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Godspeed, John McCain. You are my hero

WASHINGTON: At long last, have they left no sense of decency? White House official Kelly Sadler, during a meeting Thursday, had this to say about Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., for opposing President Trump’s CIA nominee over her failure to condemn torture: “It doesn’t matter, he’s dying anyway.” Also Thursday, on Fox Business Network, retired Air [...] The post Godspeed, John McCain. You are my hero appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource: manilatimes_net manilatimes_netMay 12th, 2018

Godspeed, John Glenn : Public hails hero of space, politics

Godspeed, John Glenn : Public hails hero of space, politics.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 9th, 2016

BLOGTABLE: What is your lasting memory of Ginobli?

NBA.com blogtable If this is the end for Manu Ginobili, what is your one, lasting memory of the Argentine superstar? * * * Steve Aschburner: There’s no single shot or playoff moment for me. Instead, it’s simply the way in which Ginobili has aged gracefully before our eyes, from rambunctious import to San Antonio Spurs elder statesman. At this late date, he retains the ability to turn playoff games with a clutch bucket, a steal or a charge taken. But he also has been a class act, stellar teammate, willing role player and a glaring oversight by those of us in the Pro Basketball Writers Association who never got him enough votes to win our Magic Johnson Award, presented annually to the great player who is great with the media. I voted for him again this year but, just in case, I’ve got to honor his worthiness here. Shaun Powell: There are plenty of Ginobili highlights in the NBA, but the basketball memory for me is came in Athens at the 2004 Olympics, when he set the tone for Argentina with a buzzer-beater against Serbia and helped his country win gold. It was good to see Manu among his own, getting lots of love and being in his element. He became a national hero then and essentially punched his ticket to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame someday. John Schuhmann: Being in the building for his final game with the national team at the Olympics in Rio two years ago. There's a connection that international fans have with their athletes that we don't have in the United States, and it's always special to witness that first hand. Basketball isn't the No. 1 sport in Argentina, but Argentines have a tremendous pride that one of their own, in addition to having led unprecedented success with the national team, became of the best and most decorated players in basketball history. As an Argentine-American, it was special for me to be in that building for what was an emotional moment for Ginobili and his countrymen. Sekou Smith: Wow. The end of the road for Manu, huh? It is a reality. After all these years, all the wins and spectacular moments with both the Spurs and Argentina, it's hard to pick just one lasting memory. But I'll go with The 2005 Finals, when Manu was on fire in a great series against a Detroit Pistons team trying to win back-to-back titles. He helped those Spurs topple the Pistons in one of the best seven-game Finals we've seen. Tim Duncan was the Finals MVP, and deservedly so, but it could have just as easily been Ginobili. Manu's style and unorthodox ballet on the court always served as a reminder to me how those who perform at the highest level -- the truly special ones, like Ginobili -- are true artists on the court......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 26th, 2018

Jerry West: This game is going to overtake all the other sports

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com LOS ANGELES – Jerry West’s longevity is surpassed only by his excellence, which is surpassed only by his credibility, which is surpassed only by his legacy, which is surpassed only by his continued relevancy, which is surpassed only by his humility, which is surpassed only by his longevity... Aw, you get the idea. The man known as “Zeke From Cabin Creek” early in his NBA playing days, as “Mr. Clutch” by the time he was putting the finishing touches on a Hall of Fame career and as “The Logo” for much of the league’s past half century got credit for only 81 steals in the 14 seasons he played for the Los Angeles Lakers from 1960-1974. The reason: that stat only got tracked starting in West’s farewell season. But he racked up No. 82 by stealing the show with his acceptance speech of the NBA’s Lifetime Achievement Award presented at the annual All-Star “Legends Brunch” at the L.A. Convention Center. West’s appreciation of NBA history, gratitude for his place in it, optimism for the game’s future and competitive fire all shone through when he stood before the audience filled with both his peers – some of the greatest players ever – and fans sampling for the first time one of All-Star Weekend’s most reliable highlights. Three months shy of his 80th birthday, West – who won one NBA title as a player, eight more as an executive with L.A. and Golden State, and as a consultant now to the Clippers, had input into that team’s blockbuster trade of star Blake Griffin – was one of four former Lakers honored per the brunch program’s tradition of recognizing men who associated with the host city. James Worthy received the Global Ambassador Award, Bill Walton was presented with the Hometown Hero Award and Magic Johnson was named the 2018 Legend of the Year. In introducing West, NBA commissioner Adam Silver said: “One thing people know about Jerry is, he pulls no punches. And so, Jerry is someone I know I can count on. When there’s things happening in the league, Jerry will tell me exactly what I should know about today’s game and what’s happening with today’s players.” West used some of his time on stage, though, to acknowledge and thank a fifth Los Angeles legend: HOFer Elgin Baylor. In fact, he got emotional, pausing to collect himself while praising his former teammate and dear friend, long considered one of the most underrated players in NBA history. Baylor got to the Lakers two years before West, before they left Minneapolis, and was an 11-time All-Star from 1958 to 1971 who still ranks third all-time at 27.4 points per game. “Elgin, I won’t ever forget the way you treated me when I came here,” he said to Baylor, who was seated at a nearby table. “Amazing player but more amazing man. I remember when I was in college, never being able to watch the game, no TV, and of course we didn’t have one in my house. But I used to hear about this guy and I thought ‘Oh my God, I’m going to have a chance to play with him.’ “He’s my hero. I used to watch him practice, I’d watch him out of the corner of my eye. Just the way he conducted himself with people. Just one classy man.” West talked up others in the room whose lives he touched, and both lauded and encouraged current NBA players in their performances and in their commitments off the court. “You can be leaders because you have a voice. Don’t ever pass that up. Don’t ever lose your voice,” he said. “I really believe in humility. I also believe in civility.” After talking about the NBA’s astounding growth over the run of his equally astounding career, West’s competitiveness flickered through once more. “I’m going to say this – and I don’t like to say things that are controversial – but this game is going to overtake all the other sports,” he said. Comedian Billy Crystal, a long-suffering Clippers fan, opened the program with a hoops-themed monologue. “When I first started going to Clippers games, there was me, [broadcaster] Ralph Lawler and the players,” Crystal said. “A triple-double meant there were three couples in the stands. ... Watching all of this talent, I was glued to my seat – because that’s the way the Clippers would keep you from leaving.” Crystal provided some imagery when he likened pro basketball’s legendary stars to great musicians. “Wilt in jazz terms was a big band. He was powerful, huge, big brass section,” Crystal said. “Then Elgin came into the league and his style changed the way the game was played. ... He was cool, improvisational jazz. Then came the Big O [Oscar Robertson], who was the Dave Brubeck of basketball – easy but powerful and complex rhythms all at the same time. “That led the way to Dr. J [Julius Erving] and Kareem – Doc was [John] Coltrane, Kareem was Thelonious Monk with a little bit of Duke Ellington. ... Magic was unbelievable [and] brought us to Motown. Also, the country sounds of Mr. Larry Bird. Then came Michael – I can’t remember his last name but he played for the White Sox. He played to the beat of his own drummer. “Tim Duncan was not jazz; Tim Duncan was Beethoven. Then came the rappers, Shaq and [Allen] Iverson. And other virtuosos like Kobe [Bryant], LeBron [James] and Steph [Curry] and KD [Kevin Durant], [Russell] Westbrook. And the best goes on and on and on.” Silver, though, might have had the morning’s best line. In a shout-out to Magic Johnson – who has been fined $550,000 in the past six months for violating league tampering rules in talking publicly about Oklahoma City’s Paul George and Milwaukee’s Giannis Antetokounmpo – the commissioner said: “Magic, thank you for paying for the brunch today.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

WATCH: ‘Pacific Rim: Uprising’ trailer enjoys a monster weekend

  Universal Pictures dominated English-language TV and movie trailers over the weekend of Jan. 26 to 28, 2018, with localized editions of its two big trailers proving popular among YouTube viewers. Starring John Boyega of "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" as a reluctant hero in the fight against enormous interstellar beasts, the second trailer for March's "Pacific Rim: Uprising" rocketed to well over 10 million combined views through an English-language trailer and its subtitled copies, introducing a new type of giant battlesuit and a new glimpse at the sort of enemies that Boyega's Pentecost Jr. will be up against. Likewise, Universal pushed out Spanish, Portuguese and Italia...Keep on reading: WATCH: ‘Pacific Rim: Uprising’ trailer enjoys a monster weekend.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 30th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

De Lima welcomes 2 US senators’ appeal to uphold human rights

Opposition Sen. Leila de Lima on Wednesday welcomed the appeal of US Senators John McCain and Benjamin Cardin for President Donald Trump to reaffirm their country's commitment to human rights at home and abroad.   De Lima thanked the senators for addressing the deteriorating human rights situation across the world, including the wave of extrajudicial killings in the Philippines under President Rodrigo Duterte's war on drugs.   "I thank the two good senators for boldly raising the importance of upholding human rights and the rule of law while other public officials choose to be mum on the matter," De Lima, who has been given international recognition as a human right...Keep on reading: De Lima welcomes 2 US senators’ appeal to uphold human rights.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 28th, 2017

USS John S. McCain Departs Subic Bay en route to Yokosuka

PHILIPPINE SEA (NNS) -- The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) departed Subic Bay, Philippines aboard heavy lift transport vessel MV Treasure in route to Fleet.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017

USS John S McCain Departs Subic Bay En Route to Yokosuka

PHILIPPINE SEA (NNS) -- The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) departed Subic Bay, Philippines aboard heavy lift transport vessel MV Treasure en route to Fleet.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017

USS John S. McCain Departs Subic Bay en route to Yokosuka

PHILIPPINE SEA (NNS) -- The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) departed Subic Bay, Philippines aboard heavy lift transport vessel MV Treasure in route to Fleet.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsNov 28th, 2017

USS John S McCain Departs Subic Bay En Route to Yokosuka

PHILIPPINE SEA (NNS) -- The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) departed Subic Bay, Philippines aboard heavy lift transport vessel MV Treasure en route to Fleet.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsNov 28th, 2017

Magsayo retains WBO Int l Featherweight title

TAGBILARAN CITY, Bohol --- A world title fight could be in the horizon for undefeated Mark 'Magnifico' Magsayo. The hometown hero did not disappoint in his homecoming in this beautiful province in the Visayas as he successfully defended his WBO International Featherweight belt against Japanese challenger Shota Hayashi in a unanimous decision win Saturday in the sold out Bohol Wisdom Gymnasium here. Magsayo got an identical 116-112 scores from the three judges to wrap up the successful staging of Pinoy Pride 43 'The Battle in Bohol'. "Nahirapan din ako kasi di ko talaga in-expect ang tibay niya saka malakas talaga," said Magsayo, who battled a very game and tough Japanese veteran. "Matibay siya sa bodega saka sa mukha kaya medyo nahirapan ako."  The 22-year old Magsayo spoiled the birthday wish of Hayashi, who turned 30 Friday, with his 18th straight win in his return to this province famous for its majestic Chocolate Hills since his seventh win back in 2014. With an impressive 18-0 (13 KOs) record and a good performance in his fight, Magsayo could be heading into a world title bout against WBO Featherweight champ Oscar Valdez or a eliminator on March 2018. Hayashi dropped to 30-7-1 win-loss-draw record. Meanwhile, 'Prince' Albert Pagara knocked out Mohammed Kambuluta of Tanzania with 2:26 in the second round. Pagara floored Kambuluta early in the second round before finishing off the Tanzanian with a right straight for his 20th KO win in 28 victories against a lone loss. Kambuluta dropped to 17-4 win-loss card. Jeo 'Santino' Santisima pummeled Indonesian Ki Chang Kim to submission just 36 seconds into the opening round to score a magnificent knockout win in their junior featherweight bout. Santisima caught Kim with two body shots that dropped the Indonesian, who never recovered from the Pinoy's devastating body blows. Santisima improved his record to 15 wins, 14 from KOs, with two losses. Kim absorbed his fifth loss against eight wins and a draw. In other undercard results, Christian Bacolod opened the night with a sensational second round TKO win over Ryan Makiputin. Bacolod floored Makiputin twice in the second round before finishing off the fight with a barrage of combinations as the referee stepped in to stop the fight, 2:50 in the round. Roli Gasca made quick work of Boholano Jason Tinampay, knocking out the home crowd bet with a thunderous right uppercut to the jaw with 1:15 in the opening round.  Rocky Fuentes edged Ryan Tampus via unanimous decision (59-55, 60-54, 59-55) while Esneth Domingo dominated the score cards, 39-36, 40-36, 40-35, for a UD win over Lowell Saguisa. Melvin Jerusalem outpointed Jestoni Racoma in a unanimous decision win, 80-72, 80-72, 78-74. Another local bet in Virgel Vitor went home  victorious after getting the identical 97-93 scores from the judges against John Ray Logatiman in their Junior Featherweight bout.   Complete Pinoy Pride 43 Results Mark 'Magnifico' Magsayo def. Shota Hayashi via UD (116-112, 116-112, 116-112) 'Prince' Albert Pagara def. Mohammed Kambuluta via KO, 2:26 in the second round Jeo 'Santino' Santisima def. Ki Chang Kim via KO, 2:24 in the first round Virgel Vitor def. John Ray Logatiman via UD (97-93, 97-93, 97-93) Melvin Jerusalem def. Jestoni Racoma via UD (80-72, 80-72, 78-74) Esneth Domingo def. Lowell Saguisa via UD (39-36, 40-36, 40-35) Roli Gasca def. Jason Tinampay via knockout, 1:15 in the first round Rocky Fuentes def. Ryan Tampus via UD (59-55, 60-54, 59-55) Christian Bacolod def. Ryan Makiputin via TKO, 2:50 in the second round --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 25th, 2017

Men's volleyball stars hold benefit exhibition match

Virtual Playground gathered its volleyball talents for a one-day benefit exhibition match held recently as part of the agency’s advocacy project.   Held for the benefit of 5-year-old Yunix Ashteen Andrecio diagnosed with an Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, VP’s pool of NCAA and UAAP men’s volleyball stars led by national team captain John Vic De Guzman staged the event in Calamba, Laguna.   Looking to give back and share all the blessings he received this year, hometown hero and former College of St. Benilde ace De Guzman initiated the benefit game.  “When I learned about the case of Baby Yunix, nag-isip po ako ng puwede ko maitulong kaya po I asked the help of my friends in Laguna, ‘yung local government and my management agency, Virtual Playground for support,” said De Guzman, the reigning NCAA Most Valuable Player who led CSB to its breakthrough crown in Season 92.  “Sa pamamagitan po ng volleyball ay nakapagbigay po kami kahit paano ng kaunting assistance sa mga nangangailangan,” he added. Aside from De Guzman other VP talents who made the benefit game possible were De La Salle University’s Raymark Woo, Geuel Asia, Levin Dimayuga and Mike Frey, Josh Villanueva of Ateneo de Manila University, Timothy Eusebio of San Sebastian College, San Beda’s Jomaru Amagan, Anjo Pertierra of Mapua and Jerome Sarmiento of Adamson. Also giving a helping hand were Philippine national team members Ranran Abdilla and Bonjomar Castel. Virtual Playground is committed to expose its talents to more advocacy projects as part of their ongoing campaign 'VPInspire. It is the agency’s way to impart to its talents the virtue of being socially responsible apart from being the best in their respective field of sports. “Dasal lang po namin ang mabilis na paggaling ni Baby Yunix and gusto ko lang po malaman nya na nandito kaming mga kuya nya to win this fight with her,” said De Guzman, who is also an actor and model. “Mahaba pa po ang laban na ito - so I’m hoping mas marami pa po ang gustong tumulong.' For help and donations, kindly contact Mrs. Anna Andrecio, 0949-8555430 and 0918-2604901.       .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2017

Remains of all missing sailors recovered from U.S. warship

SINGAPORE – Divers have recovered the remains of all 10 US sailors who went missing after their warship collided with a tanker off Singapore, the US Navy said Monday, August 28. The remaining 8 sailors were retrieved by divers searching flooded compartments of the USS em>John S. McCain /em>, it said, after ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 28th, 2017

Bodies of some of the 10 missing US sailors found after collision off Singapore – ABC News

Bodies of some of the 10 missing sailors have been found in flooded compartments of the USS John S. McCain, a Navy destroyer that collided with a commercial vessel east of Singapore early Monday morning, the U.S. Navy said. Ten sailors have been missing since the collision, and the remains of some were found by divers performing recovery operations inside the ship, Adm. Scott Swift, the commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, said in a statement. Remains that may belong to another sailor missing from the McCain were found by the Royal Malaysian Navy as it assisted the U.S. in waters east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore, Swift said. &'8220;Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with the families of those sailors and the families of our sailors who were injured,&'8221; he said in the statement, issued from Singapore's Changi Naval Base today, where the damaged USS McCain is docked and where the tanker that it collided with is anchored. &'8220;The search-and-rescue efforts continue.&'8221; One of the missing sailors was identified by government officials as Ohio resident Jacob Drake. Drake's cousin, Brandie Roberts, told ABC News that he joined the Navy right out of high school at 17 years old. Roberts described her cousin as a &'8220;hilarious&'8221; and &'8220;ridiculously smart&'8221; person. &'8220;We are all begging for answers and begging he is found safe,&'8221; she said. Drake is engaged, Roberts said. He has plans to marry next summer, The Columbus Dispatch reported. In a statement, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, offered his support to Drake's family and the U.S. Navy. &'8220;Connie and I are thinking of Jacob’s family during this horrible time and we join Ohioans in praying for Jacob’s well-being and safety,&'8221; Brown said. &'8220;Servicemembers like Jacob represent the very best of our state, and I’m hopeful the divers searching for these brave sailors can find him and bring him home safely.&'8221; Ohio Gov. John Kasich wrote on Twitter that he is &'8220;praying for all, especially Ohio's own Jacob Drake.&'8221; The McCain was heading to Singapore on a routine port visit after conducting a sensitive freedom-of-navigation operation near one of China's man-made islands in the South China Sea, according to the Navy. The destroyer collided with a tanker vessel, the Alnic MC, off the coast of Singapore around 5:20 a.m. local time Monday, the Stealth Maritime Corp. said in a statement. Reports of the damage to the two ships seem to indicate that they were crossing paths or at least attempting to move in different directions at the time of the collision. The McCain's hull received significant damage as a result of the collision, according to the Navy. Photos show what looks like a wide cave on the port side of the ship at the water line. An initial report about the collision indicated that the ship reported a loss of steering three minutes prior to the impact, a U.S. official said. The official notes this was an initial report, and that it’s not clear if this is what led to the collision, as the crew could have taken several evasive maneuvers to avoid a collision &'8212; something crews are trained to deal with. After the collision, adjacent compartments on the McCain —- including crew berth, machinery and communications rooms —- flooded, according to the Navy, which added that a damage-control response prevented the situation from becoming more serious. Ships from multiple countries searched for the missing sailors after the collision. President Trump tweeted that his &'8220;thoughts and prayers&'8221; are with the McCain's sailors. Several politicians on both sides of the aisle echoed his sentiment, including Sen. John McCain. The ship is named for his grandfather John Sidney McCain Sr. and his father, John Sidney McCain Jr. &'8220;Cindy and I are keeping America's sailors aboard the USS John S McCain in our prayers tonight &'8212; appreciate the work of search &'38; rescue crews,&'8221; McCain wrote in a tweet. The collision was hardly an isolated incident for the Navy. It comes only two months after the USS Fitzgerald's collision with a Philippine container ship in the middle of the night off the coast of Japan. Seven U.S. sailors lost their lives in that collision, and last week the Navy relieved the Fitzgerald's commanding officer, executive officer and senior enlisted sailor for mistakes that led to the crash. The USS Lake Champlain, a guided missile cruiser, collided with a fishing boat in the Sea of Japan in May. There were no injuries from that crash. The Navy ship tried to alert the fishing boat before the collision, but it was too late. The USS Antietam, also a guided-missile cruiser, ran aground off the coast of Japan in February, damaging its propellers and spilling oil into the water. John Richardson, the Navy's top admiral, called for an operational pause in the region and &'8220;a deeper look into how we train and certify forces operating in and around Japan,&'8221; after the McCain's collision. &'8220;We'll examine the process in which we train and certify our forces that are deployed in Japan to make sure we're doing all we can to make them ready for operations and war fighting,&'8221; he told reporters. &'8220;This will include but not be limited to looking at operational tempo, trends in personnel, material, maintenance and equipment. It will also include a review of how we train and certify our service warfare community, including tactical and navigational proficiency,&'8221; he said yesterday at a press conference.( MICHAEL EDISON HAYDEN, JULIA [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2017

Trump isn t letting Obamacare die; he s trying to kill it

(THE CONVERSATION) Early on the morning of July 28, Republicans were dealt a surprising blow when Sen. John McCain (R-AR), along with Sen......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 30th, 2017

Trump’s transgender military ban ‘not worked out yet’ – BBC News

The White House has not yet decided how it will implement the president's ban on transgender people serving in the US military. Mr Trump's surprise Twitter announcement on Wednesday has been met with criticism from rights groups. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the administration would work alongside the Pentagon to decide how to proceed. It is not yet clear how the announcement will affect current transgender service personnel. &'8220;The United States government will not accept or allow transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US military,&'8221; Donald Trump tweeted. &'8220;Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail.&'8221; Asked at a press briefing if troops on battlefields would be immediately sent back, White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the policy had yet to be worked out. &'8220;The decision is based on a military decision. It's not meant to be anything more than that,&'8221; she said. However, some US media outlets questioned the spending justification. The Washington Post drew attention to an analysis that the US military spends almost $42m (£32m) a year on the erectile dysfunction medication Viagra &'' several times the total estimated cost of transgender medical support. Meanwhile, Politico reports that the move was prompted by threats from Republican hardliners over a spending bill which would provide funding for Mr Trump's promised military spending and border wall plans. One Republican lawmaker had already tabled an amendment to the spending bill to prevent the military paying for transgender surgical procedures. The timing of this transgender ban is almost as interesting as the move itself. Why now? With the Trump administration being buffeted by the Jeff Sessions political death watch, the ongoing multi-prong investigation into the Trump campaign, the healthcare drama in the Senate and the impending Russian sanctions bill, perhaps the administration decided this was a good time to change the subject and rally conservative forces to his side. Republicans have long used cultural issues as a wedge to divide Democrats and energise evangelicals. As one White House insider acknowledged, this is straight out of that playbook. While Mr Trump campaigned as sympathetic to LGBT rights, he needs the traditional religious conservatives to stay loyal to him now, more than ever. The president's action will create a furore among liberals and the media commentators whose disdain for the current administration is not a new development. This is a fight the White House will welcome. The decision to allow transgender people to serve openly in the military was made by the Obama administration last year, with a one-year review period allowed for its implementation. The policy included a provision for the military to provide medical help for service members wanting to change gender. But in June, Defence Secretary James Mattis agreed to a further six-month delay. In 2016, the independent Rand Corporation estimated that about 4,000 US active-duty and reserve service members are transgender, although some campaigners put the figure higher than 10,000. Rand also predicted that the inclusion of transgender people in the military would cause a 0.13% increase in healthcare spending (approximately $8.4m). Kristin Beck, a retired elite Navy SEAL, issued a challenge to President Trump in an interview with Business Insider: &'8220;Let's meet face to face and you tell me I'm not worthy.&'8221; She said that during her decorated military career, she had been &'8220;defending individual liberty&'8221;. &'8220;Being transgender doesn't affect anyone else,&'8221; she said. &'8220;We are liberty's light. If you can't defend that for everyone that's an American citizen, that's not right.&'8221; Army reservist Rudy Akbarian, in Los Angeles, said: &'8220;My heart dropped a little bit, you know. It hurt.&'8221; &'8220;Not everyone responded well after learning I was transitioning,&'8221; he said. &'8220;But after spending time on missions and realising we all share the same love for the country, we worked together and got the job done. &'8220;The discrimination I'm facing now is from those outside the military &'' not the people who work with me.&'8221; Mr Trump said his decision was based on consultation with his generals, but there has been a mixed reaction. Former Defence Secretary Ash Carter, who lifted the ban last year under President Obama, said: &'8220;To choose service members on other grounds than military qualifications is social policy and has no place in our military.&'8221; Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Republican John McCain, said major policy announcements should not be made via Twitter. &'8220;Any American who meets current medical and readiness standards should be allowed to continue serving,&'8221; he added. Several British military generals also condemned Mr Trump's decision, including the commander of the UK Maritime Forces, Rear Admiral Alex Burton, who said &'8220;I am so glad we are not going this way.&'8221; &'8220;Each dollar needs to be spent to address threats facing our nation,&'8221; Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler, a long-time opponent of the Obama administration's position, said in a statement. &'8220;The costs incurred by funding transgender surgeries and the required additional care it demands should not be the focus of our military resources,&'8221; she said. Trump supporter and political commentator Scott Presler is among those who disagree with the military carrying the cost of such interventions. While disagreeing with the ban, he added that &'8220;generals know more about war than I do.&'8221; &'8220;I don't think this is an attack on the LGBT community &' I'm mixed, but I have confidence in the guidance that President [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 27th, 2017

Senate opens ‘Obamacare’ debate at last but outcome in doubt – ABC News

Prodded by President Donald Trump, a bitterly divided Senate voted, at last, Tuesday to move forward with the Republicans' long-promised legislation to repeal and replace &'8220;Obamacare.&'8221; There was high drama as Sen. John McCain returned to the Capitol for the first time after being diagnosed with brain cancer to cast a decisive &'8220;yes&'8221; vote. The final tally was 51-50, with Vice President Mike Pence, exercising his constitutional prerogative, breaking the tie after two Republicans joined all 48 Democrats in voting &'8220;no.&'8221; When the Senate voted Tuesday evening on the bill's initial amendment, it underscored how hard it will be for the chamber's divided Republicans to pass a sweeping replacement of Obama's law. By 57-43 — including nine GOP defectors — it blocked a wide-ranging proposal by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to erase and replace much of the statute. It included language by Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, letting insurers sell cut-rate policies with skimpy coverage, plus an additional $100 billion to help states ease out-of-pocket costs for people losing Medicaid — a provision sought by Midwestern moderates including Rob Portman, R-Ohio. On the day's opening vote to begin debate, and with all senators in their seats and protesters agitating outside and briefly inside the chamber, the vote was held open at length before McCain, 80, entered the chamber. Greeted by cheers, he smiled and dispensed hugs — but with the scars from recent surgery starkly visible on the left side of his face. Despite voting &'8220;yes,&'8221; he took a lecturing tone afterward and hardly saw success assured for the legislation after weeks of misfires, even after Tuesday's victory for Trump and Republican leader Mitch McConnell. &'8220;If this process ends in failure, which seems likely, then let's return to regular order,&'8221; McCain said as he chided Republican leaders for devising the legislation in secret along with the administration and &'8220;springing it on skeptical members.&'8221; &'8220;Stop listening to the bombastic loudmouths on the radio, TV and internet. To hell with them!&'8221; McCain said, raising his voice as he urged senators to reach for the comity of earlier times. At the White House earlier, after senators voted to consider the bill, Trump wasted no time in declaring a win and slamming the Democrats anew. &'8220;I'm very happy to announce that, with zero of the Democrats' votes, the motion to proceed on health care has just passed. And now we move forward toward truly great health care for the American people,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;This was a big step. I want to thank Senator John McCain — very brave man.&'8221; Trump continued to celebrate the vote at a rally in Youngstown, Ohio that doubled as a victory lap. &'8220;We're now one step closer to liberating our citizens from this &'8220;Obamacare&'8221; nightmare and delivering great health care for the American people&'8221; he said. At its most basic, the Republican legislation is aimed at undoing &'8220;Obamacare&'8221;'s unpopular mandates for most people to carry insurance and businesses to offer it. The GOP would repeal &'8220;Obamacare&'8221; taxes and unwind an expansion of the Medicaid program for the poor, the disabled and nursing home residents The result would be 20 million to 30 million people losing insurance over a decade, depending on the version of the bill. The GOP legislation has polled abysmally, while &'8220;Obamacare&'8221; itself has grown steadily more popular. Yet most Republicans argue that failing to deliver on their promises to pass repeal-and-replace legislation would be worse than passing an unpopular bill, because it would expose the GOP as unable to govern despite controlling majorities in the House, Senate and White House. Tuesday's vote amounted to a procedural hurdle for legislation whose final form is impossible to predict under the Senate's byzantine amendment process, which will unfold over the next several days. Indeed senators had no clear idea of what they would ultimately be voting on, and in an indication of the uncertainty ahead, McConnell, R-Ky., said the Senate will &'8220;let the voting take us where it will.&'8221; The expectation is that he will bring up a series of amendments. Yet after seven years of empty promises, and weeks of hand-wringing and false starts on Capitol Hill, it was the Senate's first concrete step toward delivering on innumerable pledges to undo former President Barack Obama's law. It came after several near-death experiences for earlier versions of the legislation, and only after Trump summoned senators to the White House last week to order them to try again after McConnell had essentially conceded defeat. &'8220;The people who sent us here expect us to begin this debate, to have the courage to tackle the tough issues,&'8221; McConnell said ahead of the vote. Democrats stood implacably opposed, and in an unusual maneuver they sat in their seats refusing to vote until it was clear Republicans would be able to reach the 50-vote margin needed to get them over the top with Pence's help. &'8220;Turn back,&'8221; Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York implored his GOP colleagues before the vote. &'8220;Turn back now, before it's too late and millions and millions and millions of Americans are hurt so badly.&'8221; Schumer's pleas fell on deaf ears, as several GOP senators who'd announced they would oppose moving forward with the legislation reversed themselves to vote &'8220;yes.&'8221; Among them were Dean Heller of Nevada, the most vulnerable Republican senator in next year's midterm elections, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin. Johnson has recently accused McConnell of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 26th, 2017

US Senate advances health care bill, tough debate looms

WASHINGTON: Donald Trump's drive to abolish Obamacare scraped through a key Senate vote Tuesday, with John McCain coming to the US president's rescue in a dramatic return to Congress following cancer surgery. The vote, which allows the Senate to begin debate on health care reform legislation, was a victory for Trump, who had spent weeks [...].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 26th, 2017

John McCain after cancer diagnosis: 'I'll be back soon'

John McCain after cancer diagnosis: 'I'll be back soon'.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 21st, 2017

U.S. Senate icon John McCain diagnosed with brain cancer

U.S. Senate icon John McCain diagnosed with brain cancer.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2017