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Focus more on how long Tiger Woods lasts more than his score

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — One year later, the scene hadn't changed. Jordan Spieth paused on the 17th green and looked across the water to the adjacent fairway at Albany Golf Club as Tiger Woods hit his shot to the ninth green, just like he did last year at the Hero World Challenge. Curiosity is just as high over another return from injury for Woods and how he will fare after a long layoff. What's different about the expectations for this comeback — his fifth since he first had back surgery in the spring of 2014 — is they are more about how long Woods will last than what kind of scores he posts. "He seems more confident this year the way he's walking and talking," Spieth said Wednesday in a whisper, having lost his voice to illness. "He seemed more excited at the Presidents Cup before he was even swinging, more anxious. And it seemed to really bother him that he was following doctor's orders, like he really wanted to get going. So once he was given the go, I think it was exciting for him. "So we're all very interested, as we should be, in how it goes for him this week — and obviously, hoping that's the start." The start of his latest comeback is Thursday against an 18-man field that features eight of the top nine players in the world. It's the first time every shot counts for Woods since a 77 in the Dubai Desert Classic on Feb. 3. That was his seventh round in his return. He withdrew the next day, citing back spasms, and had a fourth back surgery in April to fuse two disks in his lower back. Woods reports some stiffness and not as much range in motion. But he says he has no pain. The hype about this return has been fueled by friendly rounds over the last few weeks. Justin Thomas, the PGA Tour player of the year who will be paired with Woods on Thursday, said fans will be "shocked at how good his game looks." Rickie Fowler made a casual reference to how far Woods was driving it past him. Brad Faxon, who played with Woods and Dustin Johnson last Friday in a round with President Donald Trump, said Woods looked at ease and held nothing back in his swing, especially with the driver. Woods had to keep score in his pro-am round Wednesday, and that included a 2 on the 350-yard seventh hole when he drove the green with a breeze at his back and holed a 20-foot putt for eagle. The tournament is unofficial, though it offers world ranking points. Woods is at No. 1,199 in the world, and even if he finishes last, he'll move up more than 200 spots into the top 1,000. That still seems odd for a guy who spent 683 weeks at No. 1 in the world. What enthuses Woods is playing again. "It's been a very long time, and I'm really looking forward to getting out there and playing with Justin and having a good time," Woods said. After that, it will be time to reassess. "I just really want to be able to complete this week, play all four days and give myself a chance on that back nine on Sunday to win this thing," said Woods, whose last victory was more than four years ago at Firestone in the Bridgestone Invitational. He lasted only three starts when he came back from his first back surgery in the summer of 2014. He lasted two starts after he returned at the end of 2014, and then after playing all four majors in 2015, he had a pair of back surgeries. And when he returned from those last year in the Bahamas, he lasted only three events. "My physio was certainly working overtime last year after every day and even in the morning, trying to get me ready to go," Woods said. Woods said the reason his comeback last year was over so quickly was due primarily to the rough at Torrey Pines and not realizing his disk was in bad shape. He said the deceleration in his swing when he hit out of the rough made the injury worse. That's why there's so much emphasis on his health. He looks built to last, or at least last a little longer. And this is the ideal spot for Woods to return. There is no cut. Woods is guaranteed four rounds. Interest is high. Pressure is not. "I think it's an easy week for Tiger as it is for anybody else versus other weeks — not as many people, the golf course doesn't beat you up," Spieth said. "But you can start to see it's actually, I think, pretty important, these end-of-the-year tournaments to kind of set a precedent for next year." That especially holds true for Woods......»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnNov 30th, 2017

Focus more on how long Tiger Woods lasts more than his score

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — One year later, the scene hadn't changed. Jordan Spieth paused on the 17th green and looked across the water to the adjacent fairway at Albany Golf Club as Tiger Woods hit his shot to the ninth green, just like he did last year at the Hero World Challenge. Curiosity is just as high over another return from injury for Woods and how he will fare after a long layoff. What's different about the expectations for this comeback — his fifth since he first had back surgery in the spring of 2014 — is they are more about how long Woods will last than what kind of scores he posts. "He seems more confident this year the way he's walking and talking," Spieth said Wednesday in a whisper, having lost his voice to illness. "He seemed more excited at the Presidents Cup before he was even swinging, more anxious. And it seemed to really bother him that he was following doctor's orders, like he really wanted to get going. So once he was given the go, I think it was exciting for him. "So we're all very interested, as we should be, in how it goes for him this week — and obviously, hoping that's the start." The start of his latest comeback is Thursday against an 18-man field that features eight of the top nine players in the world. It's the first time every shot counts for Woods since a 77 in the Dubai Desert Classic on Feb. 3. That was his seventh round in his return. He withdrew the next day, citing back spasms, and had a fourth back surgery in April to fuse two disks in his lower back. Woods reports some stiffness and not as much range in motion. But he says he has no pain. The hype about this return has been fueled by friendly rounds over the last few weeks. Justin Thomas, the PGA Tour player of the year who will be paired with Woods on Thursday, said fans will be "shocked at how good his game looks." Rickie Fowler made a casual reference to how far Woods was driving it past him. Brad Faxon, who played with Woods and Dustin Johnson last Friday in a round with President Donald Trump, said Woods looked at ease and held nothing back in his swing, especially with the driver. Woods had to keep score in his pro-am round Wednesday, and that included a 2 on the 350-yard seventh hole when he drove the green with a breeze at his back and holed a 20-foot putt for eagle. The tournament is unofficial, though it offers world ranking points. Woods is at No. 1,199 in the world, and even if he finishes last, he'll move up more than 200 spots into the top 1,000. That still seems odd for a guy who spent 683 weeks at No. 1 in the world. What enthuses Woods is playing again. "It's been a very long time, and I'm really looking forward to getting out there and playing with Justin and having a good time," Woods said. After that, it will be time to reassess. "I just really want to be able to complete this week, play all four days and give myself a chance on that back nine on Sunday to win this thing," said Woods, whose last victory was more than four years ago at Firestone in the Bridgestone Invitational. He lasted only three starts when he came back from his first back surgery in the summer of 2014. He lasted two starts after he returned at the end of 2014, and then after playing all four majors in 2015, he had a pair of back surgeries. And when he returned from those last year in the Bahamas, he lasted only three events. "My physio was certainly working overtime last year after every day and even in the morning, trying to get me ready to go," Woods said. Woods said the reason his comeback last year was over so quickly was due primarily to the rough at Torrey Pines and not realizing his disk was in bad shape. He said the deceleration in his swing when he hit out of the rough made the injury worse. That's why there's so much emphasis on his health. He looks built to last, or at least last a little longer. And this is the ideal spot for Woods to return. There is no cut. Woods is guaranteed four rounds. Interest is high. Pressure is not. "I think it's an easy week for Tiger as it is for anybody else versus other weeks — not as many people, the golf course doesn't beat you up," Spieth said. "But you can start to see it's actually, I think, pretty important, these end-of-the-year tournaments to kind of set a precedent for next year." That especially holds true for Woods......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Woodland sets PGA record but leads by only a stroke at PGA

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press ST. LOUIS (AP) — Sirens blared across Bellerive, putting the second round of the PGA Championship on hold and ending a day of scoring rarely seen in a major. Gary Woodland set the 36-hole record — for now, anyway — after a round where his driver wasn't as reliable, he didn't see many putts drop and he didn't hit the ball quite as well as the day before. "I can live with that," he said Friday after a 4-under 66. That put him at 10-under 130, breaking by one the PGA Championship record and tying the 36-hole score for all majors. And it was only good for a one-shot lead over Kevin Kisner. There were two rounds of 63, one 64 and six 65s. And that was only half of the 156-man field. Still to be determined was whether Woodland's score even holds up as the lead. Storms arrived forcing a two-hour suspension, and the PGA of America declared the rest of the day a wash when rain pounded the course. Rickie Fowler had just birdied the 10th hole and was at 7 under. Tiger Woods had three birdies through seven holes as he tried to get in range. "I felt I was headed in the right direction," said Woods, who was at 3 under. "Tomorrow is going to be a long day for a lot of us." The second round was to resume at 7 a.m. local time. The greens would be slightly smoother, the course slightly longer, the approach unchanged — see flag, aim at flag. Perhaps it was easy for Woodland not to be overly impressed. He was playing with Kisner, who shot 29 on the back nine and was in the middle of the ninth fairway — his final hole — needing a birdie to become the first player to shoot 62 in the PGA Championship. He came up short of the green, chipped too strong and made bogey for a 64, leaving him one shot out of the lead Friday. Right in front of them was U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka, who had a 20-foot birdie putt he wanted to make for no other reason than he likes to make birdies. This one missed, and only later did Koepka realize it was for 62. Instead, he was the 15th player to shoot 63 in the PGA Championship. "My caddie said something walking off," Koepka said. "I didn't even think of it. I've been so in the zone, you don't know where you are." And then Charl Schwartzel made it 16 players with his eight-birdie round of 63. No one from the afternoon draw completed more than 12 holes. The plan was to finish the second round, make the cut and then immediately start the third round in threesomes off both tees. "I feel like we're in a good spot," Fowler said. "But the nice thing about the delay and going back out tomorrow morning, we'll get fresh greens." Bellerive really had no defense. Woodland and Kisner played in the same group, and they offered a great example that Bellerive is accommodating to just about any game. Woodland is among the most powerful players in golf. Kisner is not. He relies more on a clean hit with his irons and a great short game. The course is so soft — not so much from Tuesday's rain, but the extreme heat that requires more water on the turf — that every flag is accessible provided players find the ample fairways. "Greens are receptive, so my 4-iron stops as quick as his 7-iron," Kisner said. "If they were firm, I don't think I would have a chance with the way the greens are situated and the places they're putting the flags. But being receptive, that's my only hope." Woodland's 36-hole score broke the PGA record by one shot, most recently set by Jimmy Walker and Robert Streb at Baltusrol. It also tied the 36-hole record for all majors, matching Jordan Spieth at the 2015 Masters, Martin Kaymer at the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 and Brandt Snedeker (Royal Lytham & St. Annes in 2012) and Nick Faldo (Muirfield in 1992) at the British Open. Koepka was at 8-under 132, two shots behind. Dustin Johnson, the world's No. 1 player, had a 66 and joined Schwartzel and Thomas Pieters (66) at 133. Spieth still has hope in his second try at a career Grand Slam. Spieth didn't get under par for the tournament until his seventh hole Friday — the par-3 16th hole — and he managed to do enough right for a 66 to get within seven shots of the lead. Spieth has battled with his game all year, and his confidence isn't at its peak. It's the nature of the course that makes him feel he has a farther climb than the seven shots that separate him from Woodland. "A little frustrated at this place in general," Spieth said. "This course would be phenomenal — and probably is phenomenal — if it's not playing soft. You get away with more. You don't have to be as precise. ... Personally, I would prefer more difficult and firmer, faster conditions on the greens. Having said that, I would have shot a much higher score yesterday." Defending champion Justin Thomas was at 2 under through seven holes, while Rory McIlroy was frustrated with all pars in his seven holes. On a day like this, that meant losing ground. "It's been 16 pars in a row from yesterday to today, so hopefully I can break that run in the morning," McIlroy said. Midway through the afternoon round, the cut was projected to be even par. Woodland, even with the lowest 36-hole score in 60 years of stroke play at the PGA Championship, still had a long way to go. In conditions like Bellerive, no lead was safe. "I feel safe because I feel safe where my game is," Woodland said. "I'm not too worried with what anyone else is doing out there.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Hossler in 3-way tie for lead, Woods 4 back at TPC Potomac

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press POTOMAC, Md. (AP) — Beau Hossler has been hanging around the lead on the weekend in search of his first PGA Tour victory, and he gets another chance at the Quicken Loans National. So does Tiger Woods. Hossler, the 23-year-old in his first full year on the tour, birdied four of his last five holes and finished with a 35-foot birdie putt on No. 18 for a 4-under 66, giving him a share of the lead with Ryan Armour and Brian Gay. Armour (65) and Gay (64) each made short birdies on the par-3 ninth hole to finish their rounds and tie for lead. Woods finished a steamy morning on the TPC Potomac at Avenel with two pars that felt just as big. On a day in which he made seven birdies — all but two of them from 15 feet or longer — Woods didn't let a good round go to waste at the end. He saved par from the bunker on the eighth and ninths holes for a 65. That matched his low score of the year and left him four shots behind, the closest he has been going into the weekend since he was two shots back at the Valspar Championship. "I'm not that far back," Woods said. "The scores aren't going to be that low and it's going to be a tough weekend. It will be over 100 degrees and it will be a long weekend mentally and physically. I'm in a good position now." Hossler has at least a share of the 36-hole lead for the third time this year, and he had a close call in the Houston Open, losing in a playoff to Ian Poulter. He has shot in the 60s in 21 of his last 38 rounds. "I've had a lot of really good rounds. Unfortunately, I've had some kind of high ones that are uncharacteristic for me," Hossler said. "I think that was six in a row in the 60s, so I'm feeling good. I'm getting it in play nicely off the tee and I'm rolling the putter really well, so that obviously helps." They were at 9-under 131, one shot ahead of Francesco Molinari (65) and Billy Horschel (68). Molinari, who is playing the Quicken Loans National and John Deere Classic with hopes of boosting his FedEx Cup standing, hit all 18 greens in regulation. Woods was among 20 players separated by four shots going into the weekend that is expected to be hot as ever along the Potomac River. The course rated the fourth-toughest on the PGA Tour schedule last year behind only three majors, though the greens have remained mostly receptive even under a blistering sun on Friday. "I think the course changed a little bit at the end of the day," Horschel said after finishing in the afternoon. "I think the course will be a little bit firm, a little bit faster, but I don't think it's going to be anywhere what it was last year, so I think you can still go out there and score. We're going to try to put two more rounds in the 60s, see where it puts us for Sunday." Hossler had a 66 on Sunday at the Travelers Championship to tie for second behind Bubba Watson. He began his big finish by driving just through the green on the reachable 14th for a simple up-and-down birdie, stuffed his approach to 3 feet on the next hole, and then took on the water to the right of the green on the par-3 17th and hit that to 6 feet for birdie. Gay started on the back nine and opened with five birdies in eight holes before his momentum slowed. Armour, playing in the same group, had only one birdie in 10 holes until he finished with four birdies on the front nine. "Brian got off to such a hot start, you were just trying to keep up," Armour said. "You were just trying not to fall too far behind him, and if you do that, you probably were up near the lead." Rickie Fowler, the only player from the top 10 in the world playing this week, shot a 66 and was in the group five shots behind. Woods didn't make a putt over 8 feet in the opening round. He started Friday with a 25-foot birdie putt on the par-5 10th, and after a bogey from the hazard on the next hole, followed that with an 18-foot birdie putt. His biggest shot was chipping in from 80 feet on the 18th for birdie as he made the turn. His favorite shot was a 3-wood he hammered from 282 yards onto the green at the par-5 second hole for a two-putt birdie. It added to a 65 and a realistic chance going into the weekend. "I think I'm not that far away from putting it together where I can win," Woods said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

US Open hopes ultimate test doesn t feature trick questions

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — The U.S. Open wants to be the ultimate test in golf, and sometimes that leads to a series of trick questions. One of them was 14 years ago at Shinnecock Hills. A year after Jim Furyk tied the U.S. Open scoring record at Olympia Fields, the 2004 U.S. Open was so bone dry and lightning fast that only three players broke par on the weekend, none on Sunday. Fans having to move to the side because of a golf ball rolling toward them is not unusual, except when the player hit the shot with his putter from the green. Tee shots that landed on the seventh green rolled off the putting surface and into a bunker. One year after Rory McIlroy broke the U.S. Open scoring record at Congressional, no one broke par at Olympic Club in 2012 when Webb Simpson won. Moments like this lead to criticism that the USGA overreacts. Justin Rose sees it another way. "When everything is in balance, it's kind of boring," he said. "And I think in life, the closer you get to the edges, that's where the excitement is. So I would say the USGA is not reactionary. It's counterbalancing. So if you go too far one way, you've got to come back the other way. You don't want to fall off the edge." That's the question going into the 118th U.S. Open that starts Thursday. Might the USGA lean toward going easy on players because of what happened the last time at Shinnecock Hills? Or will it make it tougher on them because of the record scoring last year at Erin Hills? Brooks Koepka tied the record to par at 16 under, and six other players finished at 10 under or lower. "We're confident this should be a marvelous test," said Mike Davis, the chief executive of the USGA who has been in charge of setting up the courses for the U.S. Open since 2006 at Winged Foot, when the winning score was 5 over. Davis believes Shinnecock Hills is right where the USGA wants it, even with a light, steady rain on the final day of practice. Wednesday is never the measure of how a golf course presents itself. McIlroy is among those who likes what he sees. It's not a U.S. Open if players are not complaining, but it's been a quiet three days ahead of competition. The biggest question is whether the fairways are narrow enough. They are tighter than last year at Erin Hills, for sure, and an average of 15 yards wider than in 2004. "Honestly, I think they've got it right," McIlroy said. "It presents guys with options off the tee. You have to make a decision basically on every tee box what you're going to do. I'm obviously not that old, but when I watched U.S. Opens on TV and saw these long, narrow corridors of fairways and thick rough, that's what I was used to at a U.S. Open. ... If you look at the venues that are coming up, they're very traditional venues like Oakmont, Winged Foot, Pebble Beach. "Maybe you'll see more of what we perceive as a traditional U.S. Open setup." Rain was expected to yield to plenty of sun over the next four days, with the strongest wind on Thursday. Davis said he already has called several audibles on the original plan of where to put the pins on the greens, an example of the USGA not wanting the course to get on the wild side. Davis also said the winning score is not an issue at a major where par tends to be at a premium. "Never since I've been at the USGA — and it's been almost 30 years — I've never heard anybody at the USGA say we're shooting for even par," Davis said. "But we talk incessantly, 'How do we get the course to be really a great test of golf?' As we say, get all 14 clubs dirty to make sure that these players are tested to the nth degree." And what makes a good championship inside the ropes? The quality of the winner? Different players have won the last 15 U.S. Opens, the longest stretch of the four majors. The margin? The last playoff was 10 years ago when Tiger Woods won at Torrey Pines. Three of the last four U.S. Opens have been decided by three shots or more. "You need some great players in the mix," Rose said. "You need some great story lines." This U.S. Open is not lacking for either. Five players have a chance to replace Dustin Johnson at No. 1 in the world this week. Woods is hitting the ball well enough to win any week if he ever gets all parts of his game working together. To win a record-tying fourth U.S. Open would cap off an unlikely comeback following four back surgeries. Phil Mickelson, in the USGA record book with his six runner-up finishes, needs only this trophy to complete the career Grand Slam. "And then just a good test of golf where people think, 'Wow, they've really stepped up and played great golf under pressure,'" Rose added. "I think that's what people would like to see in this tournament is that guys are tested to the ends of the ability, to whether they can cope or not. And I think that's part of the charm ... not charm, but part of the allure of this tournament." The ultimate test starts Thursday. Results won't be available until the end of the week......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

DeChambeau takes 1-shot lead as Woods lurks at Memorial

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — Bryson DeChambeau finished off a 6-under 66 with birdies on two of the toughest holes, giving him a one-shot lead going into a final round at a Memorial that features Tiger Woods in the mix at Muirfield Village for the first time in six years. Woods was in total control of his shots for the second straight day, only to miss short putts down the stretch that spoiled his run. He was briefly tied for the lead Saturday until three-putt bogeys on the 16th and 18th holes, and he had to settle for a 68. He was five shots behind. Woods wasn't alone in missing short putts. Walking off the course with his first 54-hole lead, DeChambeau couldn't but help but think of the two that got away. He missed a 3-foot birdie putt on the ninth hole, and then missed a birdie putt from 4 feet on the par-5 15th. With the course soft and vulnerable to low scores, it was tough to leave shots on the course. "Just keep thinking about those two 3-footers I missed," said DeChambeau, who was at 14-under 202. "I played great, obviously. Ecstatic about where I am." DeChambeau wasn't even sure where he was when he finished because so many players worked their way up and down the leaderboard over the final two hours. He wound up with a one-shot lead over Kyle Stanley, who bogeyed the 18th hole from the bunker for a 70; Patrick Cantlay, who drove into the creek left of the 18th fairway for a bogey and a 66; and Joaquin Niemann, the 19-year-old from Chile who atoned for one big mistake on the 15th hole with a birdie on the 18th for a 70. Cantlay made two eagles, including a hole-in-one on the par-3 eighth. DeChambeau rolled in a 20-foot birdie on the par-3 16th, the third-toughest at Muirfield Village in the third round, and he hit 9-iron to 5 feet on the toughest hole , the 18th. Six players had at least a share of the lead at some point. Byeong Hun An played bogey-free for a 69 and was two shots behind, while Justin Rose dropped two shots over the last three holes for a 69 and was four back. Woods played the last five holes of the front nine in 5 under, starting with his second eagle of the week. And then he stalled, just like he did on Friday. He didn't make another birdie until the par-5 15th, when his sharp-breaking 15-footer dropped to give him a tie for the lead. That didn't last long. Woods ran his 45-foot birdie putt about 7 feet by on the par-3 16th and missed it coming back, and then closed by missing a 3-foot par putt. "I know I shot 68 today, but again, that's probably the highest score I could have possibly shot," Woods said. "I played really, really well. I played beautifully, actually. Had total control of what I was doing out there and just didn't finish it off." He won the Memorial for the fifth time in 2012, finished 20 shots behind the following year and then injuries took over. He finished in last place in 2015, the last time he was at Muirfield Village. This year has produced the kind of golf Ohio fans are used to seeing. And the weather is about par for Muirfield Village, with more thunderstorms expected Sunday. The final round will be threesomes teeing off earlier than usual to account for the forecast. "The weather is going to be a little iffy," Woods said. "But I'm in a position where if I shoot another good round like I had the last two days, I've got a chance." Rory McIlroy, remarkably, has reason to feel the same way. McIlroy nearly missed the cut, surviving on the number after two days. He played bogey-free for a 64 and wound up just six shots behind. Just like Woods and DeChambeau, he had a few regrets on the greens. McIlroy missed three birdie chances inside 8 feet. Rose has a chance to reach No. 1 in the world with a runner-up finish, depending on what Justin Thomas does Sunday. Thomas shot a 68 with three bogeys and was seven off the lead. Along with making his second ace of the season, Cantlay blistered a 4-iron as far as he can hit it on the par-5 15th, the ball landing just short of the green and stopping 4 feet away. Niemann also made an eagle with a 50-foot putt on the par-5 seventh hole. It was his bid for another eagle that cost him. Going for the green at No. 15, the teenager flared it out to the right and it caught the corner of a creek, leading to bogey. He still was in good shape to win in just his fifth start on the PGA Tour......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

Woods improves in final round at Masters, welcomes break

By Mark Long, Associated Press AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — Tiger Woods nearly aced a hole and made his lone eagle of the week. The four-time Masters champion somewhat returned to form at Augusta National. It was just a few days too late to be more than an afterthought at golf's first major. .@TigerWoods records his first eagle of the Tournament on No. 15 in the final round of #themasters. pic.twitter.com/ykAqxyNo7F — Masters Tournament (@TheMasters) April 8, 2018 Woods closed with a flurry, recording a 3-under 69 in the final round at the Masters. He finished 1 over for the tournament and left the hallowed grounds feeling a little better about his game. Woods last played the event in 2015. He returned the last two years for the champions' dinner, but didn't get on the course. The hiatus left him feeling nostalgic during his walk to the 18th green. "This is one of the greatest walks in all of golf," Woods said afterward. "And I had missed it for the last couple of years. I hadn't been able to play in it, so now I'm glad I'm competing in this tournament. And to face the challenges out there, I missed it. I really did. I missed playing out here. I missed competing against these guys. Such a great event. Best (event) in all of our sport." Woods started the weekend more than a dozen shots out of the lead and knew he would need something special to happen to get back in contention. It never happened. Never even came close, either. But there were some glimpses Sunday in his traditional red shirt. Woods had two birdies and an eagle on the back and looked like he would get to even par for the event. He lamented his iron play for the fourth straight day and loathed two three-putts, including one for bogey on No. 18. "Another loose day with the irons," he said. "And I putted awful. It was possibly the highest score I could have shot today. All in all, a bittersweet ending." He still drew one of the round's largest galleries, giving spectators a reason to get to the course long before the leaders arrived at the practice range. They simply wanted to catch a glimpse of one of golf's greatest players. Woods is assured of moving back into the top 100 in the world, notable only because he was at No. 1,199 just over four months ago when he returned from yet another long layoff following a fourth back surgery. "I think things are progressing," he said. "It was a little bit disappointing I didn't hit my irons as well as I needed to for this particular week. You miss it just a touch here it gets magnified. And I just didn't do a good enough job this week in that regard. But overall I'm five or six tournaments into it, to be able to compete out here and to score like I did, it feels good." Woods plans to take some time off in April, maybe even putting the clubs in the closet for a few weeks to "kind of get away for a while." "The run up to this event is pretty hard and pretty grueling," said Woods, who finished 12th, tied for second and tied for fifth in three tournaments on the Florida Swing. "I pushed myself pretty hard to get ready. And I peaked at it four times over the course of my career, and it's tiring." He can take some solace in making six birdies or better in the final round — nearly as many as he made in the first three rounds combined. The best one came early Sunday. Woods nearly aced the 240-yard, par-3 fourth. His tee shot landed a few feet short of the flag, bounced a couple of times and then skirted by the left edge of the hole. He was left with a left-to-right-breaking 10-footer that he dropped in the left side of the cup. His eagle putt at the par-5 15th was even better. He drained a sweeping 30-footer after reaching the green in two. Those shots provided a brief snippet of what might have been at Augusta National had Woods had better control with his irons. Woods missed greens right and left, never really getting approach shots in the precise spots on treacherous greens. His errant ways left him starting a lot sooner than expected Sunday and finishing shortly after the leaders teed off. "My swing is slightly off," he said. "I was pleased with the way I was able to drive it, but I just could not convert with my irons. I struggled with obviously controlling the shape. Can't control the shape. Can't control the distance. And it was one of those weeks in that regard.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 9th, 2018

Tiger up to the task in a tough day at Innisbrook

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press PALM HARBOR, Fla. (AP) — Tiger Woods discovered how tough Innisbrook can be in a swirling wind, and he was up to the task. Trouble in the trees for Tiger. #QuickHits pic.twitter.com/SGVRs1t5oz — PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) March 8, 2018 Woods smacked his hands into an oak as he let loose of the club during a bold escape from the trees, came within inches of an ace on the next hole, and most importantly was among 27 players — just under 20 percent of the field — to break par Thursday in the Valspar Championship. The club twirl should have given it away. 🐅 Wow. #QuickHits pic.twitter.com/vuKjRfOcWi — PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) March 8, 2018 Canadian rookie Corey Conners, who got into the field as an alternate not long after he failed to get through Monday qualifying, didn't make a bogey until his final hole at No. 9 and shot a 4-under 67. That gave him a one-shot lead over Nick Watney, Whee Kim and Kelly Kraft. Only three other players, including former PGA champion Jimmy Walker broke 70. Woods made five birdies to counter his mistakes in his round of 70, the first time he broke par in the opening round of a PGA Tour event since his 64 in the Wyndham Championship in August 2015 — just six tour events ago because of back surgeries. This was his first time playing the Valspar Championship, and it got his attention. "I enjoy when par is a good score. It's a reward," Woods said. "There are some tournaments when about four holes you don't make a birdie, you feel like you're behind. Today, made a couple of birdies, all of a sudden puts me fourth, fifth, right away. That's how hard it is." It was like for everybody, especially Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy. Spieth, who won at Innisbrook in a playoff in 2015, didn't make a birdie after the par-5 opening hole and shot a 76. Only six other players had a higher score. Rory McIlroy, who like Woods was making his debut in this event, played in the morning and shot 74. Henrik Stenson, who played with Spieth and Woods, also shot 74. Morning or afternoon, it didn't matter. There was a chill in the Florida air, and the wind made it feel colder. Ultimately, the wind swirling through the tree-lined fairways made it tough to get the ball close. Innisbrook produced the highest average score for the opening round — 72.86 — of the 23 courses used this season. Conners managed just fine, taking advantage of a tournament he wasn't sure he would be playing. He went through Monday qualifying and shot 71, but moments after walking off the course, he was told he got in as an alternate. "Kind of had a mindset of trying to take advantage of a good break, I guess," he said. Watney holed a bunker shot on the par-4 16th, made the turn and had an eagle on the first hole. "Maybe I need to steal a few shots here and there and get some good things going," said Watney, winless since August 2012. Walker (69) and past Innisbrook champion Luke Donald (70) managed to go bogey-free, a rarity on a day like this. Also at 70 were Justin Rose, Masters champion Sergio Garcia, Adam Scott and Steve Stricker, who won last week on the PGA Tour Champions. Woods is playing his fourth PGA Tour event since returning from fusion surgery on his lower back, his fourth surgery since the spring of 2014. He has shown steady progress, and this might have been his most steady performance, even with four bogeys. Those were inevitable. One of the came at the par-3 fourth, when he was fooled by the wind and sent his tee shot sailing. It was next to a tree that Woods had to straddle just to advance toward the green. He also came up well short on the 12th into a strong wind. "Into the wind, it felt like you just hit walls," he said. Woods got within two shots of the lead by ripping a long iron from the top collar of a bunker on the par-5 11th and using the slope to chip close for a tap-in birdie. He dropped shots on the next two holes, going short into the wind on No. 12 and over the green with the wind at his back on No. 13. The only unnerving moment came at the 16th, when he tugged his iron off the tee into the trees. Woods realized he would hit the tree on his follow through, asking the gallery — thousands of them — to be careful in case the club snapped. He had to take it toward the lake on the right and bend it back to the left, and it came off perfectly. But it looked painful. Because he had to generate so much club speed, his left forearm and hands struck the oak and Woods dropped the club and winced on impact. "It didn't feel very good," he said. Woods followed with a 5-iron that rolled just right of the cup for a tap-in birdie and finished with a long two-putt par after getting fooled again by the shifting wind. "This is a tough golf course. Not too often in Florida do you find elevation. Great driving golf course," Woods said. "I asked Henrik, 'What do you around this golf course when there's no wind here?' He said it's still a hell of a test. We can all see that.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 9th, 2018

Could a VR walk in the woods relieve chronic pain? – CBC News

When pain researcher Diane Gromala recounts how she started in the field of virtual reality, she seems reflective. She had been researching virtual reality for pain since the early 1990s, but her shift to focusing on how virtual reality could be used for chronic pain management began in 1999, when her own chronic pain became worse. Prior to that, her focus was on VR as entertainment. Gromala, 56, was diagnosed with chronic pain in 1984, but the left-sided pain that extended from her lower stomach to her left leg worsened over the next 15 years. &'8220;Taking care of my chronic pain became a full-time job. So at some point I had to make a choice — either stop working or charge full force ahead by making it a motivation for my research. You can guess what I chose,&'8221; she said. Now she's finding that immersive VR technology may offer another option for chronic pain, which affects at least one in five Canadians, according to a 2011 University of Alberta study. &'8220;We know that there is some evidence supporting immersive VR for acute pain, so it's reasonable to look into how it could help patients that suffer from chronic pain.&'8221; Gromala has a PhD in human computer interaction and holds the Canada Research Chair in Computational Technologies for Transforming Pain. She also directs the pain studies lab and the Chronic Pain Research Institute at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C. Using VR to relieve or treat acute pain has been done for a while. In the 1990s, researcher Hunter Hoffman conducted one of the earliest studies looking at VR for pain relief in the University of Wisconsin human interface technology lab. His initial focus was burn victims. Since then, the field has expanded. Gromala's lab focuses on bringing evidence-based therapies that work specifically for chronic pain, such as mindfulness-based stress reduction. They have published studies on their virtual meditative walk to guide and relax patients. Movement and exercise are a key part of chronic pain management in general. But for many patients, it can be too difficult. &'8220;Through VR we can help create an environment where, with a VR headset, they can feel like they are walking through a forest, all while hearing a guided walking meditation,&'8221; Gromala said. The team also designed a meditation chamber — where a person lies in the enclosed space, breathing becomes more relaxed and a jellyfish viewed through VR dissolves. Each experiment gives real-time feedback to the patient through objective measures of pain such as skin temperature and heart rate. For instance, while feeling pain, skin surface temperature and heart rate can increase. While pain medications can be important, chronic pain treatment should also address lifestyle aspects, says Neil Jamensky, a Toronto anesthesiologist and chronic pain specialist. &'8220;Physical rehabilitation therapy, psychological support and optimizing things like nutrition, exercise, sleep and relaxation practices all play key roles in chronic pain management,&'8221; he said. Other researchers like Sweden's Dr. Max Ortiz-Catalan from Chalmers University of Technology have looked at virtual and augmented reality for phantom limb pain — the particularly challenging syndrome among amputees who experience pain in a limb that is not physically there. In his study, published in The Lancet in December 2016, Ortiz-Catalan demonstrated a 47 per cent reduction in symptoms among VR participants. He believes the reason behind it is a &'8220;retraining&'8221; of the brain, where pathways in the brain effectively re-route themselves to focus more on movement, for instance. &'8220;We demonstrated that if an amputee can see and manipulate a 'virtual' limb — which is projected over their limb stump — in space, over time, the brain retrains these areas. &'8220;Through this retraining, the brain reorganizes itself to focus on motor control and less on pain firing,&'8221; said Ortiz-Catalan. With only 14 patients, this was a pilot study, but he plans to expand the work into a multi-centre, multi-country study later this year. The University of New Brunswick is one of the planned study sites. Others in the United States have published their own findings of VR for chronic pain. Last month, Ted Jones and colleagues from Knoxville released results of their pilot study of 30 chronic pain patients who were offered five-minute sessions using a VR application called &'8220;Cool!&'8221; — an immersive VR program administered through a computer and viewed through a head-mounted device. All reported a decrease in pain while using the app — some decreased by 60 per cent — and post-session pain decreased by 33 per cent. The findings were presented in the journal PLoS. &'8220;What was interesting to observe was that the pain decreased for six to 48 hours post-VR experience. It's not as long as we would like, but does illustrate that relief can be sustained over some period of time,&'8221; Jones said. His team will be expanding the research this year and will also look at how VR can help with the challenging mental health side-effects of chronic pain. Jamensky points out while VR could be a promising treatment one day, one challenge with clinical trials is the dependence on looking at pain scores when assessing the effectiveness of VR. This may overshadow individual patient goals. For instance, while the ability to decrease any individual's pain score from a &'8220;seven out of 10&'8221; to a &'8220;three out of 10&'8221; can be challenging, improving functionality and quality of life can often be more valuable to the patient. &'8220;A pain score may not [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2017

Woods now at peace

LAST week’s broadcast ratings are out, and, as expected, the final round of the PGA Championship got a major — pun wholly intended — boost when Tiger Woods played himself into contention and became the prime focus of CBS’ Sunday coverage of the final Grand Slam event of the year. Even as the rock-star atmosphere he engendered at Bellerive highlighted his pull among the sport’s avid followers, the myriad eyeballs he attracted on the small screen served as proof of his unparalleled crossover appeal. The post Woods now at peace appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated News4 hr. 41 min. ago

Thomas takes over at Firestone as Woods fades away

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press AKRON, Ohio (AP) — Justin Thomas and Rory McIlroy have become friends more by location than youth. They live near each other in South Florida and said they spent last weekend practicing together at The Bear's Club. Sunday at Firestone will be the eighth time this year they play together in a tournament, and the number grows next week when they play the opening two rounds with Tiger Woods at the PGA Championship. But this is the first time a trophy is at stake. Thomas pulled away from the pack with five birdies in the middle of his round Saturday for a 3-under 67, giving him a three-shot lead over McIlroy and Ian Poulter going into the final round of the Bridgestone Invitational. "We've played together a lot in tournaments, but never in this kind of situation," Thomas said. McIlroy played bogey-free on a Firestone course that finally started to get firm, atoning for a few missed birdie chances with key par putts. He already has won at Bay Hill this year, though he felt he should have won more. He has been runner-up three times, most recently at the British Open two weeks ago. "I played well enough to win a few times this year and I only got over the line once," McIlroy said. "Tomorrow is a great opportunity to try and win again. I'll need a good round. I'm still a few behind. But yeah, I'm getting a little sick of the second places." McIlroy made up three shots in the final round in 2014 when he rallied to beat Sergio Garcia at Firestone. It might be a taller order to take on Thomas, who already has won twice this season and appears to have found his touch with the putter. Starting with a pitching wedge from 129 yards into the breeze to 6 feet at No. 6, Thomas made birdie on every other hole through the 14th to pull away. No one could keep pace with Thomas, least of all Tiger Woods. Starting the third round Saturday five shots behind, Woods didn't make a birdie until a 12-foot putt on the 12th hole, and he didn't make another. He wound up with a 73, leaving him 11 shots back and ending his streak of 10 straight rounds at par or better dating to the U.S. Open. "It was very similar to the first day," Woods said. "Wasn't very sharp that first day, but I made everything. So today was about the same, and I didn't make anything." That wasn't a problem for Thomas, whose six birdies included a chip-in from 30 feet behind the green on the par-3 12th. He was at 14-under 196. Thomas fell behind early with two bogeys in three holes, and a 10-foot par save in between from behind the fourth green kept him from falling farther behind. Poulter set the pace early and had a three-shot lead at one point until he dropped his shot from the bunker on the par-3 seventh, and then had a mixed bag of birdies and bogeys that kept him from getting closer to the lead. Jason Day, who threw away a chance to win the Bridgestone Invitational two years ago, had a 69 and was four shots behind. Marc Leishman, who played alongside Woods, shot 67 and joined Kyle Stanley (70) five shots behind. The course started to get a little firmer. Poulter had a 62 on Thursday. Tommy Fleetwood shot 63 on Friday. The best anyone could do in the third round was a 65 by Rickie Fowler, which only got him within six shots. Thomas figured that out quickly. He made an unusual birdie on the par-5 second by hitting his tee shot in the first cut of the third fairway. Blocked by threes, he opted for a 5-wood that started out toward the third tee and sliced over the trees to the rough, pin-high about 15 feet away from an up-and-down. After a bogey from the trees at No. 3, Thomas went at a back pin on the tough fourth hole and the ball bounded over the green in thick rough. He chopped at his chip and did well to run it 10 feet by the hole, making it for par. He bogeyed the next from a bunker, and fell three shots behind, but that par save on No. 4 helped by not dropping a shot, and by understanding how the course was playing. Thomas said he told caddie Jimmy Johnson, "We can't see pin, hit pin." Fleetwood went so far long on the fourth hole that it went 30 yards over the green. He chipped 50 feet by the hole and three-putted for a double bogey, the start of what turned out to be a sloppy day and a 74 that dropped him seven shots behind. Poulter already has won at the Houston Open in what has been a big turnaround for the Englishman, who is on the cusp of qualifying for the Ryder Cup. He made a pair of medium-length birdie putts to offset bogeys from the bunkers, but fell out of a chance to be in the last group when he missed a 6-foot par putt on the 17th. "I'm going to have a chance," Poulter said. "So starting this week, tied 13th I think was my best ever result. I'm tied second right now, so huge improvement and a little bit of work left to do. And hopefully, we can do it.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

Ibrahimovic joins Ronaldo in skipping MLS All-Star Game

By Paul Newberry, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — The MLS All-Star Game will feature one of the world's most storied clubs. Unfortunately for the more than 70,000 fans expected at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Cristiano Ronaldo is not along for the ride. After Portugal's elimination from the World Cup and his transfer from Real Madrid, the five-time FIFA Player of the Year took time off rather than accompany Juventus on its American preseason tour, which includes Wednesday night's game against top players from Major League Soccer. The decision will surely be a disappointment to the big crowd that had hoped Ronaldo would make his unofficial debut while touring the United States with the Italian club that has won seven straight Serie A championships. Juventus acquired the 33-year-old from Real Madrid on July 10 in a deal his new club said was worth 112 million euros ($131.5 million) — the largest for a player older than 30 . Also sitting out the U.S. tour, which includes three other exhibitions, is Argentine striker Gonzalo Higuain. He is coming off a scoreless World Cup in which he didn't start in the round of 16 loss to eventual champion France. "Obviously these guys are world-class players," said Atlanta United's Brad Guzan, a goalkeeper for the MLS team. "With or without them, it will be a difficult game. But their names alone bring a lot of attention. It's a shame for everybody on the outside. For me, personally, hopefully it makes for an easier night." Most players take three weeks off after the World Cup. Juventus opens its Serie A schedule at Chievo Verona the weekend of Aug. 18-20 . "We are sorry not to have the Ronaldo, and Higuain as well," Juventus coach Massimiliano Allegri said through a translator. "Unfortunately, they played in the World Cup. They needed some days to rest." Ronaldo and Higuain won't be the only big names missing from the game. One of MLS' top new stars, LA Galaxy forward Zlatan Ibrahimovic, announced Monday that he's skipping the All-Star match rather than make a cross-country trip to Atlanta. The 36-year-old Swede cited the grind of playing three matches in an eight-day span, including Sunday night's 4-3 victory over Orlando City in which he scored his first MLS hat trick. Ibrahimovic ranks second in MLS with 15 goals. He played with Juventus from 2004-06. "I am disappointed to miss the 2018 All-Star game against Juventus, one of my former clubs," Ibrahimovic said in a statement. "I want to thank the fans for voting me to the team. My main focus is to score goals and help the LA Galaxy to the playoffs." The Galaxy (10-7-5) are unbeaten in nine games and have climbed to third place in the Western Conference. Per MLS rules, Ibrahimovic will also have to sit out LA's next match Saturday against Colorado, one of the league's worst teams. New York City forward David Villa also will skip the All-Star Game after missing six matches with a knee injury. Ibrahimovic and Villa were replaced on the MLS roster by Minnesota forward Darwin Quintero and New York Red Bulls midfielder Tyler Adams. Atlanta United coach Gerardo Martino, who will be guiding the MLS team, said the timing of the game does pose problems. "In reality, I recognize it's a little bit of a challenge for coaches who have players participating," Martino said through an interpreter. "Some players are coming from teams where they've played three games (in the last week). Some had a long trip to get here, like from Vancouver. I understand it's a very beautiful spectacle for the league and the United States. But I think what we have to look at in the future is to have it at a different time, either before or after the season. "We have to make sure the players arriving here in good condition are also returning to their teams in good condition." But MLS is eager to show off its most compelling success story. Atlanta shattered the MLS attendance record in its debut season, averaging 48,200 per game, and is on pace to break that mark this year at nearly 52,000 per game. The club already has the five biggest stand-alone crowds in MLS history — each more than 70,000 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. The league expects another record crowd for its All-Star Game, breaking the mark of 70,728 in Houston for the 2010 match in which Manchester United defeated the MLS squad 5-2. An extra 1,500 tickets have been put on sale to meet the demand. "It's been fantastic to see the support that the city has given the club," Guzan said. "There's not many cities around the world that have what we have here in Atlanta. I'm happy to have the opportunity to showcase this to everyone.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

McIlroy loses ground with tough finish at British Open

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press CARNOUSTIE, Scotland (AP) — Rory McIlroy pledged to "go down swinging" in his bid to win a major for the first time in four years. He might have to swing for the fences after the way he finished Saturday at the British Open. On a day of low scoring, McIlroy bogeyed two of his last three holes for a 1-under 70. Instead of being two shots behind, he was four back, certainly not out of it. And he wasn't about to change his strategy of being aggressive. "Go out and hit a lot of drivers," McIlroy said. "I felt like today the course was perfectly set up to take advantage of it and attack it. Tried to do that for the most part. Maybe my wedge play wasn't quite as good as it should have been, but I gave myself plenty of chances." McIlroy said he felt like he left some shots out on the course, and was disappointed at the way he finished. Still, he's won the Open before and believes he has a reasonable shot to do it again. "I've got a bit of experience at this," he said. "Maybe more so than some of the other guys on the leaderboard. But the leaderboard is packed with a lot of very, very good players." McIlroy and other players on the leaderboard are keeping an eye on the notoriously fickle Scottish weather going into the final round. The wind is expected to pick up some and if it shifts direction the scores could go a different direction than they did on Saturday. The best thing, McIlroy said, is there are only five players in front of the group bunched four shots off the lead. "Just need to get off to a fast start tomorrow," he said. "I'm obviously disappointed after the way I finished, but I'm still in the tournament. I'm only a few shots behind. The wind is supposed to pick up a little bit. So it will make things interesting." ___ WINDWARD FINALE Kevin Kisner has been hearing all week that the strongest wind would be on Sunday, which is fine by him. "I think it's going to be a true test, and we'll get to see really who's hitting it the best and playing the best tomorrow," Kisner said. He only had one wish. "As long as 18 is downwind, I don't really care," he said. "I played with Zach (Johnson) today and he said the last time they were here, they hit 3-woods all four days on 16 and 4-iron on 18. So I can't imagine that direction and how difficult that finish would be." ___ REDEMPTION Zander Lombard dropped two shots on the 17th hole when he pulled it into a ditch, took a drop, hit into a bunker and missed the cut. He made up for it in a big way. "I said to my caddie walking down the fairway, 'Let's have a finish for the crowds at least,'" Lombard said. After a strong drive on the 18th, the South African hit a gap wedge from 132 yards that landed in front and to the left of the hole, checked and turned to the right and then dropped in for an eagle. "It was just awesome soaking up the energy and taking it in," Lombard said. "I feel really positive for tomorrow, and I'm going to fight for it." ___ ONE BAD SWING Rickie Fowler opened with two birdies in four holes and was one shot out of the lead with a par 5 coming up at No. 6. That turned out to be his undoing. Fowler pulled his tee shot so far left that it went out-of-bounds. He sent his next shot from the tee some 40 yards to the right, and he wound up making a triple-bogey 8. That wasn't his only mistake. He made three more bogeys, including on the 18th, and that offset the eagle he made on the par-5 14th. But it added to a 73 — only Pat Perez with a 74 had a higher score among the last 14 players to tee off Saturday. "Obviously wanted to head in the right direction today, but didn't do that," Fowler said. "Back to the drawing board. We'll come out hot tomorrow and see what we can do. Made some good swings coming in, but like I said, just didn't execute through the middle of the front nine and (it) cost me." Fowler was eight shots behind and plays Sunday with Patrick Reed. ___ ROSE RALLY Justin Rose was about 18 feet away from going home Friday when he made the birdie putt on the 18th to make the cut on the number. One day later, he was five shots out of the lead. No one took advantage of the calm conditions like Rose, who played bogey-free from the third group out and shot 64. It was his lowest score at the British Open by two shots, and at the end of the day, Rose was in a tie for 13th. "There's a difference between being 3 over on Friday and way off the lead and 3 over and way off the lead on Saturday morning," Rose said. "You kind of feel a bit more grateful to be here rather than Friday night, you feel frustrated to be there. So I think the birdie on 18 last night freed me up, and I'm just very happy to be out on this golf course and not down the road somewhere else this morning. "Obviously, I had nothing to lose." He won't be losing much sleep. Rose had the entire afternoon off to rest, and he gets to sleep more on Sunday. ___ AP Sports Columnist Tim Dahlberg contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

The British Open returns to the nasty links of Carnoustie

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press Carnoustie is known as much for the calamity it causes as the British Open champions it crowns. Any mention of Carnoustie immediately brings back that image of Jean Van de Velde, equal parts tragedy and comedy, standing in Barry Burn on the 18th hole with water up his shins and rising. He made triple bogey to lose a three-shot lead, and then completed as great a collapse as can be found in a major championship by losing in a three-man playoff in 1999. Just don't get the idea Van de Velde owns all the rights to bad endings at Carnoustie. Jose Jurado was the first victim. He had a three-shot lead going into the final round in 1931 and was still two shots clear late in the round until coming undone in the brutal closing stretch, topping one shot on the 17th hole into the burn. He lost out to Tommy Armour. More recently was Padraig Harrington , only it worked out well for him in 2007. Playing the 18th with a one-shot lead, the Irishman hit his tee shot into the Barry Burn. He took a penalty drop and then hit his next shot into the winding stream. Harrington managed the best double bogey of his life. It got him into a playoff when Sergio Garcia made bogey from the bunker, and Harrington went on to win his first major. Of the six previous Opens on these menacing links, Ben Hogan is the only winner to hold a 54-hole lead. For most everyone else, Carnoustie always seem to dish out its share of carnage. Rod Pampling once opened with a 71 and had the lead. He followed with an 86 and missed the cut. Phil Mickelson still hasn't seen a weekend at Carnoustie. Garcia made his major debut as a professional at Carnoustie. He shot 89. "That's a brutal course," Bernhard Langer said. He speaks from experience in 1999, when Langer had his third-highest score of the 23 Opens he completed. He shot 297, and he tied for 18th that week. The first time Tiger Woods went an entire round without a birdie in a major was in 1999 at Carnoustie. "I think I made one birdie on the weekend and I finished three or four back of the playoff," Woods said. "That was ridiculous how hard it was." One month after Shinnecock Hills was punishing as ever in the U.S. Open, golf's oldest championship doesn't figure to be much of a reprieve. Scotland has been going through a warm, dry patch of weather, which figures to make it firm and bouncy. Mickelson, who played Carnoustie a week before the Open, said it was unlikely he would even carry a driver. "I'm either going to carry a driver or that hot 3-wood, but there's only two or three holes — there's actually only two holes I plan on using it, both par 5s. I have a low 1-iron that I've been putting in the bag and ... it's very low. Gets on the ground quick. I'll hit that on probably the last ten holes, almost every hole." Carnoustie in any conditions is regarded as a beast, with a reputation as the toughest links in the world. Sir Michael Bonallack, the former R&A secretary, might have sized it up the best when he said, "When the wind is blowing, it is the toughest course in Britain. And when it's not blowing, it's probably still the toughest." In recent Opens, it has picked up a nickname: Car-nasty. For so much of the field, it will be a new experience. Only two players from the top 10 in the world have played a British Open at Carnoustie — Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy , who was an 18-year-old amateur in 2007 and immediately showed his potential when he opened with a 68. He tied for 42nd that week. Only 33 players in the 156-man field have played an Open at Carnoustie, and only 12 have played it twice. Defending champion Jordan Spieth only knows it from television. He was 13, just starting to blossom as a junior, and he watched the Open from home as Garcia and Harrington tried to survive the finish. "I remember ... how good of a score par was on that hole and will continue to be for Opens going forward," Spieth said. "It's one of probably the toughest closing holes in the Open Championship anywhere, and that creates some drama when it comes down to Sunday, as we've seen. And I don't think it will be any different this year." Carnoustie gets its mean streak from the way the course was set up in 1999, with narrow fairways and high grass. But its strength comes from the wind, like most links courses, and this course near the North Sea is particularly exposed. It measures 7,402 yards, which is 19 yards shorter — yes, shorter — than it was in 2007, the last time the Open was at Carnoustie. Spieth will try to become the first player in 10 years to repeat as British Open champion, and right now he'd simply settle for a chance. Since his closing 64 at the Masters to finish third, Spieth has finished at least 12 shots out of the lead in four of his seven tournaments. He missed the cut in the other three. Like most majors these days, the Open figures to be wide-open. Dustin Johnson, who lost a four-shot lead over the final two rounds at Shinnecock, is back to No. 1 in the world and eager to pick up another major. He has not played since the U.S. Open. The next three players behind him in the world ranking — PGA champion Justin Thomas, Rose and U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka — all have a chance to replace him at No. 1. Recent history would suggest a young American — the last five majors have been won by Americans in their 20s. "It's definitely been pretty one-sided, and the Americans are dominating," Rose said. "So it would be lovely to turn that around next week." Woods is happy to get another crack at it. Carnoustie was his first experience with links golf in 1995, when he was still at Stanford and came over for the Scottish Open at Carnoustie ahead of the British Open at St. Andrews. He opened with a 69, closed with a 78 finished 48th. "Carnoustie is an unbelievable driving golf course," Woods said. "You have to drive the ball well there, but also it's not your traditional in (and) out golf course. It's a lot of different angles, so a lot of different crosswinds. I have to be able to maneuver the golf ball both ways there efficiently. You just have to hit the golf ball well." There is no faking. Nothing comes easily. No one really conquers Carnoustie. It's more about survival. The highest compliment might have come from Tom Watson, who won his first major at Carnoustie in 1975 in a playoff over Jack Newton. "Carnoustie is like an ugly, old hag who speaks the truth no matter how painful," Watson once said. "But it's only when you add up your score, you hear exactly what she thinks of you.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

Tiger’s fiery finish boosts confidence ahead of Open

POTOMAC, US: Tiger Woods produced his best final round since 2012 for a fourth-place finish on Sunday (Monday in Manila) at the US PGA Quicken Loans National, a new putter reviving his game ahead of the British Open. The 14-time major champion fired a four-under-par 66 at TPC Potomac, his lowest final-round score since a [...] The post Tiger’s fiery finish boosts confidence ahead of Open appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 2nd, 2018

Tiger’s fiery finish boosts confidence ahead of Open

POTOMAC: Tiger Woods produced his best final round since 2012 for a fourth-place finish Sunday at the US PGA Quicken Loans National, a new putter reviving his game ahead of the British Open. The 14-time major champion fired a four-under-par 66 at TPC Potomac, his lowest final-round score since a 63 at the 2012 CIMB [...] The post Tiger’s fiery finish boosts confidence ahead of Open appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 2nd, 2018

Ancer, Molinari share lead at National as Tiger stalls

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press POTOMAC, Md. (AP) — Tiger Woods ran off four straight birdies and finished the front nine with seven consecutive one-putt greens. Unlike Francesco Molinari and Abraham Ancer, he couldn't keep it going Saturday in the Quicken Loans National. Ancer and Molinari each handled the scorching heat on the TPC Potomac at Avenel Farm and shared the lead going into the final round. Ancer birdied two of his last three holes for the lowest score of his career, an 8-under 62, giving the 27-year-old Mexican his best shot at a first PGA Tour victory. Ancer has never been in the top 10 going into the final round in 22 previous starts. Molinari also is going for his first official PGA Tour victory, though that comes with an asterisk. He won a World Golf Championship in Shanghai in 2010, though the PGA Tour did not recognize the HSBC Champions as an official win until a year later. They were at 13-under 197, two shots clear of Ryan Armour (68) and Zac Blair (66). Woods was six shots behind, the seventh straight tournament he has been at least five shots behind going into the final round. It sure didn't sound that way, and for most of the round, it didn't look that way. With his fifth birdie of the front nine, Woods was one shot out of the lead. And then he opened the back nine with a pair of birdie chances just inside 10 feet and missed the both. He never really regained his momentum, finished with another bogey and shot 68. Considering the scoring average was 69.6 in the third round, he wound up losing two shots to the lead. "It was frustrating because I played better than what my score indicates," Woods said. "I thought that 10 under would have been a good score for me to end up at for the day, and I could have easily gotten that today on the back nine." He didn't, and now has more ground to make up. The nine players ahead of him have combined for just five (official) PGA Tour victories. Molinaro has five European Tour victories, has played on two Ryder Cup teams and is No. 17 in the world. The Italian is playing at the National and plans to be at the John Deere Classic in two weeks, even though the European Tour is in the meat of its summer schedule with national opens in France, Ireland and Scotland leading up to the British Open. Molinaro is currently among qualifiers for the Ryder Cup team, but his FedEx Cup standing is at No. 123. He's making the most of his first trip to the TPC Potomac. Even though he missed a few short putts on the front nine, he closed with a 30-foot birdie putt on the par-3 17th and hit wedge into 5 feet for birdie at the 18th. "It's where I want to be," Molinari said, referring more to his position on the leaderboard than in heat approaching 100 degrees. "I would have been happy with even 11 or 12 under. The main thing today was to stay close to the leader, so I've done a very good job of that. Tomorrow I just need to go out and do my best, hit as many good shots as possible and see if that would be enough." Ancer was tied for the lead after the opening round at the Memorial, which is the only other time he has been atop the leaderboard after any round on the PGA Tour. Conditions have been changing since the opening round with so much sun, no rain and fairways that are getting faster. That was more bothersome to Ancer than the heat. "I grew up in Mexico, in the north part of Mexico where it's very hot," he said. "Didn't bother me. I would rather play in this than cold weather." The course certainly has everyone's attention. Woods found that out the hard way with three shots from the rough that sailed some 30 yards over the green, leading to bogeys. "You have to hit it good. There's no way around it," Ancer said. Armour shared the 36-hole lead with Beau Hossler and Brian Gay, who both failed to break par. Hossler shot a 71 and was five shots behind, while Gay had a 72. Rickie Fowler, the only player from the top 10 in the world at the TPC Potomac, had a 69 and was eight shots behind......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

New putter doesn t do much for slumping Woods

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press POTOMAC, Md. (AP) — The guy who has been fiddling with putters because he wasn't happy with the results finally saw his share of putts go in. If only Tiger Woods could have looked behind him, he might have seen J.J. Spaun match his best score of the year with a 7-under 63 to share the lead with Andrew Landry in the Quicken Loans National. Spaun, who has gone back-and-forth with putters four times in his last six tournaments, quietly went about his business Thursday while most of the attention was on Woods in the group ahead of him using a mallet-style putter to help him shake out of a slump. A new putter gave Woods a better feel, but the same middling results. He had six birdie chances from 10 feet or closer and made two of them to offset a double bogey early in his round, and he had to settle for an even-par 70. "I shot about the score I should have shot today," Woods said. Landry shot his 63 in the morning when the TPC Potomac at Avenel Farm was soft, though still punishing with its thick rough. Spaun did his work in the windier afternoon, even if no one noticed. He played in the group behind Woods, and didn't even get leftovers from thousands of fans watching golf's biggest draw. "Hell, no," Spaun said with a laugh. "They don't even know who I am. They played so fast, actually. They were a solid hole ahead of us. ... I was kind of nervous, but I was more excited. I was like, 'Oh, I'm going to get to see his second shots from looking back from the tee.' But they played so fast, I didn't even see him at all. I just saw his pink shirt way in the distance." He would have seen solid play early, some wild shots off the tee by Woods in the middle and flawless work from tee-to-green late. Spaun wouldn't have seen many putts go in. Woods had five straight birdie chances from 8 feet or closer on the back nine. He made two of them — one of them from 3 feet — and didn't make a putt longer than 10 feet the entire round. Woods kept the round from getting away from him two big par saves to start the back nine, both times having to chop it back to the fairway. He got up-and-down from 147 yards on No. 11 by making a 6-foot putt. "I rolled it well," Woods said. "I mean, hey, if I'm hitting putts on my line with my speed, then I'm happy. They'll go in eventually." It was the first competitive round for Woods on the TPC Potomac, and his first time playing the tournament since 2015. This also is the last edition, and the field is among the weakest this year on the PGA Tour. Rickie Fowler is the only player in the top 10 in the world, and he also rallied for a 70. Even when he kept it in the short grass off the tee, Woods didn't have a reasonable birdie chance until No. 5, and he missed from 10 feet. And then he ran into trouble on the par-4 sixth, starting with a tee shot he pulled left that caromed off a tree and landed in a the mown path that leads from the tee to the fairway. Woods tried to hit a 3-wood to the green and it came up short and into the hazard. He had to drop it in more rough, came up just short of the green and wound up making a 4-foot putt to escape with double bogey. Going with an iron off the tee at the par-5 10th, he pulled that into the hazard but at least was able to chop it back to the fairway, rip fairway metal around the green and chip it close to save par. On the next hole, he blasted a tee shot well right, over the gallery, and had to pitch out back into play again. That par felt like a birdie. "That kept the momentum somewhat on my side," Woods said. "I knew I had some birdie holes coming up to try to get back to under par for the day, and I was close." The course was the fourth-toughest on the PGA Tour last year, trailing only three majors, though it was soft enough and the wind was mild so that low scores were available. Kyle Stanley won at 7-under 273 last year. Landry and Spaun shared the lead at 7 under after one round. "I expect that if we don't get any rain the next few days, the course is going to firm up, greens get firm, get a little bit quicker, but it's not going to be like last year," Billy Horschel said after his 64. "So you're going to have to go out with the mindset that it's a little bit different course, you can't be as conservative, you've got to still try and make birdies." Andrew Putnam also was at 64 while playing in the afternoon. Beau Hossler and Abraham Ancer were another shot behind. Woods has been at least six shots behind — and no better than a tie for 29th — after the opening round of his last six tournaments dating to the Masters......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 29th, 2018

Golf lacks dominant player halfway through the year

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press POTOMAC, Md. (AP) — Tiger Woods already has played 10 times as the year reaches the halfway point. Some might consider that a surprise considering where he was a year ago. Woods has finished within five shots of the lead only once, a runner-up finish in the Valspar Championship, and he was never in the picture at either of the two majors. Some might consider that a surprise considering how well he is swinging the club. Six months into 2018, golf hasn't offered a lot of clarity with Woods, or anyone else. Golf keeps trending younger, with few exceptions, a point driven home two weeks ago at the U.S. Open when 28-year-old Brooks Koepka made it five straight majors won by players in their 20s. Dustin Johnson is still No. 1 in the world, a ranking he has held for all but four weeks. But there still isn't a dominant figure, except when it comes to attracting a crowd. Woods is at the Quicken Loans National this week, a field so weak that Rickie Fowler (No. 8) is the only player from the top 10 in the world, and no one from the top 15 in the FedEx Cup is playing. There's still plenty of energy along the Potomac River, mainly because of the No. 82 player in the world — Woods. With two majors, the FedEx Cup, the Ryder Cup and the Race to Dubai still to come, here's how golf is shaping up so far: BEST PLAYER Given the significance of majors, Masters champion Patrick Reed gets the nod going into the second half of the year. Reed and Koepka each have only one victory — the best kind — and while Koepka didn't really start his year until two months ago, Reed had a share of the lead during the final round of the U.S. Open and looked certain to get into a playoff at the Valspar Championship until he had a putt roll back to his feet on the 18th green. Johnson, meanwhile, is No. 1 for a reason. Even with two victories, his year is shaping up as what might have been. He shared the 54-hole lead at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am and the U.S. Open. Going back to the PGA Tour season that began in October, he lost a six-shot lead in the HSBC Champions. MOST IMPROVED Bubba Watson has as many victories in the last four months as the previous three years combined. Watson has recovered from a health issue (he won't say what it was) that caused him to lose 20 pounds, and he abandoned the Volvik colored golf balls he used last year. The result is another victory at Riviera, another victory at Hartford and another World Golf Championship at the Dell Match Play. Watson lobbied to be an assistant captain at the last Ryder Cup. He now is No. 5 in the Ryder Cup standings. He was at No. 117 in the world going into Riviera. Now he's up to No. 13. RISING Among the top players, Rory McIlroy and Jason Day appear to be on the cusp of at least having a chance to get back to No. 1 in the world. McIlroy dropped out of the top 10 until winning with a big charge at Bay Hill, his first victory since September 2016. His momentum stalled when he closed with a 74 at the Masters while playing in the final group, lost a weekend lead at Wentworth and missed the cut at the U.S. Open. Day had gone nearly two years without winning until his playoff victory at Torrey Pines, followed by another victory at the Wells Fargo Championship. That at least got him back into the top 10, though he still has a long road to get back to the top. SLIDING Jordan Spieth had a mathematical chance to get back to No. 1 in the world at the U.S. Open, which suggests his year isn't all that bad. But so far, it is. It's not because Spieth hasn't won since the British Open last summer. It's because he has given himself so few chances. The only time he was in the serious contention this year was the Masters, where he made bogey on the 18th hole and still shot 64 to finish two shots behind Reed. In his seven starts since the Masters, Spieth has finished 12 shots or more out of the lead, except for the three times he missed the cut. BIGGEST SURPRISE Ted Potter Jr. had missed 46 cuts in 103 starts since his last victory and was No. 246 in the world. And then he went head-to-head with Johnson at Pebble Beach and beat the No. 1 player in the world. Since then, Potter has missed the cut in seven of his 12 events and only once finished in the top 25. BEST FINISH Justin Thomas nearly holed a wedge on the 18th hole to force a playoff at the Honda Classic, and he won with a 5-wood over the water to set up a two-putt birdie. He was even better one week later in Mexico City, where he holed a wedge on the final hole for eagle that got him into a playoff. This one didn't turn out so well, as Thomas made bogey in the playoff and lost to Phil Mickelson......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Rose practicing patience, perspective in the majors

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Justin Rose was coming up on 15 years as a pro and still didn't have a major. What he found was perspective. "Between 30 and 40, that's going to be my opportunity to go really out and get things done," Rose said. "That's 40 major championships. I'm going to create chances with those 40. I'm going to be on leaderboards." More than getting into weekend conditions, however, was realizing that it wasn't always going to work out. It was OK to fail. That was the secret to playing so well under pressure at Merion, where he broke through in the 2013 U.S. Open. "I think what happened to me at Merion, I also realized I'm going to win majors, and I'm also going to lose majors," he said. "You can't skip through your career without one or two slipping through the net. It's a byproduct of being on the leaderboard that those things happen. So I wasn't scared of losing, and that helped me win my first major championship. I wasn't shying away from the pressure of trying to win my first major." Rose had top 10s in the majors, but he didn't have a lot of chances in his 20s. The lone exception was 2007 at the Masters, where he started the final round one shot out of the lead, closed with a 73 and finished three shots back. Since his victory at Merion, he played in the final group at the 2015 Masters and couldn't make up any ground on Jordan Spieth's four-shot lead, and he lost a two-shot lead on the back nine in the 2017 Masters before losing in a playoff to Sergio Garcia. He also started three back on the final day at St. Andrews in 2015. "Ideally in your career, you grasp more than slip away, right?" he said. "But it's a byproduct of being a good player and being on the leaderboard that both things are going to happen." The message applies to Rickie Fowler, who finished one shot behind Patrick Reed at the Masters. Fowler also had a share of the lead on the back nine at Valhalla in the 2014 PGA Championship, and he played in the final group at two majors that same year. A year ago at the U.S. Open, Fowler started the final round two shots behind. "He's creating those opportunities," Rose said. "He played plenty well enough at the Masters that it could have been his year. He will let one or two go in the future. He's going to be on the leaderboard for a long, long time, and I'm sure things are going to line up for him more than once." ___ WEDDING BELLS Rickie Fowler was lugging around something and it was high time he got rid of it. So he asked girlfriend Allison Stokke to marry him while they were on a Long Island beach. "There was nothing planned out," Fowler said Wednesday, four days after he and Stokke, a former track and field athlete at Cal, got engaged. "I just really didn't want to carry the ring around any longer." That comment drew hearty laughter at a news conference for the U.S. Open. "So it worked out perfectly," he added. "We kept things very, very casual. And like I said, I didn't have anything planned out. ... I didn't want to have to keep toting that thing around for that long." Fowler got traditional, getting down on his knees to ask for her hand in marriage. Waves broke against the shore just behind the couple as Fowler's friend and PGA Championship winner Justin Thomas snapped photos. ___ PEBBLES IN THE SAND The USGA has a local rule for Shinnecock Hills in this U.S. Open that allows players to remove stones and pebbles from bunkers without penalty. Phil Mickelson could have used that 14 years ago. Tied for the lead with two holes to play, Mickelson made double bogey from the bunker on the 17th hole and finished two behind Retief Goosen. Mickelson never talked about the bunker shot after his round, but Fred Funk revealed what happened in a 2014 interview. There was a small rock under his ball. "We didn't know the rock was there, but you could hear it," said Funk, who played with Mickelson in the final round. "Phil showed me his pitching wedge. But he never said anything about it (to the media)." Mickelson's shot ran out about 5 or 6 feet above the hole. The bigger problem was running the putt by 4 feet and missing the comebacker. Funk thought small rocks could be removed as long as the player could see it, though the USGA confirmed the local rule was not in effect in 2004. ___ ALL-AMERICAN This year's U.S. Open will be a chance to celebrate the state of golf in the country. Americans hold all four of golf's major trophies for the first time since 2004. Patrick Reed won the Masters this year, joining PGA champion Justin Thomas, British Open champion Jordan Spieth and last year's U.S. Open winner, Brooks Koepka. The last time that happened was 2004, when Phil Mickelson won his first major. At the time, Jim Furyk (U.S. Open), Ben Curtis (British) and Shaun Micheel were the reigning champions. But it's not just the majors. The United States also won the most recent Ryder Cup, Presidents Cup, Solheim Cup and Walker Cup. Rory McIlroy, who hopes to end the streak, attributed it to golf going in cycles. And he said some of the credit goes to Tiger Woods. "European golf was very healthy a few years ago for a long time," he said. "It seemed every major, someone from the island of Ireland turned up to, we were winning it. It doesn't seem that long ago. But the great young players from this country, they're playing well. They have probably a couple of guys, but one in particular that they try to emulate who's back out here playing, and he's become a friend of theirs. "I think that's been a huge part of all this," he said. "A lot of these guys have gotten to know Tiger. And being able to say, 'OK, this is what he does, and we might not be able to achieve everything that he has, but you can at least try to do that.' I think that's been a huge thing for Ryder Cups and Presidents Cups, and them as individuals." ___ AP Sports Writers Barry Wilner and Jimmy Golen contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Spieth in mini-slump heading to Shinnecock Hills, US Open

By Barry Wilner, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Lots of folks have become accustomed to seeing Jordan Spieth's name atop leaderboards, particularly at golf's majors. So has Spieth. Yet since winning the British Open last July, Spieth barely has been a factor on the weekends. He believed third-place finishes in Houston and at the Masters had indicated a turnaround heading into this week's U.S. Open. But since Augusta, his best showing in five tournaments is a tie for 21st at the Byron Nelson, and he twice missed cuts, including most recently at the Memorial. Not quite the stuff that rocketed Spieth to the top of golf, with Masters and U.S. Open wins in 2015, and his third major last summer at Royal Birkdale. "Yeah, I think my patience has been tested, just not going into Saturday or Sunday with a legitimate chance to win but maybe once," Spieth said Tuesday at Shinnecock Hills. "Technically the Masters, I didn't really have a chance. The back nine, I ended up giving myself a chance. "Yeah, just the limited number compared to previous years of chances I've had on the weekends has been frustrating." Spieth, 24, always has been mature as a competitor and person. When he went after the career Grand Slam for the first time last year at the PGA Championship, he wound up 10 shots back. No one contemplated he wouldn't have won another PGA Tour title since, missing two cuts before the Masters and two more after. While exasperated, Spieth, as always, believes he is close to the way out of this mini-slump — for him, at least. "Over the last, since probably in between Austin (a first-round elimination by Patrick Reed in match play) and Houston was a really big weekend for me of settling down and getting back on the right track with things," he said. "And recognizing that it's a long career, and, you know, results aren't going to come by wanting them to come. They're going to come by being obsessed with the process, getting back to the basics, being an athlete, figuring out within the swing, the intricacies of the game. Kind of the stuff — the reason I love to practice — that's what's going to kind of bring it back, and results aren't everything." Maybe not, except that when the results have been so spectacular so quickly, they become how you are measured by the public. Spieth has won 11 times in his first five full seasons, including those three major championships. His putting skills are envied by many of his peers. So are his analytical breakdowns of shots, holes, his swing. His optimism that all will be right again is praise-worthy — and probably accurate. "I feel like my game is in the best shape it's been in a long time, including last year," he said. "And my results don't necessarily speak towards that, but I feel that way, and so I'll stick with the process, and they'll surely come at some point." If that point is this week, Spieth must outshoot not only the sentimental fan choices (Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson) but all of those young guns who have begun to grab majors: Reed, Justin Thomas, Brooks Koepka. "It almost feels like I'm back in high school and college," Spieth joked. "These are the same guys we used to battle it out with then, and I'd win one, then they would win one. It's just blown up now because there was no coverage; no one really cared to watch us back then, and now people do. "But it's nothing different than what we've kind of been doing with each other for a number of years. It's really cool to be out here doing it, but I don't think we ... think of it as a totally different experience than anything we've always kind of done.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 13th, 2018