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Fujifilm PH President: Learn to Adapt to Change

Fujifilm PH President: Learn to Adapt to Change.....»»

Category: techSource: thestandard thestandardOct 11th, 2018

Oladipo, Sabonis helping Pacers move forward

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com INDIANAPOLIS – Victor Oladipo has a fever and the only prescription is ... no, not more cowbell. Cowbell might make sense, if you factor in Oladipo’s love of and commitment to music (his debut R&B album has been available since Oct. 6). But the fever currently afflicting Oladipo, shooting guard for the Indiana Pacers, has nothing to do with extracurriculars and everything to do with the odes and anthems he’s been performing within the confines of 94 feet by 50 feet. If the fifth-year guard out of Indiana University, by way of the Orlando Magic and Oklahoma City Thunder, looks comfortable in his new star turn for the Pacers, well, just remember that’s your word. Not his. “You could say I’m comfortable with the people here,” says Oladipo, who spent three seasons with the Hoosiers before becoming the No. 2 pick in the 2013 NBA Draft. “I played in front of these fans, they mean a lot to me and I gave a lot to them just like they gave a lot to me while I was in college. “But I’m never comfortable in any situation I’m in. I will never be comfortable. That’s what kind of makes me get up and work every day. It’s like, never be satisfied. Because for some reason, ever since I was a little kid, I always wanted more.” Oladipo’s eyes just about glow after a weekend practice as he delves into his unflagging intensity. He doesn’t undercut it with a smile or a token laugh. This is real heat. “Maximize my talent and exhaust my potential,” he says. “In order to do that, I’ve got to come to work every day. That’s my thought process. Wake up each day and be great that day.” Each day would include tonight, when Oladipo will share center stage at Bankers Life Fieldhouse with the more decorated and once-beloved star who preceded him in the Pacers lineup. Paul George, a four-time All-Star and Olympic gold medalist during his seven seasons in Indiana, was due to face his old team for the first time since being traded to Oklahoma City in July. It was a parting necessitated by George, who had made clear his desire to sign a maximum-salary contract with the Los Angeles Lakers in the summer of 2018. But the trade was orchestrated by Kevin Pritchard, the Pacers’ president of basketball operations, and Chad Buchanan, their general manager, who surprised the NBA by swapping George to OKC for Oladipo and big man Domantas Sabonis. You want intense? The initial reaction to that deal was intensely negative, quickly reaching hysterical proportions. The Pacers immediately were mocked for having traded George for nickels on the dollar. Reports out of Boston characterized Indiana’s POBO as more of a bobo for allegedly spurning a Celtics’ offer of multiple players and draft picks. *Takes a well deserved nap for 3 hours ** Opens Twitter: pic.twitter.com/xWNYaVfKTy — Myl3s Turn3r (@Original_Turner) July 1, 2017 The west is sick!!!! Best conference in the world!!!! — Patrick Beverley (@patbev21) July 1, 2017 Vic to the Pacers?! He might as well run for governor while he's at it! — Cody Zeller (@CodyZeller) July 1, 2017 Former Thunder star Kevin Durant called the move “shocking” and of George said “Indiana just gave him away.” Among much of the media that covers the league, there was a general feeling of “rubes” afoot -- that the Pacers had been snookered in taking back an overpaid ($21 million annually through 2020-21) second-tier talent and an overbilled guy who had disappeared in OKC’s postseason. And now? Not so much on any of those fronts. ‘He knows how good he is’ George’s stats are down in the “OK3” core he’s formed with reigning Kia MVP Russell Westbrook and aging Carmelo Anthony. The Thunder (12-13) are the NBA’s consensus disappointment, team category, with nearly a third of their season in the books. Sabonis has boosted the Pacers off the bench in a half dozen ways. And Oladipo has all but earned himself a spot on the Eastern Conference All-Star team while speeding his new team’s fans past their heartbreak over George’s jilting. Generally, the best trades in sports are win-win, but for Indiana right now, a bit of win-lose has made the start of 2017-18 downright sublime. “We happened to really like Sabonis in the draft,” former Pacers president and ongoing consultant Donnie Walsh said last week. “We wanted more of everything in the trade too. But when it came down to it, we had this offer with Oladipo, who we also liked. They’ve come in here and the more they’ve been here, the more we like ‘em. We’re happy.” The Pacers also are 16-11, two weeks ahead in the victory column over their 42-40 finish last season that was good for a playoff berth. Oladipo is the biggest reason why, averaging more points per game (24.5) than George ever has. The 6'4" guard who attended famous DeMatha High in Hyattsville, Md., spent much of last season being beaten up for his contract and negligible impact in Oklahoma City. He had taken grief earlier for his status as the second pick in 2013, a lofty status not of his doing. And here he was again in the summer, hearing it all over again for a transaction he didn’t design. “He came in with a chip [on his shoulder],” Pacers coach Nate McMillan said. “I thought he should come in with a chip.” Some would have flinched from the pressure. A few might have curled up, full blown fetal. Oladipo has gone entirely the other way. “His confidence is at an all-time high,” backup point guard Cory Joseph said. “He knows how good he is.” As Joseph spoke after the Pacers’ upset of Cleveland Friday, a game in which Oladipo scored 20 of his game-high 33 points in the third quarter, a lilting voice drifted from behind the scenes in the home dressing room. “Look at it right now, he’s singing in the shower,” Joseph said, tilting his head and laughing. “He’s confident. You guys are all in here, he’s just singing. He’s a confident guy. Everybody in this locker room, everybody in this organization definitely welcomes that.” Trade not driving Oladipo’s breakout season Don’t misunderstand. The critics still are out for Oladipo. “My mom told me yesterday I need to work on my free throws,” he said with an eye roll after practice Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). She had noticed, during her son’s run of big games in December -- 36 points at Toronto, 27 vs. Chicago, 33 against the Cavs the night before her chiding text -- that he had missed 18-of-31 foul shots. This, by a career 80 percent shooter from the line. “I’m over that,” Oladipo said. “I’m not going to miss no more. I’ll make ‘em next time. And if I miss ‘em, I’ll make ‘em the next. If that’s my problem right now, I think I can fix it.” Twenty-four hours later, Oladipo took 13 free throws against Denver and made 11. He scored 47 points in all, hitting 15-of-28 shots and half of his 12 three-pointers. The comeback victory in OT got the Pacers to 4-for-4 on their six-game homestand and continued to shrink whatever chip it was that the 25-year-old was shouldering. “In the beginning of the year, I said, ‘I don’t have a chip. I have a brick house on my back,’” Oladipo said. But not anymore, right, now that some folks are referring to it as “the Victor Oladipo trade” rather than “the Paul George trade?” “That’s what I feel like every morning, no matter what’s going on,” he said. “I don’t even think about the trade, honestly. It’s in the past for me. People’s opinions are going to be there whether you like it or not. From the outside looking in, I guess you could say [then] that was a great trade for OKC. That’s what they believed. But it wasn’t going to change the way I worked. It wasn’t going to change my approach.” This step up in status is considered perhaps the most difficult an NBA player can make. Suddenly, opposing coaches are X&O-ing him to death. The player dogging him up and down the court is the other guys’ best defender. Often, they’ll send double-teams to get the ball into one of his teammates’ hands. “He hadn’t had that,” McMillan said. “When he was in OKC, the game plan was focused on Westbrook. When he was in Orlando, he was just a young player. Now he is seeing the defenders like a LeBron [James], like a [DeMar] DeRozan, what these stars are seeing. He’s seeing the best defenders and he’s seeing teams game-plan to take him out. “Learning how to play and be consistent every night with that challenge is something he’s going through.” Oladipo’s quick success with the Pacers has kept any crowd critics at bay. They were pre-disposed to like him just as their rebound date after George, but had he underperformed, Oladipo’s service time in Bloomington wouldn’t have protected him for long from criticism. But now, it’s George who likely will get the harsh reception. Oladipo, overtly after each of the recent victories, has made it clear to the home fans via some emphatic pointing and body language that the Fieldhouse happens to be his house. “I don’t say it, they say it,” he said. “I just do the gesture and they do the rest of the work for me. I let them do all the talking. We feed off them -- when they’re into it, we play better. I don’t know why, that’s just how basketball’s always been. They’re our sixth man and we need ‘em every night.” Oladipo’s breakout season has been bolstered, too, by the Pacers’ second-through-15th men. Those who already were in Indy knew how valuable George was at both ends. Those who, like Oladipo and Sabonis, were new this season were within their rights to be as skeptical as the national headlines of the guys coming in trade. Go-to guy emerges for Pacers OKC was a specific challenge, Oladipo having to learn on the fly how to fit his own darting, ball-heavy style to only the second man in NBA history to average a triple-double. Westbrook’s usage was off the charts, rendering the other Thunder players to supporting cast whether suited to that role or not. Just like that, Oladipo had to catch and shoot as someone to get Westbrook into double digits in assists. It wasn’t his nature and it made for an individually forgettable season. “I had a role. I tried to play that role to the best of my ability. And I improved certain areas of my game in that role,” was all he’d say Saturday, stiffly, about the OKC experience. Said Walsh: “I felt like he was going to get a different opportunity here. ... When he got to Oklahoma City, he was playing wih a guy who was averaging a triple-double. And he liked Russell Westbrook. But he comes here, he’s got an opportunity to be ‘our guy.’ “I think he might have been looking for that. I never asked him. He’s a really cool guy. He knows what he wants to be, I think.” Oladipo needed this and the Pacers needed him to need it. With George gone, they were like a smile missing a front tooth. The other teeth weren’t just going to move up in the pecking order -- no matter how good young big man Myles Turner is -- and replace the one they’d lost. If they were going to have any success this season, if McMillan was going to be able to coach and adjust in his second year taking over for Frank Vogel, the players needed to fill their roles and welcome this new addition. That’s why this tale of Oladipo’s growing success is about what the Pacers have done for him, as much as it is what he’s done for them. “We didn’t really present it like that,” McMillan said, “because we were still trying to develop who our ‘go-to guy’ was. He has been slowly taking on that role through the things he’s done. I haven’t had to say anything. He’s making good decisions with the ball. And the guys are getting a feel for what we’re doing down the stretch because we’ve had some success, and we’ve had it with Victor having the ball.” Chemistry change for Pacers There might be NBA teams with chemistry as solid as the Pacers’ right now, but it’s hard to imagine there are any with better. It’s more than mere relief that someone has stepped up, easing their own loads a bit. It is a genuine eagerness for Oladipo to max out, for each of the rest of them to do the same in whatever lane they’re riding. “Vic’s been everything at this point,” Turner said. “He’s done a great job of stepping up and being that guy, being that dude. It’s amazing to have that when you’re going through a situation where it’s a brand-new team. We’re still learning each other and he’s showing that he’s ready.” Did Turner know this would happen and, if so, when? “First couple days he started texting me in the summertime,” the big man said. “I saw what his mindset was, and I loved it from the jump. He carried that right in when we started playing pickup this summer. “Vic’s been traded, what, [two] times? He finally comes back home and he has a team that’s telling him to go, telling him to be him. I don’t think he had that with his former teams. Now that he’s here and he’s doing that, I’m pretty sure he’s [enjoying it].” Said Joseph: “He’s been a beast for us and he’s going to continue to be a beast for us. ... He’s been running with that opportunity and opening eyes around the world.” Even strong-willed, uber-confident Lance Stephenson, has backed up for Oladipo. “There’s no hate, know what I mean?” he said over the weekend. “Some guys get mad about somebody doing good. This team wants its teammates to do good. That’s what’s going to make us even better.” Oladipo keeps referring to the other Pacers in a legit lubricating of the “no I in Indy” process. “Honestly I think it’s the personalities and the men that we have in this locker room,” he said. “My teammates are phenomenal people -- not just basketball players, phenomenal people. When you surround yourself with great people, people who sincerely care about you and your team, the chemistry just comes naturally.” Sabonis shows glimpses of success, too The other guy in the trade, Sabonis, has developed more organically, his maturation seemingly inevitable regardless of locale when you tote up his youth, his work ethic and his bloodlines (son of Hall of Famer Arvydas Sabonis). He has gone from that rookie who logged just six minutes in the Thunder’s five 2017 playoff games against Houston to an essential piece in McMillan’s rotation. “Once I got traded, I knew this was a great opportunity for me to show people what I can really do,” said Sabonis, the No. 11 pick in 2016. “I was a rookie last year. Everything was new. Here, I’m being used more at the 5. That’s more the position I’ve been used to playing my whole life.” Sabonis’ minutes are up from 20.1 in OKC to 24.6 off Indiana’s bench. His scoring has doubled from 5.9 ppg to 12.1. And his PIE rating has soared from 4.9 last season to 12.6, a sign of the versatility the skilled big man possesses. “I love Sabonis,” Walsh said. “His father was one of the greatest players in the world, so I don’t like that comparison -- it kills him. He [Domantas] is just more of everything you think he is. He’s stronger than you think. He can shoot the ball better. He’s got good hands, he can catch the ball. I’ve seen him make moves in game that I’ve never seen him make in practice.” Said Turner: “I played against Domas in college -- I knew what kind of player he was. I was excited when we got him. He’s gotten bigger and stronger since then, obviously, and he just didn’t have a chance to show himself last year. But he’s been big for us now, especially when I was out with the concussion. He stepped up huge in that role and we’ve played well since then.” The Pacers are playing faster this season, up from 18th in pace last season to 10th now, part of their improvement from 15th in offensive rating (106.2) to 6th (108.3). They’re doing better, too, in contesting shots and throttling opponents’ field-goal accuracy. The biggest reason why has been Oladipo’s blossoming. Whether due to the sunshine of new, happier surroundings or from that darker, more intense place, to prove cynics wrong. No one can now talk of the Pacers’ bungling of what, after all, was a deal to rent George, not to have him long-term. Fans at Bankers Life figure to boo George on his first visit back, with an inventory they haven’t needed or used on Oladipo. Some might see that as ingratitude, others as respect. It’s a little bit of love lost, too. “Look, they loved Paul when he was here,” Walsh said. “They guy is a great player. One thing I’ve always felt: These guys that play here, they always know more about what they want for their lives than we do. How you gonna argue with that? He treated us good, we treated him good. No bad blood here. I don’t know about fans.” Folks in Indy have a new crush now, one they hope lasts for a while. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 14th, 2017

Braves hire former Dodgers, Blue Jays exec Anthopoulos as GM

By Charles Odum, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — The remake of the Atlanta Braves' management was completed Monday when Alex Anthopoulos was named general manager and John Hart was removed as team president. Anthopoulos, a former Dodgers and Blue Jays executive, will have autonomy of baseball operations, giving him more power than any Braves general manager since John Schuerholz served from 1990 to 2007. Anthopoulos also was given the title of executive vice president, while Hart will assume a senior adviser role, team chairman Terry McGuirk announced at a news conference that Hart did not attend. Anthopoulos was to fly to Orlando on Monday night to represent the Braves at baseball's general managers' meetings. He spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers' vice president of baseball operations after six years as Toronto's general manager. Anthopoulos succeeds John Coppolella, who was forced to resign as general manager on Oct. 2 after an investigation by Major League Baseball disclosed rule violations committed by the Braves in the international player market. "Alex is a man of integrity and he will operate in a way that will make all of our Braves fans proud," McGuirk said. McGuirk apologized to fans "on behalf of the entire Braves family" for the scandal. "The past few months have been the toughest in the storied history of the Atlanta Braves franchise," he said. "Frankly, the Atlanta Braves have not lived up to our standard that the fans expect of us and that we expect of ourselves." McGuirk said he was told by Commissioner Rob Manfred on Monday "the investigation has been completed for some time." He said he expects to learn within two weeks what fine or other penalties the Braves will receive. When asked who made the decision for Hart to immediately hand over control of baseball operations, McGuirk said, "It just became obvious this was the right thing to do at this time, and he and I made that decision together." Hart temporarily assumed general manager duties while leading the search for Coppolella's replacement. Gordon Blakeley, the team's international scouting chief, also resigned last month following the disclosure of international scouting violations. Anthopoulos said the investigation had no impact on his interest in the Braves. "For me more than anything else, who are you going to work for and who are you going to work with?" Anthopoulos said. "Regardless of what the fallout was going to be or what the sanctions may be, that's not going to change who I'm going to go to war with day in and day out." Anthopoulos said the Braves, who opened SunTrust Park in 2017 and whose minor league organization was named the best in the game by Baseball America, are "one of the premier jobs in all of sports." "The young talent here is as good as you're going to get in the game, and even here at the big league level, you have some exciting players as well," he said. "The opportunity here, the upside, is through the roof." Braves manager Brian Snitker and former manager and current senior adviser Bobby Cox attended the news conference. Cox was part of the Braves management team that met with Anthopoulos at SunTrust Park during a break between Games 5 and 6 of the World Series. Cox said Anthopoulos was "a home run" in the interview. "He's smart as heck and a workaholic," Cox said. "I've heard that from everyone." Anthopoulos began his baseball career with the Montreal Expos as a publicity intern before moving to scouting for three years. He joined Toronto after the 2003 season as a scouting coordinator and earned a promotion to VP of baseball operations and assistant GM in 2006 before taking over as GM......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 14th, 2017

Less time, fewer timeouts among adjustments for NBA coaches

em>By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press /em> NEW YORK (AP) — Mike D’Antoni ran an offensive system known as seven seconds or less, so he likes things fast. Good thing, because NBA coaches find things come at them more quickly this season. They are losing time and timeouts, with fewer days to prepare before the regular season and fewer chances to talk things over during games. Throw in new rules legislating how they can rest players, and there are plenty of adjustments even for veteran coaches. “I think it’s good,” said D’Antoni, the NBA coach of the year with Houston last year. “Take stuff out of coaches’ hands, because we just screw it up anyway. So it’s better for the players.” Among the changes: — Next Tuesday's (Wednesday, PHL time) start is the NBA’s earliest since 1980. It’s a week earlier than normal, with the maximum number of preseason games cut from eight to six. — Timeouts are reduced from 18 to 14, with each team having seven. They will be limited to two during the last three minutes of games, instead of the previous rule that permitted three timeouts in the final two minutes. — Teams can be fined $100,000 or more for resting healthy players during national TV games, and are discouraged from resting multiple healthy players in the same game or sitting them in road games. — Halftime will be 15 minutes for all games — and the league plans to be diligent about starting the clock as soon as the first half ends. There previously was a minute or two longer for national TV games, and sometimes the clock wouldn’t start until all players had cleared the floor. That change caught the attention of D’Antoni, who noted that in some arenas there is a longer walk from the benches to the locker rooms. “So instead of showing 10 clips at halftime, you might only be able to show two or three,” D’Antoni said. Byron Spruell, the NBA’s president of league operations, said the goal wasn’t to shorten the length of games, which run about 2 hours, 15 minutes. He said the league wanted the games to have a better flow, and worked with the coaches and Competition Committee, which includes some coaches, during the summer on the changes. Spruell said coaches were fine with the removal of the under-9 minute timeouts in the second and fourth quarters, feeling they came too soon after the quarters started. There will now be two mandatory timeouts in each quarter, at the under-7 and under-3 minute marks. Even at the end of games, coaches acknowledged there were too many stoppages. “As a head coach you always want more timeouts. You want to have that flexibility at the end of the game to be able to help your team,” Miami’s Erik Spoelstra said. “But when I’m watching games, I want there to be less. I do. I want there to be less timeouts and for the games to go a little bit quicker, particularly at the end. You want to just see the action.” All timeouts will now be 75 seconds. Full timeouts were formerly 90 seconds. “Before you have the little pow-wow for a long timeout, the coaches try to get reacquainted and figure out where you’re going to eat dinner,” D’Antoni joked. “But now you’ve got to go in and actually coach.” Spruell said the league didn’t get a lot of pushback from coaches on the suggested changes, even coming around on the resting rules. “I’m just happy Adam Silver gave us some good guidelines to follow when it comes to that so we don’t feel like we’re cheating our fans,” Memphis coach David Fizdale said. “That was one good thing that came out of the coaches’ meetings, Adam Silver’s leadership on that.” Player health was one reason for the shorter preseason. By adding the extra week to the regular season, the league reduced back-to-back games and has no teams playing four in five nights for the first time. Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek said the shorter preseason wouldn’t matter to most teams, since they usually run a similar system from year to year unless there was a coaching change, and there were none. His team is different. The Knicks are largely scrapping the triangle offense they ran when Phil Jackson was president and redefining roles with leading scorer Carmelo Anthony traded. They’ve had a number of nagging injuries and may not see some combinations play together until the games count. “It’s one of those years that maybe you wish there was eight exhibition games, but it is what it is and we just have to work,” Hornacek said. There’s also a change for general managers in the form of an earlier trade deadline. Previously the Thursday (Friday, PHL time) after the All-Star Game, now it’s the Thursday (Friday, PHL time) 10 days before it. Spruell said in discussions with GMs, they felt that would benefit the traded players, who would have the break to acclimate themselves to their new cities. So there’s plenty that’s new, but Spoelstra said they will all catch on. “Whenever there’s rules changes, regardless, players or coaches, you eventually adapt and we’ll do that as well,” he said. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Magic seek better results, more wins with mostly same roster

em>By Terrance Harris, Associated Press /em> ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A disappointing season for the Orlando Magic in previous years was followed by drastic changes to the roster during the offseason. They’re taking a different approach this season. Instead of adding an impact player or trading a disappointing star, the Magic chose to follow up their fifth straight non-playoff season by not making a significant change to their roster. Even second-year coach Frank Vogel isn’t quite sure what to expect. “We will have to take a big jump if we want to consider ourselves competing for a playoff spot,” Vogel said when asked how well this season’s team is constructed for success. “We weren’t close last year and we didn’t make a bunch of changes, so the improvement has to come from within. It has to come from player development. That’s the task that has been put in front of me and that’s what I’m embracing.” The team is banking on continuity to help turnaround its fortunes. For the first time since the 2014-15 season, the Magic have a second year coach. That means the second year of Vogel’s defensive system and the continuation of the small-ball offensive scheme Vogel gave into midway through last season. And while there isn’t a superstar on the roster, Orlando returns the starting five of Elfrid Payton, Evan Fournier, Terrence Ross, Aaron Gordon and Nikola Vucevic that wrapped up last season’s 29-53 finish. The most significant additions are No. 6 overall pick Jonathan Isaac, who entered the NBA draft after a one-and-done year at Florida State, and Jonathon Simmons, a perimeter defense specialist who joined the club as a free agent from San Antonio. New president of basketball operations Jeff Weltman has defended the decision to virtually stand still and not make wholesale change to the roster. Weltman is in listen, learn and evaluate mode now. “We come in without a history with some of the organization and the players and we have to give ourselves the time to understand what it is that we have,” Weltman said. “But what our hope is is to put everybody in the best possible situation to succeed while we are making those evaluations.” __ Here are some other things to know about the Magic this season. strong>PLAYOFFS THIS YEAR? /strong>Even without doing much to improve their roster, the Magic could be on the brink of ending their five-year playoff drought. But it has much less to do with their improvement and more to do with three teams that were in the Eastern Conference playoffs last season but are now in rebuild mode. That creates an opportunity for Orlando to be the postseason chance. Atlanta, Indiana and Chicago have overhauled their rosters, opening up possibilities for teams that were on the outside of the playoff race last season like Philadelphia, Miami and Orlando. strong>PAYTON’S PLACE: /strong>There probably hasn’t been a Magic player more scrutinized than Payton. His perimeter shot isn’t consistent and his on-ball defense has left a lot to be desired. But clearly the Magic believe in Payton. A lot of that has to do with the improvement he made once Vogel shifted to the small-ball lineup last season. He had five triple doubles and averaged 13.5 points, 7.0 rebounds, 8.4 assists and 2.5 turnovers after the All-Star break. strong>BEING DEFENSIVE: /strong> Vogel is a defense-first coach but he inherited a team that was anything but that last season. The continuity of players gives the Magic a chance to be improved defensively this year. The addition of Simmons will also help. He has the athleticism to get after opponents on the perimeter like the Magic couldn’t last season. strong>PERIMETER PROBLEMS: /strong> In a league where the three-point shot has taken over, the Magic have struggled from beyond the arc. That could continue to be the case unless Gordon and Payton improve immensely and Fournier and Ross become more consistent. The Magic ranked 29th in the NBA last season in three-point shooting after making just 33 percent from long range. strong>JONATHAN ISAAC IMPACT? /strong> Isaac’s impact may not be obvious. At 6’10” and 210 pounds, the 20-year-old may not be ready to deal with the physical aspects of playing in the NBA. But his length and athletic ability gives him a chance to be a solid defender off the bench while he bulks up. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2017

New Marlins owner Jeter mum on future of Stanton, Mattingly

em>By Steve Wine, Associated Press /em> MIAMI (AP) — Back in the ballgame, Derek Jeter says he'll learn on the job as he tries to lead the Miami Marlins out of the wilderness. How Jeter expects to get there remains a secret, even after his first public comments about the Marlins since beginning his pursuit of the team nearly a year ago. The rookie owner declined to discuss his plans, and whether they include Giancarlo Stanton, Don Mattingly or even the home run sculpture at Marlins Park. 'You're trying to get me to tell you what I'm going to do?' Jeter said. 'Some things you keep private. But yeah, we do have to rebuild.' Jeter and new principal owner Bruce Sherman held a 30-minute news conference Tuesday to discuss their investment group's $1.2 billion purchase of the Marlins. Jeter shed no light on an anticipated roster shake-up following the team's eighth consecutive losing season, the longest streak in the majors, but said he'll rely heavily this offseason on president of baseball operations Michael Hill. 'I'm not coming in here thinking I know everything about team ownership. I do not,' Jeter said. 'One thing I'm good at is knowing what I do not know. I surround myself with people who are much smarter than I am. 'We have some wonderful people who are working in this organization now. We are going to add some quality people as well to help us turn this organization around.' The former New York Yankees captain attended Miami's season finale Sunday — the first time he sat in the stands since high school. Yet another Miami loss didn't change his mind, and the next day Jeter and Sherman closed on the purchase of the team from Jeffrey Loria. Jeter said he hasn't met with any players, and wouldn't address the future of Stanton, the major league home run and RBI champion. Stanton's salary will nearly double next year to $25 million, which could make him unaffordable for the revenue-challenged franchise. Loria became widely unpopular because his frugality led to constant roster turnover and lots of losing. Jeter acknowledged speculation that another payroll purge looms. 'I don't like the word teardown,' Jeter said. 'Moving forward, there are going to at times be unpopular decisions we make. We have a plan, but at the same time we have to have patience.' Jeter said he met Monday with Mattingly, his former Yankees teammate, who has two years to go on a four-year contract as manager. 'It has been a long season,' Jeter said. 'I told him to get out of here and go enjoy himself and get back to his family. We'll sit down when the time is right and evaluate everyone.' Jeter and Sherman also wouldn't discuss plans for the garish home run sculpture — loved by some, hated by many. 'I read I was getting rid of it,' said Jeter, who added that's not necessarily true. 'Every one of our partners has an opinion,' Sherman said with a smile. There are at least eight other investors. Jeter took exception to speculation that his group struggled to raise the needed money. 'It upset a lot of our investors. They have plenty of money,' he said, before smiling and adding a clarification. 'They might not have plenty of money now, but they had plenty of money.' The investment group bought a team in debt after finishing last in the NL in attendance 12 of the past 13 years. 'We have to engage the community,' said Sherman, a venture capitalist who has a home in Naples, Florida. 'With Derek's leadership, it's going to be a great opportunity to do that. It is going to be a long-term process.' Sherman has the highest equity stake at about 46 percent. Jeter has about a 4 percent stake, and he'll lead baseball and business operations as chief executive officer. Jeter, who lives in Tampa, Florida, said he'll be a hands-on owner. 'The vast majority of my time will be working for the Marlins,' he said. 'You have to be present. You have to be involved.' He spent 20 years with the Yankees and won five World Series rings before retiring in 2014, and often talked of wanting to own a ballclub. Now he does. 'I like competing,' Jeter said. 'I don't miss playing the game, but I miss being part of a team.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 4th, 2017

First-time NFL protesters explain how they became woke

The Associated Press - Football coaches warn players not to say anything that could wind up on the opposing team's bulletin board. When he set out to challenge NFL protesters, Donald Trump took the opposite tack. He put up a billboard. The president essentially called out-of-work quarterback Colin Kaepernick 'an SOB' for taking a knee to protest racial injustice during the national anthem. And any player who followed him? 'Fire 'em!' Trump said. He may have wound up inspiring them instead. Almost all of the 200 players who took part in protests during Sunday's games were doing so for the first time. They became 'woke.' In follow-up interviews, Seattle coach Pete Carroll and linebackers Von Miller of Denver and Lorenzo Alexander of Buffalo discussed why their thinking changed, what they hoped to accomplish and whether they intend to continue protesting. Not everyone kneeled, a gesture Kaepernick began during the Obama administration, when he still had a job and few followers. This time, there was plenty of support and their defiance ran the gamut, from raising fists to staying seated to not showing up for the national anthem. There were loud discussions in some locker rooms before teams arrived at a consensus about what to do. They were greeted by boos in more than one stadium. Some teams issued statements explaining their decisions. Eight owners linked arms with their players. Even Tom Brady got involved. 'We understand why people are upset about it,' Carroll said . 'It is not about denigration of the flag, the country or anything that stands for. It's not about that at all. 'It's about trying to get your feelings out and your ideas across. Protests, just by the nature of the word, not everybody is going to agree — that's why it's a protest,' he added. Following are lightly edited transcripts: ___ strong>Pete Carroll, 66, coach, Seattle Seahawks /strong> 'This isn't about the kind of salaries they make; they're very fortunate to be where they are and they know it and they have the courage to speak out. . 'I think it's extraordinary that this is happening and I think it's a moment that we all can learn what we want to learn out of this. I hope we learn about empathy, to listen, to come to an understanding what someone else feels without passing judgement. It doesn't mean you're going to agree. That's OK. That's OK. 'Hopefully, like I said, the compassion part will come about in the proper manner and there will be action taken and there will be movement made, and we'll come to an understanding. It's hard. It's hard, but it's good. . 'Sports has always been the uniter. It has never been the divider, it's been the uniter. And to make it something other than that is a terrible mistake because it's an institution in our culture and in others around the world. . It demonstrates all of the beautiful things about culture and all of the beautiful things about bringing people together from different backgrounds and all and rallying for common goals.' ___ strong>Von Miller, 28, linebacker Denver Broncos /strong> 'Me and my teammates, we felt like President Trump's speech was an assault on our most cherished right, freedom of speech. Collectively, we felt like we had to do something for this game, if not any other game, if not in the past, in the future. At this moment in time, we felt like, as a team, we had to do something. We couldn't just let things go. 'I have a huge respect for the military, our protective services and everything. I've been to Afghanistan; I've met real-life superheroes. It wasn't any disrespect to them, it was for our brothers that have been attacked for things that they do during the game, and I felt like I had to join them on it. . 'I felt like it was an attack on the National Football League as well. You know, he went on and talked about ratings. This is my life, and I love everything about the National Football League. From the commissioner, all the way down to the field tech guys and the chefs in the kitchen. .. I try to keep out any politics or social issues and just try to play ball. But I feel like it was an attack on us. 'If I'm not going to do anything in the future, if I haven't done anything in the past, I feel like this was the time to do something.' ___ strong>Lorenzo Alexander, 34, linebacker, Buffalo Bills /strong> 'Me taking a knee doesn't change the fact that I support our military. I'm a patriot and I love my country. But I also recognize there are some social unjustices in this country. I wanted to take a knee in support of my brothers who have been doing it. 'I won't continue to do it, but I just wanted to show them that I was with them — especially in the backdrop of our president making the comments about our players, about their mothers. And then you put that in conjunction with how he tried to gray-area neo-Nazism and KKK members as being fine people, I had to take a knee. 'And I was very emotional about it all day. It wasn't like a kneejerk reaction. I really had to think about what I wanted to do today. . People always say words never hurt, but words are very divisive, and it creates a lot of issues domestically and internationally. He needs to really control himself.' ___ em>AP Sports Writers Tim Booth and John Wawrow contributed to this report. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

Duterte to NPA: “Life is not a revolution”

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 20 October) – President Rodrigo Duterte is frustrated by the entry of foreign corporations that lord it over the lands of the country but he told the New People’s Army (NPA) that they cannot always resort to killing to change things because “life is not a revolution.” “Philippines is agriculture-based. We […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsOct 20th, 2018

Trump’s remark on having ‘natural instinct for science’ spurs reactions

Another remark made by US President Donald Trump on Wednesday elicited diverse reactions from netizens. Trump was interviewed by reporters at the White House where he expressed his uncertainty on scientists' concern on climate change. He was asked about a recent report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. It stated that by 2030, the world's temperature would reach 1.5 degrees Celsius and that climate change is on the verge of becoming irreversible. "No, no. Some say that and some say differently, I mean you have scientists on both sides of it," he was quoted as saying in the interview. "My uncle was a great professor at MIT (Massachusetts Insti...Keep on reading: Trump’s remark on having ‘natural instinct for science’ spurs reactions.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 20th, 2018

SC candidate says Duterte can withdraw from ICC without Senate concurrence

One of the candidates to the Supreme Court believes that the President can unilaterally withdraw from a treaty without the concurrence of the Senate. Lawyer Rita Linda Jimeno, Associate Dean of the Centro Escolar University School of Law, said the President could invoke the doctrine of rebus sic stantibus in withdrawing from a treaty such as the case of President Rodrigo Duterte's move to unilaterally withdraw the country's membership from the International Criminal Court. READ: Duterte does the inevitable, declares PH withdrawal from ICC She explained that the international law doctrine of rebus sic stantibus allows the withdrawal from a treaty if a fundamental change of ci...Keep on reading: SC candidate says Duterte can withdraw from ICC without Senate concurrence.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

Training camp abroad up for grabs in Collegiate Grand Slam

A one-week training camp abroad will be up for grabs for the six teams competing in the inaugural Philippine Superliga Collegiate Grand Slam slate to open shop on November 3. PSL president doctor Ian Laurel formally announced the incentive waiting for the tournament winner.          “These teams are preparing for their big tournaments so we will give incentives for their training camp, most likely it will be in Thailand for seven to ten days and this will be awarded to the winner,” said Laurel on Thursday during the combined PSL All-Filipino and Collegiate Grand Slam press conference held at Club Filipino in San Juan.  “Magandang labanan ito pagdating dito sa incentive na ‘to,” he added. Vying for the title and a chance for an all-expense paid international camp are University of the Philippines, University of the East, University of Sto. Tomas, Far Eastern University and provincial teams Colegio San Agustin-Binan and De La Salle University-Dasmrinas. The Lady Maroons, who are fresh from winning the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference that ended their 36-year title drought, are considered as one of the teams to beat.     Tots Carlos will make her return after recovering from a stress fracture on her right shin but UP will miss the services of Isa Molde, who is taking a break after playing in the UAAP beach volleyball tournament last month. “My team is composed of half very young rookies and veteran members so this tournament will help my team get exposure,” said UP coach Godfrey Okumu. “I believe that my team will learn again how to deal with their losses and wins in every game. So to me it’s a process of growth to my team, especially the young players coming in.” The tournament will be played in a single-round robin elimination round. The top two teams will faceoff in a winner-take-all match for the title while the No. 3 and No. 4 squads will dispute the bronze medal.   ---          Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

Trump denies covering for Saudis on journalist, says truth out soon

WASHINGTON, DC, USA – President Donald Trump on Wednesday, October 17, denied covering up for ally Saudi Arabia in the suspected murder of a critical journalist and said he expects to learn the truth about Jamal Khashoggi's fate within days. Trump's comments followed the publication in pro-government Turkish media of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

President Duterte to Security Forces: ‘Be Neutral’ in 2019 Elections

President Rodrigo Roa Duterte on Monday, October 15, commanded the nation’s security forces to be unbiased and remain non-partisan during the election season. In a speech during the Philippine Army’s change of command rites here, the President asked soldiers to make a deal with the Filipino people. “Let us make a deal here, promise, we […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsOct 17th, 2018

NFL wants players to play with a free mind

By Rob Maaddi, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL doesn't want players worrying about getting flagged or fined. "You gotta play," NFL football operations chief Troy Vincent said Tuesday at the league's fall meetings. "You hope that no player is thinking about a rule. We want them to play (with a) free mind where you're just free and you play." Chiefs rookie linebacker Breeland Speaks said he didn't take Tom Brady down because he was concerned about a roughing-the-passer penalty in the fourth quarter of Kansas City's 43-40 loss at New England on Sunday night. Brady eluded Speaks and ran 4 yards for a touchdown to give the Patriots the lead. "We watched that video and watched that play and Tom did what we've seen Tom do a thousand times," Vincent said. "He stepped up in the pocket and the defender didn't make a play or didn't create a sack, but you don't want any player thinking about a penalty or being fined but you hope that he would make that adjustment on some of the things we've put in place and that's not just for his opponent's protection but for his as well." Overall, roughing-the-passer calls are down since the competition committee clarified to game officials the techniques used in such hits during a conference call last month. There were 34 roughing calls through the first three weeks and 19 in the three weeks since the call. Vincent said the league didn't advise officials to cut down on the calls, but emphasized to them making sure they see it clearly. "If you don't see the complete play, don't call it," Vincent said. "That was a directive from the competition committee. That was always the point of emphasis but after the (conference) call and after watching the video, the committee and our coaches (said): 'If you don't see the complete play, we ask that you leave the penalty in your pocket.'" Packers linebacker Clay Matthews was penalized three times in the first three weeks for roughing the passer, including two of which that appeared to be normal tackles. Matthews suggested the league has gone soft and argued that defensive players no longer know what constitutes a legal hit. Dolphins defensive end William Hayes tore his right ACL trying to avoid landing on Raiders quarterback Derek Carr. "Every time we emphasized a call, you see more calls in the preseason and first (few) weeks and then you see an adjustment, and a leveling out of calls," said Atlanta Falcons CEO Rich McKay, the head of the league's competition committee. "We're not going to apologize for trying to protect players we think are in a vulnerable state." Some other things we learned on the first day of the NFL's fall meetings: MORE FINES THAN FLAGS: There have been only six penalties for illegal use of the helmet, but Vincent said between 10-12 players have been fined for such hits and almost 70 warning letters have been issued to players about using the crown of their helmet to initiate a hit. "We told officials if they don't see all three elements of it, we can fine it on Monday and we'll get the conducted corrected," McKay said. "I think the players have adjusted, the officials have adjusted and I know the coaches have adjusted." CONCUSSIONS DOWN: Concussions in preseason were down from 91 to 79, a 13 percent decline. Concussions on kickoffs were zero in the preseason, down from three. Concussions in practices were down from 23 to 9. Jeff Miller, the league's executive vice president of health and safety initiatives, credits a reduction plan the NFL put into place last year, improvements in helmets in part spurred by the league ratings of helmets and banning of some, rules changes such as the "helmet rule" and the kickoff rules, and the education of players. "We're certainly optimistic about the results," said Dr. Allen Sills, the NFL's medical director. "We'll continue with more in-depth analyses of concussions." HELMET BAN: Miller said there were some 230 helmets players used in 2017 that ranked in the red area, meaning they were banned for new league players in 2018 and will be banned for every player next season. Through Week 3 of this season, about 40 were still in use that were grandfathered in. He noted "it's sometimes hard to make a change," but added that players won't have a choice after this season regarding those helmets. ADVANTAGE, OFFENSE: Teams are scoring more than ever. The number of points (4,489), touchdowns (504) and touchdown passes (328) are the most in league history through six weeks. McKay credited the performance of young quarterbacks and the emphasis on calling illegal contact and defensive holding penalties. Illegal contact penalties are up from 11 to 36. After six weeks in 2016, there were 30 such calls. "We didn't like the way it was going last year and it led to passing yardage going down," McKay said. "As defenses get more aggressive and grab more, yards go down." Vincent said he expects scoring to "normalize" as teams see more film on the young quarterbacks and he noted weather conditions later in the season could make an impact. "I believe some of the defenses and coordinators will adjust," Vincent said. "Players are adjusting all the time and you just need game footage to see what people can and can't do." PARITY IS GOOD: Games have been closer through the first six weeks. So far, 54 games have been decided by one score, tied for the most in league history at this point. There have been 28 games decided by three points or fewer, second-most at this point. "Those are good stats for us because fans want to watch and attend close games," McKay said. ___ AP Pro Football Writer Barry Wilner contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2018

Trump questions climate change during hurricane damage tour

PANAMA CITY, USA – President Donald Trump on Monday, October 15, met with victims of Hurricane Michael in devastated areas of Florida and Georgia but again cast doubt on the scientific consensus that climate change is caused by human activity. Flying in the Marine One presidential helicopter over Florida's ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 16th, 2018

Trump: Climate change not hoax

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is backing off his claim that climate change is a hoax but says he doesn’t know if it’s manmade and suggests that the climate will “change back again.” In an interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes” that aired Sunday night, Trump said he doesn’t want to put the U.S. at a […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

Trump says climate change not a hoax, not sure of its source

WASHINGTON, D.C.: President Donald Trump is backing off his claim that climate change is a hoax but says he doesn’t know if it’s manmade and suggests that the climate will “change back again.” In an interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes” that aired Sunday night, Trump said he doesn’t want to put the U.S. at a [...] The post Trump says climate change not a hoax, not sure of its source appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

Bong Go: More programs lined up for Zamboanga

As part of the administration’s promise of real change, the government is prioritizing the health, livelihood and infrastructure programs for areas outside Metro Manila including this city, Special Assistant to the President (SAP) Christopher Lawrence “Bong” Go said on Saturday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

Bong Go launches 14th Malasakit Center in Zamboanga

ZAMBOANGA CITY, Oct. 14 -- Special Assistant to the President (SAP) Christopher Lawrence "Bong" Go today said that as part of the Duterte administration's promise of real change, the government is.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Bong Go launches 14th Malasakit Center in Zamboanga

ZAMBOANGA CITY, Oct. 14 -- Special Assistant to the President (SAP) Christopher Lawrence "Bong" Go today said that as part of the Duterte administration's promise of real change, the government is.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Alec Baldwin vows to break the talk show model by going deep

NEW YORK --- When his new talk show premieres Sunday night, don't expect Alec Baldwin to get overly political. The 60-year old actor plans to leave that on the set of "Saturday Night Live" with his occasional impersonations of President Donald Trump. "The Trump thing is just silly. Nothing we do on 'SNL' about Trump is going to change anybody's mind about anything," Baldwin said. "There are people in Washington going, 'That Alec Baldwin, I hate him'... and there are others that say, 'Thank you, for helping us process this.'" That's why he doesn't see an upside to being overly political on the new "The Alec Baldwin Show" on ABC at 10 p.m. The show features candid one-on-one conv...Keep on reading: Alec Baldwin vows to break the talk show model by going deep.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 13th, 2018