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Free college: When push could turn to shove

One other legacy that our President wants to leave his country when he retires or ends his term is free education at the tertiary or collegiate/university le.....»»

Category: financeSource: philstar philstarSep 13th, 2017

24 NBA questions before 17-18 tips off

By David Aldridge, TNT analyst The season starts on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). You’ve been waiting patiently all summer with your questions. Fire away.     1. So … what’s the point of playing this season? The Golden State Warriors are still the prohibitive favorites to repeat this season, next season and into the foreseeable future. But it was good to see a good chunk of the Western Conference -- the Houston Rockets, Oklahoma City Thunder and Denver Nuggets, to name three teams -- not fold before the first card is dealt. That fact alone is incredibly important. The Warriors are still the best team in the West, without question. But if teams don’t even try to get better, or spend money to compete, the whole rationale for playing fades away. The Thunder could have rode Russell Westbrook alone to another first-round playoff loss, watched him walk out the door in free agency next summer and thrown up its hands, plead ‘woe is us and all small-market teams,’ and enjoyed a luxury tax-free life for the next few years. The Rockets could have just kept selling tickets to fans to watch James Harden and his pals shoot 50 threes a game for the next two or three years. It’s an appealing brand of basketball. Denver could have just kept building through the Draft, climbing a few more wins here or there for a while, and snuck into the eighth seed, choosing to be comfortable rather than bold. But they didn’t. They’ve called and raised. In all likelihood, it won’t be enough to beat Golden State. But those teams can sleep well at night. They’re not cheating their players, or fans. 2. So, is OKC now a legit threat to the Warriors? The short answer: no. But it’s closer. Carmelo Anthony will be as good a third option as anyone in the league has, though; he will eat regularly on the weak side as defenses scramble to handle Westbrook-Paul George pick and rolls; a quick seal and ‘Melo will be off to the races. If coach Billy Donovan goes small ball with Patrick Patterson at the five, there will be many nights when OKC drops a 130 spot. Yes, the Thunder’s defense is going to be an issue; while Enes Kanter was a sieve off the bench, he was coming off the bench, playing behind Steven Adams. Anthony will be starting and playing big minutes, many at the four. But it won’t matter most nights when the Thunder is up 20 to start the fourth quarter, after 36 minutes of Westbrook sorties, George 3-pointers and transition dunks, and Carmelo post-ups and spot-ups (he shot 44.8 percent last season on catch and shoot shots. Among forwards who played 30 or more minutes last season, per NBA.com/Stats, only Kevin Durant, Otto Porter and Kawhi Leonard shot better). The Thunder can guard you with George, Andre Roberson and Adams and they can outscore you with Westbrook and George and ‘Melo. They have a solid bench (Patterson, Ray Felton, Jerami Grant, Alex Abrines) and Westbrook won’t be physically spent by the end of the 2018 playoffs. Wait; what am I saying? Of course he’ll be spent. But he’ll also be playing way deeper into May. 3. Did not getting Anthony hurt Houston or nah? The Rockets -- okay, Chris Paul -- wanted this done bad. It won’t hurt Houston in the regular season, when Paul and James Harden will dominate. And while Harden didn’t like Kevin McHale’s critique of his leadership, Mac was spot on. That doesn’t make “The Beard” a bad guy or teammate -- people gravitate to their comfortable roles in life, and CP3 is a natural-born leader. Harden will, one thinks, be more comfortable with slightly less light on him. They’ll do fine playing together and off one another. But the shadow of the Rockets’ implosion from deep -- 29 of 88 on three-pointers the last two games against the Spurs in their Western Conference semifinals series -- still hangs over them. Ryan Anderson was negated in the postseason. There’s a reason CP3 pushed for ‘Melo so hard. The Rockets will need unexpected consistent offense from a P.J. Tucker or Luc Mbah a Moute in May if they have any hopes of playing in June. 4. Can we just start the Cleveland-Boston East finals now? Maybe Toronto, with C.J. Miles shooting 40 percent on 3-pointers to complement Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, will break up what seems inevitable. Maybe Washington, with its super-solid starting five intact, now has the mental toughness to bust past the second round, where it’s been beached three of the last four postseasons. But it doesn’t feel like that. Boston, ultimately, should be a lot better this season than last. It will take a while for coach Brad Stevens to figure out the rotation and whether Jaylen Brown can really stick at the two, but ultimately, the Celtics have two dynamic playmakers/scorers in Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward, and with Al Horford providing the glue at both ends, they’re going to be a load by the end of the season. And while Cleveland will have to wait a while for Isaiah Thomas, the Cavs have more than enough firepower until Thomas can make his debut. Whatever Dwyane Wade has left will be accentuated playing with James, and Kevin Love (holy moly, is he underrated) will feast drawing slower, bigger centers out to him on the perimeter. J.R. Smith doesn’t like losing his starting job to Wade, and he should be ticked. But he nonetheless will help Cleveland’s bench, which will be incredibly difficult in its own right with Tristan Thompson and Kyle Korver complementing Smith. And that’s before Thomas returns, which will put Derrick Rose on that second unit. There won’t be any rest for defenses who’ll then have to contend with a rested James, et al, coming back. It says here that not only will the Cavs not miss Irving offensively, they could be even more diverse and difficult to guard this season. Not to mention that James is supremely motivated to make an eighth straight Finals. 5. Could Curry break his record of 402 3-pointers in a season? At first glance, with Durant and Klay and Draymond (and, now, Nick Young) all needing to get fed as well, it would seem impossible for Curry to best the mark he set two years ago, on the 73-9 regular season team. But consider: coach Steve Kerr thinks a new guy always blossoms in his second year with the Warriors, which means Durant should be even more lethal offensively this year, as the Warriors’ offense reaches an even higher level of efficiency. And the way they move the ball, it’s not a stretch to think that with defenses tripping over themselves to get to Durant, Curry could get into one of those ridiculous grooves that could leave him within striking distance of 402 by the end of the season. 6. Could the last one in the Eastern Conference turn out the lights? The New York Knicks were hardly a power in the East before trading Anthony, but his departure creates one more team that will struggle to win 35 games this season. With the paucity of talent there should be at least four 50-win teams in the East -- Cleveland, Boston, Toronto and Washington -- with the Milwaukee Bucks knocking on the door. 7. Who’s going to regret their offseason? The Bucks were fine off the court -- their new arena is already more than halfway constructed and looks like it’s going to be a gem -- although the surrounding mall that is supposed to be part of the complex is not going up as quickly. But the Bucks didn’t address their bigs-heavy roster and move some of the surplus -- how can coach Jason Kidd keep all of Greg Monroe, Jabari Parker and John Henson happy with Thon Maker scarfing up more and more frontcourt minutes? -- for the shooting Milwaukee still needs. The East is so open, and Milwaukee is so close to breaking through into elite status with Giannis Antetokounmpo an elite performer. 8. Rudy Gay -- sneaky good pickup? Gay says he’s cool starting or coming off the bench for the Spurs, but he’d best as San Antonio’s sixth man, at least to start things. Bringing Pau Gasol off the bench didn’t work so well, so if he’s starting at center, coach Gregg Popovich can’t go small ball with “Cousin” LaMarcus Aldridge at the five and Gay at the four alongside Kawhi Leonard. (Current state of Spurs fans’ cuticles here and here as they consider a season with an extended Klaw absence if this quad injury doesn’t improve soon.) The Spurs could have some serious firepower in reserve if Gay and Patty Mills come off the bench, but Mills or Dejounte Murray will likely have to start at the point until Tony Parker comes back. 9. Speaking of Popovich … Should he and Steve Kerr and Stan Van Gundy stick to sports? No. 10. Who’s gonna be Kia Rookie of the Year? I say Markelle Fultz. What, you thought I was gonna pick against a DeMatha Catholic man? (Actual unretouched photo of me as a sophomore at the most successful high school in the history of the United States may or may not be here). Playing off of Joel Embiid, J.J. Redick, Robert Covington … it’s hard to see Fultz not looking really good when he should have all kinds of room to operate. Lonzo Ball will put up bigger numbers, and Tatum will be on a better team. But Boston was good last year, and Jayson Tatum will likely not play as much as the others. The Sixers are poised for a big jump up in the standings, and that’s always a narrative that voters like and get behind -- which is what will hurt Dennis Smith Jr.'s chances in Dallas. 11. What does Dwyane Wade really have left? Now that the inevitable buyout of Wade’s $24 million deal by the Bulls has led to the equally inevitable trek to Cleveland to play with James, can the 35-year-old Wade still be a significant contributor on a title contender? Given the general dysfunction in Chicago last season, you can dismiss most of the good and bad numbers Wade put up, with two exceptions: he still averaged almost five free throw attempts per game, and he shot 31 percent on 3-pointers -- not great, but more than double his anemic 15.9 percent behind the arc in 2015-16, his last with the Miami Heat. Wade obviously knows the cheat code for how to most effectively play off of James, so he’ll use the regular season to learn his teammates and be ready for the playoffs. But can Wade hold up over seven games defensively if he has to chase, say, Bradley Beal around, or try to deny DeRozan his preferred mid-range spots, and still be productive offensively? 12. Back to the Sixers -- how good will they be? My guess is they’ll pretty good in the 60 or so games I anticipate Embiid will play this season -- I’m assuming several designated off days for him during the season, not another injury. The mix of young talent (Fultz, Embiid, Ben Simmons, Dario Saric, Covington) and crafty vets (Redick, Amir Johnson) should mesh to make the 76ers a very tough team to defend. But Philly has to resolve the Jahlil Okafor situation, and in fairness to him, give him a fresh start somewhere else with a trade as soon as possible. If I were a good team that would be hard-pressed to add a free agent any time soon and feels a player short of true contention -- I’m looking at you, Memphis Grizzlies and Wizards -- I’d work hard to get the new, slimmed-down Okafor on my squad while he’s still on his rookie contract and make him the focal point of a kick-ass second unit. 13. Should we feel some kind of way about the Trail Blazers? I’m picking up what you’re putting down. A full season of the “Bosnian Beast” in the middle, it says here, will vault Portland into the top four in the West. Note I said “full season.” That means Jusuf Nurkic has to give coach Terry Stotts between 65-70 starts for the above premonition to be, as they say in the legal world, actionable. If so, Nurkic’s underrated scoring and passing out of the post will only make Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum that much more deadly out front, along with improving Portland’s defense. Per Basketball-Reference.com, the Blazers were 11.6 points per game better than the opposition with those three on the floor together and a +5 when their regular five-man lineup with Maurice Harkless and Al-Farouq Aminu joined the guards and Nurkic. And that’s pronounced, “Noor-kitch,” accent on Noor. 13. A little movie break ... Kevin Costner’s accent in “Robin Hood” -- worst ever, right? Yes, but Natalie Wood’s in “West Side Story” was painful, too. 14. Many have written the post-CP3 Clippers off. Should they? The Clippers are my darkhorse this season -- if they do the right thing and go small more often. They’re doing it more in practice so far than in games because Danilo Gallinari is working through a foot injury, but Blake Griffin at the five and Gallinari at the four could be spicy during the regular season. That would mean Sam Dekker and/or Wes Johnson would have to become credible and dependable at the three, allowing coach Doc Rivers to play a Pat Beverly-Milos Teodosic backcourt more often, which will just be fun. This would, of course, mean less DeAndre Jordan, and … that may not be the worst thing. Nothing against DJ, who is the best defensive big in the league, bar none. Unfortunately, the NBA isn’t about defense any more -- at least not in the traditional sense. Even someone like Jordan who doesn’t just block shots, but also helps snuff out opposing pick and rolls, becomes less valued by the league’s advanced stats crowd if he doesn’t contribute more offensively. The three has gone a long way to tyrannizing the defense-dominant big man out of the game. (Zach Lowe recommends the Wizards try to get Jordan via trade, and it’s not the first time I’ve heard that name mentioned in connection with Washington, the idea being the only chance the Wizards have of beating Cleveland or Boston is to slow them down enough defensively that Wall-Beal-Porter can try and keep up offensively. Washington is definitely a load when Wall gets locked in on D and creates turnovers, and the idea of Jordan inhaling lobs from Wall is enticing to think about. But the Wizards are not -- not -- going to take on a fourth big contract, and Jordan’s surely going to opt out after this season; he’s rightly expecting a massive payday in 2018, and the Clippers certainly now have motive and means to retain him.) Anyway, some Lou Williams, Austin Rivers and/or Teodosic and Willie Reed off the bench isn’t bad, either. 15. Could Kyle Kuzma be the best rookie on the Lakers this season? Don’t @me, LaVar. Kuzma has followed up a very strong Vegas Summer League with high notes in preseason, averaging better than 19 points per game for the Lakers. He’s been dazzling at times, displaying in-between skills that intrigue, and showing why so many teams were trying to trade back into the first round to get the Utah forward before L.A. snagged him with its second and much less heralded first-round pick last June. And there will be minutes available at the four this season. So far, Kuzma has displayed unusual strength for a rookie and confidence in his ability to score. Of course, he’s inexperienced, and like all rookies, has to differentiate between an open shot and a good shot. The other, more famous first-rounder, Lonzo Ball, will almost certainly be the better all-around player in time. For this year, though … hmmm. 16. What does a Hawks fan have to look forward to this season? Honestly, not much. But they’ll always be well-coached and get better. I’d pick one of the young players, like rookie John Collins or second-year small forward Taurean Prince, and concentrate on them during the season. See what they do with their minutes on the floor, and watch how they gradually expand their games at both ends. Seeing a young guy get better as he gains experience and accepts coaching is one of the great joys of watching the NBA every night. 17. Orlando? What gives there? The team’s new braintrust of Jeff Weltman and John Hammond will need some time to fix the roster -- a mélange of athletic wings that have trouble defending and guards that have trouble shooting. The former is addressed somewhat with the signing of Jonathon Simmons from San Antonio, but I don’t see a solution to the latter with any of the existing backcourt contributors. Unless coach Frank Vogel figures out some way to get more turnovers/runouts from his group, they just can’t get in transition enough for their length and legs to make a difference. 18. New Orleans? What gives there? The short answer is, I have no idea. All of NBA Earth has DeMarcus Cousins out of there one way or another (he’s an unrestricted free agent in ’18 and wants to be on a contender/the Pelicans will never pay him what he wants and will have to trade him by the deadline/no way he and Anthony Davis fit together/Wall agitates for a reunion with his former Kentucky big man in D.C./your departure theory here) by this time next year, but we’ll see what coach Alvin Gentry has come up with for “Boogie” and “the Brow” after a summer to think it over. Rajon Rondo being out hurts their depth, but I have to be honest -- I don’t see how he and Jrue Holiday can possibly work together in a backcourt, and Holiday’s the guy the Pelicans just gave $125 million to, so he should probably have the ball in his hands every night, shouldn’t he? I like Ian Clark and Frank Jackson down there, but that untethered three spot burns a hole in the New Orleans sun. Well, at any rate, should be more fun than watching reruns of My Life on the D-List. 19. Favorite D-List Muppet? Beaker. 20. LeBron is leaving Cleveland again after this season, isn’t he? Everything points to yes, and a relocation to Los Angeles to play with the Lakers or Clippers next year – except … what if the Cavs win it all again this year? That’s not an impossible scenario -- in fact, it’s a pretty simple one to lay out: Cavs run roughshod through the Eastern Conference in the playoffs again, get through a good but hardly great Boston team in the conference Finals and set up a fourth straight encounter with Golden State. It’s easy now to say the Warriors dominated the Cavs in last season’s Finals -- but only if you ignore the fact that Cleveland led by six with just more than three minutes remaining in Game 3, only to see the Warriors score the game’s last 11 points to take a 3-0 lead instead of 2-1. And given that Cleveland vaporized the Warriors in Game 4, a 2-2 series would have meant the Cavs just needed to win once in Oracle -- which they’d done twice in the 2016 Finals -- to have a real shot at repeating. The point is, the difference between the teams isn’t as big as Draymond Green would have you believe; the Cavs have no fear of the Warriors, and Jae Crowder gives coach Tyronn Lue a viable on-ball defender for Kevin Durant, leaving LeBron free to play off of Green. And: that unprotected Nets pick, whether one or three or five or seven, is Cleveland’s best recruiting tool. LeBron knows everyone in college basketball and he can literally pick whoever he’d like to finish his career with in Cleveland before handing over the reins. I’m not saying he’s definitely staying, either -- only that his departure isn’t the lead pipe cinch some would have you believe. The season to come will have a lot to do with his next decision. 21. So, how will the playoffs go this season? Eastern Conference (seeds No. 1-8): Cleveland, Boston, Washington, Toronto, Milwaukee, Miami, Detroit, Philadelphia Western Conference (seeds No. 1-8): Golden State, Houston, Oklahoma City, Portland, San Antonio, Memphis, Utah, Minnesota Eastern Conference semifinalists: Cleveland, Boston, Washington, Milwaukee Western Conference semifinalists: Golden State, Houston, OKC, San Antonio Eastern Conference finals: Cleveland over Boston Western Conference finals: Golden State over OKC (you heard me) NBA Finals: Golden State over Cleveland (in seven games) 22. Tell me something crazy that’s going to happen this season that no one’s predicting! Giannis Antetokounmpo. NBA MVP, 2017-18. 23. Are you high? No, ma’am. 24. So, why 24 questions? As always, we start the season with 24 questions (or predictions, or issues, whatever) in honor of Danny Biasone, the late owner of the Syracuse Nationals, whose discovery in 1954 helped save the league. At that time, the NBA was in the midst of a literal slowdown, in large part by teams that were desperate to figure out some kind of way to stay competitive with George Mikan, the league’s first superstar big man, and his team, the Minneapolis Lakers. Teams would hold the ball for minutes at a time without shooting in an effort to shorten the game and give them a chance to beat Minneapolis late. But the end result was boring -- very boring -- basketball. At the owners’ meetings that year, Biasone came up with an idea. NBA games were 48 minutes long. Biasone figured out that in a normal game, one not waylaid by the slowdown tactics, about 120 shots -- 60 per team -- were taken. So, why not just divide the number of minutes in every game -- 2,880 -- by the number of shots in an average game -- 120 -- to come up with some kind of a time limit in which a team had to shoot. And thus, the 24-second shot clock (2,800/120) was born. With the implementation of the shot clock in the 1954-55 season, scoring went way up, as did the quality of play. Teams were now running up and down the floor in order to try and beat the shot clock, complementing the “fast break” game that many colleges had played for years. But the new style in the pros was immensely popular with fans. And it still is. Plus, there’s just something iconic about that clock counting down every 24 seconds. It’s unique to the NBA. Thus, we ask 24 questions, in honor of the guy who owned a bowling alley as well as the Nationals for much of his adult life, and probably enjoyed the bowling more. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2017

Tale of 2 cities: Olympics sponsors in Pyeongchang and Tokyo

em>By Youkyung Lee and Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press /em> SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Winter Olympics coming to South Korea in February offer an example of the Olympian efforts often required to meet corporate sponsorship goals. Tokyo tells a different story: The coffers are already overflowing for the 2020 Summer Games. It's a tale of two cities and two Olympics — winter and summer. Pyeongchang is a little-known destination in one of South Korea's poorest provinces. It is the 'little town that could,' bidding twice unsuccessfully for the Winter Olympics before winning on its third try. A final push enabled it to reach its sponsorship target of 940 billion won ($830 million) in September, with just five months to go. Tokyo is an established global capital, and the Summer Games usually generate more excitement — and more money. Organizers have raised 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion) in sponsorship, twice any previous Olympics. International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates describes it as a remarkable achievement. The divergent experiences of two Asian host cities illustrate the challenges that smaller bidders face, as well as South Korea's dependence on the big family-owned companies that dominate its economy. Not that Tokyo is home-free. The cost of the 2020 Games has nearly doubled from initial projections. As with most Olympics, taxpayers will have to foot a good part of the bill. ___ strong>WHERE 'CHAEBOLS' RULE /strong> Starting with the 1988 Seoul Olympics, South Korea has used mega-events such as the soccer World Cup to raise the profile of the country and its manufacturing exporters. Pyeongchang is different. The project was initiated by local politicians in an area long alienated politically and economically in South Korea's rise to prosperity. Some feared people would confuse the city's name with Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. They couldn't count on the automatic support of the huge family-run conglomerates, known as 'chaebol,' such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. 'When such mega-events were the nation-state's key project, the chaebol were called on and were expected to become the leading participants,' said Joo Yu-min, a professor at the National University of Singapore who co-authored a book on South Korea's use of mega-events. In the end, the national government brought the conglomerates in, first in the bid process, and then for sponsorship. That underscores both the outsized role they play in the economy and their close ties with government. They owe a debt to special treatment from the government, which in turn used them to industrialize the country after the devastating 1950-53 Korean War. After Pyeongchang's bid was rejected a second time, the government called on Samsung and others to help. The president even pardoned Lee Kun-hee, the patriarch of the Samsung founding family who had been an IOC member but voluntarily suspended his membership after being indicted for tax evasion. The IOC reinstated Lee in 2010 with a reprimand and some restrictions, allowing him to lobby heavily for what became Pyeongchang's winning bid in 2011. It took three years for the organizing committee to sign its first domestic sponsor, KT Corp., the country's second-largest mobile carrier. Again, the national government asked the conglomerates for help. All the major ones signed on, after the office of then-President Park Geun-hye made a special request and multichannel pressures for financial assistance, Joo said. Elsewhere, companies may weigh sponsorship decisions based more on the marketing benefits. 'In South Korea, companies make donations out of a sense of duty that they are being part of the national event,' said Park Dong Min, the executive director overseeing membership at the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Sponsors who signed up late weren't willing to give as much, because there was less time to enjoy the marketing benefits. A bank that signed on less than a year before the Games significantly reduced its sponsorship. To top it off, a massive sports-related political corruption scandal rocked South Korea in 2016, just when Pyeongchang was making last-ditch efforts to raise sponsorship. 'Companies showed some reluctance' to sponsor the Olympics, said Eom Chanwang, director of the Pyeongchang organizing committee marketing team. 'Nevertheless, they still joined.' The scandal brought down Park, the president. Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung group, received a five-year sentence for bribery. Lee, who has appealed, had become de facto chief of the Samsung group after his father Lee Kun-hee, the IOC member pardoned in late 2009, fell ill. It was the younger Lee who signed an agreement with IOC President Thomas Bach to extend Samsung Electronics' sponsorship of the Olympics globally through 2020. Samsung declined interviews for this story. With the scandal still fresh in people's minds, major companies have held back from launching full-fledged marketing to promote the Games. 'Samsung traditionally has done consumer marketing through the Olympics, but because its chief is in jail, it cannot do as much these days,' said Kim Do-kyun, a sports professor at Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Physical Education. The Pyeongchang Games were the biggest victim of the scandal, he said. ___ strong>SUMMER OF '64 /strong> The president of Japan's biggest toilet manufacturer was seven years old when the Olympics first came to Japan. TOTO Ltd. made news in 1964 for its prefabricated toilet-and-bath units that helped speed the construction of a luxury hotel, the New Otani, in time for the Games. The company, now known for high-tech toilets that baffle some foreign visitors, is back as a sponsor of Tokyo 2020. 'I feel our company and the Olympics have been bonded by fate,' TOTO president Madoka Kitamura said at a sponsorship signing ceremony at the same hotel last year. The $2.7 billion in sponsorship for Tokyo 2020 is more than three times the original estimate. By comparison, sponsorship revenue was $848 million in Rio de Janeiro last year, and about $1.2 billion for both London 2012 and Beijing 2008. The Winter Olympics typically attract less, though Sochi, Russia, raised $1.2 billion in 2014. Analysts attribute Tokyo's success to both patriotism and a sense of nostalgia for the 1964 Summer Games. They were much more than a sports contest for Japan. They were a moment of pride, marking the country's return as an industrial power after the devastation of World War II and a seven-year U.S. occupation. 'All of Japan still recognizes the unique role that the 1964 Olympics played in Japan's stepping out onto the world stage,' said Michael Payne, a former IOC marketing director who now works as a consultant. 'Many of the CEOs of top Japanese companies would have been young kids back in '64 and are very aware of the role those Games played for the psychological recovery from the Second World War.' They grew up with the high-speed 'Shinkansen' bullet train, inaugurated in 1964; modern expressways and western-style toilets, all symbols of Japan's postwar economic growth. 'Now they have become business leaders, they want to contribute and leave something behind that can be remembered for the next 50 years,' said Masahiko Sakamaki, executive director of marketing for the Tokyo organizing committee. He said that memories of the recovery may have boosted interest in sponsorship, as Japan was still reeling from a deadly 2011 earthquake and tsunami when Tokyo won the bid in 2013. Sakamaki said the organizing committee started receiving sponsorship inquiries as soon as it was established in 2014, before the official start of sponsorship contracts in 2015. There is so much interest that the IOC is allowing Tokyo to have multiple sponsors in some categories, instead of the usual one, including in aviation, newspaper publishing, electronics and banking. TOTO officials won't say how much they are contributing, but media reports say companies in its sponsorship category give between 6 billion and 15 billion yen ($53 million to $133.5 million). Tokyo 2020 wouldn't comment on those reports. 'We believe our presence as part of an all-Japan effort toward a successful Olympics will enhance our favorable brand image,' said Mariko Shibasaki, the company's senior planner for sports communication. Thanks in part to robust sponsorship revenue, the organizing committee has increased its contribution to the cost of the games from 500 billion to 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion). The sponsorship revenue makes up half of the income in the privately-run organizing committee's operating budget. Other revenue comes from the International Olympic Committee, marketing and ticket sales. The overall cost of the Tokyo Olympics is estimated at 1.4 trillion yen (12.4 billion) with the Tokyo government shouldering 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion) and the remaining 200 billion yen (1.8 billion) paid by the national government and local governments hosting events. ___ em>Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writer Stephen Wade in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Makabayan solons push for inclusion of budget for free college education for 2018

Makabayan solons push for inclusion of budget for free college education for 2018.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsAug 16th, 2017

On-court digital experience unlocks access to basketball training in Manila

In a city where basketball is the pulse and access to data and training is limited, Nike is launching Nike Hyper Court, the first ever on-court digital experience that unlocks exclusive HD basketball content without the need for data, to inspire ballers across the city to take their game to the next level. Turn up to one of the initial five courts across Manila and ballers can connect to Nike Hyper Court and gain free access to content, powered by Google technology, that includes training drills, elevated member activities and the best of Nike global basketball content. “The passion for basketball in Manila is unlike any other city in Asia. We want to inspire young ballers to realize their full potential through the physical and digital aspects of their sport. Nike Hyper Court enables these ballers to train anytime without worrying about access to training drills and data costs,” said Nike Southeast Asia & India Senior Marketing Director, Bulbul Khera. “Nike Hyper Court, powered by Google, presents a great example of how businesses can partner with the community to customize technology and provide an original, digital solution aimed at empowering Filipino basketball players and youth across the capital. We are excited to see Nike Hyper Court use Google’s technology to change the game. This technology allows for endless possibilities on and off the court,” mentioned Miguel de Andrés-Clavera, Google Creative Technology Lead. The content is designed with a hyperlocal approach with the help of experienced coaches. Features include drills and skills training programs addressing power, quickness and versatility tailored for different types of players, all delivered through a program that learns and makes recommendations from continuous user interaction. Each of the Nike Hyper Courts in the five Barangays (districts) are visually stunning thanks to the design of Arturo Torres, internationally renowned artist known for his signature superhero themed illustrations of rappers, basketball stars and New York Times bestselling books. Arturo’s design for each court features an emblematic identity of five basketball superstars: LeBron James, Kobe Bryant, Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and Kyrie Irving. “I want the kids that play on these courts to know that they can be like the superstars I’ve drawn. Sure you have to put in the work, but no one can tell that you can't do something. With Nike Hyper Court you can go out there and prove them wrong – to anyone that's ever said no to you,” said Torres. The first five courts are launching this holiday season: 1. Titan Love Court, BGC – LeBron James Court 2. Ususan Court, Taguig – Kobe Bryant Court 3. Comembo Covered Court, Makati – Kevin Durant Court 4. Scarlet Homes Covered Court, Paranaque – Russell Westbrook Court 5. YCL Covered Court, Quezon City – Kyrie Irving Court.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 17th, 2017

France makes diplomatic push to solve Lebanon crisis – Al Jazeera

France is making a diplomatic push to solve the political crisis caused by the snap resignation of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri earlier this month, as the country’s foreign minister is expected to meet Hariri in Riyadh on Thursday. According to at least one analyst, however, Paris may have made a “risky bet” by getting involved in the ongoing diplomatic turmoil over Hariri’s fate, which has pit Saudi Arabiaagainst its regional rival, Iran, and Tehran’s ally in Lebanon, Hezbollah. “As no compromise in Lebanon will pass without an agreement between Riyadh and Tehran, Paris is looking to deal with both,” said Stephane Malsagne, a historian and professor at Sciences-Po in Paris. The highest levels of the French government are getting involved in diplomatic efforts to resolve the political turmoil gripping Lebanon, which was under French colonial rule until 1943. France’s Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian is expected to meet with Hariri in Saudi Arabia on Thursday, an aide said, according to Agence France Presse. The meeting comes a day after Le Drian arrived in Riyadh and met with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and a week after French President Emmanuel Macron also flew to Riyadh to meet the Crown Prince. Macron hastily flew to Saudi Arabia on November 9 from the nearby United Arab Emirates. Macron’s stop in Riyadh came just as tensions were mounting between Saudi Arabia and Iran over the fate of the Lebanese prime minister. Hariri, a Sunni Muslim politician and longtime ally of both Saudi Arabia and France, announced his resignation in a televised address from Riyadh on November 4. Many, including Lebanese President Michel Aoun, have accused Saudi Arabia of forcing Hariri to step down and of holding him in detention. The Saudis have denied the allegations and accused Hezbollah of creating a “state within a state” in Lebanon. This week, Hariri said he planned to return to Lebanon soon, but did not specify when. According to Malsagne, French diplomacy has so far “not succeeded in obtaining guarantees from Riyadh” on Hariri’s freedom of mvoement and speech, nor has it clarified when Hariri may be allowed to return to Lebanon or what the Saudis’ true political intentions are. “It’s therefore a risky bet for France,” he told Al Jazeera. The French president also spoke with his Lebanese counterpart, Michel Aoun, on November 10. Macron stressed “the importance of preserving the stability, independence and security of Lebanon and French support for the Lebanese people,” according to a statement put out by the Elysee. He also met with Lebanon’s Foreign Minister, Gebran Bassil, in Paris on Tuesday. During a press conference at the Lebanese embassy in Paris, Bassil thanked Macron for “the initiative he is undertaking for Lebanon in the face of an exceptional situation,” French website L’Orient Le Jour reported. Bassil said, however, that Lebanon “must decide on its internal and external politics” and “counts on making a free decision”. A day later, Macron offered Hariri and his family to come spend a few days in Paris, but specified that the invitation was not an offer of political exile. The Hariri family, which holds French citizenship, has longstanding ties to the French political class. Hariri’s father, former prime minister Rafik Hariri, who was assassinated in 2005, was a close friend of former French President Jacques Chirac. When he resigned from politics in 2007, Chirac considered moving into a Paris apartment owned by the Hariri family, Reuters reported at the time. The French government, meanwhile, has maintained close ties to Saad Hariri, explained Eric Verdeil, a professor at Sciences Po in Paris. While France has traditionally kept a balanced approach to Lebanese internal politics – often working as a facilitator between various factions – it has been closer to the Hariri-led March 14 camp, which includes Lebanese-Christian political groups. “It’s clear that the political class [in France] and successive French governments saw in Saad Hariri a politician whom they could support and that they strongly supported him for several years,” Verdeil told Al Jazeera. Nonetheless, the French “try to be in a position to talk to everyone,” Verdeil said. Hariri visited Macron at the Elysee in September and said during his visit that “relations between France and Lebanon are excellent”. Yet despite their close relationship to Hariri, his resignation came as a shock to French leaders. “They were very surprised by this resignation that was unexpected and obviously they weren’t consulted,” Verdeil said. If Hariri does not eventually return to Lebanon, France will still maintain close ties to the country in order to maintain its own interests in the region, according to Malsagne. “Franco-Lebanese relations are not confined to the men in power,” he told Al Jazeera. Since France closed its embassy in Damascus in 2012, Lebanon has served as “an observation post” for France to monitor what’s happening in the Middle East, especially in Syria and Iraq, he explained. France has a long history of mediation in Lebanese political crises, Malsagne said, and its involvement today does not come as a surprise. Joe Macaron, a resident analyst at the Arab Center Washington DC research organisation, said that Hariri is France’s major Sunni ally in Lebanon and the wider Middle East. It is in France’s interests “to make sure that Saad Hariri remains a player in Lebanon’s politics,” Macaron told Al Jazeera. “They have good relations with a lot of Lebanese leaders, but if Hariri doesn’t return to power, whoever replaces him […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 16th, 2017

San Beda Red Lions turn back Lyceum Pirates to claim the NCAA season 93 crown

MANILA, Philippines (UPDATED) – The Lyceum of the Philippines University’s historic 18-0 sweep in the elimination round went for naught as the San Beda College Red Lions took a 92-82 win in Game 2 to sweep their best-of-3 NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball finals at the Araneta Coliseum Thursday, November ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 16th, 2017

Duty-Free access to US for agriculture, garments pushed

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippines will push for duty-free access of garments, textiles, wrist watches and agriculture products to the US as preliminary t.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 15th, 2017

MSMEs must benefit from free trade, Robredo tells ASEAN businessmen

MANILA, Philippines – Vice President Leni Robredo urged entrepreneurs from Southeast Asia to push for inclusive growth that would benefit even micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs). Robredo delivered the keynote speech during the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Business and Investment Summit on Tuesday, November 14, at ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 14th, 2017

Marlins have Stanton on the market as GM meetings start

By Ronald Blum, Associated Press ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — For sale: 28-year-old chiseled slugger who led the major leagues with 59 home runs, the most in 16 years. Price: $295 million over a decade. Complication: Giancarlo Stanton only goes where he wants to, since the star right fielder has a full no-trade provision. Now under a new ownership group that put former New York Yankees star Derek Jeter in charge of baseball and business operations, the Miami Marlins have concluded their payroll-paring regime is willing to explore trades of Stanton and other high-priced players. "I think over the next few days I'll get a feel for what the marketplace is for our players," Marlins president of baseball operations Mike Hill said Monday, the opening day of the annual general managers' meetings. Miami had a $116 million payroll on Aug. 31, up from $81 million at the end of last year. Bruce Sherman's group bought the team on Oct. 2 from Jeffrey Loria and is exploring trades for players who contributed to the team's eighth straight losing season. The Marlins have not made the playoffs since winning the 2003 World Series, the second-longest postseason drought behind Seattle. Stanton's salary jumps from $14.5 million this year to $25 million next season. It peaks at $32 million annually from 2023-25. When he spoke Oct. 25 at the World Series while receiving an award, Stanton said he didn't have "stamped-out ideas" whether he would want to stay in Miami during a rebuild. The Marlins seem to know which teams he would accept a trade to. "I do have a sense, and we'll keep that internal, and at the appropriate time we'll discuss whatever we need to discuss," Hill said. "We work internally. We do what we need to do, and then if we need to present him with something, we'll do so at the appropriate time." Among other costly Marlins next year are third baseman Martin Prado ($14 million), right-hander Edinson Volquez ($13 million), center fielder Christian Yelich ($7 million, with $37.5 million more guaranteed over the following three years) and second baseman Dee Gordon ($10.5 million, with $27.5 million guaranteed over the following two seasons). Given a penurious approach, the Marlins may find trades make sense. "It's tough to be competitive if you're overly concentrated in two or three players," New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said. "I think we experienced some of that last year." High-revenue teams would be the most likely matches. The New York Yankees do not appear to be a probable destination. Right fielder Aaron Judge won the AL Rookie of the Year award unanimously after hitting 52 homers, center fielder Aaron Hicks played well when he wasn't hurt, and Clint Frazier is competing for playing time among a group that includes veterans Brett Gardner and Jacoby Ellsbury. "We have a lot of good players signed, so we're not in a situation where we have to be pressured into moving fast on anything," general manager Brian Cashman said. "It gives us a little bit of a chance to be patient and engage the market and see if there's any value to be had via trade or free agencies for us because we have a lot pieces currently in place and more pieces coming." New York does figure to be interested in 23-year-old Japanese right-hander and outfielder Shohei Otani, a two-way player who wants to sign with a major league team. But the Major League Baseball Players Association does not seem close to an agreement on a new posting deal with MLB management and Nippon Professional Baseball. That could push off Otani negotiations for weeks or months. Teams are having trade discussions and agents also are the hotel, pitching their clients to teams. Cashman is not meeting with manager candidates during the GM session. Yankees bench coach Rob Thomson and former Cleveland and Seattle manager Eric Wedge were interviewed last week, and Cashman would not deny reports that San Francisco bench coach Hensley Meulens will be interviewed. Former Yankees outfielder Carlos Beltran, who announced his retirement Monday after 20 big league seasons, could be a contender. "He's played the game a long time. He knows the game inside-out. He's obviously got respect of his peers and (is) bilingual," Cashman said. "He brings a lot to the table in terms of someone that's played the game the right way and had a great career and goes out with a world championship ring and is highly respected I would say across all environments of our industry.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 14th, 2017

Salceda welcomes P6-B add’l fund for free college tuition

Salceda welcomes P6-B add’l fund for free college tuition.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolstandardRelated NewsNov 9th, 2017

BEST OF 5 Part 4: LPU can thank cellphones for all of this

Read Part 1 of ABS-CBN Sports’ Best of 5 series on the LPU Pirates here. Read Part 2 of ABS-CBN Sports’ Best of 5 series on the LPU Pirates here. Read Part 3 of ABS-CBN Sports’ Best of 5 series on the LPU Pirates here. --- Topex Robinson has laid the groundwork, and it was finally time to build something in Lyceum of the Philippines University. Just like he had off-court, the always amiable mentor also had grand plans on-court for the Pirates. Having a plan is different from getting it done, however. “It was hard. I already had a vision of what I wanted my team to be and I made sure I articulated my vision,” he shared. “Obviously, getting people wasn’t easy, but if they know that you’re going to a direction, you would attract those people who shared my vision.” And so, slowly but surely, Robinson’s staff was being filled by the likes of Rommel Adducul, a former big-time professional player, and Jeff Perlas, a highly-esteemed assistant in coaching circles. In terms of players, however, still nothing much was going for the Intramuros-based squad. GAME-CHANGER Until one phone call. Robinson personally fetched CJ Perez from Ateneo de Manila University after the latter learned that his academic deficiencies would force him to sit out the season. Earlier that day, Perez called Robinson and told him all that was happening. Right then and there, the former had an offer for the latter. “When CJ left Ateneo, I gave him an opportunity with us, pero ang sabi ko, ‘You can go to any team.’ He said he wanted to play for me,” the head coach said. “I said, ‘Are you sure? Because all of the collegiate teams are gonna get you and gonna offer you anything you want.’ But he committed to us and I appreciate the trust he gave me.” PRODIGAL SON Indeed, LPU had one advantage all others didn’t – Robinson had long been a father figure to Perez as the two were formerly the faces of San Sebastian College-Recoletos for two years. “Isang beses, pinaisip (ni coach Topex) sa amin yung heroes namin tapos napapatingin ako sa kanya. Siya yung iniisip kong hero kasi yung trust na binibigay niya sa akin, sobra-sobrang trust,” the now 23-year-old tantalizing talent shared. “Tinutulungan niya ako, pinu-push niya ako kahit anong magyari. Siya talaga ang nagmo-motivate sa akin.” And so, Perez became a Pirate – without a doubt, the biggest get in the history of their basketball program. However great he is, however, he is just one man. “Obviously, who would love to have a CJ Perez on the team, but again, CJ is just a part of the puzzle. He’s not the whole equation,” Robinson said. “Yes, CJ could win us games, but he could also lose games. People are tagging us as CJ’s team, but it’s very important to get everybody on the same page.” THE STANDARD Indeed, Perez becoming a Pirate is not the rule, but an exception to the rule. As history has proven, Intramuros was not a dream destination for youngsters – be it LPU, be it Colegio de San Juan de Letran, be it Mapua University. And so, the LPU head coach tried to work with whatever he had. “You accept the fact that you will not get the blue-chip players. What you’re really looking for are players who are driven,” he shared. He then continued, “The skill, we could work on that. The character, yung may chip on the shoulder, yun yung kailangan namin.” In other words, he looked for a player like Topex Robinson. “That’s basically how I was as a basketball player. My PBA career, I knew I was not gifted and I knew I had to survive. Pretty much, I was looking for players I could see myself in,” he said. JOIN THE CLUB Fortunately, there were many places to find treasure. And even better, sometimes, treasure comes to find you. Another phone call came – and getting shipped to the Pirates were two talents who would prove to be the perfect pieces for what they wanted to do. “Bago kami sa LPU, galing kaming Adamson. Nung nagbago na yung coach, tumawag na kami kay coach Topex kung pwede niya kaming matulungan,” Jaycee Marcelino narrated. He was referring to the regime change for the Soaring Falcons in 2016 which saw Franz Pumaren take over for Mike Fermin. And for them, it was only their kababayan in Robinson whom they trusted to continue harnessing their potential. “Magkakilala po kami ni coach kasi magkababayan kami. Humingi kami ng tulong para makapaglaro pa rin kami sa pangarap naming liga,” Jayvee, the twin, shared. Robinson and the Marcelinos all hail from Olongapo in Zambalaes. And so, the twins became Pirates – without a doubt, one of the biggest steals in college basketball in recent history. X MARKS THE SPOT And now, Topex Robinson has a crew full of Topex Robinsons. From Perez to the Marcelinos, from glue guy MJ Ayaay to National University outcasts Kim Cinco and Ralph Tansingco, and from forgotten foreign student-athlete Mike Nzeusseu to underrated Reymar Caduyac, all of LPU has something to prove. Whether or not that would be enough to win a championship is not yet certain. What is certain now is that Robinson has a Pirate crew completed in his vision – both on and off the court. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 8th, 2017

Irving, Celtics hold off Hawks in closing minutes

By George Henry, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Kyrie Irving scored 35 points, Jayson Tatum added 21 and the Boston Celtics held off the Atlanta Hawks 110-107 Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) for their ninth straight victory. Irving’s triple from the right wing put the Celtics up 104-103 — the game’s 25th lead change — with 1:37 remaining, and Boston led the rest of the way. Dennis Schroder had 23 points for the rebuilding Hawks, who dropped to 2-9 a night after a surprising two-point win at Cleveland. Boston improved to 9-2, best in the NBA, and has its longest winning streak in seven years. Al Horford had 15 points, 10 rebounds and nine assists in his best game against the Hawks. Horford spent his first nine seasons in Atlanta before leaving as a free agent ahead of last season and had totals of 20 points and 17 rebounds in three games against the Hawks. Irving had his first 30-point game as a Celtic on a night packed with highlights. He dribbled between his legs and behind his back before hitting a floater off the glass from the left baseline to put Boston up 46-44. He had two impressive assists late in the third with long, one-handed passes that led to 3s by Marcus Smart and Tatum, the latter giving Boston a 72-71 lead. And Irving fed Horford for a dunk that was part of a 13-0 run that put the Celtics up by six. Boston coach Brad Stevens wasn’t pleased with the ball movement or defense early in the third, storming the floor to call timeout after Atlanta’s Luke Babbit hit a triple to put the Hawks up 57-54. Irving took charge, either scoring or assisting on 16 straight points. The Celtics gradually pulled away, taking a 10-point lead early in the fourth on Semi Ojeleye’s triple. RAINING DOWN Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer joked before the game that he regretted having his assistants work with the 6'10" Horford a couple of years ago to develop a strong presence beyond the perimeter. Horford entered the game shooting nearly 52 percent on 33 attempts from the arc. “I think there was just a real push from us and a credit to him that he could do it,” Budenholzer said. “It’s part of the way the game is, and his passing just opens up the court even more for him to drive and attack. He’s such a good player, such a smart player.” TIP-INS Celtics: Irving has scored more points — 245 — than any player in his first 11 games with Boston. ... With Marcus Morris getting the night off to rest his sore left knee, Aron Baynes started at center and finished with just two points and three rebounds in 15 minutes. Hawks: Malcolm Delaney returned after missing two games with a sprained right ankle and had 13 points. Marco Belinelli scored 19 despite a sore left Achilles. UP NEXT Celtics: Host the Lakers on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time). Hawks: Off until they visit Detroit on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

BEST OF 5 Part 2: O captain, my captain, Topex Robinson

Read Part 1 of ABS-CBN Sports’ Best of 5 series on the LPU Pirates here. --- Long before Lyceum of the Philippines University was dominating the NCAA, it was already a force to reckon with in other collegiate leagues. The Pirates were the class of both the National Capital Region Athletic Association (NCRAA) and the Inter-Scholastic Athletic Association (ISAA). Also, they had four Sweet 16 finishes to their name in the Philippine Collegiate Champions League (PCCL). Perennial favorites in the collegiate leagues they competed in, they were, without a doubt, a battleship staking claim to a river. Clearly, the Intramuros-based squad needed a whole damn sea to set sail in. MAKE WAY And so, LPU entered the first and oldest collegiate league in the country as a guest team in 2011. However, they soon realized that they may have had good endings in their prior collegiate leagues, but the NCAA is a whole different story. The Pirates fell far from the .500 mark in their first four years in the NCAA and compiled an overall record of 25-47. “Na-experience ko lahat simula guest team pa lang ang Lyceum. Noon, yung pag-compete namin, kapos na kapos pa,” now graduating Wilson Baltazar recalled of that time. He then continued, “Naalala ko nung mga panahong yun, gustong-gusto naming manalo, pero laging kulang effort namin.” Their battleship was now in the sea, but was also now alongside other battleships – other battleships which were bigger, badder, better. Clearly, change had to come. PARTING WAYS Long before he was the leader of a crew that is now in the championship round, Topex Robinson was already leading a generational group in the Finals. In just his first year as head coach of San Sebastian College-Recoletos in 2011, Robinson made it all the way to the Finals, guiding the famed “Pinatubo Trio” of Calvin Abueva, Ronald Pascual, and Ian Sangalang into yet again challenging dynastic San Beda College. Unfortunately, his first championship wasn’t meant to be as he and his alma mater ultimately bowed down to the Red Lions. The former PBA player would not reach the same heights again in Recto. With a 5-13 record in 2014, both Baste and its alumnus had fallen off the map. Clearly, change had to come. SEE YOU AT THE CROSSROADS And so, LPU saw the resignation of 11-year head coach Bonnie Tan while San Sebastian witnessed Robinson’s second departure from the bench. Not long after, LPU and Robinson then found one another. “It was something I didn’t expect to happen so early because, basically, I had just resigned from San Sebastian. I guess I was just blessed to be given an opportunity,” the always amiable mentor now narrates. Just as the Pirates were more than willing to give the young coaching mind a fresh start, the young coaching mind was also more than willing to give the Pirates a fresh start. “It was just an opportunity for me to grow. I always loved coaching and that’s how I always envisioned myself,” he said. He then continued, “So whatever opportunity there is for me to take my calling, I’m always open to that.” THIS IS DIFFERENT Still, Robinson made it clear that it never crossed his mind that he would end up inside the walls of Intramuros – a place he did not really have any ties to. “I never thought of being LPU coach,” he expressed. In fact, he went on to say that in during those first few practices, he had a tough time getting their team name right. As he put it, “Actually, the first year, I still always said, ‘San Sebastian.’ Yung adjustment from San Sebastian then all of a sudden, I was in LPU, it took me a while bago mag-sink in.” Fortunately for the mentor, he had the all-out support of both the school of the students. “What I appreciate about LPU is the support of the students and the management. Yun yung isang bagay na I was really excited about – knowing na I had the full support of the community,” he said. Of course, that all-out support entailed being given the tallest of tasks. “Sa start pa lang, they told me to change the culture. I pretty much explained to them that it’s not an overnight thing, that it’s gonna take a while,” he said. ROUGH START Robinson’s entry didn’t necessarily turn the tides in LPU’s favor. He won four of 18 games in his debut season and then followed that up with a 6-12 record in his sophomore effort. However, he also wasted no time in effecting change in the habits of players. “Yung iniba ni coach Topex, yung disiplina sa team. Ngayon, willing kaming lahat gawin lahat para manalo,” Baltazar shared, noting the difference between the Pirates of old and the Pirates under Robinson. He then continued, “Sa training talaga, dun mo makikita yung pagkakaiba. Ngayon kasi, lahat nag-sacrifice sa training, lahat nagbibigay ng effort mula sa dulo ng bench hanggang first five.” Baltazar went on to say how their new head coach gave his all to make them understand that they are a team and not just a collection of individuals. “Lahat kami, walang entitled, pantay-pantay lang. Kung anong ginagawa ng isa, ginagawa ng lahat,” he said. And while that understanding didn’t translate onto the standings just yet, Robinson already proved that he was up to the tallest of tasks. That did not get lost on the LPU community which entrusted him with its fledgling program. “What I appreciate from them is LPU is really determined to change what was there and make this program one to be respected,” he then continued. Now, the LPU Pirates had their captain. Now, it was just all about assembling the right crew. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

Trump says U.S.-Japan alliance cornerstone of Asia security

U.S. President Donald Trump vowed on Monday to push for a free and balanced trade partnership with Japan after decades of “massive trade deficits” and stressed the U.S.-Japan alliance was the cornerstone of Asian security......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

BEST OF 5 Part 1: The LPU Pirates are knocking on the door of history

The best-ever start to the season in the 93-year history of the NCAA belongs to Lyceum of the Philippines University. Yes, that Pirate crew which has been in the league for only six years. That best-ever start, 18 wins in 18 games, has put LPU straight into the Finals. Meaning, not only have they made their first playoffs, they have also made their first championship round. In doing so, the Pirates were also granted the luxury of a three-week break while watching their challengers in Colegio de San Juan de Letran, San Sebastian College-Recoletos, Jose Rizal University, and San Beda College go at it in successive knockout bouts. And for now, their first-ever Finals is far from the minds of the Intramuros-based squad. LOVE. SERVE. CARE. After setting the league on fire through 18 games, their first agenda was to stay true to the three words on the back of their warmup shirts: “Love, Serve, Care.” “We went to White Cross which is a home for kids who were abandoned,” head coach Topex Robinson shared. “It’s a part of letting them know how blessed they are to be in this situation right now.” Last October 26, LPU visited the orphanage in San Juan to spend time with youngsters whom they want to inspire. While that isn’t necessarily the typical preparation for a big game, it does help with the mental aspect of things – specifically, reminding them that they aren’t bigger than anything. “Amongst us, we know how we handle things. They know that our job isn’t done, that we haven’t accomplished anything yet,” Robinson said. “Rather than boast and be proud, we did a lot of community service so again, it’s going back to service. We could be enjoying everything, but it’s always about helping back and giving back.” HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS And so, two-thirds of the Pirates’ three-week break was devoted to both giving back and looking back. According to their mentor, most of the players went back home to their provinces during the Halloween break. “I gave them three days off to go back to their families. Ang reminder ko dun when they went back is to try to remember where they started and how everything has gone for them,” he shared. He then continued, “It’s always about remembering saan sila nanggaling before.” Robinson went on to say how he reminded CJ Perez of how he went from Pangasinan to San Sebastian College-Recoletos and then transferring to Ateneo de Manila University only to find his home inside the Walls of Intramuros. The same goes for Kim Cinco and Ralph Tansingco who floundered in National University and for Marcelino twins Jaycee and Jayvee who found no place in Adamson University. “It’s always about being grateful for where they are now,” the head coach said. READY. SET. GO. All of this means that mentally, LPU is more than prepared as it sees action in its first-ever Finals – which just so happens to also be its first time playing on the floor of the Araneta Coliseum. Now that has been taken care of, they turn their attention to the game itself. “We were pretty much trying to take it lightly because we had three weeks, but we will be playing Alab (Pilipinas) in a tuneup match,” Robinson said. He then continued, “It’s gonna be our first, pretty much, basketball (since October 19).” That is why, on Sunday, the Pirates took on, and closely competed with, Ray Parks Jr.-led and Jimmy Alapag-coached Alab of the Asean Basketball League. After that, they return to practice to re-ignite the flame that had them setting the league on fire for 18 games. Nobody knows exactly what will happen in Game 1 of the NCAA 93 Finals on Friday at the Araneta Coliseum. One thing is for sure, though: the LPU Pirates will cherish their first-ever Finals, their first time at the Araneta Coliseum, and their first chance to officially put their school at the top tier of teams. After all, just six seasons ago, that was all but a dream for them. LPU and whoever wins between San Beda and San Sebastian will wage war in Game 1 of the NCAA 93 Finals. All of the action will be on S+A, S+A HD, and sports.abs-cbn.com/livestream/ncaa. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 5th, 2017

Free entry in MOA Arena for Alab Pilipinas’ first home game

Alab Pilipinas will be playing in the biggest venue it has ever played in to commence its campaign for the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League. The Filipinos will be playing host to defending champion Hong Kong Eastern Sports Club on November 19 at the MOA Arena. It will be the first time that the Philippines’ representatives in the region’s first and only professional league will be playing in one of the country’s foremost venues. In their maiden season, Alab played in provincial venues as well as the Olivarez College Gym in Paranaque. Now, however, they only want more and more Filipinos to be there to cheer them on. “It’s a treat to our supporters,” team manager Charlie Dy said. The even better news is that seating will be free of charge as the team itself will be giving away tickets for free. Dy said fans only need to check their Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts to find out how to avail of free entry. Those who will make it inside the 20, 000-seater arena in Pasay will be treated to a Filipino team bannered by reigning and defending Local MVP Ray Parks Jr. and coached by legendary Jimmy Alapag. Flanking them are also legendary Dondon Hontiveros, American reinforcements Ivan Johnson and Reggie Okosa, as well as battle-hardened veterans Robby Celiz, Lo Domingo, Pao Javelona, Rico Maierhofer, Pamboy Raymundo, Oping Sumalinog, and Josh Urbiztondo. Alab will be challenging the defending champions who will still be led into battle by World MVP Marcus Elliott and Asean Heritage MVP Tyler Lamb along with Filipino-German Christian Standhardinger. And for those who will not make it inside the MOA Arena, all of the action will still be on S+A, S+A HD, and sports.abs-cbn.com/livestream/abl. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 4th, 2017

BLOGTABLE: Do you believe in the Magic or the Pistons more?

NBA.com blogtable Which team do you believe in more: the 5-2 Orlando Magic or the 5-3 Detroit Pistons? * * * David Aldridge: Despite their loss to the Lakers Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), I'm still more Team Detroit at present, for a couple of reasons. Last season, Orlando was 29th in the NBA in three-point percentage (.328) and 29th in Offensive Rating (101.2). Through the first two weeks of this season, the Magic is first in three-point percentage (.441) and second in Offensive Rating (110.9). I just don't think that kind of perimeter turnaround is sustainable over the course of an entire season. Big men Aaron Gordon and Nikola Vucevic look comfortable shooting three-pointers so far, but it's a long season and big guys wear down. The Magic does have significant upside, to be sure (Gordon playing more at center? Sign me up!), and if there's one thing coach Frank Vogel can build, it's a defense-first team. But I just like Detroit's group. I'm a big Avery Bradley guy; he's a winner and almost everything he does on the court leads to more winning. We'll see if Tobias Harris and Stanley Johnson can be the answers up front, but IMHO, there's no reason Harris can't continue to be a go-to guy. Plus, Andre Drummond looks poised for a big ol' season, and if he gets back to being disruptive defensively and a Hoover on the boards, Detroit can compete against anyone. It would help them if more people actually show up at Little Caesars Arena. Steve Aschburner: Gotta stick with the Pistons for now. Their loss to the Lakers Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) was a disappointment in the context of their back-to-back success over the LA Clippers and the Golden State Warriors, a potential sign of feeling too easily satisfied on the West Coast trip. Detroit has no business even knowing the definition of “complacency.” But I did see them bouncing back this season for a playoff spot in the East, which I didn’t project for the Magic. Orlando has more offensive firepower and talent that’s been due to mature, but let’s see how they’re doing a month from now – nine of their 15 November games are on the road, including a four-game swing out West -- before buying in. Shaun Powell: Wow ... I'll give the edge to the Pistons only because their wins (at Clippers and Warriors) are of higher quality, but it's almost a push. It's possible that we're seeing Aaron Gordon finally turn the corner in Orlando, and right on time since it's a contract year. And likewise for Tobias Harris (interestingly, a Magic giveaway) in Detroit. Both teams made solid offseason pickups in Avery Bradley (Pistons) and Jonathon Simmons (Magic), too. Good to see these franchises are feeling frisky, even in the weak East, although you can't be totally sold on their staying power until they prove otherwise. John Schuhmann: The Magic have the much better point differential, but their five wins are against teams that are otherwise 15-15, while the Pistons' five wins (highlighted by back-to-back road wins over the Clippers and Warriors) are over teams that are otherwise 20-9. It's also clear that Orlando's numbers from three-point range -- they've shot 44 percent and their opponents have shot 28 percent -- are not sustainable. Aaron Gordon as a full-time four (instead of starting the season at small forward like he did last year) makes a big difference and Frank Vogel knows what he's doing, but Detroit has more experienced talent, with Reggie Jackson (Tuesday's game in L.A. notwithstanding) and Andre Drummond both looking much better than they did last season. Sekou Smith: Right now it's fun to see both of these teams we didn't necessarily expect to be playoff contenders come out of the gate as strong as they have. Sometimes you hope you are wrong when you pan a team (like I did to the Magic in our season preview). I believe the Pistons have more of what it takes to sustain a higher level of play this season, based mostly on personnel that fits the playoff profile. But I'm anxious to see if the Magic, led by a couple of my favorite players (Aaron Gordon and Jonathan Simmons), can continue to defy the preseason expectations -- or lack thereof. There's something about the "no-one-believes-in-us" attitude Orlando has that can fuel their fire in ways internal motivation simply cannot......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2017

Nuggets, Bucks go against NBA’s guard-heavy grain

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com They’ve become the must-have accessory in the NBA (just ahead of designer headphones and hoodie warmups), the one player no team can do without, the one player that no team seems to lack. Yes, quality point guards are a dime-a-dozen group now in the NBA. They’re populating the league in such abundance that the Phoenix Suns didn’t flinch when they told disgruntled starter Eric Bledsoe to stay home or the hair salon -- whichever he preferred. It’s hard to find a serious playoff contender that doesn’t have one (and some have two). And then there are the Denver Nuggets and Milwaukee Bucks, who arguably have none. Partly by necessity and partly by choice, both teams are running their offenses through gifted big men and getting reasonably decent results. These two teams are building for a big run while also going against the NBA’s trend … and, by no coincidence, are the two most logical landing spots for Bledsoe in a trade. Pump the brakes, though. Neither seems to be in a rush because they’re weighing the merits of using young, non-traditional point guards as compliments to the centerpieces: Giannis Antetokoumnpo with the Bucks and Nikola Jokic with the Nuggets. Both are solid passers and act as triggers while their point guards orbit around them, defer to them and pick spots to command the ball. But when, if ever, will either team get cold feet and fall in line with the rest of the NBA? The Suns would like to know, but it could be a long wait if the Bucks get the right results from reigning Kia Rookie of the Year Malcolm Brogdon and the Nuggets likewise from Jamal Murray. Their teams are taking a wait-and-see approach with their development while leaning heavily on Antetokounmpo and Jokic’s respective playmaking. Their coaches are saying all the right things: Jason Kidd of the Bucks: “Malcolm knows how to play the right way. He’s getting better. We’re lucky to have him.” Michael Malone of the Nuggets: “I believe in him and [Murray] has to believe in himself.” Yet both coaches are acutely aware that Murray and Brogdon, because of their size, can also play off the ball. Murray, for one, might be better suited as a game-finisher anyway. Both teams are in play for Bledsoe or perhaps a veteran addition either at the trade deadline or in free agency next summer. Brogdon surprised the NBA in winning Rookie of the Year while Ben Simmons missed last season and Joel Embiid played only 31 games. Still, that doesn’t diminish what Brogdon delivered last season and his value to the Bucks now. He’s wiser than most NBA sophomores because he stayed all four years in college and, as a second-round pick, his sense of urgency and hunger was greater than that of lottery picks. Brogdon is a self-made grinder, a consistent player who rarely screws up and is already one of the Bucks’ better defenders. The Bucks know what they’re getting from him on a nightly basis. “I’m a lot more confident,” Brogdon said. “When you have a year of experience and also the experience of playing in the playoffs, it just makes a world of difference. I know what my role is. I feel I’ve found my niche with this team.” Yet, Brogdon’s four assists per game (in 32.1 minutes per game) ranks 38th among starting point guards mainly because of Antetokoumnpo, who handles the ball and runs the offense much like LeBron James does. Brogdon’s ability and willingness to blend with Antetokounmpo is helpful to a system that plays off the young superstar’s multiple skills. Giannis is off to an MVP-like start and the last thing the Bucks want to do is slow his roll. But Kidd also wants Brogdon to sharpen his point guard instincts as well. “We talked about it last year, understanding when it’s time to score, being able to play-make, understanding how to get a teammate a shot, just being consistent when learning how to run the show,” Kidd said. “He’s been able to run the offense and be a leader. “And really, it’s all about that, and understanding who hasn’t touched the ball. That’s what makes a point guard special in this league. Figure out how to get the ball to the right people at the right time. That’s the next step for Malcolm.” The Nuggets waited until the eve of the season to name their starter at point guard, although it was clear last year that Murray had pole position. He assumed the role late in the season from Emmanuel Mudiay (who started 55 games) and Jameer Nelson (40 starts) and kept the ball, starting seven games. That wasn’t the plan when the Nuggets took him No. 7 overall in the 2016 Draft. Mudiay was their point guard of the future and Murray, who didn’t play the position in college at Kentucky, was projected as a scoring guard. But Mudiay’s erratic shooting, limited range and inconsistent playmaking opened up the job, which Murray won almost by default after the Nuggets waived Nelson. Malone admitted that Muray’s edge on Mudiay, a superior athlete, was shooting. Malone wanted someone with deeper range next to Gary Harris to space the floor for Jokic and newcomer Paul Millsap. Problem is, Murray’s shooting (37.1 percent) has been Mudiay-like here in the early season. From Oct. 21-27, he missed 16 straight three-pointers and is making just 18.2 percent of his three-pointers (after shooting 33.4 percent in 2016-17). His defense remains an issue at times (100.6 Defensive Rating this season) and part of the Nuggets’ slow start could be pinpointed to Murray’s growing pains. “I think they drafted me for a reason,” Murray said. “I just go out there and play basketball. I’m not worried about missing. I just got to be thinking about the next shot.” Malone and the Nuggets are taking the long view and realize Murray, 20, is trying to master NBA point guard play on the fly. But if they’re anxious to make a significant move in the tough West this season, the Nuggets’ point guard position might need an upgrade at starter or backup. “He showed me he’s not afraid of the moment,” Malone said, who added that part of the learning experience for players such as Murray means to deal with the not-so-good days and “let them play through it.” The Nuggets and Bucks are hesitant to include Murray or Brogdon in trade talks for good reason: Both are on cheap rookie deals and are big parts of each team’s future. Teams rarely move players this quickly unless there’s a serious issue (think Chris Webber after his rookie season in Golden State) or a deal is too good to skip. It wouldn’t be a surprise if the Nuggets are trying instead to unload Mudiay in a package to Phoenix and the Bucks are selling some combination of John Henson and Matthew Dellavedova. There’s risk, too, in acquiring Bledsoe himself. He went rogue with the Suns and teams usually shy away from players with flapping red flags. If he came to Milwaukee or Denver and didn’t mesh with Giannis or Jokic, it would be a disaster. Until further notice, the Bucks and Nuggets are good to go with the status quo. Teams can gawk all they want at their lack of a true point guard … and then deal with the sight of a 6’11” Antetokounmpo reaching the rim in three steps, or with the sight of 6’10” Jokic throwing Bill Walton-like backdoor passes from the key. Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2017

LPU barges into Finals for first time after besting San Beda in 2OT classic

Lyceum of the Philippines University is not yet done making history in the NCAA 93 Men’s Basketball Tournament. And not even defending champion San Beda College can do anything about it – not right now, at least. CJ Perez’s star shone anew, but Mike Nzeusseu proved to be the difference as the Pirates edged out the Red Lions in a double overtime classic, 107-105, on Thursday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. Perez tallied 20 points, six rebounds, six assists, and four steals while Nzeusseu posted a humongous double-double effort of 27 points and 21 rebounds to go along with two blocks. “Credit goes to the players. They just didn’t wanna give up,” head coach Topex Robinson said post-game. It was also those two who made good on four of six free throws that turned a two-point deficit with under two minutes remaining to a two-point win. Arnaud Noah and Robert Bolick went back-to-back to grant San Beda a 105-103 lead with 1:29 remaining before Perez’s split from the stripe and Nzeusseu’s 2-of-2 trip at the line gave back the lead to the Intramuros-based squad. “San Beda is a strong team. It’s just a testament of working together as a solid group,” their mentor said. Down by one with 12.7 seconds left, the Red Lions gave the ball to Bolick to make something happen, but his try over the outstretched arms of MJ Ayaay and Nzeusseu only hit the front of the ring. Seconds later, another split from the stripe by Perez sealed the deal in LPU’s gritty win. With the gritty win, LPU completes an elimination round sweep last accomplished by San Beda in 2010. With the gritty win, LPU resets the best start to the season in the history of the oldest collegiate league in the country at 18-0. With the gritty win, LPU automatically advances into the championship round – their first trip there since joining the NCAA in 2011. “It’s still a long way to go. There’s still so much that we have to work on,” Robinson said. Birthday boys Jaycee and Jayvee Marcelino also added a combined 13 points, 10 rebounds, six assists, and four steals. The Pirates were already well on their way to a win with Perez granting them a one-point lead with 1.5 ticks to go in the first overtime. The Red Lions were given a break, however, as a controversial call was assessed on Jaycee Marcelino, sending Bolick to the line. The King Lion missed the first before making the second, sending the game to another extra period. There, Bolick still tried his best to take down the league-leaders, but was thwarted by Perez and Nzeusseu. He wound up with 16 points, five rebounds, and three steals. Donald Tankoua was a force with 34 points, 13 rebounds, and two blocks while Javee Mocon chipped in a 14-point, 14-rebound double-double. All of it still weren’t enough to deny LPU’s shot at history. And now, San Beda will have a longer, tougher road to the Finals. With the rule change, they will no longer have any twice-to-beat advantage in the stepladder playoffs despite ending the elimination round at 16-2. BOX SCORES LPU 107 – Nzeusseu 27, Perez 20, Marcelino JC 9, Caduyac 9, Pretta 8, Santos 8, Ayaay 7, Baltazar 6, Serrano 6, Marcelino JV 4, Ibanez 1 SAN BEDA 105 – Tankoua 34, Bolick 16, Mocon 14, Doliguez 13, Abuda 8, Presbitero 6, Soberano 5, Noah 4, Oftana 3, Cabanag 2, Potts 0, Bahio 0, Adamos 0 QUARTER SCORES: 25-22, 56-46, 70-69, 85-85, 97-97 (1OT), 107-105 (2OT) --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 19th, 2017

Atienza: Medical marijuana to turn PH into ‘zombie nation’

Published: 5:33 p.m., Oct. 16, 2017 | Updated: 12:28 a.m., Oct. 17, 2017 Medical marijuana should be weeded out because there is a big chance it could turn the country into a "nation of zombies," Buhay Rep. Lito Atienza said. In a statement, Atienza expressed fears that House Bill No. 6517, which seeks to provide the public free access to medical marijuana, would in effect be a "backdoor decriminalization" of smoking weed. "If other countries wish to destroy themselves by enabling medical marijuana, then let them create their own problems. We Filipinos certainly do not want to degenerate into a nation of zombies," Atienza said. He said that he would fight the bill when it...Keep on reading: Atienza: Medical marijuana to turn PH into ‘zombie nation’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 16th, 2017