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Fundamental differences

Heading into Game One of the West Finals, fans had ample reason to believe it would be a humdinger and indicative of how tightly fought the entire series would be. After all, the Rockets boasted of the league’s best record, with a formidable roster that general manager Daryl Morey assembled precisely to take the measure […] The post Fundamental differences appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource: bworldonline bworldonlineMay 15th, 2018

Fundamental differences

Heading into Game One of the West Finals, fans had ample reason to believe it would be a humdinger and indicative of how tightly fought the entire series would be. After all, the Rockets boasted of the league’s best record, with a formidable roster that general manager Daryl Morey assembled precisely to take the measure […] The post Fundamental differences appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMay 15th, 2018

Duterte fails to unite warring PDP-Laban factions

Following a five-hour meeting between President Duterte and members of the fragmented Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan last Thursday evening, the two factions – led by Sen. Aquilino Pimentel III and lawyer Rogelio Garcia – have yet to reconcile their differences. Source link link: Duterte fails to unite warring PDP-Laban factions.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Duterte fails to unite warring PDP-Laban factions

Following a five-hour meeting between President Duterte and members of the fragmented Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan last Thursday evening, the two factions – led by Sen. Aquilino Pimentel III and lawyer Rogelio Garcia – have yet to reconcile their differences......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Warring PDP-Laban factions to meet again in September

Another meeting of feuding groups within the ruling Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan has been set next month to hash out their differences......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Koreas extend conciliatory steps to Asian Games

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — With the Koreas, there's no separating their sports from their politics. The war-separated rivals will take their reconciliation steps to the Asian Games in Jakarta and Palembang, Indonesia, where they will jointly march in the opening ceremony and field combined teams in basketball, rowing and canoeing. "Sports have played the role of peacemaker between the Koreas," said Kim Seong-jo, vice chairman of South Korea's Olympic committee and the country's chef de mission at the Asian Games. "If the combined teams put out good performances and win medals, that would be putting the cherry on the top." North and South Korea have used sports diplomacy this year in a bid to decrease animosity and initiate a new round of global diplomatic efforts to resolve the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang. South Korea leaders consider goodwill gestures as crucial to keep the positive atmosphere alive for what could become a long and difficult attempt to persuade the North to give up its nuclear and missile programs. There's not much Seoul can do beyond such gestures, though, as joint economic projects are out of the question when lifting sanctions against North Korea is far beyond the South's control. The more substantial discussions on the North's denuclearization — including what, when and how it would occur— are always going to be between Washington and Pyongyang. Here's a look at what the Koreas are planning for the Asian Games and their ebbs and flows in sports diplomacy: ___ BLUE FLAGS AND COMBINED TEAMS In the opening ceremony in Jakarta, athletes from North and South Korea will parade together under the flag featuring a blue map that symbolized a unified Korean Peninsula. It will be virtual repeat of the joint march during February's Winter Olympics in the South Korean ski resort of Pyeongchang, minus the gloves, parkas and fur hats. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent hundreds of athletes, artists and government officials to the Pyeongchang Olympics. The Koreas also fielded their first combined Olympic team in women's ice hockey, which drew passionate support from crowds despite losing all five of its games with a combined score of 28-2. At the Asian Games, the Koreas will be expected to deliver more than just feel-good stories. There's pressure for the investment to yield gold. A group of 34 North Korean athletes, coaches and officials have been in South Korea since last month for combined teams in women's basketball and the men's and women's events in rowing and canoeing. Coach Lee Moon-kyu, who has retained a core of South Korean players who won gold at the 2014 Asian Games at home in Incheon, got a first-hand look at North Korean players during exhibitions in Pyongyang in early July. Lee later picked three North Korean players for the Asian Games squad, including center Ro Suk Yong. Lee will also have a North Korean assistant coach on his bench. The Koreans will face Taiwan, Indonesia, Kazakhstan and India in their preliminary group. South Korean forward Lim Yung-hui said the chemistry between the players has been improving. "The Northern players share the same goal of the gold medal and we talk a lot about how we should be putting out a good performance there," Lim said. "We weren't given much time, but we are practicing hard in a positive atmosphere." The Koreas will field combined teams in dragon boat events in canoeing and the lightweight men's four, lightweight men's eight and lightweight women's double sculls in rowing. If a combined team wins gold, athletes on the podium will hear the traditional folk song of "Arirang,"used in both Koreas as an unofficial anthem for peace, instead of their respective national anthems. The Korean athletes are likely to become an attraction at the Asian Games, where the international media will follow closely. At the Pyeongchang Olympics, South Korean figure skater Kam Alex Kang-chan created a media frenzy by taking a selfie with North Korea's Kim Ju Sik and posting it on Instagram. The photo recalled a famous 2016 selfie taken by two North and South Korean gymnasts at the Rio Olympics which International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described as a "great gesture." ___ THEY DON'T ALWAYS PLAY NICE The Koreas have a history of using sports to foster diplomacy since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. The 1991 world table tennis championships in Japan were the first time the Koreas fielded a combined team at a major international event. The atmosphere wasn't always friendly, though. During the height of their Cold War rivalry and recurring periods of animosity since, sports often became an alternate political battlefield. North Korean athletes and coaches would reject handshakes with their South Korean competitors and berate South Korean reporters during news conferences. The sports detente of 1991 evaporated when a North Korean athlete who competed at the world judo championships in Barcelona defected and arrived in South Korea amid heavy media coverage. North Korea boycotted the 1986 Asian Games and the '88 Summer Olympics in Seoul, and relations dramatically worsened on the eve of the Seoul Olympics with the bombing of a South Korean passenger jet that killed all 115 aboard in December 1987. The inter-Korean warmth heading into this year's Asian Games contrasts with the awkwardness between the rivals surrounding the 2014 Asiad held in South Korea. Seoul's then-conservative government invited North Korean athletes to compete, but made it clear it had no interest in joint marches or combined teams. North Korean subsequently withdrew an offer to send its all-female cheering squad to Incheon after squabbling with the hosts over costs. North Korean leader Kim did send a senior government delegation to the closing ceremony, but they returned home without meeting then-South Korean President Park Geun-hye. The North was still seething over the Asian Game treatment years later as it gleefully observed Park's presidency crashing over a corruption scandal. "The Park Geun-hye group's mad confrontational racket is to blame for why (the North Korean) visit to Incheon did not result in improved relations," the North said in a statement in April last year. ___ WILL THE GOOD TIMES LAST? Kim has found a willing counterpart in Moon, a liberal who won the presidential by-elections to replace Park last year. Since the Pyeongchang Olympics, Kim has met Moon twice and leveraged the summits to get to U.S. President Donald Trump. After their June summit in Singapore, Kim and Trump issued a vague aspirational goal for a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula without describing specific plans. Sports exchanges and other goodwill gestures are important policy tools for Moon, who wants Seoul to be in the "driver's seat" in international efforts to deal with Pyongyang. The Koreas have also agreed to resume temporary reunions between relatives separated by the war and are holding military talks to reduce tensions across their heavily armed border. "Hopefully, (the Asian Games) will provide an opportunity to use sports to facilitate diplomacy and cooperation," Moon said while meeting Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi in Seoul last month. Seoul's presidential office hasn't announced yet whether Moon would attend the opening ceremony in Jakarta on Aug. 18. Whatever happens in Indonesia or with nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang, the Koreas will always have those heartening selfies posted by athletes. "Sports can be used to build momentum and trust, but they don't solve fundamental problems," said Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University and a policy adviser to Moon. "There's not much South Korea can currently do, but at least it's trying to actively do the things it can to keep the positive atmosphere alive. ".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Sharon Duterte fan, Kiko staunch critic

OPPOSITION Senator Francis “Kiko” Pangilinan admitted that he and wife actress Sharon Cuneta has political differences as she supports the administration of President Rodrigo Duterte. But Pangilinan was quick to deny that this has affected their relationship. He said in the long years of being married, they have learned to….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Docile or hostile?: ‘Domestication’ genes found in foxes

A six-decade breeding experiment with foxes designed to shed light on how wolves became dogs has led to the discovery of genes that favor tame or aggressive behavior, scientists said Monday. Comparing the sequenced genomes of foxes selected across 50 generations for their friendliness towards people with another group bred for hostility uncovered dozens of telltale differences, including one gene in particular, they reported in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. "We were able to show that a specific gene" --- known as SorCS1 --- "does have an effect on behavior, making foxes more tame," lead author Anna Kukekova, an assistant professor at the University of Illinois, to...Keep on reading: Docile or hostile?: ‘Domestication’ genes found in foxes.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

IOC disappointed UN won’t grant North Korea sports exemption

LAUSANNE, Switzerland --- IOC President Thomas Bach says he is disappointed the United Nations will not allow sports equipment to be sent to North Korea. The International Olympic Committee's request was rejected by the U.N. Security Council Sanctions Committee. Bach says "this makes it more difficult for the IOC to accomplish its mission to bring athletes from all over the world together to promote understanding and friendship regardless of political background or any other differences." In a statement, Bach added that "it is all the more disappointing because the exemption asked for the easing of restrictions on sporting equipment only for a very limited number of athlet...Keep on reading: IOC disappointed UN won’t grant North Korea sports exemption.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

The Sotto TakeDown Request : A Press Freedom Issue

THE FUNDAMENTAL mandate of a free press is to provide fair, accurate and relevant information in furtherance of the right of the people to know, so that they can make intelligent decisions about th.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 7th, 2018

Prescription for disturbed/contaminated soil

By: Edgar Mana-ay THE thin mixture of weathered rock and organic material below our feet is Earth’s most fundamental resource. We step on it, live on it, and through, it we produce much of our food. Soil supports forest growth, which gives us essential products, including paper and wood. Soil material, organisms within the soil, and […] The post Prescription for disturbed/contaminated soil appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

Choosing Time or Money: Fourth step to being your best 

(Fourth of a series) Choosing between time or money is a common dilemma that seems to confront most people. Do you feel like you don't have a choice, like you're a victim of the pressures of time?What is your relationshipwith time: Is it friend or foe?Do you feel that there's just not enough time for what you need? Isit scarce, or do you have all the time you need?Isitabundant?   If these questions seem absurd to you, it's because I'm asking fundamental questions. It's like if you were a fish, do you know that you live in water? Or you just never asked the question. There is no awareness.   This is the whole point. What is your Paradigm ("framework containing th...Keep on reading: Choosing Time or Money: Fourth step to being your best .....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018

Arroyo, Alvarez tandem good for House

THE decision of Speaker Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and her predecessor Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon Alvarez to mend their differences is a cue for members of the House of Representatives to go beyond political persuasions to attain the legislative agenda of President Duterte. The House of Representatives should be ready to….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

Pangarap ko ito nung college pa lang -- Paat on national team stint

Cignal middle Mylene Paat is looking forward for her first stint with the national team. The former Adamson University star was elevated into the main 14-woman roster that will see action in the Jakarta Palembang Asian Games next month after Petron hitter Ces Molina withdrew due to an injury last Tuesday.      “Na-excite, sobrang excited ko kasi sobrang pangarap ko ‘to nung nasa college pa lang ako,” said Paat, who had 15 points in the HD Spikers’ 25-15, 22-25, 25-20, 25-18, win over Smart-Army Thursday in the Philippine Superliga Invitational battle for third. She added that playing for the tri-colors alongside the country’s best players is a dream come true. “Though, college talaga ako nag-start mag-volleyball sobrang nilu-look up ko ‘yung mga players sa national team,” Paat said. Paat, actually, got a call up for the national squad back in 2015 for the Asian U-23 Championship held in Manila but differences with her college team and the then-newly formed national squad under Roger Gorayeb barred her from suiting up alongside the likes of Alyssa Valdez and Jaja Santiago.     “Naudlot lang kasi nagka-misunderstanding ‘yung Adamson tsaka ‘yung magiging coach ng Under 23 Pool,” she recalled. Given a second chance, Paat was one the most dedicated players that heeded the call of the Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. She was present in almost all of the scheduled national team tryouts last May. Her talent and sacrifice didn’t go unnoticed as she was named in the 20-woman national pool under head coach Shaq Delos Santos.     “’Yung pagpasok ko sa pool sobrang blessing na ‘yun sa akin parang sabi ko ito na ‘yung umpisa ng paghihirap na ginawa ko, lahat ng pagpupursigeng ginawa ko,” she said. Fate again smiled on Paat. “And then, biglang binalita sa akin na ako nga daw ‘yung papalit kay Ate Ces sabi ko sobrang na-excite ako kasi first time ko mapunta sa pool tapos first time ko rin mapabilang sa Top 14,” said Paat, who was called to replace Molina after the Blaze Spiker suffered a stress fracture on her shin. Now part of the country’s representative to the quadrennial continental sports meet, Paat wants to prove that she deserved her spot. “Kailangan lang talaga mag-focus kasi siyempre yung mga kasabayan ko doon alam naman nating mga star ‘yung nandoon so kailangan ko makipagsabayan sa kung ano mang ability na meron sila,” she said. “Kailangan ko magsipag talaga at magpurisge para makasabay ako kahit papaano.”   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 26th, 2018

Chance for modernization and social justice for the Philippines

There are many indicators and elements for modernization for a country such as the Philippines. Some would look at infrastructure like high-rise buildings. Others look at education while others will look at media development. But a fundamental change promoting modernization for any country is agrarian reform. This is what Taiwan and South Korea implemented as […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJul 25th, 2018

PVL: UP transferee at the forefront of AU’s offensive might

As at it was in the last season NCAA finals between Arellano University and eventual champion University of Perpetual Help, Christian dela Paz, 20, is again leading the offensive drive of the Chiefs in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference.      The 20-year-old former UP Fighting Maroon sizzled with 24 points in Arellano’s debut in the PVL Saturday against Adamson University to underscore the leading role he is to take again on his third year with the Chiefs.    To set the record straight, the soft-spoken hotel & restaurant management student from Parang, Marikina, Rizal, said he left the UP squad because of differences with the coach, not because of the lack of playing time. Standing five-foot-nine, dela Paz, one of superstar Marck Espejo’s teammates in Sta. Elena High School in Marikina, leaps so high he can outsmart the taller blockers on the other side of the court whether he is near or far from the net.   Stories to tell     Dela Paz takes understandable pride in Espejo’s phenomenal rise and singular achievements in the sport being products of the same town. He relishes telling and retelling how dominant a player the multi-awarded former Ateneo Blue Eagle was as early as then and where their high school team was competing.  Middle blocker Christian Segovia, 24, Demmy Lapuz, 19, and Kim Tan, 18, who help ease dela Paz’s scoring load, also have interesting stories to share.       Segovia, born and bred in Tondo and studying HRM as well, says in Filipino: “I should have been playing for FEU, not with Arellano. I was already listed on the FEU team barely a week before the UAAP opened. My mother, already frustrated with my poor grades, got wind of it and immediately pulled me out of the team.       “I was transferred to Arellano where I earned good grades that pleased my mother. I got back into volleyball and showed her I could balance sport and studies this time around. Now, my mother, grandmother and three siblings are always watching my games.”     Yolanda survivor    Lapuz says he had an auspicious beginning with the Chiefs. He was already a starter on his rookie year when Arellano reached the finals against Perpetual last year.      This Tacloban City native was in third year high school when Typhoon Yolanda battered his place of birth in November 2013.       He recalls the ordeal in Filipino, “We were lucky to be living in a subdivision on a mountain slope. The roof of the house was blown away but we survived. The great destruction and the stench of death all around us was one experience everyone should not be subjected to.”       Learning and enjoying volleyball in his physical education classes in UDM had, according to Tan, weaned him away from basketball. The same school gave him his first training in volleyball; he became competent at it.       Higher tuition fees drove his family to seek other schools for him. He enrolled in NU and stayed there without playing volleyball for three years until his barkada in Arellano convinced him to try out for a spot on their varsity team.       He tried out and was taken in. Only a rookie, he started for the Chiefs in their first PVL game, making him a shoo-in for Arellano’s NCAA squad next season.       The other members of the Arellano Chiefs are Roi Domingo, setter Edmark Meneses, Adrian Villados, Tonell Arellano, Jethro Cabillan, Joshua Esguerra, Junnel Cacam, Jesrael Liberato and Evo Rinon        .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

Global peace network seeks continuation of GRP-NDF talks amidst escalating Duterte-Joma word war

The Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict urge both the GRP and NDF to continue finding constructive ways to work together in order to renew official negotiations and find joint understanding of settling their differences at the table......»»

Category: newsSource:  samarnewsRelated NewsJul 21st, 2018

Philippines Senate, House agree on Bangsamoro Law

MANILA: A bicameral committee of the Senate and House of Representatives finally threshed out their differences and agreed to pass the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) which could lead to its si.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

PBA: San Miguel players sent home early to prepare for Game 4

ANTIPOLO, RIZAL -- The San Miguel Beermen simply lost the will to win in Game 3 of the best-of-five Commissioner's Cup. Pair that with the Alaska Aces' infinite source of energy, it resulted to a Game 4 on Sunday at the Big Dome. Beermen head coach Leo Austria seems to agree with the premise, as he sent home his players ten minutes after the final buzzer to aid them in their recovery for Sunday's big game, which could spell either another conquest of the Aces or a winner-take-all Game 5. Austria knew it was do-or-die for Alaska this time around, but their opponents' energy, motivated by their desire to extend the series, proved to be the difference Friday evening. "In terms of energy, wala talaga kaming energy kanina. It's hard to win all games eh. Considering na Alaska ang kalaban namin, alam namin na this third game na, their backs are against the wall. Ibibigay nila ang lahat ng makakaya nila, and it happens. But on our part, we did not play our game. We played their game. Outhustled kami, outplayed," the multi-titled coach explained. The coach credited Alaska's heart at the Ynares Sports Center, pointing out the most glaring differences in the game: second chance-points and field goal attempts. Alaska scored 33 second-chance points to SMB's 16, while the Aces attempted 103 field goals to the Beermen's 82. "It is a wake-up call for us, because it is an opportunity na hindi namin put into waste. Sabi ko sa kanila, hindi na kailangan ng another conference to recover and to recharge and to regroup, so we still are in a position na may advantage." What also was noticeable in the game was the benching of Renaldo Balkman, who rode the pine for the last eight minutes of the game. The coach explained that he wanted to prevent any sort of injury to the former New York Knick, as his team failed to respond to the Aces' vicious offensive and defensive attack. "He's playing around 42 minutes per game and ngayon lang siya bumaba ng kaunti, which is 37. So I think he needs rest that time dahil for you to come back dahil it requires a lot of energy to pressure, hustle, to rebound, lahat gagawin mo and we're trying to avoid na something might happen, baka mamaya kakapwersa niya, ma-injure pa siya or ganyan." "So I think that's the right thing to do for some of the players to taste some precious playing time for them." The tactician also admitted that overconfidence had crept to their minds, but they were given a rude awakening by their second-seeded opponents by way of an emphatic 21-point victory. Could it be the Aces' last gasp? Austria hopes so, pointing out the team's virtual twice-to-beat advantage for the rest of the series. "We will try to watch what happened tonight and I hope na we come out next game na talagang full of energy. I think na energy-wise, wala talaga kaming energy kanina. I don't know kung nakatulong ba yung 3 days off prior to this game." __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

CA upholds PAL policy on flight attendants retirement age

Invoking 'biological differences,' the Court of Appeals (CA) has upheld the policy of Philippine Airlines (PAL) of having different compulsory retirement ages for its male and female flig.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 19th, 2018

Formula E paves way for electric cars on and off racetrack

By Terrin Waack, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Unplug and go. Filling up a car is as simple as that, even if it's not gas flowing through the nozzle. Electricity is efficient. Formula E, a global electric auto racing series, steers the way — toward the future of not only its sport but also its industry. "You don't realize it," Mahindra Racing team principal Dilbagh Gill said, "but the second car from today that you're going to buy is going to be an electric car." America is one of Formula E's biggest targets. So, for the second consecutive time since the series' inception in 2014, Formula E took on the Brooklyn streets for a season-finale doubleheader of its 12-race schedule. The track length is 2.373 kilometers with Lower Manhattan in the backdrop as well as the Statue of Liberty. Techeetah's Jean-Eric Vergne became the fourth different driver to win the championship and Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler took home the overall team title. Confetti at the finish line marked the end of an era. In January, Formula E unveiled its new Gen2 car for next season. The current cars have a maximum power of 200kW, limited to 180kW during races, and they top out at 225 kph (140 mph). This model has been around since the series started and requires a mid-race car change because the battery runs out. The Gen2 car will run faster and longer. No more swaps. Performance has basically been doubled in just four years without changing the battery's fundamental chemistry. "I don't know if you remember before Formula E started, there was this whole perception that lithium batteries were a little bit dangerous — they were prohibited on airplanes, they caught fire on mobile phones," Panasonic Jaguar Racing sporting manager Gary Ekerold said. "Since we've run Formula E ... absolutely fine. Batteries are proven to be safe." But they're still monitored. A dielectric — non-conductor — fluid in the battery keeps it cool while the car runs. There's also a battery management system that constantly records data, monitoring temperature and voltage. When the car is charging, dry-ice blowers — Super Chillers — connect to the car and prevent overheating. It takes less than an hour to recharge a drained battery. "It's going to start reaching a stage where the time it takes to fill up your gas — 4 minutes and 40 seconds on average — is going to be the time it takes to charge your car," Gill said. Teams are given identical batteries. The chassis, or bodies, of the cars are also the same. Where teams can get creative are places such as the electric motor, inverter, powertrain and gearbox. Manufacturers get involved here. Everyday car names occupy pit lane. Audi and Jaguar already have teams. Nissan and BMW will next season. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche are joining for season six. "This is like a playground for them," Mahindra Racing driver Feliz Rosenqvist said. "When you get to the competitive side, you can always find new ways that maybe you wouldn't do on a normal car. You push the software and hardware." The steering wheel, which has a programmable screen, is also fair game. Things can get technical when the car gets broken down into specific parts and technology is thrown into the mix. But the basics remain: Energy is how far. Power is how fast. "It's still a racing car," Panasonic Jaguar Racing driver Mitch Evans said. "It looks like a racing car. It drives like a racing car." It just doesn't sound like the normal racing car. The roar of a combustion engine is missing. "That's normally like a sensor for your driving — how quick you're going, how you hear the revs — and now you can only hear the wind," Rosenqvist said. "It's more like riding a bike. As you increase your speed, you just start hearing wind." To spectators, the whizzing equates to an amplified toy car, go-kart or scooter. All electric, of course. It's not that disruptive to the public. Electric cars are the way of the future. They're already racing on city streets. They go rain or shine — only stop for thunder or lightning. And they're much better for the environment. "Your whole life runs on a battery," Gill said. "The time is now.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018