fans......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 4th, 2018

Neo-Nazi youth group covers Melbourne with ‘Gays are a walking disease’ posters

Homophobic posters by neo-Nazi youth group Antipodean Resistance shocked the people of Melbourne, Australia, when these were exposed last week, just in time for Pride Month. The posters plastered along Prahran's Chapel Street bear a rainbow background, a mockery of the LGBTQ community's pride flag, as well as a caricature of a homosexual with its mouth opened, saliva spewing out, holding out a placard saying, "What are you doing about A.I.D.S.?" "Happy AIDS Month" was written in the upper half of the poster while "Gays are a disease" was noted on the poster's lower half. The neo-Nazi's website is listed below the homophobic rhetoric. It is worth noting that the timing for pu...Keep on reading: Neo-Nazi youth group covers Melbourne with ‘Gays are a walking disease’ posters.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

Pinoy family in ‘Parts Unknown’ remembers Bourdain

The weather in December 2015 was unfamiliar – humid and rainy – to celebrity chef and travel show host Anthony Bourdain and his crew, as they shot some scenes in a crowded community in Maricaban in Pasay City......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018