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Germany shooting was live on Twitch for 35 minutes

An anti-Semitic attack that killed at least two people in the German city of Halle Wednesday was streamed live for 35 minutes, and eventually seen by some 2,200 people, the online platform Twitch said. “The account owner streamed this horrific act live on Twitch for 35 minutes, during which time it was viewed by approximately […] The post Germany shooting was live on Twitch for 35 minutes appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource: tribune tribuneOct 10th, 2019

LIVE UPDATES - PBA Governors Cup 2019 Finals: Ginebra vs. Meralco Game 2

For the third time in four seasons powerhouse franchises Barangay Ginebra and Meralco square off in the finals of the PBA's season-ending conference, the 2019 Governors' Cup.  Led by super-import Justin Brownlee and local stars such as LA Tenorio, Scottie Thompson, Stanley Pringle, and Japeth Aguilar, the fan-favorite fourth-seeded Gin Kings bested sister-team San Miguel and NorthPort en route to another Governors' Cup Finals berth.  The second-seeded Bolts, powered by two-time Best Import Allen Durham and the likes of Baser Amer, Raymond Almazan, Chris Newsome and rookie sensation Bong Quinto, took down Alaska and Talk N' Text on their way to another Governors' Cup Finals matchup against Ginebra. Ginebra has had Meralco's number in the last two Finals pairings, with the Gin Kings winning 4-2 back in the 2015-2016 season and 4-3 the following year.  After a 91 - 87 victory in Game 1, can the Gin Kings continue to reign over the Bolts, or will Meralco even up the series?  Game 1 tips off on Friday, January 10th at 7:00 PM, LIVE from the Araneta Coliseum in Cubao, Quezon City.  Join us as we bring you live updates here!  MERALCO SURVIVES GINEBRA ONSLAUGHT END OF 3: The Gin Kings gain ground with a huge run but Meralco maintains an 82-76 lead in Lucena#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020   TIED BALLGAME! Brownlee! Tied at 70#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020 ???? Brownlee floats it in, TABLA NA!#2019GovsCupFinals #PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/8ICHY3ZupY — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 STRONG START IN THIRD QUARTER BY GINEBRA ???? STANLEY PRINGLE BANGGGGG! Baba sa dalawa ang hinahabol ng Barangay Ginebra!#2019GovsCupFinals #PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/nXWP8EHL7J — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 ???? Stanley Pringle connects on the open corner bomb!#2019GovsCupFinals #PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/0Qd2KZpfMn — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 ???? LA Tenorio takes it away and lays it in! 8-0 run mula sa Ginebra para simulan ang third quarter!#2019GovsCupFinals #PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/zbSVW6BVjP — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020   BOLTS STILL ELECTRIC Meralco's Chris Newsome beats the buzzer for a 63 - 46 halftime lead. HALFTIME: Newsome beats the buzzer and Meralco will take a 63-46 lead over Ginebra at the break#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020 ALMAZAN RESTORES ORDER Three straight hits for Almazan and it’s 52-40 Meralco. Timeout on the floor#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020   GINEBRA MOUNTING A RALLY Caguioa jumper! Meralco lead down to five, 41-36#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020 ???? BROWNLEE WITH SOME SAUCE ????#2019GovsCupFinals#PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/axvsdF6GpU — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 ???? Justin Brownlee MONEY on the pull up!#2019GovsCupFinals#PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/KkMHYhD6rz — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 BOLTS WITH 15-POINT BULGE AFTER FIRST Powered by John Pinto's hot shooting off the bench, Meralco posts a 36 - 21 lead over Ginebra after the first period. END OF 1: Bolts unleash a 30-8 run after calling their first timeout of Game 2. Meralco leads Ginebra, 36-21, in Lucena#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020 PINTO HITS FOURTH TRIPLE! Pinto hits his third and fourth triples of the opening period in back-to-back possessions. Ginebra calls for time again as the Bolts are now up by 14. 31-17 Meralco with two minutes to go in the first#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020   MERALCO GOES ON 10-0 RUN TO SEIZE UPPER HAND 10-0 Meralco run after Pinto hits the corner three. Ginebra calls for time as the Bolts take over, 16-13#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020 ???? John Pinto launches and buries his second three of 1Q!#2019GovsCupFinals#PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/SmBapCUIbC — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020   GINEBRA IN CONTROL EARLY Six straight points for Brownlee plus a Scottie layup on the break. Early “Ginebra” chants as the Gin Kings lead, 13-6. Timeout Meralco#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020 ???? Justin Brownlee spins and scores against Almazan!#2019GovsCupFinals#PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/6wlxeLnVGY — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 ???? Thompson wala, Brownlee on the tip-in! #2019GovsCupFinals#PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/xPPe2HZMl7 — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 8:44 1q Brownlee attacks, gets fouled by Almazan. 2/2 for Justin; 9-6 Ginebra #2019GovsCupFinals — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020   BROWNLEE OPENS GAME WITH A TRIPLE 11:38 1q Unang pukol! Baaaaang 3?? Brownlee! #2019GovsCupFinals — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 ???? Brownlee tres ang panimula sa Game 2! #2019GovsCupFinals#PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/PA5eU3dCZX — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020   GAME 2 STARTERS Game 2 starters Ginebra ???? - Japeth, Brownlee, Pringle, Thompson, Tenorio Meralco ??- Amer, Newsome, Quinto, Almazan, Durham#PBAFinals — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020 ALL SET FOR GAME 2 IN LUCENA! COMING UP: Game 2 of the 2019 PBA Governors’ Cup Finals ???? #2 Meralco??vs. #4 Barangay Ginebra ???? Gin Kings lead, 1-0#PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/38f80NEieT — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) January 10, 2020   Magic up-close ?#2019GovsCupFinals #PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/H34JzBXrSw — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 JDV ????????‍?? #2019GovsCupFinals #PBAFinals pic.twitter.com/44NQzRuVvj — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020 Tabla 1-1 para sa @MeralcoBoltsPH o 2-0 para sa @barangayginebra #2019GovsCupFinals game 2 sa Lucena! pic.twitter.com/Kf9g8TphmX — PBA (@pbaconnect) January 10, 2020.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2020

LeBron James keeping Father Time at bay in LA

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com The bearded man in a robe who walks with a slight hunch and carries an hourglass always lurks in the shadows, almost out of view. Nobody is paying him much mind or cares what he has to say -- at least not initially. He’s not on anyone’s radar until he appears and applies a gentle tap on the shoulder (or a violent shove in the back) of the unsuspecting. And that’s when they realize they’ve been paid a visit by someone whom Charles Barkley always says is undefeated. Yes, it is “Father Time,” the mythical creation of the ancient Greeks whose clock is more pronounced than any made in Switzerland. He is, by every metric, always on time, although that seems to vary, depending on his mood. He is gracious and respectful in some cases, unforgiving in others. Ultimately, he and only he decides when your time in sports is up. And so, it’s a matter of when, not if, he’ll throw LeBron James in reverse. But where other stars became role players or transformed into shells of their former selves, LeBron is playing at a high level. He turns 35 later this month and because he’s delivering Kia MVP-quality results here in his 17th NBA season, he is winning against time, and therefore, he is … cheating time. He’s almost at 57,000 minutes played in the regular season and playoffs combined, which ranks fourth behind Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Karl Malone and Kobe Bryant. He should pass Kobe for No. 3 in career scoring (33,643 points) by the All-Star break. The all-time scoring mark and a high ranking on the all-time assists list are in sight, too. Ask him why and how he’s doing it and LeBron is playfully coy and quick to say “fine wine.” He’ll also often credit the extra motivation he acquired last summer, when he watched the playoffs from his sofa, not far removed from a groin injury and a dreadful first season with the Lakers. Those things caused him grief and fueled his desire to reclaim his place. "I put in the work and I trust everything that I’ve done, especially this offseason," James said. "I’ve come in with a great mindset, with a healthy mindset and a healthy body." Considering his middle age, LeBron is putting together a masterful season (25.6 ppg, 7.1 rpg) while excelling as a volume 3-point shooter. His 10.8 apg leads the NBA and his effort defensively -- which was laughable last season -- is laudable now. Nobody at 35 has assembled such numbers in league history. “He’s LeBron James,” said Clippers coach Doc Rivers. “Until he isn’t.” What’s age got to do with it? Well, nothing right now. LeBron is still capable of unleashing a facial dunk, as he did with a smirk against the Kings’ Nemanja Bjelica, who perhaps wisely never bothered to challenge it. He also covers all the court rather than, as some aging players are wont to do, play between the free throw lines. It’s true that soon enough he will wear longer shorts than anyone in the game -- not from faulty tailoring, but from constant pulling and tugging. And while the ball is in play, he will someday hear squeaking on the court and suddenly notice that sound is coming from his joints. “Nobody knows when it’ll happen to him because he’s still playing in the air,” said Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins. “And even when that goes, his basketball IQ will allow him to stay great on the ground. I mean, who gets triple doubles at his age? Only he knows when his time is up.” When that day arrives -- and assuming he doesn’t first quit while he’s ahead -- how big of a decline will it be for LeBron (and, by extension, for us) to witness? Will he fall prey to nagging injuries, get torched nightly by previously inferior players, or quit playing defense? Here’s how “Father Time” diminished six greats who came before LeBron: 1. Michael Jordan: When he retired for the second time, after his last season with the Bulls, Jordan was still very much a physical marvel and the reigning MVP and Finals MVP (he won five MVPs and six Finals MVPs). He was certifiably great for 13 of his 15 seasons and could’ve been longer if not for three years of college ball, an injury-shortened 1985-86 season and 1.5 missed seasons due to baseball. His body only began to betray him when he un-retired in 2001 to play for the Wizards. At 38, Jordan rarely dunked, wasn’t as sharp defensively and knee issues limited him to 60 games in 2001-02. 2. Jerry West: “The Logo” never had a down year in his 14-year career. He was First-Team All-Defense in 1972-73 as a 34-year-old and was solid in his final season (20.3 ppg, 6.6 apg, 2.6 spg). But he wasn’t at his peak of the late 1960s and opted to quit over pride (and money, when Lakers owner Jack Kent Cooke refused to renegotiate his contract). 3. Bill Russell: His career ended mainly because he ran out of psychological fuel. Russell lost his passion to play at 35, even after winning championship No. 11 in his final season (1968-69). That season, he played 46.1 mpg in the playoffs, averaging 10.8 ppg, 20.5 rpg and 5.4 apg. While those numbers are perhaps skewed by the way the game was played back then, they’re still remarkable. 4. Wilt Chamberlain: A man of astonishing stats, Chamberlain averaged a league-leading 18.6 rpg and shot 72.7% overall in his final season (1972-73). Knee issues had long forced Wilt into being a statue in the paint and a third option on offense. After that final NBA season, he jumped from the Lakers to the ABA for money. San Diego offered him $600,000 to be a player-coach, but his Lakers contract prevented him from playing. Wilt coached instead, doing so with disinterest, often not showing up for games or practice. He quit basketball completely after that season. 5. Kobe Bryant: Those roundtrip flights to Germany to get oil for his knees managed to delay the obvious for a few years, but a torn Achilles in 2013 at 35 was the killer. Kobe, much like Jordan and LeBron, was elite into his 30s. And he’ll always have that 60-point send-off. 6. Karl Malone: He won his final MVP at 35 and was built for durability, never suffering a serious injury. He averaged 20.6 ppg in his final season with Utah (2002-03) as he approached 40. By then, he had morphed into a jump shooter and lost his instincts for offensive rebounding. He bowed out as a ring-chasing role player with the Lakers in ‘03-04. Larry Bird was ruined by debilitating back issues at 32. Abdul-Jabbar often only jogged downcourt his last six seasons. Tim Duncan became a secondary option in his last four seasons while Dirk Nowitzki averaged more than 20 ppg once over his final five seasons. Vince Carter is 42 and proudly still playing, but clearly is 10 years beyond his prime. Allen Iverson was the last to know his quickness was gone. “For me, it was Year 12 when it hit me,” said Lakers great James Worthy, who had knee issues. “My patented move was taking off from somewhere inside the free throw line. I found myself halfway there once and I started to descend before I got close to the rim. I had to do a George Gervin flip instead of a dunk. “It’s different now, with this generation of players. I was eating Burger King before games and working out on Nautilus machines. I went to college with Lawrence Taylor and I remember him telling me, ‘I don’t wanna get hit anymore.’ And he’s a reckless guy. LeBron will wake up one day and he won’t have that drive. He’ll be tired and while physically he’s in such great shape, something will go away, either a move or speed.” LeBron seems determined to be the outlier. He spends, by various estimations, more than $1 million on his body for round the clock therapy and a personal trainer. Last summer, he refused to allow the shooting schedule for the movie “Space Jam 2” to interfere with his schedule, rising at 3:30 a.m. to train before heading to the set. He has more than once fantasized about staying in the league long enough to possibly play against or alongside his son, Bronny (now a high school freshman). “LeBron is not only a great player but a physical marvel,” said Warriors coach Steve Kerr. “Probably the best athlete to ever walk this planet. I’ve never seen anybody in my lifetime in any sport whom I would consider a better athlete. It’s one of his best attributes and the one that goes the least noticed. You just take it for granted that he’s out there every night and still doing his things.” LeBron exchanged playful tweets with Tom Brady last month, with LeBron saying the two are “one in the same.” Brady is a tame comparison to LeBron. Brady doesn’t run 94 feet and back for nine months (playoffs included) and when tired can simply hand off to the running back. Same for NFL legend Joe Montana, who made the Pro Bowl at 37. MLB legend Nolan Ryan threw once every four or five days. Maybe tennis star Roger Federer, who won Wimbledon at 36 and still reaches finals at 38, comes closest. “It wouldn’t shock me if LeBron played until he was 40,” West said. “He’s such a great athlete and knows enough about his body that he’ll probably leave before he declines.” After watching Robert Parish waste away on the Bulls’ bench, Jordan said he’d never allow himself to stay in the game that long. His pride and unwillingness to be seen as hanging on meant he’d walk away first. LeBron doesn’t think of the twilight and given how he’s playing now, that doesn’t appear to be in the future, anyway. “I was with the Nuggets late in my career and the funny thing is I was leading the league in assists,” said Mark Jackson, fourth on the all-time assists list. “There was a loose ball, a deflection, and it’s right here, and I can go get it. I made the move to go get it, and before I could get anywhere near it, a kid out of nowhere, and in a blur, snatched it. Gets the ball, by the time I get to the spot where the ball is, he’d already dunked it. Young kid by the name of Allen Iverson. I knew it would never be the same.” Jackson says LeBron is so multi-gifted that he can endure decline in one area and still flourish in another. “He also has the knowledge, pace and understanding that he’ll still be able to be effective even when he slows down,” Jackson said. “I don’t think it’ll be drastic. He can average a triple-double for the next five years.” LeBron is taking great satisfaction in fighting age while tweaking skeptics, both real and imagined, who wondered if decline was imminent. He cites that “Washed King” nickname -- did somebody actually call him that? -- as motivation. “It’s the personal pressure I put on myself,” LeBron said. Eventually, like everyone, he’ll take the L from “Father Time.” Until then, LeBron is making us wonder if that mythical man exists. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 5th, 2019

Germany, Netherlands, Austria, Croatia qualify for Euro 2020

By Ciaran Fahey, Associated Press BERLIN (AP) — Germany, the Netherlands, Austria and Croatia qualified for the 2020 European Championship on Saturday. Germany advanced with a 4-0 win over Belarus on Saturday, with Toni Kroos scoring twice and steering the side top of Group C. Second-place Netherlands also qualified despite a 0-0 draw with Northern Ireland in Belfast. Northern Ireland captain Steven Davis missed a penalty in the first half. Austria joined already qualified Poland from Group G with a 2-1 win over visiting North Macedonia. Poland won 2-1 for its first win in Israel since 1988. Croatia booked its place as Group E winner with a 3-1 win at home over Slovakia. IMPRESSIVE GERMANY Injury-hit Germany started with an unfamiliar central defensive pair of Borussia Mönchengladbach’s Matthias Ginter and Freiburg’s Robin Koch, the latter making only his second appearance and his first in a competitive game for Germany. There was little sign of inexperience against defensively minded Belarus, however, with Joachim Löw’s team dominating with good chances early on for Timo Werner, Serge Gnabry and Kroos. Manuel Neuer pulled off a brilliant flying save to deny Igor Stasevich with the visitors’ first chance, just before Matthias Ginter made the breakthrough in the 41st minute. Leon Goretzka scored four minutes after the break, and Ginter set up Kroos to mark his 95th game for Germany with the third goal in the 55th. That set off fans’ celebrations with Mexican waves going around the stadium. Stasevich had a chance to pull one back from the penalty spot after a clumsy challenge from Koch, but Neuer guessed the right way. Kroos wrapped up the scoring with a fine second goal in the 83rd, turning with a left-right combination to elude two defenders before shooting with his left boot inside the post. WALES HAILS BALE Gareth Bale returned from injury and helped Wales keep its automatic qualification hopes alive with a 2-0 win at Azerbaijan in Group E. Kieffer Moore and Harry Wilson scored in the first half to give Wales its first away win in more than a year. Third in Group E with 11 points, Wales can secure automatic qualification with a win in its final game on Tuesday over second-place Hungary on 12 points. Bale hadn’t played for a month due to a calf injury, but the Real Madrid winger played just under an hour in Baku before being taken off by coach Ryan Giggs to safeguard his availability for the Hungary showdown in Cardiff. Bale was a booking away from suspension. BELGIUM PERFECT Eden Hazard scored twice and younger brother Thorgan Hazard also grabbed a goal as already qualified Belgium beat already qualified Russia 4-1 in St. Petersburg. The Belgians’ ninth win from nine qualifying games ensure they top Group I and join Italy as one of the six seeded teams in the finals’ draw on Nov. 30. Scotland defeated Cyprus 2-1 in Nicosia to move third in the group, and Kazakhstan won 3-1 at San Marino. Also, Slovenia beat Latvia 1-0 in Group G......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 17th, 2019

THROWBACK: The stunning San Beda-Letran Finals face-off in Season 91

With yet another important milestone in its more than a decade-long dominance in the NCAA, the San Beda University Red Lions seek their fourth straight men’s basketball crown in Season 95. But in their roar to four, San Beda would face not just an old rival, but also a heartbreaking tormentor in the Colegio de San Juan de Letran Knights, which denied them a colossal, record-setting six-peat in Season 91.  While carrying a spotless 18-0 slate behind MVP Calvin Oftana, Evan Nelle, James Canlas-Kwekuteye and coach Boyet Fernandez that forced the stepladder semifinals, wherein Letran emerged as the rightful finals contender, carried by skipper Jerrick Balanza, Fran Yu, Larry Muyang, and coach Bonnie Tan, with victories over San Sebastian and Lyceum, San Beda would dread a repeat of that debacle.  But definitely, the veteran Knight Balanza, moreso AC Soberano and Donald Tankoua of the present San Beda roster, along with the 20,158 individuals inside the venue couldn’t forget that long, grueling championship night on October 29, 2015 at the Mall of Asia Arena. Storied nemeses They were already part of their respective varsity rosters, with the Knights coached then by Aldin Ayo and the Red Lions mentored at that time by Jamike Jarin, when the storied nemeses met in Game 3 of the Season 91 Finals that fateful Thursday. In each of their two previous successive Finals meetings in Seasons 88 and 89 with mostly the same lineup, the Knights would bow in three games to the Red Lions, which claimed their third and fourth consecutive titles since 2010. The first San Beda-Letran NCAA Finals match in half a century happened in 2007, with San Beda winning the crown—the Red Lions’ second straight title then after a 28-year title drought. After San Beda took its fifth straight title at the expense of the Arellano Chiefs in 2014, Letran got the chance to face the Red Lions again in the Finals of Season 91, and they would go all-out to stop their bitter rival’s date with history. A six-peat? No way, the Knights would assert in their march onto the Best-of-Three with a more formidable team under the new aggressive young coach Ayo, a former Letran player, in their bid to notch its first NCAA finals victory over the Red Lions since the heydays of the Lauro Mumar vs Carlos Loyzaga duel in the 1950s. And in the Season 91 Finals, Letran took the first game, 94-90, but San Beda emerged victorious in the second, 68-61, arranging the winner-take-all. Moment of truth When that moment of truth came, the Red Lions were reenergized with their Game 2 win and became confident in snagging that sixth straight title. Faced with this, however, the Knights remained solid and unperturbed in their iron-clad “Mayhem” armor. True enough, San Beda was shut out of focus in the beginning, as the Knights romped with a raging run-and-gun, leaving the Red Lions scoreless in a key stretch, 8-0, for a 16-7 early lead. Javee Mocon and Michole Sorela would finally provide the needed stops and lead a spirited comeback for the Red Lions. But Letran’s Rey Nambatac would drop a clutch basket to give the Knights an eight-point advantage at the end of the first quarter, 20-12. JP Calvo would continue Letran’s scorching offense in the second quarter, instigating a 10-0 run in the first minutes. But San Beda will answer a 5-0 spurt of its own behind Tankoua and Soberano’s steady shooting and consistency in the charity lane. The Knights’ high-octane offense held the Red Lions at bay, but the Mendiola dribblers’ 11-of-15 free throws would still keep Muralla cagers within striking distance. By the 1:14 mark, Roldan Sara converted a triple to give San Beda its first taste of the lead, 39-38, but Nambatac provided Letran the marginal lead at halftime with his two free throws, 40-39. See-saw battle The Lions would take over at the start of the third quarter, behind a string of baskets from Mocon and Art dela Cruz. The Knights, however, would answer with a nine-point blitz from Jomari Sollano to wrest the lead back at 51-48. Mocon would extend the see-saw battle with a putback and free throws, 52-51. But a 3-0 spurt, capped off by Kier Quinto’s twinner at the end of the period still placed Letran on top at the end of the third quarter, 54-52. By the first few minutes of the final canto, San Beda seemed frustrated by Letran’s incredible defensive game. And the Knights would dictate the tempo, preventing the Red Lions to wrest control. Letran’s offensive might was also a big factor, with Kevin Racal sinking back-to-back threes, halfway in the fourth.  Graduating players Baser Amer and Ola Adeogun would prevent a Letran pull away, keeping it a manageable four-point deficit, 60-64. But after Racal and Finals MVP Cruz’s assault from three-point land gave Letran what seemed an insurmountable 75-67 lead with 1:53 left, the Knights were silenced by a shocking 8-0 barrage by the Red Lions at the end of regulation, with Amer scoring the equalizer, 13.5 seconds left, to send the game to overtime.  Extended play During the extended play, Amer scored off a gallant incursion to pad an 82-79 lead, 1:28 remaining, setting off wild chants from the San Beda gallery. But these were then muted after four unanswered points coming from Racal’s two charities off an Adeogun foul and Sollano’s midrange jumper after a 24-second violation by the Red Lions, that put Letran in the lead once more, 83-82, with 32.6 seconds left. After successive misses by Amer and Dela Cruz, Adeogun fouled Sollano as the Knights regained possession, and the Letran center marched to the charity lane for two free throws with six seconds left. Sollano would sink the first, and flub the second. In the battle for the rebound, Letran’s McJour Luib and San Beda’s Dela Cruz were then assessed a controversial double-lane violation by referee Nestor Sambrano, who awarded ball possession to the Knights under FIBA rules of “alternating possession.” With 3.7 seconds left to play, and Letran leading at 84-82, Sara had no other choice but to foul Cruz, who would also split his charities.  First title in 10 years, championship steak ended Sorela would then miss a desperation attempt near mid-court as time expired, sending the Letran crowd to a frenzy, with the Knights bagging its first title in 10 years, breaking the hearts of Bedans everywhere as the Red Lions’ five-year championship streak has ended. Racal would top-score for the Knights with 24 markers, most of which in that key stretch in the endgame. Sollano had his career game of 19 points and seven rebounds, Cruz finishing with 14, and Nambatac, 13. Dela Cruz would lead the Red Lions with a near triple-double of 15 points, 13 rebounds, and eight assists. He added a steal and two blocks in his incredible all-around game. Adeogun completed his duty in San Beda with a monster double-double of 13 points and 13 rebounds. Fellow outgoing Lion Amer chipped in 14 points, which was similar to the output of the prolific Mocon. Will San Beda avenge this heartbreaking loss in their first Finals rematch against Letran since Season 91 and assert its remarkable dynasty or will the Knights frustrate the Red Lions anew and waylay them in an NCAA men’s basketball championship series for the second time in a row?  Watch Game 1 of the NCAA Season 95 Finals between the San Beda Red Lions and the Letran Knights starting on Tuesday, November 12, at the Mall of Asia Arena and live on ABS-CBN S+A Channel 23, ABS-CBN S+A HD Channel 166, LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183, TFC.tv, TFC, iWant and livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 12th, 2019

Pulisic scores 3 for Chelsea; City wins in Premier League

By James Ellingworth, Associated Press Christian Pulisic seemed to surprise himself with his hat trick for Chelsea. As he left the field after the 4-2 defeat of Burnley on Saturday, the young American needed reminding by his teammates that scoring three goals means you get to keep the ball. "I didn't realize that was the tradition," he said. "My teammates helped me out." Pulisic hadn't scored for Chelsea before but seized his chance on his first English Premier League start since August, extending Chelsea's unbeaten run to seven games in all competitions. Manchester City took back second place with rather less flair. Just closing to within three points of leader Liverpool, which plays on Sunday, wasn't good enough for manager Pep Guardiola, though, who accused his team of playing "just 45" minutes in its 3-0 win over Aston Villa. Brighton beat Everton 3-2 in stoppage time, while Bournemouth lost more of its early momentum in a draw with Watford. THE PULISIC SHOW There have been U.S. stars in the Premier League before, but none quite like Pulisic. The 21-year-old attacking midfielder arrived in the summer with his star status already confirmed with dazzling performances for Germany's Borussia Dortmund. Still, it took him months to make his mark in the Premier League. There were some slightly hesitant substitute appearances and intense competition for places with other young players such as Callum Hudson-Odoi and Mason Mount. On Saturday, none of that seemed to matter. Pulisic showed off his versatility with his first goal in the 21st minute, stealing the ball from defender Matt Lowton, sprinting forward, beating the experienced James Tarkowski, and shooting precisely inside the far post. The second goal saw Pulisic beat Tarkowski again before hitting a deflected shot, and the third was a fine header off Mount's cross, again showcasing Pulisic's versatility. Scoring a Premier League hat trick was something only one American had done before, Clint Dempsey in 2012. Even with Pulisic's standout play in attack, Chelsea looked fragile. Burnley had good chances to score in the first half, and briefly looked capable of a shock comeback following goals in the 86th and 89th minutes. PART-TIME MAN CITY Guardiola was left unimpressed with his team despite their three-goal winning margin. Villa put up stern resistance in the first half, but City seized control of the game when Raheem Sterling scored on a rapid, direct move 20 seconds into the second half. "The second (half) we play in the way we normally are but we have to try and play 90 minutes," Guardiola said. "We played just 45." Guardiola was full of praise for Sterling, who scored his fourth goal this week after a hat trick against Atalanta on Tuesday. "Normally the next game you play a bit like, 'How good I am,' and he was completely opposite," he said. Sterling's role in City's second goal was more controversial. Officially, the goal was direct from a cross-shot by Kevin de Bruyne, but Villa manager Dean Smith said he believed David Silva touched the ball when Sterling was obstructing the goalkeeper. Ilkay Gundogan added City's third off a corner. OWN GOAL DRAMA Brighton staged the comeback of the day, winning 3-2 thanks to a stoppage-time own goal from Everton's Lucas Digne. Everton had been leading 2-1 before a hotly disputed penalty call against Michael Keane, who trod on the foot of Brighton's Aaron Connolly. The spot kick was awarded after a video assistant referee check and converted by Neal Maupay. Four minutes into added time, Digne knocked a cross into his own net to hand Brighton the three points. Lys Mousset was the key man again for Sheffield United. On Monday, the Frenchman scored the winning goal against Arsenal, and on Saturday he scored to salvage a 1-1 draw against rival West Ham. It was the first time the teams met in the league since the 2006-07 season left bad blood between them. That year, West Ham signed Argentine stars Carlos Tevez and Javier Mascherano on third-party ownership deals which broke Premier League rules. Tevez's goals helped West Ham avoid relegation while Sheffield went down. Bournemouth and Watford played out a 0-0 draw which disappointed both teams. Bournemouth had been seeking to cement its place in the top half, while Watford was desperate to end its winless start to the season......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 27th, 2019

Germany, Netherlands win as Croatia drops points

By James Ellingworth, Associated Press Germany flirted with defeat for a second straight European Championship qualifier before Marcel Halstenberg's first international goal lifted the team to a 2-0 win over Northern Ireland on Monday. Coming off a 4-2 loss to the Netherlands, Germany's recovery was unconvincing, helped by Northern Ireland wasting good chances. The Dutch delivered another impressive attacking display as Memphis Depay marked his 50th game for the Netherlands by scoring one goal and setting up two more in a 4-0 win over Estonia. Belgium made qualifying seem a pushover by beating Scotland 4-0 to keep a perfect winning record, but other favorites faltered. Croatia and Poland both dropped points but remained top of their increasingly competitive groups. REBUILD CONTINUES Germany's still in rebuild mode. More than a year on from its embarrassing group-stage elimination at the World Cup, Joachim Löw's team still struggles to get what should be routine wins. Just as South Korea ran Germany into the ground at the World Cup, so hard pressing from Northern Ireland nearly earned an upset win in Belfast. The host had the better of the first half. Conor Washington had one good shot saved by Manuel Neuer, and later tripped over the ball in front of goal, missing the best chance of the game. Germany emerged from the break refreshed and needed just three minutes before Halstenberg volleyed the ball into the net after Julian Brandt flicked on a cross. Stuart Dallas then went close for Nothern Ireland, who continued to challenge until deep into stoppage time, when Serge Gnabry grabbed Germany's second goal on a counter. "They pressed us hard in the first half, but at some point they got tired," Halstenberg said. Asked if Germany was getting back to the level of Europe's best, he was diplomatic. "It's hard to say." Ryan Babel was crucial in the Netherlands' come-from-behind win over Germany on Friday and he tore up another defense on Monday, scoring twice against Estonia. It was the first time Babel scored two in an international game and left the Dutch third in Group B, though they've played one game fewer than everyone else. The Netherlands' home-and-away games against Northern Ireland next month and in November will likely decide the automatic qualifying places in Group C. CROATIA CHECKED World Cup finalist Croatia was held by outsider Azerbaijan to 1-1 on Monday, denting its chances of reaching next year's European Championship. Croatia won an early penalty for handball, converted by captain Luka Modric, but Azerbaijan wing back Tamkin Khalilzade cut in from the left in the 72nd minute and beat Dejan Lovren before shooting past goalkeeper Dominik Livakovic. For Azerbaijan, a Euro 2020 host, it was the first point of the qualifying campaign after four straight defeats. Croatia leads Group E by a single point from Slovakia and Hungary with two qualifying spots available. Slovakia beat Hungary 2-1 to move up to second. The other team in the hunt for qualification, Wales, was playing a friendly. BELGIUM TAKES IT EASY Scotland's Hampden Park was a walk in the park for Belgium. The visitors were three goals up after just 32 minutes as they kept a perfect record of six wins from six in qualifying. With an 11-point cushion to third-placed Kazakhstan, Belgium could seal qualification in its next game against San Marino. Belgium's goal difference of +18 is the best of any team in the qualifying competition and its gone five competitive games without conceding. Russia kept second place in Group I, but was lackluster in beating Kazakhstan 1-0, needing an 89th-minute headed goal from right back Mario Fernandes. Cyprus beat San Marino 4-0. After a fourth defeat, Scotland was in fifth place. It has never finished a European Championship qualifying campaign below fourth. POLAND SCORELESS AGAIN Poland looked a dead cert to qualify until last week, and now that seems a long time ago. After four straight wins, a 2-0 loss to Slovenia on Friday rattled the Poles. A 0-0 draw with Austria on Monday left Poland with its lead cut to two points. Slovenia earned a second big win in four days, beating Israel 3-2 to snatch second place in Group G. The competition's top scorer, Eran Zahavi, netted his ninth goal in qualifying as Israel turned a 1-0 deficit into a 2-1 lead, but Roman Bezjak drew Slovenia level before winger Benjamin Verdic scored the winner. Fourth-placed North Macedonia kept long-shot qualifying hopes alive by beating Latvia 2-0......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 10th, 2019

2019 NBA Summer League standouts: Day 8

A look at top performers from Day 5 of the action in Las Vegas and Day 8 of the overall Summer League: Get your first look at the NBA’s top Rookies during NBA Summer League LIVE on NBA League Pass! +++ Tyler Herro, Miami Heat A variety of players have kept the Heat perfect in Las Vegas, and on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) it was Herro's turn to step into that role. His textbook shooting form was on target all game as he scored 25 points with a pair of three-pointers and added seven rebounds and five assists. While his three-point shooting has been inconsistent, Herro has found ways to score in Summer League. Alize Johnson, Indiana Pacers Atlanta ran away with the win, but Johnson was a bright spot in Indiana's blowout loss. He finished with a double-double (18 points, 10 rebounds), marking his second consecutive such game in Summer League. The Pacers have to be pleased with the offensive development their 2018 second-round pick is showing. Anfernee Simons, Portland Trail Blazers Another day in Las Vegas, another 30-point game for Portland. Simons was electric against the Jazz, scoring 35 points (13-for-18 overall, 6-for-7 on three-pointers) while also contributing in other areas. Like most rookies a season ago, Simons struggled on defense. But he came up with two steals and showed some improvement on that end. Tony Bradley, Utah Jazz The second-year center has been a steady performer for the Jazz all summer and continued that against Portland. He came up clutch late with a pair of free throws to seal the win as he finished with 17 points and seven rebounds. The Jazz could use some frontcourt depth and Bradley could be making his case for more minutes this season. Brandon Goodwin, Denver Nuggets The second-year guard was perhaps the sole reason Denver was in the game against Boston. Goodwin's strategy of calling his own number paid off often as he scored 28 points in all manner of ways. He was particularly aggressive attacking the rim, nailing a couple of nice buckets in the paint over the Celtics' 7'7" fan favorite, Tacko Fall. Carsen Edwards, Boston Celtics Scoring was Edwards' forte as a star at Purdue and he showcased those abilities off the bench against the Nuggets. He dropped 23 points -- and shot 5-for-7 on three-pointers -- and dazzled with his ballhandling, too. With Celtics boss Danny Ainge and coach Brad Stevens both watching at Cox Pavilion, Edwards showed out in a big way in the win. Chris Boucher & Malcolm Miller, Toronto Raptors Toronto has to be happy how its two young prospects fared win against the New York Knicks. Both of them had identical shooting performances (7-for-14) and both scored in double figures (19 for Miller; 23 for Boucher). Setting an aggressive tone for the Raptors, they combined for 15 rebounds while Boucher added two blocks. Chris Clemons, Houston Rockets An undrafted rookie, Clemons showed off the shooting touch that made him a solid player in college. In fact, he shot better from three-point range (6-for-11) than he did overall (6-for-15) against the Sacramento Kings. Houston's love of shooters is well known, and Clemons' showing with coach Mike D'Antoni in the Cox Pavilion crowd should help his cause......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 10th, 2019

2019 NBA Summer League standouts: Day 7

A look at top performers from Day 4 of the action in Las Vegas and Day 7 of the overall Summer League: Get your first look at the NBA’s top Rookies during NBA Summer League LIVE on NBA League Pass! +++ Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio Spurs The No. 2 scorer in Las Vegas kept it rolling on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) against the Toronto Raptors. Walker IV poured in 32 points on 12-for-23 shooting and added six rebounds as well. After a torn meniscus in his right knee limited him to 17 games last season, Walker IV is out to show he's still the scoring guard he was when the Spurs drafted him No. 18 overall in 2018. Kevin Hervey, Oklahoma City Thunder The undrafted big man is trying to pave a path to OKC's camp this fall and may be well on his way. He did it all on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) against the Sixers, logging a double-double (17 points, 17 rebounds) while showing solid court sense on defense. After an 11-point, 12-rebound Summer League debut on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) vs. Utah, Hervey has likely been the Thunder's best player so far in Las Vegas. Bruce Brown, Detroit Pistons Last season, Brown struggled with his shot (39.6%) and was a virtual non-factor as a three-point shooter (25.8%). One Summer League game does not a shooter make, but his improved shooting range and consistency were bright spots in Detroit's win vs. the Pacers. He shot a respectable 4-for-9 overall (and 1-for-2 on three-pointers) and remained particularly active as a defensive rebounder. Semaj Christon, Sacramento Kings In the California Classic, Christon was one of the better all-around performers for the Kings. He continued that trend on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) against the Dallas Mavericks, excelling in a variety of ways (15 points, nine rebounds, eight assists). He has been out of the league for two seasons and is hoping to turn some heads with performances like these in Summer League. Rui Hachimura, Washington Wizards Washington's top pick in the 2019 draft was not flashy at all in a thrilling win vs. the Brooklyn Nets. What he was, though, was timely. Hachimura finished with 19 points and was active around the rim, finishing strong or shooting with confidence in those situations. Tacko Fall, Boston Celtics Players with a cult following are nothing new in Summer League, and Fall is the latest player to receive such honors. He lived up to the cheers and pregame adulation from a pro-Celtics crowd by scoring 12 points on 5-for-5 shooting off the bench (in just 11 minutes). His offense and ability to control the paint on defense helped energize Boston en route to its 89-72 blowout win. Jaxson Hayes, New Orleans Pelicans Zion Williamson, the No. 1 overall pick of the 2019 Draft, had a short run in Summer League. But he got a lot of enjoyment out of watching Hayes play on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time), celebrating as much as the crowd did after Hayes' vicious poster jam over the Bulls. That play highlighted a monster night for the rookie Hayes, who finished with 28 points (on 10-for-15 shooting), four rebounds and three blocks in the Pelicans' runaway victory. Qi Zhou, China The big man delivered off the bench in the final game of the night at Cox Pavilion, carving up the Hornets inside all game long. He had 17 points and nailed a trio of three-pointers while also collecting nine rebounds to power China to an upset of the Charlotte Hornets. Jordan Poole, Golden State Warriors The No. 28 pick of the 2019 Draft, Poole has been a steady scorer for Golden State at Summer League. He kept that rolling on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time), but showed better shot selection in getting his 23 points (on 7-for-15 shooting) in the Warriors' win against the Los Angeles Lakers......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 9th, 2019

2019 NBA Summer League standouts: Day 6

Check out the best players from Day 3 of the 2019 NBA Las Vegas Summer League. Get your first look at the NBA’s top Rookies during NBA Summer League LIVE on NBA League Pass! * * * Gary Trent Jr., Portland Trail Blazers Good luck finding faults in the performance Trent Jr. put on the Houston Rockets that was a case study in efficient Summer League play on Sunday (Monday, PHL time). He scored 31 points (in 25 minutes), going 10-for-12 overall and a sizzling 7-for-8 on three-pointers. He was also perfect at the line (6-for-6) while playing solid defense, rebounding well (six boards) and setting the overall tone in Portland's win. Ignas Brazdeikis, New York Knicks In perhaps the best game of the day, a Knicks rookie took the spotlight. No, it wasn't No. 3 overall pick RJ Barrett, but his teammate Brazdeikis who made New York fans rejoice. Although the Knicks lost, Brazdeikis had 30 points -- including a clutch three-pointer that sent the game to overtime -- as well as eight rebounds and two assists. Coby White, Chicago Bulls Chicago's top pick in the 2019 Draft continues to keep it rolling at Summer League. After a 17-point debut on Friday (Saturday, PHL time) in a blowout win, White was solid for the Bulls again. He notched 15 points, six rebounds and five assists, but it wasn't all perfect. White had seven turnovers to spoil an otherwise solid night. Duncan Robinson, Miami Heat Robinson did his work in the rebounding department and the rest of his game flowed from there. The second-year big man pulled in 10 rebounds -- all on the defensive glass -- and then added 20 points on offense as the Heat blew past the Jazz. Keldon Johnson, San Antonio Spurs One of the last picks in the first round of the 2019 Draft, Johnson was efficient and solid in Sunday's win against the Hornets. Johnson had 19 points on 6-for-10 shooting and nailed all seven of his free throws, too. He and fellow first-round pick Luka Samanic (16 points) showed youthful promise and savvy in helping San Antonio to a win. Terence Davis, Denver Nuggets Davis was red hot against the Orlando Magic, shooting 8-for-13 overall as part of a night in which he was red-hot from deep (5-for-7 on three-pointers). He also added five rebounds, three assists, a steal and a block. The day got even better for Davis as he reportedly signed a two-year deal with the Raptors. Omari Spellman, Atlanta Hawks The Minnesota Timberwolves rolled the Hawks, but Spellman showed some nice all-around aspects to his game. He had a solid scoring night (16 points, 7-for-12 shooting), put in work on the boards (eight rebounds) and came up with three big blocks in the loss, showing some improved defensive mobility......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 8th, 2019

Spurs draft picks strong in 106-96 win over Hornets

By Steve Reed, Associated Press The San Antonio Spurs' draft picks are stepping up in the NBA Summer League. Second-round picks Keldon Johnson and Quinndary Weatherspoon each scored 19 points and first-rounder Luka Samanic added 16 to lead the Spurs to a 106-96 win over the Charlotte Hornets on Sunday (Monday, PHL time). Get your first look at the NBA’s top Rookies during NBA Summer League LIVE on NBA League Pass! Ben Moore scored 17 points and had eight rebounds for the Spurs (1-1), who shot 51 percent from the field. The Spurs had three picks in the top 49 in the NBA draft and will be counting on them in what is expected to be a highly competitive Western Conference. Samanic, the 19th overall pick, was 5-of-10 from the field with two three-pointers and had four rebounds for Spurs Summer League coach Becky Hammon. The Hornets, who are playing without their first-round pick PJ Washington due to a foot injury, got 23 points and seven rebounds from Miles Bridges, who competed in last year's dunk contest. Cody Martin, the team's second-round pick, had 15 points while Dwayne Bacon and Josh Perkins each added 14 for the Hornets (1-1). WARRIORS 80, RAPTORS 71 Jacob Evans scored 24 points and Jordan Poole added 21, and the Warriors held off the Raptors in a matchup of two franchises that reached the NBA Finals last month. The Warriors (1-1) shot 44 percent from behind the three-point arc. The Raptors were led by 21 points and 13 rebounds from Chris Boucher. Jordan Lloyd added 11 points for Toronto (0-1). NETS 74, CROATIA 58 Rodions Kurucs and Dzanan Musa each scored 15 points as the Nets (1-1) pulled away in the fourth quarter to defeat Team Croatia. The Nets won despite shooting 5-of-22 from three-point range. Croatia (0-2) was led by 12 points from Roko Badzim and 11 each from Zeljko and Marjan Vukovic. TIMBERWOLVES 90, HAWKS 66 The Timberwolves spoiled DeAndre Hunter's Summer League debut, cruising past Atlanta. Josh Okogie led Minnesota with 15 points and seven rebounds, while Keita Bates-Diop added 11 points and 11 rebounds. Minnesota won despite shooting just 37 percent from the field. Omari Spellman led the Hawks with 16 points and eight rebounds. Hunter, the No. 4 pick in the draft out of Virginia, was limited to six points in 20 minutes on 2-of-8 shooting. NUGGETS 84, MAGIC 79 Terence Davis was 8-of-13 from the field with five three-pointers and finished with 22 points, five rebounds and three assists to lead the Nuggets (1-0) past the Magic. Brandon Goodwin had 16 points and seven rebounds, while Vlatko Cancar added 12 points. Behind Davis, Denver made 11 three's. Orlando was led by Erik McCree's 17 points. DaQuan Jeffries and Amile Jefferson each had 13 for Orlando (0-1). CAVALIERS 82, BULLS 75 Naz Mitrou-Long scored 21 points and had eight assists to help the Cavs edge the Bulls. JaCorey Williams and Dean Wade each added 11 points for Cleveland (1-1). Mychal Mulder had 18 points and Coby White 15 for the Bull (1-1)s. White, the seventh overall pick in the draft, also had six rebounds, five assists and a steal but committed seven turnovers. HEAT 93, JAZZ 81 Kendrick Nunn scored 22 points and Duncan Robinson added 20 to lead the Heat. Robinson also had 10 rebounds and Nunn had eight assists. Tyler Herro, the 13th overall pick had 16 points for Miami (2-0). Willie Reed had 14 points and George King and second-round pick Miye added 11 points apiece for the Jazz (1-1). SUNS 105, KNICKS 100 (OT) James Palmer Jr. scored 23 points, Jared Harper and Rayvonte Rice added 19 apiece and the Suns beat R.J. Barrett and the Knicks in the first overtime game in the Summer League. Rice hit the go-ahead three-pointer early in the two-minute extra session and Rice and Harper each hit a pair of free throws in the closing seconds. Rice hit five three-pointers and Palmer four for the Suns (1-0). Ignas Brazdeikis, a second-round pick acquired in a trade, scored 30 points for the Knicks (0-2), going 11-of-19 from the field with three triples, tying the game with a deep shot with 24 seconds left in regulation. Mitchell Robinson added 17 points. Barrett, the third overall pick, had eight points on 3-of-15 shooting along with eight turnovers but he also grabbed 10 rebounds. TRAIL BLAZERS 97, ROCKETS 87 Gary Trent Jr scored 31 points on 10-of-12 shooting, including 7-of-8 three-pointers, and the Trail Blazers topped the Rockets. With Anfernee Simons adding 16 points on 4-of-6 shooting from distance, the Blazers (1-1) went 14-of-26 behind the arc. Isaiah Hartenstein led the Rockets (0-2) with 22 points and Chris Clemons had 19. GRIZZLIES 87, CLIPPERS 75 Brandon Clark, the 21st overall pick, made a flashy debut in the Summer League with two big dunks in the first three minutes and scored 17 points to lift the Grizzlies over the Clipper. Clark was 7-of-11 shooting and had four rebounds and two blocks. Grayson Allen also scored 17 points for the Grizzlies (2-0). Mfiondu Kabengele scored 19 points for the Clippers (1-1) and Terance Mann had 12 rebounds. Memphis went 9-of-33 from three-point range and shot 32% overall......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 8th, 2019

After earthquake, NBA Summer League resumes

By The Associated Press Tony Bradley had 19 points and 14 rebounds and the Utah Jazz defeated the Oklahoma City Thunder 78-68 on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) as NBA Summer League play resumed in Las Vegas one day after an earthquake in the area forced two games to be shortened and another to be canceled. The NBA Summer League games are being played at two venues — the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion at UNLV. The NBA said a survey was completed by two separate independent structural engineers on Saturday, which determined the facilities were safe. Get your first look at the NBA’s top Rookies during NBA Summer League LIVE on NBA League Pass! The overhead scoreboard at the Thomas & Mack Center swayed during the quake, which caused major concern about safety. The floor in the Cox arena sustained minor damage that was repaired. Bradley was 9-of-14 to lead the Jazz to a win at the Cox Pavilion. Justin Wright-Foreman and Miye Oni each had 14 points for the Jazz (1-0). Oklahoma City (0-1) was led by 20 points from Hamidou Diallo and 11 points and 12 rebounds from Kevin Hervey. PISTONS 93, TRAIL BLAZERS 73 Over at the Thomas & Mack Center, the Detroit Pistons (2-0) got 18 points from Svi Mykhailiuk and 17 points and 10 assists from Bruce Brown in a lopsided win over the Portland Trail Blazers (0-1). The Pistons made 15 3-pointers. Portland was led by 15 points by Anfernee Simons and 13 from Devin Robinson. Rookie first-round draft pick Nassir Little struggled, finishing with two points on 1-of-6 shooting in 22 minutes. BUCKS 89, HAWKS 83 Bonzie Colson had 18 points and Jock Landale chipped in with 13 points and eight rebounds as the Bucks (1-1) held off the Hawks. Milwaukee held Atlanta to 34-percent shooting from the floor. Jordan Sibert led the Hawks with 22 points. He was 4-of-14 from the field but made all 10 free throw attempts. Tahjere McCall added 16 points and seven rebounds for Atlanta (0-1), who only played eight players. CELTICS 96, 76ERS 82 Carsen Edwards had a standout debut in Las Vegas, scoring 20 points on five three-pointers as the Celtics pulled away from the 76ers. Edwards, the 33rd overall pick in the draft from Purdue, finished 7-of-17 from the field and added three steals. Grant Williams finished with 12 points and six rebounds in his debut for the Celtics, while the team’s other first-round pick Romeo Langford sat out with a thumb injury. Rookie Matisse Thybulle led the 76ers (1-1) with 15 points on four 3-pointers, while Zhaire Smith and Marial Shayok each had 14. NOTES: Several players who are expected to play in Las Vegas couldn’t join their new teams because their rights were traded at the June 20 draft in deals that were unofficial until Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). Among those was KZ Okpala of the Miami Heat, who joined his new franchise for the first time Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) and is expected to make his Summer League debut on Sunday (Monday, PHL time). Okpala watched Miami’s first four summer games on television and says he’s “just trying to stay ready.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 7th, 2019

Norvell Jr.’s late 3 lifts Lakers to big comeback victory

By David Brandt, Associated Press Zach Norvell Jr. made a three-pointer with four seconds remaining to lift the Los Angeles Lakers over the Sacramento Kings 99-97 on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), completing a comeback from 21 points down early in the fourth quarter. Get your first look at the NBA’s top Rookies during NBA Summer League LIVE on NBA League Pass! Sacramento led 86-65 with less than eight minutes left, but the Lakers rallied with 34 points down the stretch to improve to 2-1 at the California Classic in Sacramento. The Lakers closed on a 12-1 run over the final 2:16. Zach Norvell closes out the California Classic with a #LakersWin pic.twitter.com/Ky6OmriWx8 — Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) July 3, 2019 Jordan Howard led the Lakers with 25 points on 10-of-15 shooting, including 5-of-8 from three-point range. He scored 17 in the fourth quarter. Nick Perkins had 20 points, Devontae Cacok added 13 and Norvell scored 11. Sacramento (1-2) had five players score in double figures, led by Wenyen Gabriel with 16 points. Second-round pick Kyle Guy added 14, but shot just 5 of 17 from the field. Semaj Christon scored 13. Gabriel had a chance to win the game at the buzzer but missed a contested 25-footer. HEAT 73, WARRIORS 65 Kendrick Nunn scored 21 points, Tyler Herro added 20 and Miami rallied to beat Golden State in Sacramento. Golden State led by as many as 11 in the second quarter and had a 50-45 advantage after the third quarter. Miami pulled even by midway through the fourth quarter and Nunn’s step-back three-pointer with 35 seconds remaining sealed the win. It was the second straight good game for the 23-year-old Nunn, who led the Heat (3-0) with 27 points in the team’s comeback win over Sacramento on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). Herro scored 13 of his 20 points in the fourth quarter. This year’s 13th overall draft pick shot 7-of-21 from the field, including 2-of-11 from three-point range. Damian Jones had 15 points and seven rebounds for Golden State (0-3). GRIZZLIES 81, CAVALIERS 68 Keenan Evans scored 20 points, Yuta Watanabe added 12 points and nine rebounds, and Memphis beat Cleveland in Salt Lake City Summer League action. Memphis (2-1) pulled ahead late in the first quarter and never trailed again. The Grizzlies had a 47-29 rebounding edge. John Konchar added 11 points and eight rebounds. Naz Mitrou-Long led Cleveland (0-3) with 12 points and six rebounds. Jalen Hudson added 10 points. JAZZ 84, SPURS 81 Miye Oni scored 17 points, Jarrell Brantley added 16 and Utah never trailed in a victory over San Antonio in Salt Lake City. Oni, the 58th overall pick in this year’s draft out of Yale, shot 5 of 12, including 4 of 8 from 3-point range. Willie Reed added 14 points and 16 rebounds. Utah (2-1) jumped out to a 24-8 lead in the first quarter before hanging on. San Antonio had a chance to tie the game in the final seconds but a 3-pointer by Lonnie Walker IV was off the mark. Walker had 19 points and eight rebounds for San Antonio (2-1). Drew Eubanks scored 15 and Quinndary Weatherspoon added 13......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 4th, 2019

Warriors injuries create opening with Finals in balance

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. — From now until further notice, each game of the 2019 NBA Finals will be largely influenced not by a go-ahead basket or a big stop or a rally-induced comeback, but a hot-off-the-press medical update prior to tipoff. Is Klay Thompson's tweaky hamstring a go? Will this be the day Kevin Durant finally shakes that lingering calf strain and suits up? The hints and subtle signs seem to point toward the positive for Golden State. Thompson was a late scratch Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) because the Warriors -- with a mixture of confidence and arrogance and concern -- felt the guard missing Game 3 was perhaps best for his recovery without proving deadly in the long run. And as for Durant, he’s still “ramping up” his workouts, in the description of coach Steve Kerr, and so his status has been upgraded to "stay tuned." It has become must-watch after a 123-109 loss. Yet if the answer is negative to all of the above, the next entry on the medical report might be the grim health of the dynasty built by these two-time defending champions. Their still-under-construction monument now teeters, prone to a nudge from Toronto. The Warriors find themselves down 2-1 to the Raptors, lacking any guarantee they’ll see two of their three leading scorers back in the lineup Friday (Saturday, PHL time) for Game 4 ... or for however long this series lasts. Thompson joined Durant on the sideline, and the Raptors (as could be anticipated) pounced on the gift to seize control of the series. It was a game the Raptors had to win, and they did. The production came from multiple players, with Kyle Lowry finally making an imprint on this series and Danny Green rediscovering his long-lost three-point touch. Meanwhile, the Warriors consisted of Steph Curry and not much else. The two-time Kia MVP dazzled and fought through traps and triple-teams all night to drop a career-high 47 points, some of it on shot-making wizardry. But the short-handed Warriors were doomed when Draymond Green and DeMarcus Cousins in particular were underwhelming on a night they needed to be stellar for Golden State to have a chance. As a result, the atmosphere inside Oracle Arena was flatter than most of the shots taken by Curry's teammates, and this was partly due to the introduction of the starting lineups, when Thompson’s name wasn’t announced. The fans knew then, officially, that their eyes and the home team were in for a long night. While the Warriors fought, scrappy doesn’t win games at this point in the postseason, not when the other team is good and opportunistic. Playing in a hostile building for the first time in the Finals, the Raptors made a collective decision to greet fire with fire. Or, as they wrote on the blackboard inside the visitor’s locker room: Let It Rip. “I think we all kind of followed that advice,” said Danny Green. “We hadn’t really had a good team shooting night and I knew we were due.” For Toronto, it wasn’t just that they won, but that they did so with their most impressive outing in the series. And now, the question for the Raptors is this: Will their inconsistent players use this outing to turn the corner and push the Warriors, even if Thompson and/or Durant return? This is aimed, first and foremost, at Lowry. He took the “let it rip” plea personally. Entering this game, he had six baskets total in this series and at times suffered defensively. Challenged by a pregame talk from coach Nick Nurse, Lowry embraced his inner pit bull and was relentless all night. The All-Star point guard took 16 shots, making eight, for 23 points and nine assists while making his presence felt for the first time this Finals. “For me, it was just not being so passive and trying to get everyone else involved and get myself going and let everyone else feed off that,” Lowry said. He and Green re-introduced the three-pointer to the Raptors’ offense. The two shot 11-for-19 and repeatedly stole whatever momentum Golden State could generate by responding with long-distance daggers that forced fans to slump back into their seats. This from the same player who had five total three's in his previous five playoff games, ruining more than a handful of runs with momentum-deflating misses. There’s no other way to describe the last three weeks of Green’s postseason shooting but dreadful. He has only one job: Stand in the corner and shoot open 3s. He’s made a career of that. So what do the Raptors make of Green shooting 6-of-10 from deep Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)? In the short term, it helped win Game 3. In the big picture, will this confidence carry over from one night to another, or does it depend on whether Green hits his first few? Nurse said: “Danny’s buckets boosted our whole team’s confidence because we were used to relying on those most of the year.” With better production from players who had been mostly missing, the Raptors had the balance needed to deliver their highest-scoring and most efficient (52 percent shooting) contest of the series. Green and Lowry joined Kawhi Leonard (30 points) and Pascal Siakam (18) and Marc Gasol (17) to take turns pummeling the Warriors from all different directions and manners. One reason for this was Thompson’s absence. Not only is he a proven outside shooter, but his defense is top-notch as well. You could even argue that Thompson’s missing defense was just as costly as his jumper. Yet the 109 points Golden State did manage were mainly because of Curry providing nearly half the offense. Given the circumstances of being without Thompson and Durant, and the constant pressing by Toronto whenever he had the ball, this was Curry’s finest post-season effort. His shooting was superb all across the floor, making three's (six) and free throws (13-14) and in general (14-31). “It’s the Finals,” Curry said. “You give everything you’ve got, sacrifice your body when you have the opportunity. Just competitiveness and trying to play until the buzzer.” “He does things that honestly I don’t think anyone has done before," Kerr added. "The way he plays the game, the way he shoots and the combination of his ball-handling, it’s incredible to watch.” If only he had someone riding shotgun. Cousins was sloppy on both ends, with three turnovers and one basket, and a step slow on defense against Gasol. This came one game after he seemingly regained his legs and confidence to gave Golden State a much-needed lift. Green’s continued recklessness was mystifying; he often made questionable decisions as a playmaker, suffered four turnovers and once again struggled to contain Siakam. The Warriors needed Green’s best, given their missing parts, and received something less. “We’ve got to be more solid with the ball and it starts with me,” he said. “I’ve had a bunch of turnovers in every game of this series. I think if I played better with the night (Curry) had, we would have won.” And so the Warriors, while talking bravely about their next-man-up mentality and embracing their “Strength in Numbers” slogan, must realize, deep down, that preventing the Raptors from winning two more games with a handicapped team might be difficult, if not impossible. Keep in mind that Golden State hasn’t sparkled for four quarters since the first game of the Western Conference finals. The last three games of that series, and the first three of the NBA Finals, the Warriors trailed by double digits. Thompson has an off day and Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) pregame period for therapy on his hamstring, although such strains are unpredictable and tricky. Will he be able to cut and fight through screens and be bouncy for 35-plus minutes through the intensity of an NBA Finals game, or will the injury restrict him and cause Kerr to seek a healthier, yet less productive replacement? “The whole point was to not risk a bigger injury that would keep him out the rest of the series,” said Kerr, explaining a decision made in consultation with the team doctors. “I feel very comfortable with it. I never would have forgiven myself if I played him and he had gotten hurt. So you live with the decision you made. The good thing is Klay has done well the last two days; hopefully he’ll be out there Friday.” Then there’s Durant, who last played May 8 (May 9, PHL time). After doing nothing but individual drills the last few days, he’ll go through a more normal practice session that will be simulated with the help of some assistant coaches and bench players. They'll see how Durant holds up. But that won’t match the stress level of a real game. And even if Durant gets clearance for Game 4, he hasn’t played in roughly a month. What about his timing? His wind? His touch? His ability to bring the same energy on defense? All legit questions and concerns for the Warriors -- until they’re not, whenever that is. “No one cares if guys are hurt,” Green said. “Everyone wants to see us lose anyway. So I’m sure people are happy they’re hurt.” Chances are that basketball fans, even if they’re against the Warriors, want to see stars on the floor this time of year. That’s what the NBA Finals is always about: Premium players doing premium things, or failing to do so, and letting the championship odds rise or fall on their performances. This year’s Finals have been denied one star for every game, and an additional star for one game. The battle with star attrition finally cost the Warriors a postseason loss, and at the worst possible time. The flow of the remainder of the NBA Finals, then, could rest with aching tendons and muscles and the recovery powers of those who own them. “We’re missing 50 points with KD and Klay, but we’ll adjust,” said a confident Curry. “It’s a long series, you know. It’s going to be fun for us.” The next Warriors medical update will arrive Thursday afternoon (Friday, PHL time). And another one Friday (Saturday, PHL time) just prior to tipoff. All along, the Warriors have led everyone to believe that it’s only a matter of time before they’re fully healthy. But will it be in time? And even then, will it be enough against a Toronto team suddenly thinking big? Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 6th, 2019

Warriors head into Game 3 vulnerable, yet pressure is on Raptors

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. -- The two-time defending champion Warriors will be of divided attention here in the next few days. They’ll be occupied by Game 3 of The Finals … and Game 1 of Kevin Durant’s rehabilitation. The two go hand-in-hand, actually, and hold equal importance. With untimely injuries threatening to delay the Warriors’ third straight title or downright prevent it from happening, the club teeters on edge, unsure whether its next step will be on the gas pedal or a banana peel. Klay Thompson is iffy for Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) because of a gimpy hamstring that cut short his floor time in Game 2, which the Warriors managed to win anyway. He did some light shooting on the eve of Game 3 against the Raptors and, Klay being Klay, counted himself in after three days’ rest. But it’s not really up to him, is it? It’s up to the team medical staff and mostly a tendon that’s moody and doesn’t always cooperate with the human attached to it. And so: This all depends on what side of the bed the hamstring lands on Wednesday morning. Kevon Looney, the fast-developing big man who has been a pleasant surprise throughout the postseason, is done for the summer with a cartilage fracture in his collarbone area. At least in this case, his loss is minimized by the re-emergence of DeMarcus Cousins, back from two months off with a bum quad muscle and feeling frisky about it and his encouraging effort in Game 2. OK, now here’s the elephant in the emergency room: What does the future of The Finals hold for Durant, MIA for roughly a month now, who has been ruled out for Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)? Durant didn’t practice with the team Tuesday morning (Wednesday evening, PHL time), but he did go through an individual workout that afternoon. There is no scheduled team practice on Thursday (Friday, PHL time), the only off-day between Games 3 and 4 at Oracle Arena. Yet all signs point to Durant putting his body through a workout/practice/scrimmage at some point between now and Friday’s (Saturday, PHL time) Game 4 because coach Steve Kerr said the former MVP is “ramping up” his workouts. It’s safe to say the Warriors will be interested spectators for that one, biting their fingernails to the knuckle, although Kerr indicated Durant’s availability for The Finals is more “when” than “if.” That means Durant has given them some reason to feel optimistic about Friday (Saturday, PHL time) if not Game 5 in Toronto. “Klay and Kevin, we’re very hopeful we’re going to get them back out there,” Kerr said. In a worst-case scenario, the Warriors in Game 3 would be without two players averaging more than 50 points combined in the postseason, and their scoring and defensive presence is impossible to replace. That would put them in a tough spot, needing to rely on replacements who aren’t familiar with, or quite capable of, carrying that amount of minutes with impact. Yes, it’s true the Warriors finished Game 2 without either player and managed to win. Yet, no disrespect to the champs, that’s a big chore to do for four full quarters and against a solid defensive team such as the Raptors. Even if Thompson plays, will he be healthy enough to supply the energy and flexibility needed to perform his usual top-notch defense and running through screens for his jumper? “If I can just be out there even at 80 percent, I still think I can be very effective,” he said. “From the progress I've made these last two days, I'm very encouraged that I'll be able to go out there. As long as nothing is torn or really injured, I'm not too fearful of it because, knock on wood, I've been very blessed with not very many traumatic injuries in my career. I don't think this one is of greatest concern. It's just the day and age we live in where little things can just grow to be big problems, but I don't think this will be one of them.” How would a diminished or missing Klay affect the Warriors? Well, Stephen Curry could not afford to be anything less than MVP-ish. He’d see doubles and triples thrown his way by the Raptors and that would cause him to take tougher shots than normal. In that situation, as the Warriors’ only volume scorer and shooter on the floor, Curry could feel overwhelmed and force the issue. Cousins would be required to ratchet up his shooting and intensity on offense, but will he stay clear of foul trouble, which would put a crimp in his playing time? Finally, the Warriors would lean more on Shaun Livingston, Draymond Green, Andre Iguodala and Quinn Cook than normal. Cook made a pair of important shots in Game 2 after Thompson limped off and could be an X-factor, or at least he’d need to be for Golden State’s sake. “Our team is very adaptable,” Kerr said. “We have a lot of versatility. What it requires is bench players being ready to step up, like they always are, and guys just playing hard and playing together. I think you have to be fearless, too, which our team is. You can't worry about anything. You just go out there and play and compete and let it fly and whatever happens, happens.” And then there’s Toronto. A weakened or missing Thompson would be an opportunity they simply couldn’t afford to blow. How many times does a gift present itself in the biggest series of the season? Not often. It must be seized. In such a situation, the Raptors would be wise to occupy Curry and dare others to produce for four quarters. If Thompson plays, they’d be best to take advantage by running him ragged through screens on defense, putting that hamstring to the test. That would be one less player with high defensive credentials for Kawhi Leonard to deal with. Assuming that scoring will be an issue for the Warriors, the Raptors must get a bounce-back game from Pascal Siakam (who regressed from 32 points to 12) and more punch from Kyle Lowry (six baskets total for the series) to make it tough if not impossible for the Warriors to keep up. If the Raptors have any shot at winning this title, they must win at least one game at Oracle anyway, and from a practical standpoint, Game 3 is the most inviting. They may never see the Warriors this vulnerable, this ripe for the taking again. “I think we come into a sense of urgency, period,” said Lowry, “no matter the situation. We want to be the first to four, and every game is an urgent game. You're in the NBA Finals, so it doesn't matter. They still have professional basketball players down there, and they're really talented basketball players. So you still got to be ready to go out there and play your butt off and play hard.” The Warriors do not feel the same level of urgency because they’re not down 0-2, and the next two games are at home, and the core group is championship tested. As they demonstrated in Game 2, they don’t get rattled by tense championship games, even with Thompson and Durant off the floor. They also know, or at least feel strongly, that Thompson and Durant will suit up soon. “If there’s pain, it will be a no-go (for Game 3) because of the position we’re in,” Thompson said. “This could be a longer series, so there's no point in trying to go out there and re-aggravate it and potentially keep myself out of the whole entire Finals instead of just one game.” The Warriors might not get much sympathy from a basketball world that perhaps feel the champs are finally getting their just due. Everyone saw them play the 2015 championship series against Cleveland without Kevin Love and all but one game without Kyrie Irving. In the 2017 Western Conference finals, Leonard, then with San Antonio, went down after lighting it up for most of Game 1. And how can anyone forget Chris Paul missing Houston's final two games of a seven-game playoff series last season? Not saying those were the reasons for three championships in four years; still, all of those misfortunes suffered by others favored the Warriors. But who’s keeping score? “There's a certain amount of luck involved with this, and we know that,” Kerr said. “We have been on both sides of that. Some of our opponents have suffered injuries. We have suffered injuries. It's just part of the deal. You just keep pushing forward.” Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 5th, 2019

Lopez sticks to the Bucks plan, and it s more fun for everyone

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com MILWAUKEE — Come for the three-point melodrama, stay for the rim protection, the put-backs, the block-outs and the blocked shots. Come for the anguish and frustration that plays out across Brook Lopez’s face over the course of a typical NBA game, stay for the maniacal, jubilant, fourth-quarter clapping that gets turned into a GIF and goes viral within minutes. Brook Lopez clapping violently dot gif pic.twitter.com/a22arVkUSc — CJ Fogler (@cjzero) May 16, 2019 Come for the unbuttoned Fresno Grizzlies minor league baseball jersey, stay for the Disney fashion T-shirt showing beneath it and the Pizza Planet cap up top. “I’ve always tried to have fun when I go out and play basketball,” said Lopez. The Milwaukee Bucks’ center embodied his team’s performance as they clawed back Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals, beating the Toronto Raptors, 108-100, Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) at Fiserv Forum. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] “I obviously love playing the game,” said Lopez, dressed like a 7-foot 10-year-old for his podium appearance. “But no question I’ve been having a great time here.” Lopez, 31, scored 29 points, a personal playoff best, and grabbed 11 rebounds. It was his first 20-point night of the Bucks’ 10 playoff games so far, only the fourth of his career (he has appeared in just 23 postseason games in 11 seasons). And it came on the heels of a Game 5 effort against Boston a week ago in which Lopez was held scoreless. Milwaukee clinched anyway. This one was an ordeal for Lopez and for the Bucks, an opener in the best-of-seven series in which they slogged through three quarters without much touch or rhythm. The style of play they’ve embraced over 82 games and the past month of postseason was betraying them; Milwaukee kept hoisting and missing three-pointers, as single-mindedly in spite of horrid results as if they all wore beards and played for Houston. The resulting nastiness: A 6-for-34 (17.6 percent) showing from the arc, while digging an 83-76 hole that maxed out at 13 points. Lopez was a notable offender. He missed his first three from deep and only broke through midway through the second quarter. His shot from out front that got the Bucks within 42-37 was followed by a reaction of one part frustration, one part exasperation and a couple parts relief. That’s the wide open space of Lopez’s game, out there on the wing or in the corner launching for all the world to see. Home fans seem to live and die on each attempt, riding an emotional rollercoaster while – on nights such as this one – they wait for his results to regress to the mean. That finally happened in the fourth quarter. Lopez – who shot a total of 31 three-pointers in his first eight seasons, 300-plus in each of the next two and ultimately 512 in 2018-19 with the Bucks – hit two to get his team going in the quarter. His third in the period, one possession after Lopez finished a slo-mo fast-break for a 101-100 lead, sent Toronto into a timeout, down four with 1:55 left. That was when Lopez came with the clapping. And when play resumed, there was Lopez again, getting a hand on Kawhi Leonard’s attempt to attack the rim, stripping and corralling the ball for a block and rebound. As good as Kyle Lowry was over the final 12 minutes, as potent as the Raptors’ offense was at certain points earlier, they were done scoring for the night. Lopez did the small stuff all night, even finishing off the dribble a couple times. It’s just that, by virtue of how he and the Bucks have played this season, those things get overshadowed by the broad strokes that didn’t go his way until late. “This is the Brook we all know and we all love,” said Giannis Antetokounmpo. Said Khris Middleton: “He’s a beast. Inside the paint, made some big plays for us. On the defensive end, he covers up so much for our mistakes.” The Bucks’ adherence to what works has been tested for quarters, for halves, but so far only for one whole game in these playoffs – they dropped the opener against Boston. Milwaukee won the next four in a row to oust the Celtics. In the dressing room afterward, there was chatter that they’d snatched one away, that they couldn't have played worse – at least on offense. In that fourth quarter, outscoring Toronto 32-17, Milwaukee made up for a multitude of sins. The Bucks hit 50 percent of their shots, missed only 1-of-10 free throws and dominated the boards (14-4) to finish with a 60-45 edge. The Raptors were held to 5-of-22 shooting in the quarter. And Lopez, dragging a minus-5 plus/minus rating through three quarters, was sitting on a plus-7 by the horn. The key? Absolutely faith in the style they’ve honed since late September, and a commitment to letting it fly. Whether we’re talking about a conscienceless approach to three-pointers or Lopez’s irrepressible good nature. He has made as many as eight three-pointers in a game this season (at Denver, Nov. 12, PHL time) and attempted as many as 15 (vs. Brooklyn, Dec. 30, PHL time). There is no such thing as too many. “That’s what my teammates have been telling me,” Lopez said. “George Hill specifically and then [Giannis], too. They just stick in my mind: ‘Keep shooting the ball, you just need one to go down. Keep letting it fly.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 16th, 2019

Bucks loathe to adjust gameplan after season-long success

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com MILWAUKEE — Just one game removed from one of the most marvelous seasons of basketball in Milwaukee Bucks history – 60 victories in the regular season, a sweep of Detroit in the first round, the debut of a dazzling new arena – the team is loathe to let all that go and overreact to 48 minutes that didn’t go their way in Sunday's (Monday, PHL time) Game 1 loss to the Celtics. But if they underreact in Game 2 Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) at Fiserv Forum, it will be at their own peril. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] Adjustments – from game-to-game, at halftime, even on the fly during live action – are as much a part of the NBA postseason as podium interviews. The reason is simple: Strategic mistakes, small failings and tendencies you can get away with facing teams randomly across a six-month canvas are sniffed out and exploited by an opponent you see as many as seven times in a two-week span. You can stubbornly stick with a pat hand, but most coaches and players would rather change things up to minimize what didn’t work last time and might, if repeated, prove fatal again. The Bucks, though, sounded a little clingy Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) in the wake of their 112-90 defeat. Wanting to hold on to everything that worked so well from October until, well, noon on April 28 (April 29, PHL time). “No, no. Definitely not,” forward Giannis Antetokounmpo said. “We’re just going to keep doing what we’ve been doing all year.” You might be inclined to read that quote assuming sarcasm, as in: Oh right, we’re just going to keep doing exactly what got us blown out and stripped of home-court advantage. Sure. After all, Antetokounmpo had one of his worst performances of the season (7-for-21 FGs, a minus-24 rating). But no, the Greek Freak was sincere. “I don’t think there should be no change at all,” he said. “Why should there be a change after a game that we lost, like … we should not be the team that makes the adjustments.” Antetokounmpo was not alone. “The way we’ve been playing all season has been just letting it fly,” center Brook Lopez said. “So even if we miss it 10-out-of-10 times, just keep [shooting].” The Bucks made 13 of their 39 three-point shots Sunday (Monday, PHL time), well off their regular-season rate of 38.2 percent. Lopez was 1-for-4 on three's and 1-for-5 overall, combining with fellow Bucks starters Sterling Brown and Eric Bledsoe to shoot 3-for-17 from the floor. Said Milwaukee coach Mike Budenholzer: “I think adjustments and all those things are sometimes overrated.” So unless the Bucks are trying to snooker the Celtics with some tweaks they weren’t willing to share, we’ll get to see how that pat hand plays out. Milwaukee did get serious mileage out of its formulas prior to Game 1. Offensively, they’ve surrounded Antetokounmpo with potent three-point shooters, relying on his drives into the lane to draw defenders and offer them unobstructed views from the arc. Defensively, they committed to defending the other guys’ three-pointers, protecting the rim and keeping foes off the foul line. What did that leave? Contested two-pointers and mid-range jumpers – so ugly and out-of-style in the NBA of 2019. It all worked tremendously – until the Celtics shot 15-of-27 on mid-range attempts in their rout. Suddenly, the Bucks’ sagging defense against pick-and-rolls looked as gimmicky and ineffective as that tactic deployed late this season of guarding Houston scorer James Harden from behind. Once the prolific Rockets scorer got over his shock at the unusual method, he was able to pick it apart. Ditto for the Celtics' shooters. Kyrie Irving is one of the most dangerous scorers from any place on the floor but particularly inventing ways to put the ball in the hoop in the mid-range. Celtics veteran Al Horford savored his looks inside the arc, as did Gordon Hayward. The Bucks, meanwhile, were 5-of-12 from mid-range. They try to avoid those shots for the same reasons they encourage opponents to take them. Never mind that the same dynamic was in play in the Houston-Golden State opener later in the day: the Rockets took only four mid-range shots, were 14-of-47 on three's and lost, because the Warriors were 10-of-23 on mid-range attempts and 31-of-53 on two-pointers overall. There is one area in which the Bucks believe they can adjust without, y’know, adjusting. They can play harder. A pervasive lack of hustle and urgency was apparent in real time at Fiserv but was undeniable when Budenholzer and his staff went to “the truth machine” before practice Monday (Tuesday, PHL time). That would be the video the Bucks reviewed before Monday's (Tuesday, PHL time) workout. “He chewed us out. And like I say, ‘Film don’t lie,’” Bledsoe said. “It was effort, man. We weren’t playing our game.” Antetokounmpo said he got scolded on that front in a postgame phone call from his older brother Thanasis. “No. 1, I play for my family,” he said. “So when he’s like, ‘C’mon man. Giannis! You’ve got to go, you’ve got to go. You’ve got to still be aggressive. You’ve got to make the right pass,’ it stabs you in your heart. But at the end of the day, I know it’s the truth.” The Bucks appeared a step slow on both ends. It showed when they went after loose balls or closed out on Celtics shooters. And it showed when lollygagging, relatively, in getting to their spots on offense. Boston already was sending extra defenders at Antetokounmpo, and the Bucks not being crisp in their execution never made them pay. “We weren’t as quick in transition,” Lopez said. “Our pace wasn’t great … We can be better at getting it out. Everyone running the floor, finding their spots. Keeping the spacing wide.” It should be noted the Bucks only lost two games in a row one time all season (March 2-4 against the Jazz and Suns). They’re proud of that resiliency. Of course, in the regular season, they only played the same opponent in consecutive games one time (New York, Dec. 26-28, PHL time). The Bucks never had to react after losses to specific things the other guys did. They merely had to be themselves, only better. “Even though we lost the first game, we’re just gonna come out and play our hardest and see how Game 2 goes,” Antetokounmpo said. “If it doesn’t go well for us, then you can think about adjusting. But right now, we’re not adjusting nothing.” Fine. But unless someone rattles Boston out of its comfort zone in the mid-range, Milwaukee’s adherence to its style of play could contribute to its undoing. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 30th, 2019

Harden, Westbrook help Rockets beat Celtics 116-105

  By KRISTIE RIEKEN AP Sports Writer HOUSTON (AP) — James Harden scored 42 points, Russell Westbrook had 36 and the Houston Rockets snapped Boston's seven-game win streak with a 116-105 victory over the Celtics on Tuesday night. Houston broke it open with a 15-2 run that made it 116-98 with about two minutes left. Harden scored six points during the decisive stretch, and Danuel House had five. Boston had two turnovers and missed numerous shots to allow the Rockets to turn the close game into a one where coach Mike D’Antoni cleared the bench for the last minute with the game well in hand. Harden had eight rebounds and seven assists and Westbrook finished with 10 rebounds and five assists as Houston continued to go with a small-ball lineup after trading Clint Capela last week. The Rockets enjoyed a big advantage at the line, going 37 for 42 compared to 20 for 25 for the Celtics. Harden made 17 of 18 foul shots. Gordon Hayward had 20 points in Boston's first loss since Jan. 26. Jaylen Brown scored 19, and Jayson Tatum had 15 on 5-for-15 shooting. Harden, who scored 19 points in the third quarter to help Houston take control, picked up his fifth foul with about eight minutes left. But he was able to stay in the game and avoid fouling out. Robert Covington had 12 points and seven rebounds in his fourth game since he was acquired as part of a four-team trade that sent Capela to the Hawks. The Rockets were up by seven with about eight minutes left when Harden picked up three fouls in about 30 seconds. The Celtics then closed to 96-94 on Brown's 3-pointer and a dunk by Tatum with 5:40 to go. But Houston made five straight free throws to push the lead to 101-94 before making the big run to put the game away. TIP-INS Celtics: Kemba Walker received a technical foul in the second quarter for arguing with the officials. ... The Celtics had 18 turnovers. Rockets: G Eric Gordon missed his second straight game with a bruised left leg. ... P.J. Tucker received a technical foul in the second quarter for arguing a foul call. ... House had 17 points and nine rebounds. UP NEXT Celtics: Host the Clippers on Thursday night. Rockets: Visit Golden State on Feb. 20......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2020

Bullpups send statement at Baby Tams expense, sweep UAAP 82 elims

STANDINGS Bullpups 14-0 (Finals) Baby Tamaraws 12-2 (twice-to-beat) Blue Eaglets 8-6 (semifinals) Baby Falcons 8-6 (semifinals) Tiger Cubs 7-7 Jr. Warriors 3-11 Jr. Archers 3-11 Jr. Maroons 1-13 Nazareth School of National University broke no sweat facing its toughest test in the UAAP 82 Boys Basketball Tournament, having all the answers against second-running Far Eastern University-Diliman for an 80-73 win, Wednesday at Filoil Flying V Centre. Needing just one more win to sweep the elimination round, the Bullpups took control right from tip-off and never let it go. Terrence Fortea was online all game long and wound up with 17 points while Reyland Torres was the workhorse as always and had for himself 16 markers, nine rebounds, and three assists. The defending champions dominated the first three quarters and were up 71-40 entering the final frame. The Baby Tamaraws kept coming, however, and battled back to within six, 71-77, inside the last three minutes. "Medyo may lapses nung fourth quarter. We had 27 turnovers and gust ko nga malaman ilan dun yung sa fourth," head coach Goldwin Monteverde said. National U just went back to basics, however, as all five players on the floor touched the ball before Ernest Felicilda hit a booming triple that silenced the green and gold. They had no more makes from that point, but their defense stood strong and ultimately raised their record to a perfect 14-0 at the end of elims. "It's an accomplishment, siyempre, pero yung importante pa rin naman, yung dulo. We have to finish what we started," coach Gold said of the accomplishment they just missed on in their title run a year ago. With that, the Bullpups automatically advance into the Finals where they will await the ultimate winner in the ensuing stepladder playoffs. FEU-Diliman will still have a twice-to-beat advantage in the next round and will first await the victor in the knockout bout between third-seed Ateneo de Manila High School and fourth-seed Adamson High School a week from now. Patrick Sleat fronted their effort in this one with 17 points, five rebounds, and four assists as top gun Penny Estacio was held in check for only 12 markers in 4-of-14 shooting. It also didn't help the Baby Tams that Cholo Anonuevo left the game in the first half due to an apparent leg injury. BOX SCORES FOURTH GAME NU 80 - Fortea 17, Torres 16, Abadiano 11, Alarcon 9, Felicilda 7, Quiambao 7, Tamayo 5, Enriquez 4, Buensalida 2, Tulabut 2, Duremdes 0, Laure 0, Mailim 0 FEU-DILIMAN 73 - Sleat 17, Estacio 12, Padrones 11, Bagunu 8, Pasaol 7, Saldua 7, Bautista 6, Libago 5, Anonuevo 0, Basilio 0, Mantua 0, Remogat 0 QUARTER SCORES: 24-13, 43-12, 71-40, 80-73 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2020

Four past champions highlight 2020 NBA Skills Challenge

NEW YORK, Feb. 4, 2020 – Defending champion Jayson Tatum of the Boston Celtics and former champions Patrick Beverley of the LA Clippers, Spencer Dinwiddie of the Brooklyn Nets and Derrick Rose of the Detroit Pistons will display their vast array of talents in the 2020 Taco Bell® Skills Challenge on Saturday, Feb. 15 (Sunday, Feb. 16 in the Philippines) at the United Center in Chicago. Tatum is one of five 2020 NBA All-Star selections in the eight-player field, joined by the Miami Heat’s Bam Adebayo, the Milwaukee Bucks’ Khris Middleton, the Indiana Pacers’ Domantas Sabonis and the Toronto Raptors’ Pascal Siakam. The 17th Taco Bell® Skills Challenge is part of State Farm® All-Star Saturday Night, which also features the MTN DEW® 3-Point Contest and AT&T Slam Dunk.  All-Star Saturday Night will air live on TNT and ESPN Radio in the United States at 8 p.m. ET (9 a.m. in the Philippines) NBA All-Star 2020 will reach fans in more than 200 countries and territories in more than 40 languages. Tatum and Dinwiddie won the Taco Bell® Skills Challenge in 2019 and 2018, respectively.  Beverley, a Chicago native, was crowned champion in 2015.  Rose, a Chicago native and the 2010-11 Kia NBA MVP while playing with the Chicago Bulls, earned the Skills title in 2009 as an NBA rookie.  The 2020 Taco Bell® Skills Challenge is a three-round, obstacle-course competition that tests the players’ dribbling, passing, agility and 3-point shooting.  Featuring a mix of guards and frontcourt players, the event showcases a head-to-head, bracket-style tournament format.  First-round matchups will be determined on the night of the event. Here is a closer look at the 2020 Taco Bell® Skills Challenge participants: • Bam Adebayo, Heat (1st appearance): A first-time NBA All-Star selection in his third season, Adebayo is one of five players averaging at least 15.0 points, 10.0 rebounds and 4.0 assists per game in 2019-20.  He has recorded his first three career triple-doubles this season.   • Patrick Beverley, Clippers (2nd appearance): The 6-1 guard is a two-time NBA All-Defensive Team selection, a career 37.9 percent shooter from 3-point range and a premier rebounder at his position.  Beverley is averaging 5.8 rebounds per game this season, just below his career high of 5.9 rebounds set in 2016-17. • Spencer Dinwiddie, Nets (2nd appearance): He is averaging a career-high 21.3 points and 6.4 assists per game.  The NBA G League veteran has improved his scoring average in each of his four seasons with Brooklyn. • Khris Middleton, Bucks (1st appearance): An NBA All-Star selection for the second straight year, Middleton is posting career highs in scoring (20.4 ppg), field goal percentage (50.8) and 3-point field goal percentage (44.2) to go with 5.8 rebounds and 4.1 assists per game.  He scored a career-high 51 points against the Washington Wizards on Jan. 28. • Derrick Rose, Pistons (3rd appearance): Rose is shooting a career-high 49.8 percent from the field and averaging his most points (18.5 ppg) and assists (5.8 apg) since the 2011-12 season.  A three-time NBA All-Star selection, Rose last appeared in the Taco Bell® Skills Challenge in 2011. • Domantas Sabonis, Pacers (1st appearance): Sabonis is averaging career highs across the board as a first-time NBA All-Star selection, with 18.3 points, 12.7 rebounds and 4.6 assists per game.  He ranks third in the NBA in double-doubles (38) and has recorded his first two career triple-doubles this season.           • Pascal Siakam, Raptors (1st appearance): Siakam has become the first NBA G League veteran to be named a starter in the NBA All-Star Game.  This season, he has already set a career high for 3-pointers made (84) to go with career-high averages of 23.7 points, 7.6 rebounds and 3.4 assists per game.   • Jayson Tatum, Celtics (2nd appearance): The 21-year-old first-time NBA All-Star selection is averaging career highs of 21.7 points, 6.8 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.36 steals per game in his third season.  Last year, Tatum made a half-court shot to win the Taco Bell® Skills Challenge.         2020 Taco Bell® Skills Challenge Rules Two players compete simultaneously on identical courses and the fastest finisher reaches the next round.  In the first round, the eight players are paired to participate in four head-to-head competitions.  The four winners advance to the second round, where two more head-to-head showdowns determine the two finalists.  The first finalist to successfully complete the course is declared the winner of the 2020 Taco Bell® Skills Challenge.  Click here for a complete explanation of the rules......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2020

Defending champion Harris and NBA All-Stars Lillard and Yong headline 2020 3-point contest

NEW YORK, Feb. 4, 2020 – Defending champion Joe Harris of the Brooklyn Nets and NBA All-Stars Damian Lillard of the Portland Trail Blazers and Trae Young of the Atlanta Hawks will participate in the 2020 MTN DEW® 3-Point Contest on Saturday, Feb. 15 at the United Center in Chicago. The eight-player field for the two-round, timed shooting competition also includes Davis Bertans of the Washington Wizards, Devonte’ Graham of the Charlotte Hornets, Buddy Hield of the Sacramento Kings, Zach LaVine of the Chicago Bulls and Duncan Robinson of the Miami Heat. The 34th MTN DEW 3-Point Contest is part of State Farm® All-Star Saturday Night, which also features the Taco Bell® Skills Challenge and AT&T Slam Dunk.  All-Star Saturday Night will air live on TNT and ESPN Radio in the United States at 8 p.m. ET.  NBA All-Star 2020 will reach fans in more than 200 countries and territories in more than 40 languages. The 2020 MTN DEW 3-Point Contest features a new look with the addition of two shots in the “MTN DEW Zone” – two locations positioned equidistant between the traditional racks at the top of the 3-point arc and the adjacent “wing” rack.  Each of the two ball pedestals in the MTN DEW Zone is located 6 feet behind the 3-point line and holds one special green ball, the “3-Ball.”  Shots made with the green ball are worth three points.  Click here for a diagram showing the location of the MTN DEW Zone.      In addition to the two new shots, the MTN DEW 3-Point Contest will continue to have five main shooting locations – four racks containing four official NBA game balls (each worth one point) and one multicolored “money” ball (worth two points) as well as one special “all money ball” rack.  Every ball on the all money ball rack, which each participant can place at any of the five traditional shooting locations, is worth two points. With the addition of the MTN DEW Zone, the number of balls in a round has increased to 27 from 25, the amount of time in a round has expanded to 70 seconds (1:10) from 60 seconds (1:00) and the maximum possible score in a round has risen to 40 points from 34 points.  The three competitors with the highest scores in the first round advance to the championship round.  The player with the highest score in the championship round is the winner of the 2020 MTN DEW 3-Point Contest.  Click here for a complete explanation of the rules. Here is a closer look at the 2020 MTN DEW 3-Point Contest participants: • Davis Bertans, Wizards (1st appearance): In his first season with Washington, the 6-10 forward from Latvia is fourth in the NBA in 3-pointers made per game (3.6) and leads the league in catch-and-shoot 3-pointers made per game (3.1).  Bertans is shooting 42.9 percent from beyond the arc, which ranks 10th in the NBA and is identical to his full-season mark with the San Antonio Spurs last season. • Devonte’ Graham, Hornets (1st appearance): Playing his second NBA season, Graham ranks fourth in the league in 3-pointers made with 176.  He was selected to play for the U.S. Team in NBA Rising Stars on Friday, Feb. 14 during NBA All-Star 2020 in Chicago.   • Joe Harris, Nets (2nd appearance): Last year, Harris became the second NBA G League veteran to win the 3-Point Contest, joining 2009 champion Daequan Cook.  Harris, who led the NBA in 3-point field goal percentage last season, is shooting better than 40.0 percent from beyond the arc (40.5) for the third consecutive season. • Buddy Hield, Kings (2nd appearance): Hield was one of three players to reach the final round in the 2019 MTN DEW 3-Point Contest, along with Harris and the Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry.  In his fourth NBA season, Hield has made the third-most 3-pointers in the league with 186. • Zach LaVine, Bulls (1st appearance): LaVine has already set a career high for 3-pointers made in a season with 154.  A two-time AT&T Slam Dunk champion (2015 and 2016), LaVine is seeking to become the first player to win both the Slam Dunk and the 3-Point Contest. • Damian Lillard, Trail Blazers (3rd appearance): Lillard, who earned his fifth NBA All-Star selection this season, ranks third in the NBA in scoring (29.8 ppg) and second in 3-pointers made (192).  In his last six games, Lillard has averaged 48.8 points and 8.2 3-pointers made per game and shot 57.0 percent from beyond the arc.   • Duncan Robinson, Heat (1st appearance): The undrafted Robinson ranks fifth in the NBA in 3-pointers made (165) and sixth in 3-point field goal percentage (43.9) in his second season.  An NBA G League veteran, Robinson tied a Miami franchise record by making 10 3-pointers against Atlanta on Dec. 10. • Trae Young, Hawks (1st appearance): The NBA’s fifth-leading scorer (29.2 ppg) has made the same number of 3-pointers in 46 games this season as he did in 81 games last season (156).  In his second season, Young was named a starter for the NBA All-Star Game and a participant for the U.S. Team in NBA Rising Stars.    .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2020