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Health problems trap Australian professor in NAIA

An 84-year-old Australian professor who was denied entry into the Philippines upon arriving at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 1 is currently staying at the airport’s “exclusion room” while waiting for authorities to clear him for travel......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarAug 11th, 2018

Australian professor detained at NAIA seeks lifting of ban for health reasons 

AN Australian law professor whom the government banned from entering the Philippines for participating in a protest three years ago is asking the Bureau of Immigration to lift the order against him for health reasons. Speaking through his lawyers, Gill H. Boehringer, 84, is currently detained at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) Terminal 1 [...] The post Australian professor detained at NAIA seeks lifting of ban for health reasons  appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Aust academic detained in the Philippines

The lawyer for an Australian academic and human rights activist who has been detained in the Philippines has urged the government let him stay in Manila for the sake of his health. Professor Gill B.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

BI: Elderly Australian prof has yet to board flight due to health concerns

The Australian professor who is facing exclusion for being blacklisted has yet to board a flight to depart the Philippines due to medical issues, the Bureau of Immigration said on Friday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Blacklisted Australian professor denied entry at NAIA

An Australian professor earlier blacklisted by the Bureau of Immigration for joining a protest rally in 2015 was denied entry at the airport yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Sexual harassment panel being set up at embattled UNAIDS

Berlin --- An independent panel of experts on sexual harassment is being set up at UNAIDS after calls for the organization's head to resign over his handling of harassment allegations. The Geneva-based agency overseeing the fight against HIV/AIDS said Friday that its oversight body --- representing governments, donors and interest groups --- is setting up a five-member panel chaired by Gillian Triggs, an Australian professor. It is tasked with reviewing the situation at UNAIDS over the past seven years, evaluating the effectiveness of existing policies to prevent harassment and other problems, and recommending measures to improve matters. UNAIDS chief Michel Sidibe has denied cl...Keep on reading: Sexual harassment panel being set up at embattled UNAIDS.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

How Running May or May Not Help the Heart – New York Times

If 50 men run 3,510 marathons over the course of three decades, will their heart health suffer or improve? A new study delving into precisely that questionconcludes that the answer is simultaneously reassuring and complicated, with long years of endurance training seeming not to harm runners’ hearts, but also not necessarily to benefit them in the ways that the runners themselves probably expected. Over the past 40 years or so, attitudes about the effects of strenuous exercise on the heart have whipsawed. At one point, many people believed that endurance exercise would be a panacea for heart problems. A 1977 report in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, for example, intimated that marathon running and a healthy diet would immunize runners completely against atherosclerosis, or the buildup of plaques in the arteries that is the hallmark of heart disease. But after some runners died of heart attacks, including, famously, Jim Fixx, the author of “The Complete Book of Running,” in 1984, many scientists, physicians and athletes began to worry that long-term, strenuous exercise might actually be bad for the heart. In support of that idea, a few studies in recent years have found that the hearts of lifelong male endurance athletes may contain more plaques or other signs of heart problems, such as scarring, than the hearts of less-active men of the same age. A small study presented at a recent meeting of the Radiological Society of America, for instance, found that among a group of middle-aged male triathletes, those who most often trained and competed showed slightly more scarring inside their hearts than the other athletes. But, adding still more complexity to the issue, other recent studies have indicated that, even if longtime endurance athletes do develop heart problems such as atherosclerosis, their version of the disease may be different from and more benign than the types of heart disease that develop in less active people. It was in hopes of bringing more clarity to the increasingly tangled question of how endurance training affects hearts that researchers from the University of Minnesota, Stanford University and other institutions decided, for the new study, to zero in on a unique group of runners: men who had participated in at least 25 consecutive Twin Cities marathons in Minneapolis-St. Paul. These 50 runners, identified by marathon participation logs, turned out to have completed, collectively, 3,510 marathons, with each runner, individually, having finished anywhere from 27 to 171 of the races. The men obviously were experienced endurance athletes. They had trained for at least 26 years, and some for more than 50. Many had started competing in high school or earlier, but others had come to the sport much later, often, the researchers report, in hopes of ameliorating the effects of past lifestyle choices, such as smoking or junk food diets. Most were lean at the time of the study, but a few qualified as overweight, based on their body mass indexes. Most ran 30 miles per week or more. The researchers had each of these runners fill out detailed questionnaires about their training routines, as well as their general health history and habits. Then they scanned the runners’ hearts to look for atherosclerosis. Sixteen of the runners proved to have no plaque in their arteries at all. The rest had some deposits, with 12 displaying slight amounts, another 12 moderate levels, and 10 having worrisomely large deposits of plaques. When the scientists compared the men’s running histories to their scan results, however, they found little relationship between how much they had run overall and how much plaque they had in their arteries. Those men who had run the greatest number of marathons did not tend to have less, or more, arterial plaque than the men who had run fewer races, indicating that extreme running itself had not increased the severity of heart disease. On the other hand, a history of heavy smoking and high cholesterol was linked to greater levels of plaque, especially in the men who had begun running later in life. The good news was that these findings suggest that years of hard running had not harmed the men’s hearts, says Dr. William O. Roberts, a professor of family and community medicine at the University of Minnesota, who led the study, which was published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Indeed, all that running probably helped to keep some runners’ arteries clear. But the exercise also had not inoculated those with a history of unwise lifestyle choices, especially smoking, against developing heart disease. “You can’t just outrun your past,” Dr. Roberts says. Of course, this study was relatively small and focused on Caucasian men with the physical, economic and psychological wherewithal to run competitively for years. Whether the results apply equally to other people and other sports is unclear. (Dr. Roberts and his collaborators published a small study earlier this year of female marathon runners that found almost no plaques in their hearts.) This type of study also can show only relationships between running and heart health. It cannot prove that running directly caused any changes in the heart. Still, the results may help to quell some runners’ and their families’ worries about the cardiac demands of long-term training. But if you misspent your youth smoking and eating poorly or have a family history of cardiac disease, you might want to talk with your physician about having your heart assessed, Dr. Roberts says, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Here’s how you can stop caffeine from taking over your life

Waking up tired and groggy from a poor-quality sleep is probably one of the worst feelings ever. So before we start lashing out at people or end up going berserk, our first inclination is to reach for that cup of freshly brewed coffee to calm us down. Aside from its invigorating effect, caffeine, which is naturally present in your "cup of joe," stimulates certain portions of the autonomic nervous system. According to Health Line, once this stimulant reaches your brain, you'll feel more awake and prevents the onset of exhaustion. However, after all the coffee goodness, there are also some negative effects that can lead to serious health problems. The Mayo Clinic reported that inge...Keep on reading: Here’s how you can stop caffeine from taking over your life.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 29th, 2018

Cell phone addiction can lead to joint injuries

Keeping a good posture goes a long way in maintaining good health, including keeping your joints healthy, said Dr. Benjamin Tow, an orthopedic and spine surgeon at Mt. Elizabeth Hospital in Singapore. "Shoulder, back, neck and knees are very common problems because we are active people, we move our joints all the time. The joints can give us a lot of problems as we age, or as we become more active," Tow said. To ensure healthy joints as one ages, Tow advises training the body to maintain a good posture at all times, avoid chronic overloading---meaning, excess weight---that can lead to faster degeneration of the joints, and to always warm up before exercising. When in pain, stop...Keep on reading: Cell phone addiction can lead to joint injuries.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 26th, 2018

PH may fall into debt trap with China funds, says firm

Turning to China for financing President Duterte's infrastructure program may lead the government to make the same mistakes made by other Asian countries that have fallen not only into a debt but also corruption trap, London-based Capital Economics said on Thursday.   "By seeking closer ties and increased investment from China, President Duterte of the Philippines risks repeating the mistakes made by other countries in the region. With the current account deficit already approaching unsustainable levels and given the corruption problems associated with Chinese investment projects elsewhere in Asia, the Philippines would be better off shunning Chinese investment," Capital Econo...Keep on reading: PH may fall into debt trap with China funds, says firm.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2018

Imelda Marcos cites multiple health problems

Former first lady Imelda Marcos cited her supposed fragile health condition brought about by at least seven ailments in her plea to the anti-graft court Sandiganbayan to allow her to post another bail bond and appeal her conviction on seven counts of graft......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 16th, 2018

Surprising Health Challenges as We Get Older

(NC) As we get older we can begin to experience health problems as our bodies change. Not everyone will experience them. But some medical conditions become more common or more serious after we get a few decades under our belts. Here are some common issues that often accompany aging, and what you can do about […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 5th, 2018

Older dads kids run higher health risks at birth – study

PARIS, France – Newborns of fathers 45 and older are more likely to be underweight or wind up in intensive care, researchers reported Thursday, November 1, adding to the list of problems associated with older dads. For fathers 55 and up, infants tended to score worse in a standardized test used ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 1st, 2018

Djokovic beats Sousa in straight sets at Paris Masters

By Jerome Pugmire, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — Novak Djokovic began his bid for a record-extending fifth Paris Masters title with a 7-5, 6-1 win against Joao Sousa in the second round on Wednesday. Serving for the match at 5-1, Djokovic handed a towel to a male spectator who seemed unwell and who wiped his forehead with it. The second-ranked Serb set up match point with an ace and sealed victory on his third match point when Sousa returned a second serve long. The U.S. Open champion won four of the last five tournaments he has entered, including Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and most recently the Shanghai Masters. Djokovic is seeking to reclaim the top ranking from Rafael Nadal at a tournament Nadal has never won. Djokovic next faces Damir Dzumhur. Dzumhur upset 14th-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas 6-3, 6-3, while big-hitting Russian Karen Khachanov also advanced to the third round. He led 6-2, 2-0 against Matthew Ebden when the Australian retired. Returning from a right knee injury , Nadal faces Spanish countryman Fernando Verdasco on Wednesday, with 20-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer also in action against Milos Raonic. Federer leads the big-serving Canadian 11-3 overall. Federer's last appearance at the Paris indoor event was a third-round loss to big-serving John Isner in 2015. There were doubts Federer would play after a grueling past week which saw him clinch his ninth victory at the Swiss Indoors and 99th overall. "I feel good," Federer told a news conference. "I feel like I recovered well from last week." The 37-year-old Federer is selective of when he plays in order to keep his body as fresh as possible, and he skipped the entire clay-court season for the second straight year. With the season-ending ATP Finals in London starting Nov. 11, he is playing three straight tournaments. But the third-ranked Federer feels comfortable with it. "I feel like it's better for me to play matches rather than practice," Federer said. "As long as I don't feel like I'm taking a chance on my health prior to London, that's the key as well." Federer showed fighting qualities last week in Basel, where he was twice taken to three sets and went an early break down in three of his last four matches. "I was a bit bumpy. But I was happy how I was fighting, how I was trying to figure it out in a different manner," he said. "Last week was special to win the way I did it, in a different manner." Federer moved within 10 titles of Jimmy Connors all-time singles record. He is cautious about his chances of success in Paris, where his only tournament victory came in 2011. The Australian Open champion is drawn in the same half as Djokovic, Australian Open runner-up Marin Cilic and big-serving Kevin Anderson, who upset Federer in the Wimbledon quarterfinals this year. "I rarely play two or three tournaments in a row now. So starting on Wednesday and winning five matches in a row with this caliber (of players) is very difficult," Federer said. "If I get close to the last four that would also be great." In first-round play Tuesday, there were wins for Mikhail Kukushkin, Gilles Simon, Daniil Medvedev, Marton Fucsovics, Raonic and Verdasco......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

Health alliance pushes for mental health law

Mental Health has become a top concern in many parts of the world at present and that increase in mental health problems have been observed even in third-world countries like the Philippines......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsOct 21st, 2018

Looking for an edge: Teams trying to turn data into wins

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press Data is pored over by coaches and staff of the Orlando Magic on a regular basis. They’ll dissect how far a player runs during practice, how quickly that player accelerates and decelerates, how his performance changes as the workout goes along, biometric measurements like his heartbeat or when his workload is particularly heavy. The charts and graphs are detailed and precise. But how it’ll help the Magic win, that’s still an unknown. Wearable technology — chips worn during practice to collect information that analysts churn into reports — has been around the NBA for the past several seasons. It’s not permitted on game nights, and anything specific about processes the 30 teams are using falls into the category of closely guarded secrets. And when it comes to coaches deciding what play to call in the final seconds with a game on the line, it doesn’t seem to have an impact quite yet. “It’s all very beneficial stuff,” Magic coach Steve Clifford said. “But I can only digest X amount of information. And it has to be the right amount of information.” That’s one of the challenges that NBA teams are facing in this information age. Everyone knows analytics can help in countless ways. But the question remains simple: How? “You’ve got to take it and use it as best you can,” said New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry, who said he resisted using some data that he was presented several years ago when he coached in Phoenix — and wound up taking that Suns team to the Western Conference finals. “But at the end of the day, I think the instincts that you have as a coach become just as important, really.” There are some consistencies in what’s being collected. Regardless of what hardware a team is using, everything basically tracks the same things: distance of movement, speed of movement, acceleration and deceleration, workload and heart rate. Teams work on their own, largely without NBA oversight except for some rules laid out in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. It’s already been a boost in how teams monitor a player’s recovery from injury or surgery. But some also have wondered if the data collection is too invasive, or could be used against a player — something that isn’t supposed to happen under league rule. “It seems inherently geared to advantage the team,” University of Illinois law professor Michael LeRoy said in comments posted to his blog last year. “When it’s not linked to performance and not actually linked to injury, just correlation ... it’s hard to see where that data can be used to the advantage of a player.” The NBA has put together a list of what brands (like Catapult and STATSports) and types of products that teams can use, much in the same way it approves knee braces and other accessories. Teams aren’t mandated to share the data they’re collecting from the wearables with the league, although that may change once devices are permitted to be used during games. “Data collected through wearable devices has the potential to have a number of applications to improve player health — but it’s not a silver bullet,” said Dr. John DiFiori, the NBA’s medical director. “Information from wearables can add more detail on each player’s loading, which, together with a team’s overall toolkit, can help develop more individualized injury prevention programs, and assist teams in promoting safe return to play following an injury.” There could be benefits to standardizing the data, but that seems a long way off — especially since teams are still figuring out how to best go forward individually. The league and the NBA Players Association are working on finalizing a validation program will be in place to ensure that devices are measuring what the manufacturers say they’re measuring, and that they do so accurately. Atlanta rookie Kevin Huerter said in his short time as a pro, he’s learned a ton about his body that he didn’t even know because of what he’s gleaned off what his team has collected. “At this level, they worry and care so much more about your body,” Huerter said. “The technology monitors how tough practices are and how tough you’re pushing yourself. It’s a longer season, everybody knows that. So I think a lot of it is making sure guys stay healthy and listening when guys are hurting a little bit one day.” It might extend careers, help with injury management, maybe develop ways to avoid injuries. But whether this data will ever be sharpened to the point of helping a team figure out how to overcome a five-point deficit with 28.2 seconds remaining, that’s anyone’s guess. “Where the league is going, you’re looking for every edge,” Clifford said. “But as a coach, what you can’t do is you can’t stop watching the film. The data, talking to people, the numbers, all that, it’s all good information. But to have the clarity I think you need to make the right decisions, you better have watched enough film because that’s where you can see why, why, why it’s happening.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

With LeBron gone, Eastern Conference set for a new champion

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press The roadblock has been removed. With LeBron James gone, the path to the NBA Finals from the Eastern Conference is open again. Boston, Philadelphia, Toronto and more are hoping to win the race to it. James ruled over the East for eight years, making four straight trips to the finals from Miami and then moving back to Cleveland in 2014 and getting there every year since. From Boston to Indiana, up north in Toronto all the way down to Atlanta, teams would emerge with what they thought was a title contender only to see James send them home for the summer. Now King James has abdicated his throne and moved to Los Angeles, and there should be rejoicing in the land he left behind. “It’s a new lease on life in the Eastern Conference,” said Hall of Famer and TNT analyst Reggie Miller, who faced a similar situation when he played in the East during the era of Michael Jordan’s Bulls. “It’s great that LeBron has taken his talents out West because it opens up the doors for not only a lot of these young players, but these organizations now. Fresh blood, something new to kind of see who can compete for that Eastern crown.” The Celtics nearly won it last year, falling to the Cavaliers in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals. They were without the injured Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward, and now that the two stars are healthy and have rejoined Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown, Al Horford and the rest of a deep team that made a valiant run without them, Boston is probably the favorite in the East. But there’s intrigue beyond that, which rarely existed during James’ reign. Philadelphia finished strong in its first season with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons playing together, and now might get a full one with 2017 No. 1 pick Markelle Fultz joining them after his shoulder problems last season. Toronto shook up a 59-win team by firing coach Dwane Casey and shipping DeMar DeRozan to San Antonio in the trade for Kawhi Leonard, and Indiana bolstered a team that took Cleveland to seven games in the first round. Any of them have a chance to get to the place that James wouldn’t let them. “An appearance in the finals is going to be sweet,” Embiid said. A look at the East, in predicted order of finish: PLAYOFF BOUND 1. Boston — Depth of talent is not only tops in the East, but comes closest in the NBA to rivaling Golden State’s. 2. Philadelphia — If either Simmons or Fultz develops a jump shot to open things up more for Embiid, look out. 3. Indiana — Victor Oladipo has emerged as an All-Star and the Pacers are balanced behind him. 4. Toronto — If Leonard is fully healthy and motivated, Raptors added a top-five player to a 59-win team. 5. Milwaukee — Giannis Antetokounmpo is going to make the Bucks fun to watch in their new arena. 6. Washington — John Wall and Bradley Beal will give the Wizards plenty on the perimeter, but they need Dwight Howard provide a boost on the interior. 7. Miami — Heat won’t want to send Dwyane Wade into retirement without one final playoff appearance. 8. Detroit — A full season with Andre Drummond and Blake Griffin together should be enough to get the Pistons back into the postseason. ___ IN THE MIX 9. Cleveland — Kevin Love and the remainder of the Cavaliers that James left behind should still be good enough to fight for a spot in the top eight. 10. Charlotte — The Hornets will host an All-Star Game in February. They’ll try to host playoff games in April. ___ FACING LONG ODDS 11. Orlando — Steve Clifford is the latest coach to try to mix a collection of young players into one that can defend enough to be a decent team. 12. Brooklyn — Nets made a seven-win improvement last season even while being dismal at defending and rebounding. Do either better and they can take another leap. 13. New York — Kristaps Porzingis remains out indefinitely while rehabbing a torn ACL, so new coach David Fizdale will give rookie Kevin Knox an early green light. 14. Atlanta — Trae Young may be exciting to watch, but he won’t be able to stop another long season of losing in Atlanta. 15. Chicago — The Bulls of Tom Thibodeau were veterans who always defended hard. The Bulls of Fred Hoiberg have been none of the above. ___ WHAT TO KNOW CANADA’S CHANCE: The Raptors gambled on acquiring Leonard from San Antonio, and now Toronto has a year to show him it’s worth sticking around when he becomes a free agent next summer. BEST MAN: A popular question after James left was who is the best player now in the East? Irving, Embiid, Antetokounmpo and Leonard are among those who can make compelling cases. HOWARD’S HEALTH: Dwight Howard has sat out his first preseason with the Wizards because of a balky back, the kind of injury that can sometimes linger, and Washington needs a presence in the middle no matter how good its backcourt is. OPENING NIGHT PREVIEW? Cleveland and Boston met in the opening game in the East last season and ended up squaring off in the conference finals. This time, it’s Boston and Philadelphia to open things in the East and they’ll be good candidates to close them......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

From Marcos to Duterte: How Philippine presidents handled their health problems - Rappler

From Marcos to Duterte: How Philippine presidents handled their health problems - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsOct 9th, 2018

Nearly half of Pinoys believe Duterte has health problems - SWS

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Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsOct 7th, 2018

Nearly half of Pinoys believe Duterte has health problems – SWS

`async` tag for dfp JS removed on July 3, 2018. This is for adblocker detection mechanism, some ad blockers destroys the DFP instance, others dont. Our Ad Block checking mechanism fails when to det Source link link: Nearly half of Pinoys believe Duterte has health problems – SWS.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsOct 7th, 2018

Nauru orders MSF to stop work among asylum seekers

WELLINGTON, New Zealand – Nauru's government has ordered Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) to cease its work on the tiny Pacific island treating asylum-seekers and locals suffering from mental health problems, the medical charity said. The country has come under fire over the treatment of asylum-seekers, including children, who are ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 7th, 2018