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Foot-in-mouth disease

ILOILO City Mayor Jose Espinosa III should take the opportunity to make a stronger and more viable stand on issues hounding Panay Electric Co. like the alleged erroneous overbilling. That opportunity came with the adoption of a report from the City Council’s committee on public utilities chaired by Councilor R Leone Gerochi. With the inclusion […] The post Foot-in-mouth disease appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource: thedailyguardian thedailyguardianJan 11th, 2018

Number of HFMD cases doubles — DOH

MANILA, Philippines — The number of patients infected with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in the country has doubled, the Department of Health (DOH) rep.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 24th, 2017

Statement: NUJP on Secretary Aguirre’s ‘misquoted’ destabilization plot accusation

No, Mr. Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre II, we the media will not be the scapegoats as you try to weasel your way out of your latest bout of foot-in-mouth disease......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsJun 11th, 2017

PBA Finals: Alaska punched in mouth in lackadaisical effort vs Magnolia

The Alaska Aces' 2018 PBA Governors' Cup Finals start has gone off the wrong foot. From tipoff, their opponents, the Magnolia Hotshots looked like a team one step ahead and zoomed to a quick 15-0 run to start Game 1. Furthermore, the swarming defense of Magnolia prevented the Aces from scoring for over the first six minutes, their scoring drought parched by two free throws by Kevin Racal. Coach Alex Compton's squad slowly fought back and trimmed the lead to 12 at halftime, 52-40, with Mike Harris' 17 points leading the way. However, the 35-year old reinforcement just scored three markers in the second half and lost, 100-84. "They hit us in the mouth, took us too long to respond and then once we made a run, we cut the lead in the second half to eight. Two bad mistakes and it came back to 13. They just played harder than us tonight," said Harris after the game. Alaska's poor start was deja-vu all over again for the team, as they also exhibited a nightmarish start against the seventh-seeded Meralco Bolts in Game 1 of the best-of-five semifinals, 97-92. However, they bounced back and won the next three to advance to the best-of-seven championship series. With a similar start, the former NBA player knows it's not too late to respond. "They punched us, but the best thing about getting punched is if that you're strong enough, you'll get up. Punches hurt. It will hurt tonight, sleep on it, and tomorrow forget about it." About his three-point effort in the second half, Harris just laughed it off, but noted he needs to be more aggressive if they want to tie the series in Game 2 on Friday. Three-point and free throw shooting were the main culprits in Alaska's loss, Harris lamented, his team just shooting 7/28 from downtown and a sub-par 19/32 from the line. With that said, Harris knows he must play better if they do not want to dig themselves in an 0-2 hole. "I'm not here to point fingers at anybody except for myself. So, it's me. I could get more offensive rebounds, I can get defensive rebounds, push it a little more, put a little bit more pressure on. Tonight they made the right reads, we didn't."   __     Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 6th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Neo-Nazi youth group covers Melbourne with ‘Gays are a walking disease’ posters

Homophobic posters by neo-Nazi youth group Antipodean Resistance shocked the people of Melbourne, Australia, when these were exposed last week, just in time for Pride Month. The posters plastered along Prahran's Chapel Street bear a rainbow background, a mockery of the LGBTQ community's pride flag, as well as a caricature of a homosexual with its mouth opened, saliva spewing out, holding out a placard saying, "What are you doing about A.I.D.S.?" "Happy AIDS Month" was written in the upper half of the poster while "Gays are a disease" was noted on the poster's lower half. The neo-Nazi's website is listed below the homophobic rhetoric. It is worth noting that the timing for pu...Keep on reading: Neo-Nazi youth group covers Melbourne with ‘Gays are a walking disease’ posters.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

Atlanta Hawks get in sync at new practice facility

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com ATLANTA -- The pregnant check written by Hawks owner Tony Ressler for the team’s glossy new 90,000 square foot training center didn’t concern him as much as the more numerous, smaller ones. As in: Double practice courts? Check. Outdoor swimming pool? Check. Grilling area and on-site gourmet chefs? Check. Video game consoles and a fleet of flat-screen TVs? Check and double check. Still, Ressler and the folks at Emory Healthcare, which teamed with the Hawks to blueprint the place, wanted more for the $50 million. And so they checked off another amenity: An East Coast hub of a California sports science lab that developed a cult following among a number of players and over half the league’s teams. Peak Performance Project carted computers, high-tech gadgets and cutting edge fitness equipment from its Santa Barbara headquarters to set up shop in Atlanta. The company, or P3, helped the Hawks raise the bar in what’s become a practice facility building boom in the NBA, where the Bulls, Sixers, Nets, Kings and Raptors all recently moved into or building swanky centers that could double as country clubs. Yes, the gourmet meals, hydrotherapy pools and theater seating is quite a refreshing change from the prehistoric places in which teams trained before. The Hawks’ old setup was inside Philips Arena, where ironically players had to climb stairs to reach the Stairmaster machines and had the disadvantage of only one practice court. Perhaps the Ground Zero of practice centers, however, was used by the Nets some 20 years ago in New Jersey. They shared a gym, weight room and a locker room with pot-bellied drivers from the owner’s trucking company. Yes, Derrick Coleman sometimes showered next to Fred from Bayonne. Not only have facilities come a long way — the Nets now train on the Brooklyn waterfront with a panoramic view of Lower Manhattan — so has sports science and how it’s being embraced as a necessary part of the game. Ten years ago nobody in the NBA had their bodies poked by scientists or 'scoped by modern technology to learn more about the way those bodies function. Then P3 came along and quickly became the gold standard of technology and sports and a go-to place in the offseason for players looking for an edge. If the NBA All-Star Game draws the biggest collection of talent around the league during the year, then an athletic science lab in Santa Barbara might be next. Damian Lillard, Karl-Anthony Towns, Rudy Gobert, Zach LaVine, Andre Drummond and Kyle Korver are just some of those seduced by science. P3 collects data through assessments of a player’s body and his high velocity movements to identify his physical strengths and weaknesses, raise red flags for areas that could be prone to potential injury, and give him and his team information to help improve performance. There’s also training sessions designed to prevent injuries and enhance the muscles and movements needed to reach potential, an elite athlete optimization that’s suddenly vital to careers. “Their assessments and the data they collect are so valuable to helping you understand what needs to be done,” said Korver. “No question it was so important for my career.” In a section of the Hawks facility used exclusively for P3, there’s a straight running track, some free weights, and hi-tech treadmills. It looks simple, and in a sense, it is, although the science and technology sets it apart and makes it unique. The center can test and train 12 to 15 athletes at a time over a two-hour period. Thousands of athletes from various Olympic, amateur and pro sports have been through the doors in Santa Barbara. No athlete can train without an assessment first. Once the data is received, then a workout conducted by bio-mechanists and performance specialists and tailored specifically for that athlete, based on the results. There’s no one-size-fits-all philosophy at P3. “It’s all individualized,” said Adam Hewitt, the director of operations at P3. “All bodies are different. You can have two guys the same size and have completely different systems. One might have flexibility in his lower, but the other doesn’t. Our thought is, how do we make the athlete better using this technology?” Hewitt said this process is light years ahead of what athletes and teams did just a few years ago, mainly because science and technology is evolving and P3 is trying to stay ahead of the curve. “Others aren’t using bio-technology to assess their athletes,” he said. “We’re showing the value that we can offer. We’ve invested so much and for so long.” P3 looks at the bodies in motion with the help of motion-capture technology similar to those used in video games. The images and information allow P3 to craft workouts to strengthen limbs and also to avoid injury. Just as NBA teams have spent millions building new practice facilities and hiring nutritionists and massage therapists, Elliott thinks it’s wise they make an investment in science. “There’s a revolution going on in sports science and athlete care,” he said. “I think it was overdue in professional sports. Your average sprinter or speed skater has more science data in his physical development and he’s working a part time job at a restaurant to make ends meet. He has more resources going for him than someone you’re paying $20 million a year. That made no sense to me. Contracts are too big and players are too important to take anything to chance. There’s a lot to lose. Even if you don’t understand it all, why wouldn’t you at least want the information on the table? If you don’t have all the information then is hard to play the probability game. You’re making bets on big contracts and on players being able to perform and stay healthy.” The use of force plates to measure explosiveness while jumping is of great use for NBA players and why P3 has growing influence on most of the league. “The NBA is leading our pro sports leagues,” Elliott said. “As a league, they should be proud. The other leagues are trying to copy them. The NFL is trying to catch up, baseball, hockey, teams are starting to hire smarter people and investing more in their performance sports science staffs. A lot has changed. I feel the biggest thing is we’ve been so invested in getting insight into the data. “There’s people in academics asking questions, and people in sport are trying to do the best they can. Rarely do they come together. Our motto is bringing these together. It’s super exciting to see. At the risk of sounding pompous I’d say I’m proud of it. I know the NBA is happy because they can see the bar’s being raised.” The P3 in Atlanta will operate same as usual, with no advertising, just word of mouth and a growing number of clients. The lab anticipates helping NBA players improve their ankle and hip mobility and put them in better position to succeed through science. “It’s about turning it back to advantages to the athlete,” Elliott said. “These guys are super unique.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 16th, 2017

Kai Sotto towers above all with 22-point lead in UAAP 81 Jrs. MVP race

Unsurprisingly, Kai Sotto has been putting up the most impressive numbers after the first round of the UAAP 81 Juniors Basketball Tournament. Ateneo de Manila High School’s towering teen has been posting per game counts of 25.3 points, 12.7 rebounds, 3.3 blocks, and 2.7 assists. He is the league’s best scorer, rebounder and blocker. Those numbers have been more than enough to thrust Sotto onto the very top of the MVP leaderboard with 93.3 Statistical Points (SPs). Not only that, he has a 22-point edge over his closest competitor in Mark Nonoy of University of Sto. Tomas who has 70.9 SPs to his name. More impressive, however, is that with the 7-foot-1, 16-year-old fronting the effort, the Blue Eaglets have not skipped a beat as they are in joint second heading into the second round. This, even after losing all of SJ Belangel, Jason Credo, Dave Ildefonso, and Joaqui Manuel. Nonoy is doing his best to chase down Sotto with averages of 18.3 points, 9.1 rebounds, 5.7 assists, and 1.7 steals – nothing short of impressive especially for a first-year player. At third in the MVP race is Ateneo’s Forthsky Padrigao with 70.0 SPs, but his place there is tenuous as he has only suited up for one game in the season. Not counting Padrigao, rounding out the top five are Far Eastern University-Diliman’s do-it-all guard RJ Abarrientos, Adamson High School’s revelation at forward in AP Manlapaz, and Nazareth School of National University’s versatile big man Carl Tamayo. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News9 hr. 3 min. ago

Kai Sotto stands tall as undisputed leader in juniors MVP race

        MANILA, Philippines – Was there ever any doubt? Ateneo Blue Eaglets’ 7-foot-1 superstar Kai Sotto has emerged as the dominant frontrunner in the MVP race at the end of the first round of the UAAP Season 81 juniors basketball tournament. With league-leading averages of 25.3 points, 12.7 rebounds and 3.3 blocks, the 16-year-old ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated News9 hr. 50 min. ago

Vucevic leads Magic over Bulls 97-91 in Mexico City

By Carlos Rodriguez, Associated Press MEXICO CITY (AP) — Nikola Vucevic scored 26 points, including a tie-breaking jumper with 28 seconds remaining, and the Orlando Magic snapped a three-game losing streak with a 97-91 victory over the Chicago Bulls on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) in their first of two games in Mexico. Vucevic shot 11-for-21 from the field and grabbed 10 rebounds, while D.J. Augustin added 15 points for the Magic. Zach LaVine scored 23 points but the Bulls (6-23) lost for the 10th time in their last 11 games and remained with the worst record in the Eastern Conference. After Lauri Markkanen tied it at 91 with 1:06 left to play, Vucevic nailed a 15-foot jumper to put the Magic ahead and Augustin iced the game with four free throws in the final seconds. The game was the NBA's 27th in Mexico, and Orlando will play Utah on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). Only the United States and Canada have hosted more. Eight of the last 26 games in Mexico have been regular-season contests......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 14th, 2018

PBA Draft: Abu Tratter says he is more than a big man

Concensus 2018 PBA Draft first round pick Abu Tratter is billed as the most promising big man in this year's batch of hopefuls. Despite the tag, Tratter bared that given his capabilities, he could be more than a towering presence. "I think I could be versatile enough to be a guard and a big," he said during the second and last day of the PBA Draft Combine. The 6-foot-6 former De La Salle Green Archer is one of the tallest players in this exceptionally guard-heavy batch. Given the advantage of being one of the few big men in this batch, he points out his athleticism as his main edge. "One way I can separate myself from everybody else is my athleticism. Not a lot of bigs are as athletic and as mobile as me, another great thing is my potential to be a great player," said Tratter. At this point, he shared that several teams have already showed interest in taking him in. "Couple of teams [have talked to me] but whatever team is picking me up, hopefully I can make a greater impact," said Tratter. Aside from his championship days in the UAAP, Tratter also had a solid experience as a Gilas cadet and a D-League stint for Marinerong Pilipino leading up to this year's Draft. He thinks all those valuable experiences will help him be a two-dimensional player in the pros just like his PBA peg, Gabe Norwood. "[I want to be] somebody like Gabe [Norwoord] where you can impact the game not only on offense but also on defense and also set the tone for the team," shared Tratter. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @the9cruz.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 13th, 2018

Little-known JP Calvo plays big in PBA Draft Combine

The PBA Draft Combine may be just for formality purposes for consensus big names and first round picks, but for players under the radar like JP Calvo, it is a very important stage to showcase their arsenal to the scouts present. The former Letran Knight Calvo valued the Combine so much that he finished the two-day event as the MVP after pacing the Combine champions aA-2 with 23 points. He was the anchor of his team after shooting the lights out with 11 points in the first quarter alone. He continued to contribute offensively all game long both by taking shots and setting up his teammates. "Actually, hindi ko expect yung [pagka-MVP ko]. Siguro yun nga, binigay talaga sa akin ni Lord ito. Talagang nag-prepare ako para sa itong draft na ito. So yun, siguro kaya maganda din ang pinakita ko," shared the court general. The 5-foot-8 point guard expressed that it is his limitation vertically that inspired him to shine during the event. "Siyempre sobrang importante para sa akin, kasi nga maliit ako eh. So kailangan ko magpakita, dahil maliit ako, so ginawa ko lang kung ano ang advantage ko para [umangat ako sa mga] kalaban," shared Calvo. Calvo honed his skills in Letran since his high school days and continued to be a reliable point guard up to his last year in the NCAA seniors. On Sunday, Calvo hopes to bring his talent to the next level that is the PBA. "Hindi ko na iniisip [pang-ilan ako mapi-pick]. Yung iniisip ko lang kung saan ako mapupunta at makapirma. Yun lang, di ko iniisip na ganyan, No. 1, No. 2. Ang importante lang ma-pick ako, okay na sa akin," he added. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @the9cruz.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 13th, 2018

Best of the best

  Playing one of his finest and complete tournaments, Magnolia's Paul Lee on Wednesday night won his first Best Player of the Conference (BPC) award over Alaska's Chris Banchero after getting 31 out of 36 first place votes from the covering media.   The 6-foot dynamo finished fourth in the statistical points (SP) race and was just a rung ahead of Banchero before getting 424 out of 885 points from the media votes to tally 1013.   Statistical leader and rookie Christian Standhardinger was third, with NorthPort's Stanley Pringle winding up fourth and Barangay Ginebra's Japeth Aguilar bringing up the rear of the five-man pack of candidates.   Banc...Keep on reading: Best of the best.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 12th, 2018

UAAP juniors: Blue Eaglets cruise past winless Junior Warriors

    MANILA, Philippines – The Ateneo Blue Eaglets continued their dominant streak in the UAAP Season 81 juniors basketball tournament with a 84-62 blowout over the winless UE Junior Warriors at the Ateneo Blue Eagle Gym on Wednesday, December 12.  Seven-foot-one sensation Kai Sotto dropped an easy 25 points and 7 rebounds ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 12th, 2018

Bledsoe has 20 points, 12 boards as Bucks beat Cavs 108-92

By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press MILWAUKEE (AP) — Eric Bledsoe had 20 points and 12 rebounds, and the Milwaukee Bucks shot 52 percent from three-point range in the first half of a 108-92 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time). Malcolm Brogdon scored 18 points on 8-of-12 shooting, while Sterling Brown had 12 points and eight rebounds for the Bucks, who rested Giannis Antetokounmpo on the second night of back-to-back games. He was ruled out about an hour before the game with neck soreness. Leading by 18 points at the half and by as much as 26 in the third quarter, the Bucks hardly needed their All-Star forward against one of the NBA's worst teams. Cleveland's Tristan Thompson had 12 points on 6-of-7 shooting and added six rebounds, but left in the third quarter with a left foot injury. Jaron Blossomgame had 11 points and 10 rebounds, while Larry Nance Jr. scored a team-high 16 points. The Cavaliers did manage to cut the deficit in half, to 13, with 5:40 left and the Bucks playing mostly backups. It was close enough that coach Mike Budenholzer put most of his starters back in the game until the closing minutes. Otherwise, the game was decided in the first half, when the Bucks — one of the top three-point shooting teams in the league — hit 11-of-21 from beyond the arc. Bledsoe was 4-of-5 from three-point territory, with all his attempts before halftime. Brown came off the bench to provide a spark in the first half, hustling all over the court to grab boards and defend. His transition dunk after a turnover with 2:08 left in the second quarter gave Milwaukee a 57-36 lead. It didn't matter much when the 6'10" Thompson was in the game, anyway. The Cavs were outscored 50-40 in the paint and out-rebounded 58-46, even with the high-flying Antetokounmpo missing the game for Milwaukee. The Bucks finished 15-of-36 (42 percent) from three-point range for the night. TIP-INS Cavaliers: G Matthew Dellavedova scored 11 points in 16 minutes in making his debut in second stint with Cleveland. A fan favorite in Cleveland, Dellavedova was acquired from the Bucks on Friday (Saturday, PHL time) in a three-team deal that sent George Hill to Milwaukee. He played sporadic minutes this season for the Bucks. Bucks: Hill scored two points in 13 minutes in making his Bucks debut, often matched up defensively against Dellavedova. C Jason Smith, who was acquired from the Wizards in the same deal, went scoreless in four minutes in his first game with Milwaukee. ... G Pat Connaughton was inactive. UP NEXT Cavaliers: Host the New York Knicks on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Bucks: Visit Indiana Pacers on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 11th, 2018

Dominant defense leads Bears over Rams 15-6

By Andrew Seligman, Associated Press CHICAGO (AP) — Eddie Goldman led a dominant effort by the defense, and the Chicago Bears shut down Jared Goff and Los Angeles' high-powered offense in a 15-6 victory over the NFC West champion Rams on Sunday night. The Rams (11-2) missed a chance to secure a first-round playoff bye and fell into a tie with New Orleans for home-field advantage throughout the NFC playoffs. Goff threw a career-high four interceptions and was sacked three times, with Goldman getting to him for a tiebreaking safety early in the third quarter. Bradley Sowell became the first Bears offensive lineman in 11 years with a touchdown reception when he caught a 2-yarder from Mitchell Trubisky in the third quarter. "For them to go out and do it (against) a team that had only one loss all year long ... is so powerful for our guys now because it helps us grow," coach Matt Nagy said. "It helps us grow with confidence. It helps us grow togetherness. When you teach that and you talk about it over and over and over — as a culture, as a building, everyone together as a family — and then they do it, it lights a fire. It puts us in a great position. We do talk about one game at a time. They're gonna enjoy tonight and then we're gonna get right back in it and get ready for next week." Coming off a shaky outing against Detroit, Goff was 20 of 44 for 180 yards with a 19.1 rating. NFL rushing leader Todd Gurley ran for a season-low 28 yards on 11 carries, and the Rams' three-game win streak came to an end. The Rams' only other loss was at New Orleans. But against the Monsters of the Midway, they managed just 214 yards. "Tonight was a humbling experience for me as a head coach," Los Angeles' Sean McVay said. The NFC North-leading Bears (9-4) bounced back from a wild overtime loss at the New York Giants and won for the sixth time in seven games. Trubisky was about as bad as Goff. After missing the previous two games because of a right shoulder injury, he was 16 of 30 for 110 yards and three interceptions. But Khalil Mack and Akiem Hicks had sacks. Roquan Smith, Prince Amukamara, Eddie Jackson and Kyle Fuller had interceptions, helping Chicago beat the team that came in with the NFL's best record. Goldman broke a 6-6 tie in the opening minute of the third quarter when he sacked Goff for Chicago's first safety this season. The Bears then used a trick play they call "Santa's Sleigh" to make it 15-6, when Sowell hauled in a 2-yarder from Trubisky on a play-action with defensive end Hicks. That made him the first Bears offensive lineman with a TD reception since John St. Clair against Kansas City on Sept. 16, 2017. The Rams had a big opportunity late in the third when John Johnson III returned an interception 35 yards to the Chicago 27. But Fuller picked off a wobbly pass from Goff intended for Josh Reynolds on the next play. Los Angeles' Greg Zuerlein missed a 40-yard field goal off the right upright in the opening minutes of the fourth after making a 50-yarder earlier in the game. INJURIES Rams: CB Dominique Hatfield was taken from the field on a cart with an ankle injury in the third quarter. He was hurt on the kickoff following Sowell's TD. ... C John Sullivan was evaluated for a concussion after being shaken up blocking on a run by Gurley late in the first quarter. But he returned in the second half. Bears: CB Bryce Callahan left the game with a foot injury late in the first half. UP NEXT Rams: Host Philadelphia on Dec. 16. Bears: Host Green Bay on Dec. 16......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

ABL: ABL: Alab s new recruit Brandon Rosser plays like Jay Washington, says Alapag

Brand new Alab recruit Brandon Rosser announced his arrival in the ASEAN Basketball League with a one-handed buzzer-beating dunk Sunday at the Sta. Rosa Multipurpose Sports Complex. The 24-year-old athlete emphatically cleaned up a Renaldo Balkman shot that was supposed to clank off just seconds before the opening frame ended versus CLS Knights Indonesia. Brandon Rosser ends the quarter with a BANG 😳 #ABL9 pic.twitter.com/d9pw5AAxy7 — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) December 9, 2018 "I think that was the first tip dunk I've ever had in a game and I think my first buzzer beater as well so getting it both for the first time is pretty cool," he said while narrating his first ABL conversion after Alab's victory, 94-67, over the Knights. The Fil-Am Rosser, who is the younger brother of San Miguel's Matt Ganuelas-Rosser in the PBA, is one of the several new faces of the young Alab Pilipinas roster. With a brother who already knows the ropes around Filipino basketball, he shared the wisdom that was given to him leading up to his Alab debut. "He said that the Filipino fans really appreciate hardworkers so I just come in and be myself and play for the fans and play for the country," said the younger Rosser whose brothers were present in the game. And hard work was exactly what he did in his first game where he finished with six points, two rebounds, two assists. He held his own while defending against massive opponents from the CLS Knights. Alab Head coach Jimmy Alapag gave high praise for the 6-foot-7 forward, as he likened Rosser to former San Miguel Beermen player and current Rain or Shine Elasto Painter, Jay Washington. "Brandon just gives us so much more versatility. He’s a guy who’s 6-foot-7 but he can shoot it, he can put it on the floor. He reminds me a lot of a young Jay Washington. Somebody who gets to the rim, somebody who can knock down perimeter shots. He’s a tough kid," said the sophomore Alab mentor. When asked to comment on the comparison to a PBA champion, Rosser expressed his excitement to reinforce it. "I've heard that comparison before. My brother actually played with Jay Wash too, so I've seen his game. Coach Jimmy, he's always looking out, anything he says, I listen. If he can say that, I'll just keep on building on that and I'll be game," Rosser said. Rosser started his collegiate career in Central Arizona College and finished at the University of California, Riverside. Playing in the ABL for Alab is his first professional basketball stint. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @the9cruz.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Largely unknown Bongao Fort in Tawi-Tawi resurfaces after huge September fire

After years of being hidden in the midst of houses and actually reused as a residential area, Bongao's less-known Spanish colonial fortification resurfaces following a huge fire in October which destroyed a number of homes in its Poblacion or town center. In an article by American anthropologist Alexander Spoehr in the defunct Sulu Studies Journal based on the 1899 drawings of an American Army officer named H. M. Reeve, he noted a section of the fort was still standing during his visit in Bongao in 1969. Spoehr mentioned that according to Reeve, the structure which had a commanding view of the town's harbor had 12-foot walls, with peepholes for guns, and no roof. A sketch by...Keep on reading: Largely unknown Bongao Fort in Tawi-Tawi resurfaces after huge September fire.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 9th, 2018

UAAP Season 81 volleyball: DLS-Z brings girls title back to Alabang

De La Salle-Zobel brought the crown back to Alabang after completing a Finals series sweep of dethroned National University, 25-21, 25-23, 15-25, 16-25, 15-8, Sunday to rule the UAAP Season 81 girls volleyball tournament at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Just like in the series opener, the Junior Lady Spikers squandered a two-set lead but made up for their miscues with a strong start in the fifth frame to knock the Bullpups off the throne after a four-year reign. Season Most Valuable Player Angel Canino fired 19 attacks and had two kill blocks in her 21-point outing while Alleiah Malaluan added 15 points for the Alabang-based squad’s 10th title overall and first since Season 75 during the senior year of Dawn Macandili and Kim Kianna Dy.    “Lahat ng hirap ng mga bata yun talaga ang gusto kong bigyan ng appreciation. Kung hindi naman dahil sa kanila, yung tulong nila, yung sakripisyo nila hindi namin magagawa ito,” said sophomore DLS-Z coach Tina Salak, who herself was a two-time UAAP champion as setter for Far Eastern University in the mid-90s.  The Junior Lady Spikers opened the match on the right foot, taking the first two sets but Bullpups behind the trio of Faith Nisperos, Jimy Jamili and Erin Pangilinan fought back to force another five-set affair. DLS-Z zapped the energy away from NU with a devastating 8-0 barrage that saw Malauan land three of her four aces in the that telling opening run. The Bullpups were able to cut their deficit to 9-6 only to see the Junior Lady Spikers take the crown off their heads.   “Super happy (sa championship). Super happy rin po ako sa mga seniors kasi para sa kanila po yun (title), for the seniors po yun,” said second year hitter Canino. “Hindi ko rin po ini-expect na ganito ang lalaruin namin and super happy ako sa kilabasan na laro namin.” Finals MVP and outgoing captain Justine Nazareno had nine markers while Theo Bonafe got seven for DLS-Z, which will part ways with other graduating players Jewel Encarnacion, Giovannah Macavinta, Alyssa Cruz and Bea Bonafe. Nisperos finished with 21 points while Jamili and Pangilinan had 16 and 14 markers, respectively, for NU. Earlier, Canino received the season MVP award to go with her Best 1st Outside Spiker plum in a short ceremony. Malaluan was the Best 2nd Outside Spiker and Best Server winner. Other awardees were Adamson's May Ann Nique (Best 1st Middle Blocker) and Ayesha Juegos (Best Opposite Spiker), FEU-Diliman's Alexis Miner (Best 2nd Middle Blocker), NU's Camille Lamina (Best Setter) and University of Santo Tomas' Det Pepito (Best Libero). Meanwhile, the Bullpups inched closer to claiming the boys crown after taking down Far Eastern University-Diliman, 25-19, 22-25, 25-8, 25-13, in their best-of-three series opener. Game 2 of the Finals is on Wednesday.       --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 9th, 2018

Alab scares off visiting Indonesians for strong start in ABL title defense

STA. ROSA, LAGUNA – In just its first game in the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League, Alab Pilipinas is already as good as advertised. Renaldo Balkman picked up where he left off, PJ Ramos powered his way through anything and everything, and the Filipinos pounded on outmatched CLS of Indonesia for a 94-67 decision on Sunday at the Sta. Rosa Multi-Purpose Complex here. The Philippines wasted no time in showing off its new and improved firepower as Balkman, their returning reinforcement, did damage from the outside just as Ramos, their new hulking help, had his way inside. Those two merged for 17 points in the opening salvo, by themselves outscoring the Knights who only mustered 14 in the same timeframe. The Alab lead would only balloon to as much as 31. Balkman wound up with 33 points, 11 rebounds, three assists, three steals, and three blocks while Ramos had 20 markers, 13 boards, and five dimes. Back-to-back Ray Parks Jr. Local MVP, with just 10 points and two assists, didn’t even have to do much for the Filipinos to get off its title defense off on the right foot. Maxie Esho topped the scoring column for the Indonesians with 20 points. They fall to 1-4 in the season. The two teams meet again a week from now, only that time, in Surabaya. BOX SCORES ALAB PILIPINAS 94 – Balkman 33, Ramos 20, Parks Jr. 10, Domingo 6, Rosser 6, Alvano 5, Tiongson 4, Javelona 4, Urbiztondo 3, Torres 3, Alabanza 0, Rivero 0 CLS KNIGHTS 67 – Esho 20, Hurt 19, Utomo 12, Brandon 7, Baskoro 3, Jawato 2, Wong 2, Panagan 2, Kurniawan 0, Hidayat 0, Nugroho 0 QUARTER SCORES: 23-14, 46-27, 74-67, 94-67 —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riego.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 9th, 2018

UAAP: Unbeaten Bullpups bury Jr. Warriors in 72-point hole

STANDINGS NU 5-0 Ateneo 4-1 Adamson 3-2 DLSZ 3-2 FEU-Diliman 3-2 UST 2-3 UE 0-5 UPIS 0-5 Nazareth School of National University is far from full strength and yet, it remains the standard of the UAAP 81 Juniors Basketball Tournament. Gerry Abadiano and Terrence Fortea showed the way, but all of the Bullpups played their parts to perfection as they ran hapless University of the East out of the Blue Eagle Gym in Quezon City to the tune of a 72-point obliteration, 115-43, on Saturday. Abadiano and Fortea scored 17 and 16 points, respectively, to lead four other teammates in double-digits as they stayed spotless after five games. “Mas maganda yung movement ng bola namin kanina compared sa ibang games tapos yung defense naman, maganda rin from start to finish,” head coach Goldwin Monteverde said post-game. It was those two who got going right from tip-off and, alongside Reyland Torres and Kevin Quiambao, combined for 28 points in the first half. With just the four of them, NU already outscored all of the Junior Warriors at that point, 28-18. The Bullpups would not take their foot off the pedal the rest of the way even as Abadiano and Fortea rested on the bench for much of the second half. In the end, Torres had 13 points, six rebounds, three assists, and two steals while Quiambao had 10 markers, five boards, and two dimes. Little-known Menard Songcuya and Renzo Abiera also contributed 10 points apiece to help make up for the absence of Batang Gilas big man Carl Tamayo. “Yung process of becoming a team, yung biggest challenge pa rin namin is how to play together,” coach Goldwin said. Shane Dichoso paced still winless UE with nine points. In the day’s other game, Adamson High School topped University of Sto. Tomas in overtime, 77-74. Andrey Doria dropped half of his 14 points in the extra period to go along with a total of seven rebounds while brother Adam also added 18 markers, five boards, and three steals as the Baby Falcons forged a three-way tie for third-place at 3-2. Big man Lorenz Capulong also came up big with a 17-point, 14-rebound to make sure they overcame an off-game by main man Joem Sabandal who only had eight points before leaving the game due to an apparent left leg injury. For the Tiger Cubs, Mark Nonoy stuffed the stat sheet anew with 20 points, 10 rebounds, and eight assists. He also had 10 turnovers, however, and as a team, they saw their 34 turnovers get converted into 21 points to fall to 2-3 in the standings. BOX SCORES THIRD GAME NU 115 – Abadiano 17, Fortea 16, Torres 13, Quiambao 10, Songcuya 10, Abiera 10, Gonzales 7, Alarcon 6, Vinoya 6, Buensalida 5, Javillonar 4, Enriquez 4, Dayrit 4, Felicilda 3, Mailim 0. UE 43 – Dichoso 9, Flores 7, Agbas 6, Almacen 6, Escamilla 5, Sullano 4, Dy Tioco 3, Alinsoring 2, Villarta 1, Tan 0, Lima 0, Gatdula 0, Santos 0, Tajonera 0, Mendoza 0. QUARTER SCORES: 27-10, 57-18, 92-30, 115-43. FOURTH GAME ADAMSON 77 – Ad. Doria 18, Capulong 17, An. Doria 14, Sabandal 8, Prodigo 6, Engbino 5, Santos 4, Hanapi 2, Barcelona 2, Dominguez 1, Nitura 0. UST 74 – Nonoy 20, Marzan 16, Benzonan 14, Casingcasing 12, Lina 10, Sumabat 2, Oliva 0, Manabat 0, Estrella 0, Amador 0, Dumlao 0, Dolendo 0, Gamboa 0. QUARTER SCORES: 25-15, 40-32, 53-43, 66-66, 77-74. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018