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Greece to limit Sharia law after European Court challenge

ATHENS — Lawmakers in Greece are set to limit the powers of Islamic courts operating in a border region that is home to a 100,000-strong Muslim minority......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 10th, 2018

PVL: How tough love and Kutsinta created special bond among Bundit, Valdez and Morado

BATANGAS CITY –- Tough love and shared success were the things that created a special bond among a Thai coach who barely spoke English, a talented spiker and a heady playmaker. A hard-earned UAAP title brought them to the volleyball limelight five years ago. On Saturday, in front of a huge adoring crowd inside the Batangas City Coliseum here Saturday night, Creamline head coach Tai Bundit, ace hitter Alyssa Valdez and setter Jia Morado parted ways after capturing the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference championship.  It was a bitter-sweet moment for the three who shared an incredible journey that captured the hearts of Filipino volleyball fans. From a simple meeting back in September 2013, to the countless hours of Spartan-like training, the triumphs, trials and tribulations to their final farewell inside the volleyball court, the three made colorful memories together. They shared the bond of family. Recalling their fondest memory with the amiable coach, Valdez said that the Bundit made his biggest mark on her with just the smallest of things: a pack of Kutsinta.   “Isa lang talaga ang mamimiss ko sa kanya, whenever we fight talaga, kailangan ko nang sabihin ‘to kasi everyone deserves to know na ganitong klaseng tao siya talaga. Everytime we fight kasi noong college kasi syempre may language barrier so lagi kaming nag-aaway talaga ni Coach Tai, in a good way (kasi) baka akala ng mga tao nang-aaway ako, every time I go out of the dorm, every single day, lagi akong may kutsinta (galing) sa kanya,” Valdez, the PVL Open Conference MVP admitted. “Before going to class lagi akong may pagkain na iniiwan niya sa dorm parang peace offering niya, para hindi daw ako mapagod, may energy daw ako, so I think isa ‘yun sa mga hindi ko makakalimutan sa kanya,” she continued. “Ganoon siyang klaseng tao, very thoughtful and hindi ko talaga ma-imagine ang paglalaro ng volleyball without him kasi siya sa mga naging coach ko na really trusted me, really put me inside the court kahit anong mangyari and iba ang tiwalang binibigay niya sa aming mga players.” For Morado she was just grateful for having Bundit push her beyond her limit to become arguably the best volleyball playmaker in the country.  “‘Yung pinaka-tumatak sa akin kay Coach Tai is how high of a standard he has for me,” said Morado, who won her third Best Setter award in the PVL and earned the Finals Most Valuable Player after the Cool Smashers completed a sweep of Ateneo-Motolite, 25-20, 25-20, 25-15.   “Kahit feeling ko I’m playing at my best na, as in, peak ko na talaga, there is always something na gusto niya i-improve sa akin na sobrang nacha-challenge ako sa kanya parati kasi it’s always so hard for me to get praises from Coach Tai,” she added. “That’s something na nadadaanan ng lahat ng players niya, sobrang taas ng standards niya.” Six days from now, Bundit will formally end half a decade of colorful volleyball coaching in the Philippines with a packed bag and a plane ticket – the same way he started it. He will leave a legacy of ‘happy, happy’ and a heart strong mantra. Morado and Valdez will need to move on with their own careers. But they won’t miss Coach Tai. They have a good reason to say so. “Hindi namin siya mami-miss,” said Valdez. “Pupunta kami ng Thailand.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018

Comm. Silver, NBPA say competitive imbalance not a problem

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com LAS VEGAS -- First came the backlash. Next, backlash to the backlash. By Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), much of the whipsawing over competitive balance -- or more accurately, imbalance -- as an NBA problem rising to the level of crisis had calmed down. Yet powerful voices from the league’s summer nerve center could not dismiss it entirely as an issue meriting closer inspection. “I'm not here to say we have a problem,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said Tuesday after the Board of Governors meeting. “And I love where the league is right now. [But] I think we can create a better system.” Neither Silver nor Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, sounded an alarm in their separate news conferences about what many see as a widening gap between the league’s haves and have-nots. Roberts, in fact, seemed to feel that all is well and that talent inequality is in the eye of the beholder. “Competitive balance, it almost depends on what your favorite team is,” said Roberts, who was rehired as head of the players union in another four-year contract announced Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “I don’t hear anybody in the Bay Area worrying about competitive balance. I also don’t hear the people in Philadelphia worrying about competitive balance, or Houston. “We’ve got great teams. And it’s never been the case, as far as I’m concerned, where I was not able most of the time to predict what teams were going to be in the Finals.” The topic came up in precisely that context before the Finals last month when Silver was asked about Golden State and Cleveland meeting in the championship series for the fourth consecutive year, a first in any of the major professional sports leagues. It reared its head again this month soon after free agency opened on July 1, with events conspiring to make insiders wonder about a growing disparity among teams. LeBron James’ signing with the Los Angeles Lakers was the biggest move in what appeared to be a continuing shift of strength into the league’s Western Conference. That was followed by the news that DeMarcus Cousins, New Orleans’ All-Star center, had joined the champion Warriors. That signing sparked the initial backlash, a rich-getting-richer cry that pointed not to Cousins’ one-year deal for $5.3 million in 2018-19 salary but the fact that the Warriors will spend in excess of $20 million for it when luxury taxes are counted. Golden State had the NBA’s fattest payroll in 2017-18 of $137.5 million, despite a $99 million salary cap, thanks to various exceptions in the prevailing “soft cap” system. “I don't necessarily think it's per se bad that the Warriors are so dominant,” Silver told reporters, not long after discussing the “competitive landscape” with the owners. “As I've said before, we're not trying to create some sort of forced parity. What we really focus on is parity of opportunity. And a fair point could be made in the tax system, when certain teams are spending significantly more than others, that that's not parity of opportunity.” The counter-backlash came from folks who rushed to the Warriors’ and Cousins’ defense, correctly noting that neither did anything wrong, conducting their business within the rules as specified by the collective bargaining agreement between the owners and the players. That CBA is the object of endless study and imagined revision, with amendments possible if negotiated prior to the end of the current deal after the 2023-24 season. Shooting for a “hard cap” likely would be a tough sell to players accustomed to the freedom of movement they currently enjoy. “It's not necessarily [Roberts’] issue,” Silver said in response to the union director’s characterization. “I think it's on me and our Labor Relations Committee, ultimately, to sit with the players and their committee and convince them that there may be a better way of doing things.” Silver mentioned Charlotte owner and legendary NBA superstar Michael Jordan, chairman of that Labor Relations Committee, as a valuable resource in addressing owners’ and players’ competition concerns. Both sides have valid arguments. Interest in the NBA never has been higher by almost any metric chosen, from selected TV ratings and licensing revenues to the game’s growth globally. Attendance at the MGM Resorts Las Vegas Summer League keeps pushing higher, with fans eager to see top rookies, second-year players and relative free-agent unknowns chasing their pro hoops’ dreams. The valuations of the 30 NBA franchises, of course, all have soared beyond $1 billion, according to Forbes.com, with the Knicks, the Lakers and the Warriors all estimated to be worth more than $3 billion. Longtime NBA observers such as TNT’s David Aldridge wrote a column this week that argued on behalf of dominant teams, anyway, saying that they actually drive rather than depress fan interest. As for any inability to win games or titles, he laid the blame for that on poor franchise management. The Knicks and the Clippers have all sorts of big-market advantages but haven’t won any championships lately (or at all in the Clippers' case). For Roberts, whose players reap 51 percent of NBA basketball-related income that tops $7 billion annually, business is good, period. “I’m excited about this new season,” she said Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “This free agency, there’s been a lot to write about so we’re all, I think, looking forward to what’s going to happen come October. “To the extent that people are predicting the end of the game, I just don’t think so. I would be surprised if Adam called me to say, ‘What the hell are we going to do?’ I think he’s as happy as I am. ... I think we’re in good shape.” Critics note Golden State’s on-court dominance in winning the last two championships. It only took nine NBA Finals games --one over the minimum -- while facing arguably the league’s best player in LeBron James. But those same critics seem to foget that the Warriors were pushed to the full seven games in the conference finals, and actually faced elimination twice before beating the Rockets. “I recognize what Michele's saying,” Silver said. “But at the same time, if you talk to players in the league, and I've talked to plenty of individual players as well, they want to be in the most competitive league possible too.” For every player on the Warriors' roster -- or the Rockets, the Thunder, the Celtics or the Sixers -- there are five or six on teams that realistically have no chance of chasing a ring or the Larry O’Brien Trophy. Cleveland went to four straight Finals thanks to James; no one envisions the Cavaliers getting back any time soon. “Maybe there are some players who think they’re on a second-class team,” said Sacramento wing Garrett Temple, one of the NBPA vice presidents. “But most players I’ve played with or been around, their thought process is, ‘We’re gonna get our team to become one of those first-class teams.’ It’s more of a challenge. More so than, ‘We need them to disband so we can make everybody equal.’ Because we’re competitors.” That really is the crux of the issue. Silver and some franchises want most of the competition to come on the floor, in games, in full view of fans who believe their teams can sufficiently compete. The league’s current title contenders are fine with a system that allows them to compete all the way to the top, with an owner stroking gargantuan checks to crowd out rivals. “Let me make clear that under the current system we want teams to compete like crazy,” Silver said. “So I think the Warriors within the framework of this deal should be doing everything they can to increase their dominance. That's what you want to see in a league. “You want teams to compete in every way they can within the rules.” Silver addressed a variety of topics that were came from the BOG agenda, including: -- Change is coming on multiple fronts, most notably in the league’s age limit. That seems likely to be re-set back to 18 years old from 19, permitting players to enter the league from high school. It’s a move that the NBA should be better equipped to handle with a near 30-for-30 farm-system affiliation with its G League. It also fits with the findings of an NCAA task force that cites dissatisfaction with “one-and-done” college players. Said Silver: “My personal view is that we’re ready to make that change.” -- The start of free agency, annually triggered at midnight ET on July 1 (12:00pm, July 1, PHL time), will be moved to a daytime or prime time opening bell. It’s one of those traditions that no one thought to change, Silver said. -- The league’s investigation into the Dallas Mavericks’ sexual harassment issues should be completed by the end of the month. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

Warriors need just one game to establish superiority

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com HOUSTON — Months of building up the hard shell required to wade this deep into the NBA’s merciless playoff waters can evaporate in a snap. One bad rotation, followed by a missed layup on the back of yet another dagger from the other team and even a mighty, 65-win juggernaut can see it all unravel. The Houston Rockets know the feeling now, after living through it on what could turn out to be the biggest night of the best [regular] season in the history of the franchise. They invited the Golden State Warriors in, dared to beat the reigning NBA champions at their own game in these Western Conference finals with an emphatic win and came up woefully short of that goal in the opener. The home court advantage they worked for all throughout a brilliant season is gone. The comfort provided by a 2-1 record against the Warriors during the regular season series the Rockets held tight since January was blown away after just four quarters. Whatever aura they thought they owned heading into the Toyota Center Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) for Game 1, they shed long before the final seconds of their decisive 119-106 loss to the Warriors. It looked good early, when James Harden had the Rockets rolling to a nine-point lead in the frenzied opening minutes. But Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, Stephen Curry and the rest of a Warriors team making its fourth straight appearance in the conference finals, they don’t fold at the first sign of danger. “You’re not going to just come in and knock them out,” Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni said. “I mean, there’s just too many times we had mental lapses. We either didn’t switch properly or we didn’t switch hard enough. We turned the ball over  little too much. Every time we missed a layup, which we missed a lot of layups, they ran out. “They’re really devastating. We’ve got to make layups, don’t turn it over and do a little bit better job of mentally just staying up on people.” The fact that they were starting this series away from the friendly confines of Oracle Arena for the first time during their recent run did nothing to shake their belief in themselves. And if there is anything that is clear after just four wild quarters of this most anticipated series, it’s that the Warriors’ collective confidence is far superior to the artificial skin the Rockets wrapped themselves in leading up to the opening round of this heavyweight fight. Harden played inspired, for most of his 35 minutes, finishing with a game-high 41 points and seven assists. Chris Paul’s 23 points, 11 rebounds and three assists look good on paper. But it wasn’t enough. It was nowhere near enough to offset the Rockets’ self-inflicted mistakes or the fury the Warriors can rain down on their opponents this time of year. “They’re obviously champions for a reason,” D’Antoni said. “If we want to beat them, we have to be mentally sharper. KD, he’s tough. Obviously, he was on tonight. Hey, you can live with that. But you can’t live with that and then make mental mistakes, and that's what we do. The combination of the two was devastating.” Durant was hell bent on devastation, torching an assortment of Rockets defenders for his 37 points. Thompson drilled the Rockets for 28 points of his own, his 15 attempts from beyond the three-point line serving as a more demoralizing dagger for a Rockets defense designed to limit those attempts. With so much attention on them, the Rockets seemed to lose their defensive focus on basically everyone else. “Defensively, we’ve got to be better,” Paul said. “You know it’s funny, I got caught helping a couple times in the first half and I think Nick Young hit three [three-pointers] off those plays. Some games, some series, you may make those mistakes and guys don’t make the shots. But tonight, every time we did it, they made the shot. They make you pay when you make mistakes.” Just to be clear about what kind of armor the Warriors travel with these days, they’ve won a game on the road in 18 consecutive playoff series, well before the Durant era. So as much as this is about the back and forth between Durant and Harden, the former Oklahoma City Thunder teammates who once got this point in a season together and elbowed their way into The Finals in 2012, it’s about Curry, Thompson, Green and Andre Iguodala, the 2015 Finals MVP. Those are the other four members of the Warriors’ “Hamptons Five” lineup that started the game, the group that withstood everything the Rockets threw at them Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) and then beat them up over the final 15 minutes of a must-have game on their home floor. “They’re a good team,” Eric Gordon said, stating the obvious. "They’ve been playing together, they know who they are. They’ve been to four straight Western Conference finals. We just got to be a little better.” The Rockets’ must-win game is now Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). The pressure shifts to a Game 2 effort that has to be much better offensively if they want to keep pace with the Warriors. They’ll also need a much cleaner effort that doesn’t include sloppiness (the Warriors converted 16 turnovers into 17 points) and deficient defense (the Warriors shot .525 from the floor and .394 from the three-point line) that was on display in Game 1. These are all things D’Antoni believes to be correctable. And they could be. Indeed, they better be if the Rockets plan on stretching this series to the limit. Because there is still no way to account for the experience factor, the muscle memory edge the Warriors have when it comes to recognizing the time and place to apply the ultimate pressure on an opponent that’s ready to break. They sniffed it late in the third quarter, when the Rockets were reeling under a relentless barrage of Durant buckets. The only thing that saved them then were crucial baskets of their own from Eric Gordon and Gerald Green, and Warriors coach Steve Kerr subbing Durant out for a breather the Warriors closer did not want. “Yeah, he wasn’t really thrilled and I probably should have left him in,” Kerr said. “Late third he was going pretty well. I knew I had to get him some rest at some point. As soon as I took him out, they went on a quick run, so he was not thrilled. But he came back in and got us back on track.” You can toy with a team like the Minnesota Timberwolves in the first round, dropping Game 3 on the road only to come back and close out the series with back-to-back wins, especially when you are clearly the superior team and own that coveted home-court advantage. You might be able to get away with it in next round against a team like the Utah Jazz, when you lose home-court advantage in Game 2, but are are once again clearly the superior team and win three straight games to squash that challenge. Slip up a third time, as the Rockets did Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time), against a team that has won two of the last three Larry O’Brien trophies, a team with their sights set on a third, and … and there might not be another chance. Sekou Smith is a veteran NBA reporter and NBA TV analyst. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 15th, 2018

Turkey bans Dutch ambassador as diplomatic crisis escalates – The Guardian

Turkey has suspended high-level political contacts with the Netherlands and threatened to re-evaluate a key deal to halt the flow of migrants to Europe in a dramatic escalation of its diplomatic row with EU member states. Numan Kurtulmuş, a deputy prime minister and chief government spokesman, said on Monday that the Dutch ambassador, who is on leave, would not be allowed to return in response to a ban on Turkish ministers speaking at rallies in the Netherlands. Turkey would also close its airspace to Dutch diplomats, Kursulmuş said, adding: “There is a crisis and a very deep one. We didn’t create this crisis or bring to this stage … Those creating this crisis are responsible for fixing it.” The spokesman’s remarks came hours after President Recep Tayyip Erdoğandefied pleas from Brussels to tone down his rhetoric, repeating accusations of European “nazism” and warning that his ministers would take their treatment by the Dutch to the European court of human rights. Erdoğan also accused Germany’s Angela Merkel of “supporting terrorists” and criticised her for backing the Dutch in the row over Turkish campaigning abroad before an April referendum on controversial plans to expand his powers. “Mrs Merkel, why are you hiding terrorists in your country? … Why are you not doing anything?” Erdoğan said in an interview with Turkish television. He added that the position adopted by the Dutch and a number of other EU states amounted to nazism. “We can call this neo-nazism. A new nazism tendency.” Merkel had earlier pledged her “full support and solidarity” to the Dutch, saying allegations made twice by Erdoğan this weekend that the Dutch government was acting like Nazis were “completely unacceptable”. The Turkish remarks followed a request on Monday by the EU’s foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, and enlargement commissioner, Johannes Hahn, for Ankara to “refrain from excessive statements and actions”. It was “essential to avoid further escalation and find ways to calm down the situation”, the two said in a joint statement. Jens Stoltenberg, Nato’s secretary general, urged all concerned to “show mutual respect and be calm”. Turkey’s minister for EU affairs, Ömer Çelik, said sanctions against the Netherlands were now likely. “We will surely have sanctions against the latest actions by the Netherlands. We will answer them with these,” he said. The Turkish justice minister, Bekir Bozdağ, said the country would “not allow anyone to play with the honour of the Turkish nation and Turkish state”, while Nurettin Canikli, a deputy prime minister, described Europe as a “very sick man”. The threat made by Kurtulmuş to re-evaluate the deal the EU signed with Ankara in March 2016 that has successfully curbed migration from Turkey to Greece, then onward into the rest of the bloc, will be seen as particularly alarming. Dutch police used dogs and water cannon on Sunday to disperse demonstrators after Turkey’s family minister, Fatma Betül Sayan Kaya, was escorted out of the country and the foreign minister, Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, denied permission to land. The ministers were due to address a rally for some of the 400,000 Turks living in the Netherlands, many of whom are able to vote in the 16 April referendum. Daan Feddo Huisinga, the Dutch chargé d’affaires in Ankara, was summoned to the foreign ministryon Monday to receive formal protests over the “disproportionate, inhumane and humiliating” treatment of the protesters and the improper reception given to the ministers. The Netherlands, Austria, Germany, Denmark and Switzerland – all of which have large Turkish immigrant communities – have cited security and other concerns as reasons not to allow Turkish officials to campaign in their countries. But with as many as 1.4 million Turkish voters in Germany alone, Erdoğan cannot afford to ignore the foreign electorate. The standoff has further strained relations already frayed over human rights, while repeated indications from Erdoğan that he could personally try to address rallies in EU countries risk further inflaming the situation. The row also looks likely to dim further Turkey’s prospects of joining the EU, a process that has been under way for more than 50 years. “The formal end of accession negotiations with Turkey now looks inevitable,” the German commentator Daniel Brössler wrote in the Süddeutsche Zeitung. Austria’s chancellor, Christian Kern, called on Monday for an EU-wide ban on Turkish rallies, saying it would take pressure off individual countries. But Merkel’s chief of staff, Peter Altmaier, said that while accession talks could be halted, he had doubts as to whether the bloc should collectively decide on a rally ban. Analysts said the Turkish president was using the crisis to show voters that his strong leadership was needed against a Europe he routinely presents as hostile. Erdoğan is “looking for ‘imagined’ foreign enemies to boost his nationalist base in the run-up to the referendum,” said Soner Cagaptay, the director of the Turkish Research Programme at the Washington Institute. Marc Pierini, the EU’s former envoy to Turkey, said he saw no immediate solution to the crisis because “the referendum outcome in Turkey is very tight and the leadership will do everything to ramp up the nationalist narrative to garner more votes”. In the medium term, Pierini said: “One can hope the fever will subside. Yet bridges have been burned at a personal level: using a ‘nazi’ narrative is extreme … and will probably prevent any summit meeting between the EU and Turkey for a while.” Erdoğan last week accused Germany of “Nazi [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 14th, 2017

Manic Monday: Britain plunges deeper into Brexit crisis – Al Jazeera

EUROPEAN COURT ruling and suspended parliamentary vote spark hours of political chaos over UK’s bid to exit the EU.  Monday’s […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsDec 11th, 2018

UK can stop Brexit, rules ECJ

BRUSSELS — The European Union’s top court has ruled that Britain can change its mind over Brexit, boosting the hopes of people who want to stay in the EU that the process can be reversed. Britain voted in 2016 to leave the 28-nation bloc The European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled Monday that when an […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

EU court rules UK can change mind over Brexit

BRUSSELS --- The European Union's top court ruled Monday that Britain can change its mind over Brexit, boosting the hopes of people who want to stay in the EU that the process can be reversed. The European Court of Justice ruled that when an EU member country has notified its intent to leave, "that member state is free to revoke unilaterally that notification." Britain voted in 2016 to leave the 28-nation bloc, and invoked Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty in March 2017, triggering a two-year exit process. Article 50 contains few details, in part because the idea of any country leaving was considered unlikely. A group of Scottish legislators had asked the ECJ to rule o...Keep on reading: EU court rules UK can change mind over Brexit.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Ombudsman Martires: We will not appeal Revilla acquittal

MANILA, Philippines – Consistent with his new policy at the Office of the Ombudsman not to appeal acquittals at the anti-graft court Sandiganbayan, Ombudsman Samuel Martires said they will no longer challenge the plunder  acquittal of former senator Ramon "Bong" Revilla Jr. But Martires said "it is just not ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018

UAAP Season 81 volleyball: Canino powers DLS-Z closer to title conquest

De La Salle-Zobel flirted with disaster before pulling off a huge 25-23, 28-26, 25-13, 25-19, 15-13, victory over defending four-time champion National University in the UAAP Season 81 girls high school volleyball tournament best-of-three Finals opener Wednesday at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Sophomore Angel Canino delivered crucial hits down the stretch in the fifth frame and fired 18 points – all from attacks - including the match-clinching off the block kill that pushed the Junior Lady Spikers a win away from their 10th title and first since Season 75. Belen attack error, hits the net. Canino wins it for DLS-Z! The Junior Lady Spikers take Game 1 of the best-of-three series pic.twitter.com/takTwPGYgR — Mark Escarlote (@fromtheriles) December 5, 2018 “Iko-commend ko lahat ng mga bata. Yung lahat ng sakripisyo nila, paggising ng maaga. Yung pagtitiis nila para maka-cope up sa mga studies nila, yun ang foundation na pinaghuhugutan namin para makarating rito at makuha namin ang Game 1,” said second year coach Tina Salak. Alleiah Malaluan finished with 16 points and 14 digs while Cassandra Carballo got seven points with five coming off aces for DLS-Z. The game went nip-and-tuck in throughout the fifth set much to the delight of the crowd inside the venue. Michaela Belen put the Bullpups on top, 12-11, after a kill block on Alleiah Malaluan. Canino answered back with a kill followed by an ace by Kajia Carangan for a 13-12 DLS-Z lead. Belen tied it at 13 but the reigning Most Valuable Player sent her next attack straight to the net that pushed the Junior Lady Spikers at match point. Canino finished off NU with a left corner attack that went off the block of Erin Pangilinan. “Total team effort ang ginawa nila ngayon,” said Salak. Game 2 is on Sunday at the same venue. “Siguro po hard work pa para pagdating sa Game 2 marami na kaming maiiwasang errors sa loob bng court. Kasi po ngayong Game 1 ang dami naming error pagdating sa receive, sa service at sa communication po,” said the 15-year old, Grade 9 student Canino of their adjustments for Game 2. The Junior Lady Spikers opened the duel smoking before taking a tough challenge in the second frame. DSLS-Z saved two set points in the second before stealing the frame. NU was quick to adjust and dominated the next two sets to force a decider. Evangeline Alinsug and Sheena Toring scored 16 points each for the Bullpups, who pounded 62 attack points but gave away 44 points off errors. Faith Nisperos finished with 11 attacks for 13 points while Belen had 12 markers.   Meanwhile, Far Eastern University-Diliman dethroned University of Sto. Tomas in a hard-earned, 24-26, 25-16, 25-23, 13-25, 15-9, do-or-die Final Four battle to book a high school boys championship showdown with National University. Jose Javelona led three other Baby Tamaraws in double figures with 19 points while adding 13 excellent receptions and 12 digs for an all-around effort. Mike Ferrer had 12 markers while Jomil Codilla got 11 for twice-to-beat FEU-Diliman, which dropped the series opener. The Finals series will open on Sunday. Tigercub Rey De Vega saw his 21-point output go to waste as UST lost the crown it earned last year at the expense of the Baby Tams. Jhun Senoron and Jaycon Adeva got 19 and 15 markers, respectively, for the Tigercubs, who gave away 42 points off errors.   ---     Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

Man City faces repercussions for misleading UEFA on finances

By Rob Harris, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — European soccer's leadership has an initial conclusion on leaked Manchester City correspondence: The club has been misleading UEFA over its finances. With the power to ban clubs from the Champions League, the consequences from UEFA could be severe for the Premier League champions. UEFA discovered from reading internal emails from City, which were published by German media outlet Der Spiegel last month, the extent of schemes by the club to allegedly cover up the true source of income in a bid to comply with Financial Fair Play regulations, a person with direct knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the situation publicly while UEFA conducts a review of the City case. City has been transformed into an English soccer power in the decade since being bought by Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan, a deputy prime minister of the United Arab Emirates and a member of Abu Dhabi's royal family, winning the Premier League three times since 2012. But unfettered spending on players has been restricted by European soccer's governing body — regardless of the owners' wealth. City has already been punished by UEFA for violating FFP, striking an agreement in 2014 that saw the team fined rather than banned from the Champions League for inflated sponsorship deals with companies linked to the club or its ownership. UEFA publicly said last month that evidence from "Football Leaks" could lead to past cases being re-opened. The person with knowledge of the situation said it was more feasible to use the leaks to re-assess the candor of club executives and as a basis to judge City's compliance with FFP in the current three-year assessment period. That covers 2015 when Der Spiegel said emails were being sent internally at City showing the manipulation of sponsorship revue from Etihad Airways, the state-owned airline from Abu Dhabi, which is the naming rights sponsor of City's stadium and training campus as well as appearing on jerseys. The sponsorship was said to generate 67.5 million pounds (about $85 million) annually for City. But City's holding company — the state-backed Abu Dhabi United Group — channeled 59.9 million pounds back to Etihad, according to Jorge Chumillas, the club's chief financial officer, in an internal email to club director Simon Pearce. City has not disputed the authenticity of any emails published by Der Spiegel over the last month. Given the fresh insight into City's financial dealings, UEFA President Aleksander Ceferin has said there was a "public interest" in the correspondence being leaked, while questioning how it was obtained. "We are assessing the situation. We have an independent body working on it," Ceferin said Monday. "Very soon you will have the answers on what will happen in this concrete case." FFP was the flagship policy of Michel Platini, Ceferin's predecessor as UEFA president, and introduced at the height of the global financial crisis in attempt to prevent clubs from becoming unsustainable. Since July 2011, UEFA has monitored the accounts of all clubs entering its two club competitions. The first period UEFA assessed clubs for compliance with FFP was 2011-13, when owners were allowed to cover losses up to 45 million euros. The leaks showed how City allegedly tried to artificially raise its revenue, in one case by 30 million euros, according to emails from 2013 reported by Der Spiegel. Abu Dhabi United Group was alleged to be sending cash to a shell vehicle which was created to supposedly buy the right to use players' images in marketing campaigns. There were further examples that Sheikh Mansour could have been the source of sponsorship revenue for Abu Dhabi state-owned companies like investment firm Aabar. Der Spiegel cited a 2010 email to Aabar from Pearce, the City director who also works for Abu Dhabi's Executive Affairs Authority. "As we discussed, the annual direct obligation for Aabar is GBP 3 million," Pearce wrote. "The remaining 12 million GBP requirement will come from alternative sources provided by His Highness." Seeing internal City correspondence has given UEFA a greater insight into the conduct of the club and its officials. A 2014 email from City lawyer Simon Cliff to a colleague showed the death of UEFA's lead FFP investigator being celebrated: "1 down, 6 to go." UEFA is examining whether to open disciplinary cases against individuals at City involved in attempts to provide a misrepresentation of club finances to the governing body's FFP accessors, another person with direct knowledge of the situation said. The person, who did not identify any individuals, spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the City case. A challenge for UEFA is getting City to provide information from related companies in Abu Dhabi that the leaks show are central to compliance with FFP. City has repeatedly declined to respond to the specific allegations in the leaks, dismissing a month of negative headlines by saying: "The attempt to damage the club's reputation is organized and clear." But City has had no such qualms using its website to cast aspersions on the reputations of other clubs over their ability to comply with FFP. City has used the media watch section on its website to cite unsubstantiated news reports, including a claim in 2016 that "Inter Milan are looking to circumnavigate FFP" and speculation this year that if Paris Saint-Germain "are found to have broken FFP regulations they face being booted out of the Champions League." Those pages were deleted from its website after City was approached for comment by the AP......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

AP column: Why it was special for Rahm to beat his hero, Tiger

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — Three victories in three countries against fields large and small, strong and weak, couldn't make Jon Rahm's year any better. Nothing could top one win that offered no money, no world ranking points or even a trophy to call his own. He beat Tiger Woods in the Ryder Cup. "I don't think there's anything I can do in the game anytime soon that's going to mean more than that," Rahm said. When he spoke late Sunday afternoon after a four-shot victory in the Bahamas, the Masters was still 130 days away. That's the next major, and majors are the greatest achievement for any player. Rahm is no exception. But yes, that Ryder Cup was special. If his tears that Sunday at Le Golf National didn't show that, Rahm spoke for just over 4 minutes and used 638 words to explain. His year ended with Woods presenting him the trophy from the Hero World Challenge, but really that was the start of his story. As they looked at the trophy, where Woods' name first shows up in 2001, Rahm said Woods asked, "How old were you?" Rahm was 7. "I saw him win a great deal of events, grew up with a dream of someday beating him, and to do it on the Sunday or a Ryder Cup ... it was extremely special," he said. Seve Ballesteros inspired him, and still does. Woods motivated the 24-year-old Spaniard, as he did for so many other young players from Rahm's generation. He studied Woods, including a recent documentary for the British Open that helped on Sunday at Albany. "He said once he got in the lead, his goal was to never go back to the field, to have the field catch him," Rahm said. That wasn't the only film Rahm has watched. He says he probably has seen every video on Woods and Ballesteros that can be found on the internet. And that's probably how his fiancee learned the game. "She had no idea about golf, and I would just get the laptop and make her watch all the highlights of Tiger," Rahm said. "I've seen Tiger's final round at Pebble in 2000 about 150 times." And that brings him to Saturday night outside Paris. Europe had a 10-6 lead with Rahm contributing a point in his first Ryder Cup. "Kind of felt like I was letting the team down," he said. Rahm knew he would be in the No. 4 spot for Europe, and then the U.S. lineup was revealed. He was expecting to see Woods toward the back because that's where he had been the last two times he played, at No. 8 in Wales and No. 12 at Medinah. This time, Woods was at No. 4 against Rahm. "I'm like, 'Great.' To me, the greatest golfer of all time that I've been able to see, he just won at East Lake, he's 0-3, I was 0-2. I'm like, 'He really wants to win this, for sure, and I'm not playing my best.' So that was my first train of thought," Rahm said. He spent time that night and the next morning talking to his mental coach, European captain Thomas Bjorn and Tommy Fleetwood, who had experience playing Woods, including all three of Woods' losses that week. He thought about a strategy, which turned out to be the easy part. Woods doesn't make a lot of mistakes, so the Ryder Cup rookie better be close to flawless. The gallery was the largest on the course, and not because Rahm was playing. Turns out it was Woods who made the mistakes, with bogeys on the 13th and 14th holes to fall 2 down. Rahm missed a short putt on the 16th hole, giving him a 1-up lead with two to play. He responded with a shot into 5 feet on the 17th and a chance to close out his golfing idol. Rahm never lacks for emotions, and by now they were raging. His grandfather died on the Sunday of the PGA Championship and was on his mind. As he settled over the putt, he heard a Spanish voice in the gallery yell, "Do it for Seve!" Rahm could picture both of them watching and thought to himself, "There's no way them two are going to allow me to miss the putt." He dropped his putter and lost his mind when the putt went in. "It's all that feeling, right?" Rahm said. "I tried to stay as balanced as possible, I never got mad, even after missing the putt on 16. Making the putt to beat Tiger Woods, my all-time hero ... man, it was hard." He was screaming and hugging and forgot for a moment that Woods had walked across the green to congratulate him. "He came to me with a smile," Rahm said. "He said, 'Man, don't even worry, you played great.' And I started crying in front of Tiger. It was such an emotional moment." That's how much it meant to him, because that's how much Woods means to him......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

EJ Coseteng heads international field in Asian Karting Open

European circuit campaigner Eduardo “EJ” Coseteng heads the robust Philippine challenge against a topnotch international field when the decisive fourth and concluding leg of the Asian Karting Open Championships fires off on Thursday at Kartodromo de Coloane here......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 4th, 2018

DOC VOLLEYBALL: A Battle of Generations

At long last, perhaps the most anticipated finals match in PVL history has been set. Showing dominance and proving why they are the defending champions despite some minor stumbles, the Creamline Cool Smashers barged their way into the Finals uncontested by dispatching a gritty dark horse in the Petro Gazz Angels. On the other hand, proving that their modern approach to the sport can trump experienced veterans, the Ateneo-Motolite Lady Eagles are proving to be one of the most formidable collegiate teams in the country under the helm of a new head coach. While old and new fans of the Ateneo community will be torn between cheering for the former Queen Eagles Alyssa Valdez, Jia Morado and Fille Cainglet-Cayetano and the current Queen Eagles in Bea De Leon, Maddie Madayag and Ponggay Gaston, it is also of particular interest how Creamline head coach Tai Bundit will defend his trophy from his Ateneo successor Oliver Almadro. While Bundit has laid the foundation for a modern approach to the sport during his stint in Ateneo, Almadro on the other hand has taken it a step further in terms of intricacies in attack strategy. The dream finals match couldn’t be more interesting from a technical point of view as it is an arms race of volleyball modernization stemming from similar schools of thought. Creamline Cool Smashers: The OG New School Ever since coach Tai Bundit took the reins for the Ateneo Lady Eagles, the local volleyball scene has been introduced to numerous innovations that inarguably helped ALE seize a pair of crowns in the UAAP. Modern strategies such as the Setter-Open-Middle rotation, libero getting second ball when setter digs, fast pin plays, to name a few. For a good couple of years, the advancements brought about by Bundit have been a bane even for perennial champion coaches in the collegiate scene. As expected, most teams followed suit in order to adapt and challenge the new system introduced. Though the Bundit riddle has been challenged and conquered in the collegiate scene, Tai’s system still holds an iron grip in the professional scene despite everyone else following suit and that is primarily because of his connection with long time apprentices Alyssa Valdez and Jia Morado coupled with supplementation of astounding players in Jema Galanza, Kyla Atienza and Melissa Gohing to name a few. Despite a surprising upset to start of their PVL Open Conference journey, the Creamline Cool Smashers continued to defy odds in exerting dominance given a handicapped line-up for the most part of the season. Regardless of key players like Michele Gumabao, Risa Sato, and Pau Soriano missing action for a number of games, the trio of Valdez, Morado and Galanza have been sufficient in holding off the competition as shown by the team’s performance in serve, passing, setting, and attack – skill departments that are highly influenced by the aforementioned trio. On the other hand, the absences of Sato, Gumabao and Soriano have definitely influenced their sub-par blocking performance since these three players have the major responsibility of setting up the net defense. It is of no surprise that in order to compensate the block, the Cool Smashers have intensified their serving to at least disrupt opponents' attack strategy. Coupled with exceptional floor defense by Atienza in transition, Morado had little difficulties in setting up counter attacks throughout the tournament.   With a full force line-up coming from the semis into the finals, the Creamline Cool Smashers are at their deadliest and all set to defend their crown. With few attack options on the right side as both middles rarely prove threatening with a slide attack, it is expected that the Creamline offense would still be heavy from the left pins care of Valdez and Galanza. The Lady Eagles would certainly load up their tallest players Madayag, De Leon, and Kat Tolentino to shut down the left pin. As such, the most crucial performance that could spell the difference in the finals series would be from opposite player Gumabao. Though Morado usually opts for combination x-plays in the middle to ease off some burden from the left, the Lady Eagles have proven disciplined enough with their block that combination plays rarely work against them. Should Gumabao exert significant threats from the right and if Bundit can develop her right back row attack in time, the Cool Smashers can circumvent one of Ateneo’s strongest suit which is their block and capitalize on their sub-par floor defense to eventually defend the crown. Ateneo-Motolite Lady Eagles: Paving Their Own Path Just when the future of the Ateneo Lady Eagles went uncertain with the exit of Bundit, Almadro’s takeover proved to be a major step in the right direction as witnessed in their remarkable performance for their first major tournament. For a team with a good mix of veterans and rookies, going toe to toe with top club teams in the country bids a bright future for the team as well as making them a significant contender in the upcoming collegiate league. The match-up against their predecessors, the Creamline Cool Smashers, is not just a treat for the fans but for volleyball analysts as well since it will be highly interesting how Almadro has brought about innovations to the framework established by his predecessor and how he will use it to his advantage. Right off the bat, the best change Almadro implemented upon his succession is relegating Kat Tolentino to the opposite position. The right wing couldn’t be a more perfect position for Tolentino since she can maximize her height and power advantage to rack in the points while minimizing burden on her weakness which is floor footwork and defense. While it’s true that we have seen some players shine in the opposite position in the past, Tolentino’s height, power, and ability to be a significant threat even from the back row makes her a cut above the rest. Almadro’s approach of having a tall, dominant, hitter from the right is a step to a modern approach employed even by top foreign teams. Another noticeable shift in Almadro’s system is the lack of reliance on combination x-plays. While some teams employ such strategy as a bread and butter on offense, the Lady Eagles have moved on from the outdated strategy and have only utilized such attack to break monotony. With a tall, dominant hitter from the right and deadly middles given a good pass, setter Deanna Wong is rarely forced to bunch up the attack in the middle in the hopes of confusing the block when she can separate the defense with fast sets to the pins. Almadro’s inclination towards safe and consistent pin play instead of fancy combination plays proves that he is taking the team to a more modernized approach. While the Ateneo-Motolite Lady Eagles have been stellar in both net defense and attack, a glaring limitation too hard not to notice in the sub-par passing and floor defense. No matter how threatening Madayag and De Leon are from the middle, inconsistent passing would severely limit their output and threat imposed from the middle. With Creamline notably deadly from the service line and having a full force line-up that can finally establish a decent wall on the net, it would be of utmost priority for the Lady Eagles to slow down the serve with high passes and consistent distribution of back row and pipe attacks. In a similar way, the Lady Eagles are pressed to be aggressive with the serve as the main advantage of Creamline is consistency in passing care of Gohing. Ateneo-Motolite cannot afford to be lax or careless with the serve as a good pass almost always converts for a point for Morado and company. Though the Lady Eagles have proven formidable with the block, Valdez is still expected to plow and muscle through with her attacks hence Almadro’s ability to quickly adjust the floor defense pattern would spell the outcome of the game for the Lady Eagles. Catch Game One of the PVL Open Conference Finals on December 5, Wednesday, 6 PM on LIGA, LIGA HD, iWant and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 4th, 2018

European Central Bank launches real-time payments in challenge to tech giants

FRANKFURT, Germany – The European Central Bank will on Friday, November 30, unveil the first pan-eurozone instant payment service, hoping to become a dominant player in a field crowded by US and Asian tech giants. The so-called TIPS system will allow consumers and businesses across the 19-nation euro area to send ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2018

Bersamin shares two-pronged approach to solving issues

When it comes to issues on the environment and human rights, newly appointed Chief Justice Lucas Bersamin said he is more of a judicial activist. But in matters concerning the executive and legislative branches of government, his philosophy leans more on judicial restraint. Judicial activism and judicial restraint are two opposite approaches in the judiciary. Judicial activism is the interpretation of the constitution or the laws to advocate certain values and conditions. The court exercises its power to correct injustices and formulate policies that will protect individual rights. Judicial restraint, on the other hand, means trying to limit its powers in striking down certai...Keep on reading: Bersamin shares two-pronged approach to solving issues.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 28th, 2018

Hearing on Brexit opens at EU’s highest court

BRUSSELS --- The European Union's highest on Tuesday began considering whether Britain could unilaterally revoke its decision to leave the EU before the planned exit date of March 29. The European Court of Justice on Tuesday opened the session, which will assess the issue under an accelerated procedure due to the urgency of Brexit. Since Article 50 of the EU treaty of Lisbon dealing with the issue is scant on details --- because it was expected that no member state would want to leave --- a group of Scottish legislators want to know to what extend the UK can pull out of the withdrawal procedure on its own, amid increasing pressure from Brexit opponents for a second referendum o...Keep on reading: Hearing on Brexit opens at EU’s highest court.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 27th, 2018

SC urged to rule on decade-old plea vs joint exploration with China, Vietnam

Bayan Muna chairman Neri Colmenares urged the Supreme Court to rule on their decade-old challenge to the constitutionality of the Joint Marine Seismic Undertaking signed by the administration of former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo with China and Vietnam in 2005......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 21st, 2018

Leaks reveal Man City deal to hide player costs from UEFA

By Graham Dunbar, Associated Press GENEVA (AP) — Manchester City created a shell company for a commercial deal to disguise tens of millions of dollars in income from UEFA investigators, according to club documents cited by a German magazine. Der Spiegel cites internal Man City correspondence to show the team's holding company, state-backed Abu Dhabi United Group, paid the shell firm to "buy" player image rights from the club. The magazine reported that Man City officials detailed a long-term search for "creative solutions" to hiding expenses and evading UEFA monitoring of spending on players. Man City risked Champions League expulsion in 2014 if a UEFA club finance panel had found it had severely breached "Financial Fair Play" rules, designed to curb overspending on player costs. Critics say FFP protects storied clubs from ambitious rivals with new and wealthy owners. Der Spiegel is leading the Europe-wide publication of the "Football Leaks" documents. In recent days, European media have detailed plans shaped by Real Madrid for a breakaway European Super League kicking off in 2021, and how FIFA President Gianni Infantino has intervened in its independent ethics committee's work. Der Spiegel also reported last Friday that Man City threatened to destroy UEFA with legal action before reaching a 2014 settlement to forfeit 20 million euros ($22.8 million) in prize money. Man City has not disputed the authenticity of the documents, and said an "attempt to damage the club's reputation is organized and clear." Asked about what was reported in Der Spiegel, Man City manager Pep Guardiola said Tuesday: "Of course I trust the club, what they have done. Of course we want to follow the rules. UEFA, FIFA and the Premier League, they do what they have to do. Believe me, I'm completely honest, I don't know what happened, I'm a manager, focused on the pitch, the locker room." "I'm part of the club, I support the club," added Guardiola, who was speaking at a news conference ahead of City's Champions League match against Shakhtar Donetsk on Wednesday. "We want to do what we have to do in terms of the rules." Since Man City was bought with Abu Dhabi sovereign wealth in 2008, a team long in the shadows of more glamorous Manchester United has overtaken its rival on the field. City achieved this spending more than 1 billion pounds ($1.3 billion) to win a first Premier League title in 2012. This rise coincided with UEFA creating rules — in consultation with the European Club Association — to limit spending within a club's ability to generate revenue. Der Spiegel cited Man City documents in which officials wrote: "Without significant additional revenues ... UEFA FFP compliance WILL NOT be achieved." City CEO Ferran Soriano complained in one memo that ECA members were pushing for the UEFA rules — which many thought could curb the rise of Man City and Qatari-owned Paris Saint-Germain. "We will need to fight this," Soriano wrote, according to the magazine, "and do it in a way that is not visible, or we will be pointed out as the global enemies of football." Man City apparently wanted to shift some costs away from the club and helped set up a shell company called Fordham Sports Management with two British investors. It was supposedly used as a vehicle to disguise payments to players for the right to use their image in marketing campaigns. Der Spiegel said this helped turn almost 30 million euros ($34 million) into revenue instead of a cost, for the purpose of UEFA's investigation of club accounts......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 7th, 2018

PVL: Hard work in training pays off, I guess -- Ateneo s Gandler

Ateneo-Motolite rookie Vanessa Gandler is embracing her role with the Lady Eagles despite the challenge of playing in a different position. The De La Salle-Zobel recruit slid to open spiker from playing in the middle during her high school days, but the 17-year old volleybelle is still delivering the goods for the Lady Eagles in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference. “Feels good, hard work in training pays off, I guess,” said Gandler, who is fitting in perfectly under head coach Oliver Almadros’ system. Gandler is averaging 7.8 points per game and is the fourth leading scorer for league-leading Ateneo-Motolite behind veterans Kat Tolentino, Bea De Leon and Maddie Madayag. “In high school, I kinda played all positions kasi I just kept going around. Open is not really a new thing to me,” said Gandler, who scored 12 points in the Lady Eagles’ 25-17, 25-19, 25-22, win over Iriga-Navy on Sunday as Ateneo-Motolite secured at least a playoff for a semifinal berth with a 9-2 win-loss slate. “I just trust whatever position Coach O gives me.” Playing for one of the country’s most popular collegiate teams, Gandler admitted that expectations will be high especially for newcomers like her.      “Well, I felt the pressure ever since the start because being the only rookie on the court always is kinda pressuring,” she said. “But, I guess we always train and Coach O trains us to always be mentally tough. I don't want to let my team down.” With the Lady Eagles now in the final stretch of the elimination round, Gandler looks to take the opportunity to improve her game especially in reception. “I didn't really receive much back in high school,” she said. “Coach O would always make sure that we do the right thing in every training. He just tells us to put the ball up. It doesn't have to be perfect, it just has to be good.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 4th, 2018

CA can t review Ombudsman decisions in criminal cases – Supreme Court

MANILA, Philippines – The Supreme Court clarified that the Court of Appeals (CA) has no jurisdiction over the Office of the Ombudsman insofar as reviewing its orders, directives, and decisions in criminal cases is concerned. The Supreme Court said that if officials want to challenge an Ombudsman decision ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 29th, 2018