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Global warming outpacing current forecasts: study

The UN's forecast for global warming is about 15 percent too low, which means end-of-century temperatures could be 0.5 degrees Celsius higher than currently predicted, said a study released Wednesday. The prediction makes the already daunting challenge of capping global warming at "well under" 2.0 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) -- the cornerstone goal of the 196-nation Paris Agreement -- all the more difficult, the authors said. "Our results suggest that achieving any given global temperature stabilization target will require steeper greenhouse gas emissions reductions than previously calculated," they wrote. A half-degree increase on the thermometer could translat...Keep on reading: Global warming outpacing current forecasts: study.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerDec 7th, 2017

Global warming outpacing current forecasts: study

The UN's forecast for global warming is about 15 percent too low, which means end-of-century temperatures could be 0.5 degrees Celsius higher than currently predicted, said a study released Wednesday. The prediction makes the already daunting challenge of capping global warming at "well under" 2.0 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) -- the cornerstone goal of the 196-nation Paris Agreement -- all the more difficult, the authors said. "Our results suggest that achieving any given global temperature stabilization target will require steeper greenhouse gas emissions reductions than previously calculated," they wrote. A half-degree increase on the thermometer could translat...Keep on reading: Global warming outpacing current forecasts: study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 7th, 2017

Global warming could spur more and hungrier crop-eating bugs

  WASHINGTON --- A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. Insects now consume about 10 percent of the globe's food, but that will increase to 15 to 20 percent by the end of the century if climate change isn't stopped, said study lead author Curtis Deutsch, a University of Washington climate scientist. The study looked at the damage bugs like the European corn borer and the Asiatic rice borer could do as temperatures rise. It found that many of them will increase in number at key times for crops. The hotter weather will also speed up their metabolism so they'll eat more, the researchers ...Keep on reading: Global warming could spur more and hungrier crop-eating bugs.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018

Dimming sunlight to slow global warming may harm crop yields — study

OSLO — Spraying a veil of sun-dimming chemicals high above the Earth to slow global warming could harm crop yields in an unintended side-effect of turning down the heat, U.S. scientists said on Wednesday. Some researchers say a man-made sunshade, perhaps sulphur dioxide released high in the atmosphere, could limit rising temperatures and the after-effects like […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

China, Europe fill gap as US cedes global climate leadership

  WASHINGTON -- The latest indications of the success of human efforts to dial back climate change are not promising.   Arctic ice is melting, but in a large "hot spot", it is melting at an even faster rate, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.   In the northern Barents Sea, surface warming and loss of sea ice in winter are the most rapid in the Arctic region.   Separately, last month, Reuters reported on a leaked United Nations report to be released later this year, which said the international community looks like it is falling short of the more ambitious targets for greenhouse gas emissions set by the 2015 Paris Agreeme...Keep on reading: China, Europe fill gap as US cedes global climate leadership.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

Flood damage would double without coral reefs – study

PARIS, France – Loss of coral reefs around the world would double the damage from coastal flooding, and triple the destruction caused by storm surges, researchers said Tuesday, June 12. Coupled with projected sea level rise driven by global warming, reef decline could see flooding increase 4-fold by century's end, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 13th, 2018

Global warming may have ‘devastating’ effects on rice — study

As carbon dioxide rises due to the burning of fossil fuels, rice will lose some of its protein and vitamin content, putting millions of people at risk of malnutrition, scientists warned on Wednesday. The change could be particularly dire in southeast Asia where rice is a major part of the daily diet, said the report in the journal Science Advances. "We are showing that global warming, climate change and particularly greenhouse gases -- carbon dioxide -- can have an impact on the nutrient content of plants we eat," said co-author Adam Drewnowski, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington. "This can have devastating effects on the rice-consuming countries where a...Keep on reading: Global warming may have ‘devastating’ effects on rice — study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 24th, 2018

New phase of globalization could worsen CO2 pollution – study

The shift of low-value, energy-hungry manufacturing from China and India to coal-powered economies with even lower wages could be bad news for the fight against climate change, researchers cautioned on Monday.   As Asia's giants move up the globalization food chain, many of the industries that helped propel their phenomenal growth -- textiles, apparel, basic electronics -- are moving to Vietnam, Indonesia, and other nations investing heavily in a coal-powered future. Since the start of the Industrial Revolution, global warming has been caused mainly by burning oil, gas, and especially carbon-rich coal.   "This trend may seriously undermine international efforts t...Keep on reading: New phase of globalization could worsen CO2 pollution – study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 15th, 2018

Study: Global warming is weakening key ocean circulation

WASHINGTON (AP) --- Global warming is likely slowing the main Atlantic Ocean circulation, which has plunged to its weakest level on record, according to a new study. The slowdown in the circulation --- a crucial part of Earth's climate --- had been predicted by computer models, but researchers said they can now observe it. It could make for more extreme weather across the Northern Hemisphere, especially Europe, and could increase sea level rise along the U.S. East Coast, they said. The slowdown also raises the prospect of a complete circulation shutdown, which would be a dangerous "tipping point," according to a study in Wednesday's journal Nature . Such a shutdown was the p...Keep on reading: Study: Global warming is weakening key ocean circulation.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 12th, 2018

Coming decades vital for future sea level rise—study

How quickly humanity draws down the greenhouse gases driving global warming will determine whether sea levels rise half-a-meter or six times that, even if Paris climate pact goals are fully met, researchers reported Tuesday in a study. "The trajectory of emissions in the next few decades will shape our coastlines in the centuries to come," lead author Matthias Mengel, a scientist at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany, told AFP. Every five years that elapse before carbon pollution peaks will add 20 centimeters to sea level rise in 2300, the study found. "This is the same amount we have experienced so far since the beginning of the fossil fuel economy...Keep on reading: Coming decades vital for future sea level rise—study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 21st, 2018

Climate change diet: Arctic sea ice thins, so do polar bears

  ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) --- Some polar bears in the Arctic are shedding pounds during the time they should be beefing up, a new study shows. It's the climate change diet and scientists say it's not good. They blame global warming for the dwindling ice cover on the Arctic Ocean that bears need for hunting seals each spring. For their research, the scientists spied on the polar bears by equipping nine female white giants with tracking collars that had video cameras and the bear equivalent of a Fitbit during three recent springs. The bears also had their blood monitored and were weighed. What the scientists found is that five of the bears lost weight and four of them l...Keep on reading: Climate change diet: Arctic sea ice thins, so do polar bears.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2018

Global 2% rise in CO2 ‘giant leap backwards for humankind’

The carbon dioxide emissions that drive global warming, flat since 2014, are set to rise two percent this year, dashing hopes they had peaked, scientists reported at UN climate talksMonday. "This is very disappointing," said Corinne Le Quere, director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of East Anglia and lead author of a major study detailing the findings. "With global CO2 emissions from human activities estimated at 41 billion tonnes for 2017, time is running out on our ability to keep warming below two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), let alone 1.5 C." The 196-nation Paris Agreement, adopted in 2015, calls for capping global warming at...Keep on reading: Global 2% rise in CO2 ‘giant leap backwards for humankind’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 13th, 2017

Global warming reduces protein in key crops – study

Global warming reduces protein in key crops – study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2017

Study finds peculiar tie between warm climate, slow snowmelt

DENVER — Global warming could mean that mountain snow melts at a slower pace, researchers said Monday, a peculiar finding that might be bad news for the West.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2017

Astronomers discover 7 Earth-sized planets orbiting nearby star – CNN News

Astronomers have found at least seven Earth-sized planets orbiting the same star 40 light-years away, according to a study publishedWednesday in the journal Nature. The findings were also announced at a news conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington. This discovery outside of our solar system is rare because the planets have the winning combination of being similar in size to Earth and being all temperate, meaning they could have water on theirsurfaces and potentially support life. &'8220;This is the first time that so many planets of this kind are found around the same star,&'8221; said Michaël Gillon, lead study author and astronomer at the University of Liège in Belgium. The seven exoplanets were all found in tight formation around an ultracool dwarf star called TRAPPIST-1. Estimates of their mass also indicate that they are rocky planets, rather than being gaseous like Jupiter. Three planets are in the habitable zone of the star, known as TRAPPIST-1e, f and g, and may even have oceans on the surface. The researchers believe that TRAPPIST-1f in particular is the best candidate for supporting life. It's a bit cooler than Earth, but could be suitable with the right atmosphere and enough greenhouse gases. If TRAPPIST-1 sounds familiar, that's because these researchers announced the discovery of three initial planets orbiting the same star in May. The new research increased that number to seven planets total. &'8220;I think we've made a crucial step towards finding if there is life out there,&'8221; said Amaury Triaud, one of the study authors and an astronomer at the University of Cambridge. &'8220;I don't think any time before we had the right planets to discover and find out if there was (life). Here, if life managed to thrive and releases gases similar to what we have on Earth, we will know.&'8221; Life may begin and evolve differently on other planets, so finding the gases that indicate life is key, the researchers added. &'8220;This discovery could be a significant piece in the puzzle of finding habitable environments, places that are conducive to life,&'8221; said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. &'8220;Answering the question 'are we alone?' is a top science priority, and finding so many planets like these for the first time in the habitable zone is a remarkable step forward toward that goal.&'8221; And as we've learned from studying and discovering exoplanets before, where there is one, there are more, said Sara Seager, professor of planetary science and physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Seager and other researchers are encouraged by the discovery of this system because it improves our chances of finding another habitable planet, like Earth, in the future, by knowing where to look. The planets are so close to each other and the star that there are seven of them within a space five times smaller than the distance from Mercury to our sun. This proximity allows the researchers to study the planets in depth as well, gaining insight about planetary systems other than our own. Starting closest to the star and moving out, the planets have respective orbits from one and a half to nearly 13 Earth days. The orbit of the farthest planet is still unknown. Standing on the surface of one of the planets, you would receive 200 times less light than you get from the sun, but you would still receive just as much energy to keep you warm since the star is so close. It would also afford some picturesque views, as the other planets would appear in the sky as big as the moon (or even twice as big). On TRAPPIST-1f, the star would appear three times as big as the sun in our sky. And because of the red nature of the star, the light would be a salmon hue, the researchers speculate. The researchers believe the planets formed together further from the star. Then, they moved into their current lineup. This is incredibly similar Jupiter and its Galilean moons. Like the moon, the researchers believe the planets closest to the star are tidally locked. This means that the planets always face one way to the star. One side of the planet is perpetually night, while the other is always day. Based on preliminary climate modeling, the researchers believe that the three planets closest to the star may be too warm to support liquid water, while the outermost planet, TRAPPIST-1h, is probably too distant and cold to support water on the surface. But further observation is needed to know for sure. TRAPPIST-1 barely classifies as a star at half the temperature and a tenth the mass of the sun. It is red, dim and just a bit larger than Jupiter. But these tiny ultracool dwarf stars are common in our galaxy. They were largely overlooked until Gillon decided to study the space around one of these dwarfs. The researchers used a telescope called TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) to observe its starlight and changes in brightness. The team saw shadows, like little eclipses, periodically interrupting the steady pattern of starlight. This is called transiting. The shadows indicated planets, and further observation confirmed them. In July, the team was able to determine that two of the closest planets to the stars had atmospheres that were more compact and comparable to those of Earth, Venus and Mars by observing starlight through the planets' atmosphere. By using a global network [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 23rd, 2017

Small ponds have outsized impact on global warming – study

Small ponds have outsized impact on global warming – study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 21st, 2017

BSP cuts forecasts for BOP, current acct

US rate hike, slower global growth.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 16th, 2016

Emissions of key greenhouse far higher than thought — study

Global emissions of the potent greenhouse gas methane may be double current estimates, posing an added challenge in the fight against climate change, researchers said Wednesday......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 6th, 2016

Study: Global warming means smoggier autumns in US Southeast

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The drier, warmer autumn weather that's becoming more common due to climate change may extend summer smog well into the fall in the Southeastern U.S. in the years ahead, according to a study published on Monday......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2016

SMC Global cleared to conduct grid impact study for Negros coal plant

SMC Global cleared to conduct grid impact study for Negros coal plant.....»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated News11 hr. 55 min. ago

Airport slot allocation a potential anti-competitive practice-study

New airlines might have a difficult time competing for a slot in the country's main gateway because of the current practice of allocating airport slots, which gives older players an undue adva.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018