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Fernandez, Baldwin hailed as Collegiate Coaches of the Year yet again

For extending their respective squads' dynasties, two of the best and brightest coaches in the collegiate basketball scene are set to be feted. San Beda Red Lions head mentor Boyet Fernandez and Ateneo Blue Eagles chief tactician Tab Baldwin will be hailed as the Coaches of the Year in the 2019 Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Awards presented by SportsVision on Monday at Amelie Hotel Manila in Malate. Fernandez guided the Red Lions to their 11th title in the last 13 years, their 22nd overall in the NCAA Seniors Basketball Tournament. During the tournament, San Beda only lost once, capping the season with a 14-game winning streak, including a two-game sweep of the Lyceum Pirates in the Finals. This will be Fernandez's fifth Coach of the Year plum, tying him for most in the category with former Ateneo Blue Eagles head coach Norman Black. For his part, Baldwin is set to receive his second straight Coach of the Year trophy in this annual event organized by the Collegiate Press Corps, composed of scribes from print and online outfits covering the NCAA and UAAP. Under Baldwin's watch, the Blue Eagles cruised through the UAAP Season 81 Men's Basketball Tournament to win their second straight championship, the school's 10th overall. The awards night backed by  Amelie Hotel, Rain or Shine, NorthPort, World Balance, Arellano, and AXA Team EDS will also distinguish the UP Fighting Maroons. The Fighting Maroons were the feel-good story of the collegiate season, overcoming a shaky start to get things together late in the UAAP tournament. The team led by Paul Desiderio ended up breaking a 32-year Finals drought to end up with silver - the school's first podium finish in the sport in 32 years as well. Also set to be honored in the event are Sisi Rondina (UAAP Volleyball Player of the Year); Regine Arocha (NCAA Volleyball Player of the Year); the National University Lady Bulldogs (Award of Excellence); Ateneo's Angelo Kouame and San Beda's Javee Mocon (Pivotal Players); Lyceum's CJ Perez and Adamson's Sean Manganti (Impact Players). The 2019 Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Press Corps Awards presented by SportsVision will be aired live over Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas and Tiebreaker Times on Facebook......»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnMay 24th, 2019

Ateneo s Ravena flanked by two UP Maroons in 2019 All-Collegiate Team

Four different schools will be represented in this year's All-Collegiate Team. Robert Bolick of NCAA three-peat titlist San Beda and Thirdy Ravena of UAAP back-to-back champion Ateneo are the headliners of the Mythical Five in the 2019 Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Awards presented by SportsVision scheduled for Monday at Amelie Hotel Manila in Malate. Bolick ended his collegiate career with a bang, averaging 16.8 points in 49.1 percent shooting, 5.4 rebounds, and 4.8 assists in the Red Lions' 20-1 romp through the 94th Season of the NCAA. That included a 50-point outburst against Arellano in the elimination round - one of the highest individual marks in the history of the Grand Old League. For his part, Ravena flew the highest he ever has with norms of 14.9 points, 3.1 rebounds, 1.2 steals, and 1.0 blocks as the Blue Eagles' dominated UAAP Season 81 with an overall 15-2 record. He saved his best for last when he imposed his will on UP en route to being hailed as Finals MVP. Completing this year's All-Collegiate Team selected by the Collegiate Press Corps, made up of scribes from print and online outfits covering the NCAA and UAAP, are NCAA 94 MVP Prince Eze of Perpetual and the UP pair of Bright Akhuetie and Paul Desiderio. Eze put the Altas on his back all season long as they barged back into the playoffs. Akhuetie's own MVP campaign as well as Desiderio's heroics were also more than enough to bring the Fighting Maroons to their first Final Four since 1997 and first Finals in 32 years. All five will be honored in the annual event also supported by Amelie Hotel Manila, Rain or Shine, NorthPort, World Balance, Arellano, and AXA Team EDS. They will be alongside fellow awardees in NU Lady Bulldogs who will receive the Award of Excellence, Ateneo's Ange Kouame and San Beda's Javee Mocon who will receive Pivotal Player plums, Adamson's Sean Manganti and Lyceum's CJ Perez who will receive Impact Player citations, Red Lions' mentor Boyet Fernandez and Blue Eagles' tactician Tab Baldwin who will be recognized as Coaches of the Year, and UST's Sisi Rondina and Arellano's Regine Arocha who will make history as the first-ever SportsVision Volleyball Players of the Year. The 2019 Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Press Corps Awards presented by SportsVision will be aired live over Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas and Tiebreaker Times on Facebook......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 25th, 2019

Fernandez, Baldwin hailed as Collegiate Coaches of the Year yet again

For extending their respective squads' dynasties, two of the best and brightest coaches in the collegiate basketball scene are set to be feted. San Beda Red Lions head mentor Boyet Fernandez and Ateneo Blue Eagles chief tactician Tab Baldwin will be hailed as the Coaches of the Year in the 2019 Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Awards presented by SportsVision on Monday at Amelie Hotel Manila in Malate. Fernandez guided the Red Lions to their 11th title in the last 13 years, their 22nd overall in the NCAA Seniors Basketball Tournament. During the tournament, San Beda only lost once, capping the season with a 14-game winning streak, including a two-game sweep of the Lyceum Pirates in the Finals. This will be Fernandez's fifth Coach of the Year plum, tying him for most in the category with former Ateneo Blue Eagles head coach Norman Black. For his part, Baldwin is set to receive his second straight Coach of the Year trophy in this annual event organized by the Collegiate Press Corps, composed of scribes from print and online outfits covering the NCAA and UAAP. Under Baldwin's watch, the Blue Eagles cruised through the UAAP Season 81 Men's Basketball Tournament to win their second straight championship, the school's 10th overall. The awards night backed by  Amelie Hotel, Rain or Shine, NorthPort, World Balance, Arellano, and AXA Team EDS will also distinguish the UP Fighting Maroons. The Fighting Maroons were the feel-good story of the collegiate season, overcoming a shaky start to get things together late in the UAAP tournament. The team led by Paul Desiderio ended up breaking a 32-year Finals drought to end up with silver - the school's first podium finish in the sport in 32 years as well. Also set to be honored in the event are Sisi Rondina (UAAP Volleyball Player of the Year); Regine Arocha (NCAA Volleyball Player of the Year); the National University Lady Bulldogs (Award of Excellence); Ateneo's Angelo Kouame and San Beda's Javee Mocon (Pivotal Players); Lyceum's CJ Perez and Adamson's Sean Manganti (Impact Players). The 2019 Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Press Corps Awards presented by SportsVision will be aired live over Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas and Tiebreaker Times on Facebook......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 24th, 2019

Thirdy Ravena flies high as 2019 Collegiate Player of the Year

In a season of excellent individual performers, Ateneo’s Thirdy Ravena was second to none. After bannering the Blue Eagles to their second-straight UAAP title, Ravena is set to be named the Collegiate Player of the Year in the 2019 Chooks-To-Go Collegiate Press Corps Awards Night presented by SportsVision on Monday at Amelie Hotel Manila in Ermita. By snagging the top individual plum given by the reporters covering the beat, Ravena joined the likes of his brother Kiefer, Mac Belo, Jeron Teng, Robert Bolick and Ben Mbala in the list of the players who have taken home the coveted award. The second-generation star particularly put up a finals series to remember, averaging 29.5 points, eight rebounds, and 7.5 assists as the Blue Eagles waylaid the University of the Philippines Fighting Maroons - an affair which looked more like a coronation for the newest King Eagle. Ravena will be joined by San Beda’s Robert Bolick, Perpetual’s Prince Eze, and the UP pair of Bright Akhuetie and Paul Desiderio in this year’s All-Collegiate team. Ravena’s coach, Tab Baldwin will also be named the UAAP Coach of the Year while San Beda’s Boyet Fernandez will be named the NCAA Coach of the Year for the record-tying fifth time in the annual festivities also supported by Amelie Hotel Manila, Rain or Shine, NorthPort, World Balance, Arellano University and AXA Team Eds. For the first time in history, the Collegiate Press Corps will also be giving out the SportsVision Volleyball Players of the Year award to the standout performers of the UAAP and the NCAA. University of Santo Tomas’ Sisi Rondina will get the distinction as the first-ever UAAP Volleyball Player of the Year for willing the Golden Tigresses to the Finals. Arellano’s Regine Arocha, on the other hand, will be named the NCAA Volleyball Player of the Year after winning back the trophy for the Lady Chiefs. The 2019 Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Press Corps Awards presented by SportsVision will be aired live over the Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas and Tiebreaker Times Facebook accounts......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 26th, 2019

Fernandez, Baldwin named Coaches of Year

Fernandez, Baldwin named Coaches of Year.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 25th, 2019

San Beda's Jarin and DLSU's Ayo are Coaches of the Year

Champion coaches Aldin Ayo and Jamike Jarin are among the top achievers that will be feted on January 26 when the UAAP-NCAA Press Corps holds its annual Collegiate Basketball Awards at the Montgomery Place Social Hall in E. Rodriguez Ave., Quezon City. The two bench tacticians will receive the Coach of the Year award in the event backed by Smart, Accel, Mighty Sports, and MJM Productions for guiding their respective teams to the championship in the country’s two major varsity leagues. Ayo revived the winning tradition of the De La Salle University Green Archers who captured the UAAP title at the expense of archrival Ateneo de Manila University. This, one year after also steering his alma mater Colegio de San Juan de Letran back to the top of the NCAA. Jarin got his redemption from losing to Ayo and the Knights in 2015 by leading the San Beda College Red Lions to their ninth championship in 11 seasons after sweeping Arellano University in the title series. Ayo is the first coach in the history of the awards night to win the Coach of the Year award in both leagues, while Jarin is receiving the prestigious honor before he makes his coaching debut for National University in the UAAP next season. Other coaches who have won the award in the annual event that honors the top achievers of the UAAP and NCAA are Norman Black, Frankie Lim, Eric Altamirano, Boyet Fernandez, Louie Alas, Nash Racela, Ato Agustin, and Juno Sauler. Also to be handed out are the Smart Player of the Year award and the Collegiate Mythical Five presented by Mighty Sports. Other awards include the Pivotal Player, Impact Player, Super Senior and Mr. Efficiency. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 13th, 2017

SIYA NAMAN: UST pride Sisi Rondina is UAAP 81 Athlete of the Year

Sisi Rondina has capped off a career year in the UAAP with yet another award. University of Sto. Tomas’ heart and soul was hailed as the Season 81 Athlete of the Year for Collegiate Team Sports in the closing ceremony, Tuesday at the Mall of Asia Arena. Rondina won the MVP awards for both beach and then indoor women’s volleyball. She led the Golden Tigresses to the championship on the sand and then to a runner-up finish on the taraflex. Now, she adds the Athlete of the Year trophy to the collection she has amassed in her last year in the UAAP. “Blessed. ‘Di ko rin in-expect na sa akin mapupunta,” she said after receiving the award. She then continued, “Para rin ‘to sa teammates ko kasi ‘di ko rin ‘to makukuha kung ‘di sa kanila.” The pride of UST is the first volleyball player since Alyssa Valdez to be recognized as UAAP Athlete of the Year. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 21st, 2019

Gold standard Lacuna, towering teen Sotto make Ateneo proud as UAAP 81 Athletes of the Year

Ateneo de Manila University has three of the four Athletes of the Year in UAAP 81. Blue Eagle swimming great Jessie King Lacuna was hailed as Athlete of the Year for Collegiate Individual Sports in the closing ceremony, Tuesday at MOA Arena. Lacuna is an Olympian and has been a mainstay for the Philippine national team in the last decade. He had led the Katipunan-based school to five titles in men’s swimming all while amassing 35 gold medals and four MVP plums. Meanwhile, Ateneo swept the awards in the High School Division with Kai Sotto for Team Sports and Philip Joaquin Santos for Individual Sports. Sotto was the Season MVP in the Juniors Basketball Tournament while also leading the Blue Eaglets to a runner-up finish. The 7-foot-2, 17-year-old is now chasing his NBA dream and is training abroad. University of Sto. Tomas pride Sisi Rondina is the lone Athlete of the Year not hailing from Katipunan. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 21st, 2019

UP, UE share 2019 s king of recruiting crown

Who was our King of Recruiting in 2018? Find out here. --- Last season, the University of the Philippines, at long last, broke through in the UAAP. Behind the leadership of Paul Desiderio and key contributions from Season MVP Bright Akhuetie and Mythical selection Juan Gomez de Liano, the Fighting Maroons made their first Final Four since 1997 and first Finals in 32 years. Now, even without the iconic Desiderio, State U is nothing but confident it could build on its breakthrough. The reason? Well, because two of the brightest young stars in Kobe Paras and Ricci Rivero are now orbiting Diliman. Paras has all the physical tools to take any league by storm and now in maroon and green, he is out to continue the legacy of his father Benjie who delivered the school’s first and only championship. Meanwhile, the Euro-stepping Rivero already knows a thing or two about taking the UAAP by storm, having been chosen for the Mythical Team when he was still playing for De La Salle University in 2017. Add big man J-Boy Gob, another transferee, to that and, indeed, UP is only equipped to keep contending. On the strength of the transfers of Paras and Rivero alone, the Fighting Maroons would have been worthy of the title of 2019 King of Recruiting. Right up there with them, though, in terms of getting a big boost in the offseason is University of the East. Absent from the Final Four in the last decade, the Red Warriors will be heading into the upcoming season with a fully stocked arsenal. Now up front for them – alongside stalwart Philip Manalang, of course – will be 6-foot-9 Senegalese Adama Diakhite, three-time champion and two-time MVP in the CESAFI Rey Suerte, and college-ready Harvey Pagsanjan, the no. 7 high school player in the 2019 NBTC 24. Diakhite is a hulking presence who will prove to be a tough matchup even for the likes of reigning MVP Akhuetie and last year’s Rookie of the year Ange Kouame. Suerte, a gifted scorer from anywhere on the court, fills right into the hole left behind by scoring dynamo Alvin Pasaol while Pagsanjan can continue making all the right plays he had been doing as the longtime beacon of hope for Hope Christian High School. Also flanking them are former Ateneo de Manila University forward John Apacible, defensive stopper Neil Tolentino, Filipino-Kiwi swingman Richie Rodger, and Filipino-Australian point guard Jasper Rentoy. And with that, UP and UE will have joint custody of the crown of the 2019 King of Recruiting. They dethrone National University which claimed the crown a year ago behind a big-time recruiting class that included Ildefonso brothers Dave and Shaun, John Lloyd Clemente, and John Galinato. Just like last year, there remains no doubt that the new Fighting Maroons and Red Warriors will make their respective sides forces to reckon with come UAAP 82. Still, several squads also made it a point to be better in the offseason. In fact, the graduating players in the 2019 NBTC 24 have been spread out among eight different teams. From the 2019 NBTC 24, the annual ranking of the best high school players in the country, 14 are moving on up to the Seniors. Adamson University is the biggest winner in terms of recruits from that ranking, with three of the top 15 players now in San Marcelino. Ninth-ranked Aaron Fermin is a double-double machine in the NCAA Jrs. and is nothing but determined to realize his potential as a two-way force under multi-titled mentor Franz Pumaren. In CESAFI standout Joshua Yerro and UAAP Jrs. Mythical selection Joem Sabandal, coach Franz also has young blood to bolster the backcourt that will no longer have Koko Pingoy. The Soaring Falcons also scored four other former Baby Falcons in big man Lorenz Capulong and wings Adam and Andrey Doria and AP Manlapaz. When it comes to reaping the rewards of its high school program, though, nobody could still touch Mapua University which again got two keep its Jrs. studs in Clint Escamis and Dan Arches, both of whom made it into the top two-thirds of the 2019 NBTC 24. Escamis and Arches are offensive guards who will give much-needed firepower to a promising core comprised of fellow Mapua HS products Warren Bonifacio, Eric Jabel, Noah Lugo, and Laurenz Victoria. Also, the Cardinals are the favorites to land NCAA 94 Jrs. Finals MVP Paolo Hernandez, another Red Robin. Also bagging two prized prospects from the 2019 NBTC 24 is La Salle which is now the place where the talented tandem of Joel Cagulangan and Joshua David get to work. Cagulangan has long been a star in the making and the NCAA 94 Jrs. MVP is, without question, Taft Avenue’s point guard of the future. The even better news is that he will still have wingman David, a tried and tested glue guy, to grow with. Also set to debut for the Green Archers are Filipino-Americans Jordan Bartlett, a speedster guard; Tyrus Hill, a high-flying forward; and Kurt Lojera, a big-bodied swingman. In all, there are six graduates from the top 10 of the 2019 NBTC 24. All of them would be on different teams in the Srs. Two players from 2019 NBTC 24 are yet to commit to any school, but there is no doubt that Red Robin Hernandez and Greenie Inand Fornilos will be able additions to any collegiate team. For the second straight year, Aldin Ayo will be adding a top three recruit out of high school as incoming sophomore CJ Cansino will now join forces with another triple-doubling talent in Mark Nonoy, a rookie who plays way beyond his years. But wait, there’s more as UST also welcomes with open arms its newest foreign student-athlete in Beninese Soulemane Chabi Yo whose speed and skill will make him a problem for the other foreign student-athletes more used to being powerhouses. Sprinkle in stretch four Sherwin Concepcion as well as versatile forwards Rhenz Abando and Brent Paraiso and there’s a reason why the Growling Tigers are now very much a darkhorse contender. L-Jay Gonzales and RJ Abarrientos remain FEU’s backcourt for tomorrow, but in the meantime, the former is poised for a breakout just as the latter is poised to wrap up his K-12 schooling. Yes, Abarrientos is not yet good to go come UAAP 82, but his steady hand is still the perfect pairing for the burst of energy that is Gonzales. Make no mistake, however, the Tamaraws have gotten help in the form of 6-foot-10 Cameroonian Patrick Tchuente as well as former Baby Tams Daniel Celzo and Jack Gloria. Letran is already the biggest it has ever been up front with NCAA 94 Rookie of the Year Larry Muyang alongside Jeo Ambohot, Christian Balagasay, and Christian Fajarito. Now, the Knights have also beefed up at the wings with Allen Mina and Mark Sangalang as well as former Red Warrior and Growling Tiger Jordan Sta. Ana. LPU will have to prove it could continue contending even without NCAA 93 MVP CJ Perez, but the good news is that now backtopping Marcelino twins Jaycee and Jayvee are former San Sebastian College-Recoletos key cogs Alvin Baetiong, Jayson David, and Renzo Navarro. That’s still a pretty solid lineup in our books. Just like last year, the now two-time UAAP champions are mostly intact, only losing team captain Anton Asistio as well as reserve guard Aaron Black. That doesn’t mean, however, that there are no new faces in Ateneo. Geo Chiu, Kai Sotto’s twin tower, decided to stay in Katipunan just as fellow ex-Blue Eaglets RV Berjay and Jason Credo are now seeing minutes in head coach Tab Baldwin’s rotation. And oh, there is a possibility that double-double machine Fornilos, who placed no. 13 in the 2019 NBTC 24, is bound to be a Blue Eaglet. Perps is nothing but determined to build on the triumphant return to the NCAA of head coach Frankie Lim and to do that, they will be leaning on former San Beda University pillar Ben Adamos as well as ex-Adamson HS workhorse Jefner Egan. Count out the Altas at your own risk. JRU is just on the first phase of a grand rebuild, but there is no doubt that things are looking up for Kalentong. In John Amores, they now have an end-to-end force who is all set to make an immediate impact as a rookie. These are the new names to watch for the teams: Baste CSB National U San Beda --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2019

Almadro, Vicente, Acaylar lead nat'l team coach list

Ateneo de Manila University coach Oliver Almadro, University of the East’s Francis Vicente and Perpetual Help tactician Sammy Acaylar lead the shortlist of mentors Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. is looking into to call the shots for the national women’s team that will see action in the 29th Southeast Asian Games in Kuala Lumpur. The association has in its list 23 names limited to the members of the LVPI coaches commission. LVPI acting president Peter Cayco said that they will narrow down the list to 8 to 6 coaches for interview and in a week’s time he will recommend one to the board who will take the position. Among the names in the list, Almadro and Acaylar stood out as possible national team coaches as they led their respective collegiate teams to the throne. Almadro steered the Blue Eagles to back-to-back UAAP men’s volleyball titles and was the head coach of the men’s U-23 team and Singapore Southeast Asian Games two years ago while Acaylar led Altas back on top of the NCAA in Season 91 and was part of the coaching staff of the national squad that won gold in the 1993 SEA Games in Singapore. Acaylar also coached the national team in the 2015 AVC Asian Senior Women's Championship in China.  Vicente, meanwhile, handled the national youth team in a couple of international stints last year. Macky Carino of defending NCAA women’s volleyball champion College of St. Benilde and Obet Javier of NCAA Season 90 titlist Arellano University are some of the other prominent names on the list. Other big names like multi-titled mentor Ramil de Jesus of reigning UAAP champion De La Salle and University of Sto. Tomas’ Kungfu Reyes all begged off for various reasons but are willing to offer their help and support.                 San Sebastian College and National University mentor Roger Gorayeb, who called the shots for the national team in the 2015 SEA Games, is not included in the list “Ang kailangan natin ay ‘yung may oras,” said Cayco. “Meron d’yan magagaling pero wala naman silang oras.” LVPI is also looking to tap Serbian mentor Moro Branislav, who handled the PSL-F2 Logistics Manila in the 2016 FIVB Women’s Club World Championship and the Philippine Superliga back-to-back Grand Prix champion Foton, as team consultant.  The chosen head coach will be tasked to form a 16-woman pool. As part of the preparation the national team will play in the Asian Women’s Volleyball Championship from August 9 to 17 before heading to Malaysia for the SEA Games from August 19 to 31.   “We have all time to prepare and that’s the best part,” Cayco said. Also included in the list are Lerma Giron, Mac Gepuela, Marcelo Joaquin, Jason Gabales, Michael Inoferio, Bryan Esquibel, Raymund Castillo, Jeremiah Barrica, Raplh Dablo, Leovimo Rivera, Michael Santos, Roberto Javier, Carl Bryan Vitus, Richard Estacio, Ruel Pascual, Leonardo Toyco, Benjamin Mape, Michael Carino, Dexter Clamor and Alvin Dumalaog. The participation of the men’s team in the SEA Games is yet to be discussed.       --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2017

How Fil-Am coach Leo Balayon is leading a small US university to greater heights

Last December 16, Bethesda University, a little-known college from Anaheim, California made U.S. collegiate basketball history when it defeated the Divsion One school Cal State University - Northridge. The Bethesda Flames, led by Filipino-American coach Leo Balayon, became the only member of the National Christian College Athletic Association to defeat a Division One school. Born and raised in Davao, coach Balayon has decades of basketball experience under his belt. He played for Ateneo de Davao's basketball team and eventually became University of the Philippines' assistant coach. He played semi-professionally in China before joining his family in the US, where the sport followed him, and he became the head coach of the men's basketball team and the athletic director of Bethesda University. But it looks like he's found home. Balayon is not just breathing life into a little-known school, he's also providing second chances to players who have had a rough past.   strong>BUCKET LIST /strong> With the win, Balayon not only made history, but he was also able to cross something off his bucket list. 'I want to win against a division one team as a small school coach, that was one of the items on my bucket list,' he said.  And to add to the grandeur of their accomplishment, the win came against a coach like Reggie Theus, a 13-year NBA veteran. 'Being able to accomplish it this past week was really amazing especially doing it against a coach I respect, Reggie Theus is an NBA coach, NCAA coach he's been to the tournament, he's been an NBA all star,' Balayon said. But he didn't do it alone.    strong>BIGGER THAN BASKETBALL /strong> Along with the challenge of coaching a small school, his team consists of players who've had problems in the past, or have come from difficult backgrounds. But they're in it together, nonetheless. 'I know it's a small school, really challenging situation, but it actually allows me to find kids that need help and sometimes the kids we help they come from hard backgrounds. We've had kids who's moms were murdered. We have guys who've lost loved ones,' said Balayon.  Further embracing the situation, Balayon  appreciates the second chance the sport has given to his players.  'We can't get the top 25 high school recruits but we can get these kids that are overlooked and maybe some coaches shy away them just because of where they're coming from or their past mistakes. For us I use this platform to help kids have a second chance.'   strong>TAKE IT FROM THEM /strong> Bethesda Flames guard Rob Bush is a prime example of the hardships some of the players have went through. 'I had to put basketball down for a minute. Because my dad unfortunately died and then my mom was murdered so I had to put it down for a second. I just had to come take care of myself,' Bush said. But Bush is also living proof of how Bethesda's sports program and coach Balayon's coaching have done wonders to rejuvinate players' outlook in life. 'It's a blessing any time you can get on the court. It's blessing that we can wake up and have camaraderie whether it's ups or downs.'  Another player, 34-year-old Buddha Boyd believes the Flames were destined to play together, and are on their way to do great things. 'I always believed in this team was going to do something special because I'm 34, years old playing college basketball, I'm here for a reason,' the 6'5 swingman said.  'After getting to know my teammates and knowing their stories. I just see all of us came together for a reason, something special and the D1 win was just the beginning.'   strong>With a report from Steve Angeles, ABS-CBN News /strong> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 4th, 2017

PBA: Bolick took Stanley trade hard: “Umiyak pa nga ako”

Stanley Pringle’s blockbuster trade from Northport to Ginebra Tuesday got everyone shocked that’s for sure. However, it seems like Northport rookie Robert Bolick took the trade the hardest. Bolick, the Batang Pier’s no. 3 overall pick from last year’s Draft, has been very vocal about his relationship with Pringle. The rookie really relished the opportunity to be teammates with one of the best point guards in this region. After that relationship lasted for pretty much just one conference, Bolick really felt the gravity of the situation. It’s as if someone spoiled him the ending to a movie that he waited to watch for so long. “Actually pinatay ko cellphone ko di ko matanggap, umiyak pa nga ako,” Bolick said, going back to the time he found out about the trade. “It’s because gusto ko rin maging selfish, gusto ko pa siyang makasama nang matagal kasi Stanley’s one of the best players na nakasama kong makalaro in my position,” he added. While Bolick welcomes the opportunity to play with Sol Mercado, Kevin Ferrer, and Jervy Cruz, the rookie admits that he’ll miss seeing Pringle in Batang Pier practice. However, just because they’re no longer teammates doesn’t mean that Bolick can no longer stop learning from Stanley. “We trust the management, we trust our coaches and everything. Move on. But again, gusto ko pa rin pagdating sa practice nandoon siya,” Bolick said of Pringle. “Sabi niya, ‘Always remember na I’m always here, the phone is always open,’ gumaganun siya so may nararamdaman na ako [na emotions],” Bolick added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News10 hr. 58 min. ago

San Beda, Adamson set up semis date in Filoil Preseason

Three-time NCAA champion San Beda University has forged a 2019 Filoil Flying V Preseason Tournament semifinals showdown with UAAP powerhouse Adamson University after the two teams won out in their respective games, Monday at Filoil Flying V Centre. The Red Lions had the 1-2 punch of sophomore studs Evan Nelle and James Canlas knock out fighting Far Eastern University, 60-52. Nelle starred with 16 points to go along with four assists, four rebounds, and two assists. He fired six of his output in a four minute spurt that re-increased the three-time NCAA champions' lead from two, 44-42, to eight, 54-46. Canlas shone bright himself with 13 markers, seven boards, two dimes, and one steal that snuffed out the Tamaraws' last try at a comeback inside the last two minutes. "I'm happy about their development," head coach Boyet Fernandez said post-game, nothing but satisfied with his second-year stars. "Sabi ko nga nung sa PBA D-League, bata pa mga players ko, pero yung development nila, you'll see the maturity of these two now." Donald Tankoua also chimed in 12 points and five rebounds for San Beda which remains undefeated after eight games. Earlier, the Soaring Falcons took the seat opposite the Red Lions by routing shorthanded San Sebastian College-Recoletos, 81-61. Congolese center Lenda Douanga posted a 17-point, 15-rebound double-double all while leading four other teammates in double-digit scoring. "Today, we just had to take care of business because we know very well San Sebastian is shorthanded," head coach Franz Pumaren said. That is exactly what Adamson did as Simon Camacho made his presence felt everywhere with 11 points, 10 rebounds, seven assists, and one block while the backcourt of Jerom Lastimosa and Jerrick Ahanmisi merged for 24 markers, five boards, and four dimes. That total team effort was more than enough to put away the Golden Stags who were without ailing Allyn Bulanadi and then lost RK Ilagan to an apparent leg injury early in the game. The showdown between Adamson and San Beda is the main event for the preseason tournament's semifinals on Thursday still at the same venue. Meanwhile, Lyceum of the Philippines University made headway into the other semifinals pairing after taking the sting out of Centro Escolar University, 76-69. Alvin Baetiong and Reymar Caduyac showed the Pirates the way to the Final Four as the former finished with 13 points and five rebounds and the latter ended with 10 markers, three assists, and two boards. It was also those two who connived to quell the Scorpions' late-game rally and made sure their team overcame an apparent nose injury to top gun Jaycee Marcelino. LPU now await the winner between De La Salle University and Colegio de San Juan de Letran in their ongoing matchup. For nine-man CEU, Senegalese Maodo Malick Diouf fronted the effort with 17 points, 19 rebounds, seven assists, five blocks, and one steal. BOX SCORES FIRST GAME ADAMSON 81 - Douanga 17, Lastimosa 14, Camacho 11, Manlapaz 11, Ahanmisi 10, Sabandal 9, Zaldivar 4, Yerro 3, Magbuhos 2, Fermin 0, Bernardo 0, Doria 0, Maata 0 SAN SEBASTIAN 61 - Sumoda 12, Desoyo 12, Are 10, Capobres 8, Villapando 7, Calma 7, Altamirano 3, Calahat 2, Loristo 0, Ilagan 0, Tero 0, Dela Cruz 0 QUARTER SCORES: 15-17, 38-31, 62-47, 81-61 SECOND GAME LPU 76 - Baetiong 13, Caduyac 10, Marcelino JC 9, Ibanez 8, Marcelino JV 6, Santos 6, Yong 6, David 4, Remulla 4, Valdez 4, Tansingco 2, Navarro 2, Laurente 2, Gaviola 0 CEU 69 - Diouf 17, Guinitaran 16, Santos 12, Diaz 8, Caballero 5, Sunga 4, Abastillas 4, Bernabe 3, Pamaran 0 QUARTER SCORES: 22-21, 47-33, 58-50, 76-69 THIRD GAME SAN BEDA 60 - Nelle 16, Canlas 13, Tankoua 12, Oftana 6, Bahio 4, Cuntapay 4, Doliguez 3, Noah 2, Penuela 0, Alfaro 0, Abuda 0, Soberano 0, Carino 0, Etrata 0 FEU 52 - Ebona 8, Tuffin 7, Comboy 7, Tchuente 5, Bienes 5, Nunag 5, Stockton 3, Gonzales 3, Alforque 3, Celzo 3, Cani 3, Torres 0 QUARTER SCORES: 19-12, 25-21, 42-42, 60-52 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 17th, 2019

Costly tickets, empty seats and quiet crowd for Brazil game

By Mauricio Savarese, Associated Press SAO PAULO (AP) — The Copa America opener on Friday yielded a box-office record for Brazil with gate receipts of more than $5.7 million. It was the atmosphere in the stands, though, that captured most attention, with some players complaining about a lack of support from the crowd in the home team's 3-0 win over Bolivia. More than 46,000 fans paid an average of $125 per ticket, but at least 22,000 seats were empty at the Morumbi Stadium for a match that organizers initially said was a sellout. The volume only went up in the stands when there was jeering after Brazil's lackluster first half, during homophobic chants when the Bolivian keeper took goal kicks, and after the three second-half goals. "It's normal to be like that in Sao Paulo, many fans are more concerned about their clubs, so it is always tough for Brazil to play here," veteran right back Dani Alves said. For Brazilian league matches, ticket prices for the most popular seats cost as little as $15. The country, enduring an economic crisis since 2015, has established its minimum wage at $256 for this year. The mix of high prices, empty seats and lack of noise surprised some players, who said they could easily hear instructions from their coaches during the match. Winger David Neres said the atmosphere was "a bit different." "We are usually very focused, we don't hear much anyway. But it was a little quiet tonight," he said. "Except for the break, when they booed us. I still don't understand why that happened." Defender Thiago Silva said the jeers were understandable after a goalless first half. He also linked the behavior of the fans to the high ticket prices. "It took us a while to open the score, the ticket prices were expensive, so it is normal that they boo," Silva said. "But we were not that bad in the first half." Alves said there would be a different atmosphere when Brazil plays Venezuela on Tuesday in Salvador, in the warm northeast state of Bahia. "In Bahia the 'axe' is different," he said, using an African-Brazilian word that means energy. "People miss the national team there, they miss this energy that we take where we go. I am sure it will be more cheerful than here." Historically, Brazil's impoverished northeast is more supportive of the team. After playing Venezuela, Brazil ends its group stage campaign against Peru, again in Sao Paulo, but at the Arena Corinthians instead of the Morumbi......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 16th, 2019

ONE Championship: Mixed martial arts gold could be on the horizon for two-sport champion Stamp Fairtex

In just two matches under the ONE Championship banner, Thailand’s Stamp Fairtex has already achieved history by becoming the promotion’s first and only two-sport champion after capturing the ONE Women’s Atomweight Kickboxing and Muay Thai World Championships.   Now, the 21-year old could be setting her sights on a third world title: the ONE Women’s Atomweight World Championship in mixed martial arts.   “I do have plans of getting the third belt, the mixed martial arts World Championship,” Stamp shared. “This third belt will be the most difficult belt for me to get because there are many great fighters in ONE, and mixed martial arts is not my strong point, so this is where I have to improve my wrestling, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and mixed martial arts.”   “If I fight in mixed martial arts, I know that everyone will try to take me down and fight on the ground. I will have to try harder and harder to climb up and get some experience before I fight for the belt,” she added.   Already in ONE’s history books, Stamp sees becoming a champion in mixed martial arts as an even bigger deal.   “If I win the belt, it will be my greatest achievement,” she said.   Before thinking about a world title in mixed martial arts however, Stamp will need to focus on defending one of her two belts in the ONE Women’s Atomweight Muay Thai World Championship.   Stamp puts her title on the line against Australian teenager Alma Juniku in the main event of ONE: Legendary Quest this Saturday, 15 June at the Baoshan Arena in Shanghai, China.   “I am preparing hard for this bout, especially since it will be a title defense. I respect Alma and I know what she can bring to the table, but I also know what I am capable of and I have the utmost belief in my skills,” Stamp stated.   “Alma is very patient in her approach, and we have developed a gameplan to be able to use that patience to our advantage. Alma has impeccable timing and her counters are indeed dangerous, but I have nothing but faith in myself, my camp, and my coaches, and I am confident that I can overcome a tough challenger like Alma,” she continued.   For the young Thai champion, her motivation lies in not letting the people behind her down. Stamp knows that being a champion means being a marked woman, and she understands that part of the being the best is preparing for all comers.   “Everyone has high hopes for me. I can’t let my family, Fairtex, and my fans down. I have to keep training hard and learn something new every day so I can keep retaining my belts. I know everyone wants to come for these belts and they will be in perfect condition and will have the perfect gameplan, so for me, I have to stay focused and I have to be ready for anything.” Catch Stamp Fairtex put her ONE Women’s Atomweight Muay Thai World Championship on the line against challenger Alma Juniku at ONE: Legendary Quest on Saturday, June 15th at 11:00 PM. Full event broadcast will be on Sunday, Jun 16th at 8:00 PM  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 14th, 2019

With the Raptors, a global game now has a truly global champion

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The Canadian flag, soaked in beer and champagne, was waved in the Toronto locker room. Pascal Siakam wore the flag of Cameroon around his shoulders. Marc Gasol was yelling some happy phrase in Spanish. Every team that wins an NBA title calls itself “world champions.” These Toronto Raptors might actually be worthy of such a moniker. The new kings of NBA basketball are the first outside the U.S. to wear the crown. And they come from all corners of the globe. Team President Masai Ujiri was born in England and raised in Nigeria. Serge Ibaka is from the Congo. Gasol will play again for his native Spain this summer in the FIBA World Cup. Coach Nick Nurse won his first championship in Britain, where reserve OG Anunoby comes from. Even the team’s superfan, Nav Bhatia, comes from India. It’s a global game. It’s a global team. They’re the global champions. “It meant a lot, just having guys from different countries and speaking different languages,” Siakam said. “I think it kind of got us closer together. And you kind of have all those little kinds of friendship with guys that you can speak the same language with, and from Spanish to French to English, different cultures. I think kind of it represents Toronto in general, having that diversity.” He doesn’t even have the whole list. Jeremy Lin, an Asian-American, speaks Mandarin. The assistants on Nurse’s staff have backgrounds from stints as players or coaches in France, England, Germany, Italy, Australia, Israel and more. The director of sports science is Scottish. The head trainer is from Ontario. Jamaal Magloire, who has been on the staff since his playing days ended, is a Toronto native. “It means a lot,” Magloire said as he watched champagne spray all over the locker room. “Canada and Toronto especially are very diverse places. And this team, all the diversity that we have, it served us well.” There’s a parade — Ujiri said it was scheduled for Monday (Tuesday, PHL time), though he also wasn’t exactly certain at the time — coming to Toronto. The red and white flag with the giant maple leaf will wave. There will be plenty of other flags there as well. And more than a few proud Americans will be on that route as well, like NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard and the longest-tenured Raptors player, Kyle Lowry. “I’m very happy for them,” Golden State coach Steve Kerr said, tipping his cap to the Raptors. “Winning a championship is the ultimate in this league, and they have got a lot of guys who have earned this. So congrats to Toronto, to their organization, to their fans. They are a worthy champion.” At NBA headquarters in New York, they truly didn’t care who won the series. That doesn’t mean they don’t realize the Raptors’ title is a good thing for the league’s future. Basketball Without Borders is the vehicle that basically helped Siakam start his journey to the league seven or so years ago. There are NBA academies popping up in Africa and Asia. The league is helping to establish a new pro league in Africa that’s set to begin play early next year. The sport takes every opportunity it gets to promote what it bills as the Jr. NBA Global Championship, a tournament for kids. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said before the series that the league is aware of 700 million cellphones being in use in Africa, more than half of those being smartphones. The NBA wants people watching on those phones, and the infrastructure is such now in many places that it is actually possible. “It’s been revolutionary in terms of the people of Africa’s ability to watch our games in real time on hand-held devices,” Silver said. “So we see enormous growth opportunities both in terms of players and for participation and ultimately an interest for the league.” Having champions from Cameroon and the Congo, having the executive who gets credited for putting it all together being from Nigeria ... it’s not going to hurt the game in Africa one bit. The NBA champions are, indeed, champions of the world. “As a kid, I didn’t have the opportunity to dream about this moment,” Siakam said. “I didn’t think I could make it. I didn’t think this was possible as a kid. And I think a lot of kids don’t think that it’s possible. Just me being able to be here today and telling them that, ’Hey, look at me, I was a little scrawny kid from Cameroon ... but here I am, as a champion.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 14th, 2019

Durant s return looms large heading into potential clincher

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com TORONTO — Let us dismiss the tasty-yet-faulty comparison folks will try to make regarding Game 5 and Kevin Durant and the fate of the Warriors in these NBA Finals: In 1970, when Knicks center Willis Reed famously limped out of the tunnel at Madison Square Garden for Game 7, he only hit two jumpers and was done, too gimpy to go any further. The Warriors, starved for points against a toothy Raptors defense, will require plenty more than that from Durant before he’s done. Back then, it was winner-take-all, New York vs. L.A. Durant and the Warriors are trailing 3-1 and face elimination at Scotiabank Arena. They’re staring down a far deeper and darker tunnel. This is the stark reality for a would-be savior and his recuperating calf and the desperate two-time defending champions. Durant was upgraded to questionable for Monday (Tuesday, PHL time), which means it's likely he’ll at least be on the floor. Whether he stays long enough to break a sweat or plays well enough to make the Raptors perspire is the real issue. Perhaps never before has an injury to a superstar of this magnitude been this mysterious – and perhaps costly – in the history of The Finals. Remember, with Reed, the Knicks won at the end. Maybe there's more in common with Magic Johnson pulling a hamstring in 1989 during Game 1, but again, Magic was finished for the series, and so were the Lakers, swept by the Pistons. Durant is trying to return and in the process squelch the innuendo swirling about his recovery and also trigger a historic comeback. Can he pull this off after not playing since May 8 (May 9, PHL time), and practicing for the first time only Sunday? It was a practice, but only in the tamest sense. Durant joined his teammates and took part after the media was hustled off the court, leaving no outside witnesses or sneaky TMZ footage. The Warriors, this time of year, only conduct light drills. And it was over within an hour. To recap: Durant is supposed to step into an intense basketball game after missing a month, and battle a Toronto defense led by Kawhi Leonard, and thwart a championship bid by a team and city bracing for a maddening celebration around midnight, and … rescue the Warriors? OK, then. “I think it’s pretty easy to realize we obviously miss him out there and he’s propelled us to two championships in two years,” said Warriors guard Klay Thompson. “So it would be pretty storybook if he could come back and help us do the same.” If it sounds like the Warriors are so stretched for answers and solutions that they’re banking on Durant being close to normal after a lengthy layoff, well … maybe they are. When you’re facing elimination, there’s really no other choice. And the Warriors haven’t been able to solve the Raptors without him. Yet Durant has set himself a high bar. Before his injury, which occurred in the conference semifinals against Houston, he was on another level, nearly galactic. He averaged 34 points, five rebounds and five assists in 11 games and was a finalist for everyone’s “best player in the playoffs" honors with Giannis Antetokounmpo. Since then Leonard, the postseason leader in points, and rebounds, and minutes, has yanked that praise for himself. The Raptors, as a result, are heavy favorites to lift the trophy. Durant may not be 100 percent, leaving what he can possibly do an open question: Will he be more of a decoy than a legitimate offensive threat? And on defense, how can the Warriors cover for him, since the Raptors will surely try to exploit the situation by running Durant through screens? Without Durant, the scoring burden had to be carried by Thompson and Steph Curry, and while both have done fairly well, the Warriors have had little margin for error. Whenever Draymond Green or Andre Iguodala or DeMarcus Cousins failed to lend support for Thompson and Curry, the results have been disastrous for Golden State. Coach Steve Kerr feels Durant’s presence will be enough to cause a ripple effect that influences what both teams do when he’s on the floor. “The game plan changes if Kevin is out there, or if he’s not,” Kerr said. “So you adapt accordingly. It changes matchups, it changes rotations, all that stuff.” It’ll be a surprise if Durant’s return causes issues within the Warriors and the system that was tweaked in his absence. Although they’ve been without him for nine games, he did play three seasons with the club, so there shouldn’t be any adjustment problems. Quite the contrary, says Curry. “We’ll be able to adjust in transition pretty smoothly,” said Curry. “He’s been in plenty of Finals and has played well. No matter what the percentage he’s at, I’m sure he’ll be impactful and effective.” It’s always tricky to play doctor and determine how much time Durant should’ve missed, although that never deters anyone from doing so. Taking it a step further, while none of his teammates or coaches publicly questioned the depths of Durant’s injury, dealing with the daily dose of “is he or isn’t he?” became tiring to some. They all suspect that if Durant could’ve played, he would. What possible motive would encourage him to stay out longer than necessary? To show everyone how much the Warriors need him? That seems a stretch for someone who craves a championship. Possibly not his pending free agency either; if anything Durant would get bonus points for playing through pain and would have all summer to recover in the event of re-injuring the calf, which is not considered career-threatening. Injured players have no obligation to speak to the media, and Durant hasn’t, with his silence only feeding speculation. “I feel for Kevin,” Thompson said. “I know what type of competitor he is and we obviously miss him dearly. But whether it’s tomorrow or Game 6, we just have to do everything in our power to help him get back. He will be very welcome, I’ll say that much. Kevin’s (injury) is serious and I know how badly he wants to be out there. He’s one of the best competitors I’ve been around.” The stretchy shooting range, the high release of a shot that’s nearly impossible to block or discourage, the energy and determination and ability to make plays in tense moments, those are the elements Durant brings and the Warriors have missed in The Finals. They’ll take whatever he can give, whatever that might be.   “I would like to think he would make a difference,” Shaun Livingston said. “Again, it’s just any time a player of that caliber comes back or goes out of the lineup, it’s going to be felt certain ways. We’ll see what happens.” And if Durant is unable to play extended minutes or sputters around the floor, making mistakes and dogged by rust and fatigue and inefficiency? Then it’ll fall on his teammates, a group that couldn’t beat the Raptors in two games at Oracle Arena yet somehow must thrive in a Canadian madhouse that awaits Monday (Tuesday, PHL time). “You’re going to see a resilient Warriors team,” Thompson said. “We’ve had our backs against the wall with this same group. Obviously, it’s a little more daunting being down 3-1 but usually when our backs are against the wall, we respond the best.” Question is, will Durant have their back? Or will he and that wall crumble under pressure from these hungry Raptors and the long odds? Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 10th, 2019

Five things we learned from Game 3 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 123-109 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 3 of the 2019 Finals Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) at Oracle Arena: 1. What Stephen Curry learned … Curry was remarkable in Game 3, consciously seizing more of Golden State’s offensive burden to make up for Klay Thompson’s and Kevin Durant’s absences and turning that desperation into something historic. With 47 points, eight rebounds and seven assists, the Warriors point guard became only the ninth man to score at least 45 points in a Finals game. The lesson in that? Curry learned for a night what it has felt like for LeBron James on many such occasions. James put himself on that specific list a year ago when he logged 51 points, eight board and eight assists against Curry’s team in Game 1, same court. Like Curry, James’ team lost that night as well. Struggling mightily in something of a one-against-five predicament is the sort of things James has done often, while Curry never had faced it during Golden State’s five-year run to The Finals. They both -- James in the past and Curry on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) -- had legit NBA players around them. But the responsibility to put up points fell in both cases mostly on their shoulders. This was even a chance to revisit the 2015 Finals MVP selection, which attracted some attention on social media Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) over bogus speculation about the voting process. Andre Iguodala won the award that June, getting seven votes from the panel of media reps to James’ four. Curry got no votes. The point was, Curry had as a single game Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) what James had as an entire series in ’15. He averaged 35.8 points, 13.3 rebounds and 8.8 assists, scoring 38.5 percent of Cleveland’s points (215-of-561) while assisting on 52.7 percent of his teammates’ baskets while he was on the court. Now Curry is the guy in position, if Golden State loses the series, to get a few MVP votes in a losing effort. By the way, Jerry West is the only player to win the Finals MVP trophy in a losing effort. And West is one of the nine to score 45 or more – he did it three times, but his Lakers teams went 1-2 in those games. (The others: Michael Jordan three times, Bob Pettit, Elgin Baylor, Rick Barry, Wilt Chamberlain and Allen Iverson once each. Their teams all won on their big scoring nights.) 2. Is the scoreboard broken? It’s tempting to say that the Warriors’ attack is in broken-record mode, except the resurgence of vinyl might not be sufficient yet to bring that phrase back into the mainstream. So we’ll go with a cultural reference that’s more classic than archaic. Think of The Beatles’ “Revolution 9,” but substitute “109… 109… 109…” Yeah, it’s been about as monotonous and unsatisfying for Golden State as it was on the White Album. At least Warriors coach Steve Kerr was somewhat bemused by his team’s scoreboard consistency. In each game of these Finals, Golden State has scored 109 points. “I just knew we were going to score 109 points because that’s all we’re going to do the rest of this series,” Kerr said. “So if we’re going to keep scoring 109, we got to keep them to 108.” The Warriors kept Toronto to 104 points in Game 2. Some of that was to their credit, some to the Raptors’ misfires and mid-game chill. The simplest stat? Toronto launched 38 three-pointers in both games. The night the Raptors made 11, they lost. When they made 17, they won. Getting Thompson back for Game 4 could make a big difference there. He is one of Golden State’s best defenders. For that matter, Durant’s length could assert itself as a defensive weapon, too, if he comes back later in the series. As for 109 being a winning points total, here is some background: taken in isolation, averaged over a full Finals, that would have been plenty to win 19 of the past 20 championships. The lone exception? In 2017, when Cleveland averaged 114.8 ppg yet lost because Golden State was putting up 121.6 nightly. In 2018, the Warriors averaged 116 points to the Cavaliers’ 101. The only other times a Finals team in the past 20 years averaged within five points of 109 were the Spurs in 2015 (105.6) and in 2007 (104.4) and the Lakers in 2002 (106.0) and 2000 (104.8). Obviously, a few of those were in the game’s relative “dark ages” for use of the 3-ball, but all four won championships. The Warriors are scoring enough points to win. 3. ‘Boogie’ fever has broken   DeMarcus Cousins called his decision to sign with Golden State for a cut-rate contract, while rehabbing from an Achilles injury, his “chess move.” He wound up joining the defending champions and favorite to three-peat, and got his game back in time to contribute. Cousins subsequently suffered a quadriceps injury but returned in time to participate in The Finals. Only thing is, he looked like he was back playing checkers in Game 3. The Warriors center stood out Sunday (Monday, PHL time), scoring 11 points with 10 rebounds, six assists and two blocks. But those numbers drooped to four points, three boards, three turnovers and 1-for-7 shooting in Game 3. Cousins went from plus-12 impact in Game 2 to minus-12 Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). The big man looked a step slow and appeared to be bothered by Toronto’s length, in the forms of Marc Gasol, Pascal Siakam and Serge Ibaka. With little lift these days, he’s playing a little smaller than his 6'11", 270-pound specs. And given how long he was off and the mere eight minutes he got in Game 1, what Cousins did in Game 2 was starting to look more adrenaline-fueled than a reliable return to form. Since Curry handled just about everything else for Golden State in Game 3, he was asked afterward about Cousins’ “regression.” The point guard handled the awkward moment well -- being asked a critical question about a teammate might have tempted Curry to blow it off or lie. Instead, he talked of the Warriors’ shared responsibility on defense and noted a few calls offensively that didn't go Cousins' way. Then Curry added: “Like any great player, if you have a rough game, that resiliency to bounce back and the confidence to know that you can still go out there and impact the game, that’s something that he’ll bring, and we all will follow suit for sure.” 4. Danny Green’s big moment Understandably, when an All-Star and potential Kia MVP candidate gets traded, the deal becomes all about him. Next, folks focus on the key player or players swapped out and how the move might work for the other team. Only then do we play much attention to the guy or guys accompanying the All-Star to his new destination. That’s how it’s been for Danny Green for much of the 2018-19 season. Green and Kawhi Leonard were teammates in San Antonio for seven seasons. They went to two Finals together with the Spurs, winning rings in 2014. But when Leonard wanted out after an injured and rancorous 2017-18, the deal the Spurs put together with Toronto shipped out Danny Green, too. The reality of NBA trades is that salaries must match up, so teammates often become collateral damage to even up the dollar sufficiently to satisfy league rules. Sometimes, a teammate is thrown into a deal because he and the star are chums. A familiar face gives the featured guy some comfort -- or someone to carry his bags. But Green was a helpful playoff performer in his own right with the Spurs -- in his 12 Finals games before this year, he had made 52 percent of his three-pointers. And in 2013 he made 27 of them against the Miami Heat, a Finals record that was his for all of three years until Curry drained 32 in 2016. Green struggled with his shot in the Eastern Conference finals against the Milwaukee Bucks, going 4-for-23 on three-pointers. But his marksmanship early in Game 3 and against near the end of the third quarter propelled the Raptors’ victory. 5. Those rebounds are offensive   Toronto dominated on the offensive glass 15-6 in Game 2 and lost. Golden State dominated on the offensive glass 13-5 in Game 3 and lost. Typically, that’s a positive category for the team that wins it, something coaches hate when the other guys are reclaiming their own misses time and again. But lately, the demerits associated with offensive rebounds have loomed larger than the benefits. You grab a shot you or your teammate missed, that ought to be a good thing. But the Raptors in Game 2 (37.2 percent) and the Warriors in Game 3 (39.6 percent) were beset by inaccuracy, so there were more offensive rebounds to be had, period. The other down side of a generally positive stat is how you go about getting them. If you get overeager and the defense controls the errant shot, you might denude your transition defense. Both the Raptors and the Warriors in Games 2 and 3 respectively built considerable edges in second-chance points off their offensive rebound totals. Toronto had a 23-0 scoring advantage Sunday (Monday, PHL time), yet lost by five. Golden State held it 23-12 Wednesday, yet lost by 14. The losing team in both cases slightly won the battle of fast-break points, but offensive-rebounding strategy still forces a choice on teams. “We have a general kind of rule of thumb that once a shot goes up, we tell our guys to make a really quick, good decision,” Raptors coach Nick Nurse said before Game 3. “Either they're going hard to the offensive rebound or they're going hard to defense transition. … There's certain moments of the game – I mean, some of those late are almost scrambles, right, you're behind five and you're throwing it up there and everybody's trying to rebound, just to keep the game alive as well.” It’s a stat worth watching, even if it’s inversely related lately to the games’ outcomes. Sing it loud, sing it proud ???????? #WeTheNorth pic.twitter.com/8HfjoM9Cht — Toronto Raptors (@Raptors) June 6, 2019 Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2019

Raptors coach Nick Nurse making the right moves

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Toronto coach Nick Nurse plays to the beats to his own drum. And that’s not even one of the instruments that he’s messing around with these days. Nurse’s office in Toronto has a guitar stand on one side of his desk and a piano on the other. He’s trying to master both; the guitar travels with him on the road and he’s been known to strum it while studying film. The piano doesn’t exactly fit in the overhead storage bin of the plane so it stays behind. Nurse says he’s not any good yet. His team, however, is making plenty of beautiful music so far in these NBA Finals. The moment has not been too big for Nurse or the Raptors. They lead the title series 2-1 after a 123-109 win over injury-depleted Golden State on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time), an outcome that puts the two-time defending NBA champions in trouble. The maestro of the best season in Toronto history is a 51-year-old NBA coaching rookie, one who’s making plenty of right moves. “He looks young,” Raptors guard Kyle Lowry said. “But he’s pretty old.” Nurse might have been an unknown to casual NBA fans when he got the job a year ago following the firing of his former boss in Toronto, Dwane Casey. Nurse was an assistant on Casey’s staff, largely credited with running things on the offensive side of the ball. He had good relationships with players, but the task of replacing someone who was the NBA’s coach of the year and got fired anyway was daunting nonetheless. He has handled it with ease. “Each game’s critical, and the next one will be as critical as (Game 3) was,” Nurse said. “So it’s been like that all through the playoffs, and we just got to guard and play who is out there. That’s all we can do.” The guy he’s going against has eight rings already. Steve Kerr won five as a player, has three more from his first four seasons as coach of the Warriors and still very much has a chance at a fourth in five seasons. But this is no coaching mismatch. “I’ve watched Nick closely,” Dallas coach Rick Carlisle, the president of the National Basketball Coaches Association, said earlier in the series. “We played against him twice this year. He’s terrific in making adjustments and I love the way he’s approached the entire season. They have set up the entire season to work to get to this point and for a first-time NBA head coach, that’s not easy to do.” For a first-timer, no, it wouldn’t be easy. Thing is, Nurse is no ordinary rookie. He’s won championships — four of them, two in the British league, two more in what’s now called the G League. That’s not the NBA, of course, but there’s a progression that he’s followed, a long slow path that saw him coaching teams most people have never heard of like the NAIA’s Grand View University, Telindus Oostende in Belgium, the Oklahoma Storm of the USBL. “Some pretty remote places,” Nurse said. He got tons of attention for throwing a box-and-one on Warriors star Stephen Curry late in Game 2 of this series. Some would say that’s an unconventional move. Not for Nurse. He spent one season basically full-court pressing the whole time so he could collect the data. He’s been known to count certain shots in practice as 4-pointers, to emphasize the need for proper spacing. He’s part-coach, part-chemist. “Like a laboratory,” Nurse said. The lab on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) was Oracle Arena. The Raptors survived a 47-point night from Curry and prevailed over a Golden State team without Kevin Durant, Kevon Looney and Klay Thompson. Looney’s season is over. Durant may be back for Game 4. Thompson figures to be back. The Warriors are almost certainly going to get boosts. “Five guys are going to be out there,” Nurse said. “You really can’t worry about that.” It’s still too early to tell whether Nurse and the Raptors can pull this off. But Lowry knows his coach will be ready. “His mind for the game has been special, and the growth throughout the year has been pretty good for him,” Lowry said. “He’s not a first-time head coach — he’s a first-time NBA head coach. But the experience that he’s had in his many leagues and teams that he’s been a head coach before, he’s kind of just kind of stepped up and continued to grow with that.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 6th, 2019

Warriors injuries create opening with Finals in balance

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. — From now until further notice, each game of the 2019 NBA Finals will be largely influenced not by a go-ahead basket or a big stop or a rally-induced comeback, but a hot-off-the-press medical update prior to tipoff. Is Klay Thompson's tweaky hamstring a go? Will this be the day Kevin Durant finally shakes that lingering calf strain and suits up? The hints and subtle signs seem to point toward the positive for Golden State. Thompson was a late scratch Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) because the Warriors -- with a mixture of confidence and arrogance and concern -- felt the guard missing Game 3 was perhaps best for his recovery without proving deadly in the long run. And as for Durant, he’s still “ramping up” his workouts, in the description of coach Steve Kerr, and so his status has been upgraded to "stay tuned." It has become must-watch after a 123-109 loss. Yet if the answer is negative to all of the above, the next entry on the medical report might be the grim health of the dynasty built by these two-time defending champions. Their still-under-construction monument now teeters, prone to a nudge from Toronto. The Warriors find themselves down 2-1 to the Raptors, lacking any guarantee they’ll see two of their three leading scorers back in the lineup Friday (Saturday, PHL time) for Game 4 ... or for however long this series lasts. Thompson joined Durant on the sideline, and the Raptors (as could be anticipated) pounced on the gift to seize control of the series. It was a game the Raptors had to win, and they did. The production came from multiple players, with Kyle Lowry finally making an imprint on this series and Danny Green rediscovering his long-lost three-point touch. Meanwhile, the Warriors consisted of Steph Curry and not much else. The two-time Kia MVP dazzled and fought through traps and triple-teams all night to drop a career-high 47 points, some of it on shot-making wizardry. But the short-handed Warriors were doomed when Draymond Green and DeMarcus Cousins in particular were underwhelming on a night they needed to be stellar for Golden State to have a chance. As a result, the atmosphere inside Oracle Arena was flatter than most of the shots taken by Curry's teammates, and this was partly due to the introduction of the starting lineups, when Thompson’s name wasn’t announced. The fans knew then, officially, that their eyes and the home team were in for a long night. While the Warriors fought, scrappy doesn’t win games at this point in the postseason, not when the other team is good and opportunistic. Playing in a hostile building for the first time in the Finals, the Raptors made a collective decision to greet fire with fire. Or, as they wrote on the blackboard inside the visitor’s locker room: Let It Rip. “I think we all kind of followed that advice,” said Danny Green. “We hadn’t really had a good team shooting night and I knew we were due.” For Toronto, it wasn’t just that they won, but that they did so with their most impressive outing in the series. And now, the question for the Raptors is this: Will their inconsistent players use this outing to turn the corner and push the Warriors, even if Thompson and/or Durant return? This is aimed, first and foremost, at Lowry. He took the “let it rip” plea personally. Entering this game, he had six baskets total in this series and at times suffered defensively. Challenged by a pregame talk from coach Nick Nurse, Lowry embraced his inner pit bull and was relentless all night. The All-Star point guard took 16 shots, making eight, for 23 points and nine assists while making his presence felt for the first time this Finals. “For me, it was just not being so passive and trying to get everyone else involved and get myself going and let everyone else feed off that,” Lowry said. He and Green re-introduced the three-pointer to the Raptors’ offense. The two shot 11-for-19 and repeatedly stole whatever momentum Golden State could generate by responding with long-distance daggers that forced fans to slump back into their seats. This from the same player who had five total three's in his previous five playoff games, ruining more than a handful of runs with momentum-deflating misses. There’s no other way to describe the last three weeks of Green’s postseason shooting but dreadful. He has only one job: Stand in the corner and shoot open 3s. He’s made a career of that. So what do the Raptors make of Green shooting 6-of-10 from deep Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)? In the short term, it helped win Game 3. In the big picture, will this confidence carry over from one night to another, or does it depend on whether Green hits his first few? Nurse said: “Danny’s buckets boosted our whole team’s confidence because we were used to relying on those most of the year.” With better production from players who had been mostly missing, the Raptors had the balance needed to deliver their highest-scoring and most efficient (52 percent shooting) contest of the series. Green and Lowry joined Kawhi Leonard (30 points) and Pascal Siakam (18) and Marc Gasol (17) to take turns pummeling the Warriors from all different directions and manners. One reason for this was Thompson’s absence. Not only is he a proven outside shooter, but his defense is top-notch as well. You could even argue that Thompson’s missing defense was just as costly as his jumper. Yet the 109 points Golden State did manage were mainly because of Curry providing nearly half the offense. Given the circumstances of being without Thompson and Durant, and the constant pressing by Toronto whenever he had the ball, this was Curry’s finest post-season effort. His shooting was superb all across the floor, making three's (six) and free throws (13-14) and in general (14-31). “It’s the Finals,” Curry said. “You give everything you’ve got, sacrifice your body when you have the opportunity. Just competitiveness and trying to play until the buzzer.” “He does things that honestly I don’t think anyone has done before," Kerr added. "The way he plays the game, the way he shoots and the combination of his ball-handling, it’s incredible to watch.” If only he had someone riding shotgun. Cousins was sloppy on both ends, with three turnovers and one basket, and a step slow on defense against Gasol. This came one game after he seemingly regained his legs and confidence to gave Golden State a much-needed lift. Green’s continued recklessness was mystifying; he often made questionable decisions as a playmaker, suffered four turnovers and once again struggled to contain Siakam. The Warriors needed Green’s best, given their missing parts, and received something less. “We’ve got to be more solid with the ball and it starts with me,” he said. “I’ve had a bunch of turnovers in every game of this series. I think if I played better with the night (Curry) had, we would have won.” And so the Warriors, while talking bravely about their next-man-up mentality and embracing their “Strength in Numbers” slogan, must realize, deep down, that preventing the Raptors from winning two more games with a handicapped team might be difficult, if not impossible. Keep in mind that Golden State hasn’t sparkled for four quarters since the first game of the Western Conference finals. The last three games of that series, and the first three of the NBA Finals, the Warriors trailed by double digits. Thompson has an off day and Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) pregame period for therapy on his hamstring, although such strains are unpredictable and tricky. Will he be able to cut and fight through screens and be bouncy for 35-plus minutes through the intensity of an NBA Finals game, or will the injury restrict him and cause Kerr to seek a healthier, yet less productive replacement? “The whole point was to not risk a bigger injury that would keep him out the rest of the series,” said Kerr, explaining a decision made in consultation with the team doctors. “I feel very comfortable with it. I never would have forgiven myself if I played him and he had gotten hurt. So you live with the decision you made. The good thing is Klay has done well the last two days; hopefully he’ll be out there Friday.” Then there’s Durant, who last played May 8 (May 9, PHL time). After doing nothing but individual drills the last few days, he’ll go through a more normal practice session that will be simulated with the help of some assistant coaches and bench players. They'll see how Durant holds up. But that won’t match the stress level of a real game. And even if Durant gets clearance for Game 4, he hasn’t played in roughly a month. What about his timing? His wind? His touch? His ability to bring the same energy on defense? All legit questions and concerns for the Warriors -- until they’re not, whenever that is. “No one cares if guys are hurt,” Green said. “Everyone wants to see us lose anyway. So I’m sure people are happy they’re hurt.” Chances are that basketball fans, even if they’re against the Warriors, want to see stars on the floor this time of year. That’s what the NBA Finals is always about: Premium players doing premium things, or failing to do so, and letting the championship odds rise or fall on their performances. This year’s Finals have been denied one star for every game, and an additional star for one game. The battle with star attrition finally cost the Warriors a postseason loss, and at the worst possible time. The flow of the remainder of the NBA Finals, then, could rest with aching tendons and muscles and the recovery powers of those who own them. “We’re missing 50 points with KD and Klay, but we’ll adjust,” said a confident Curry. “It’s a long series, you know. It’s going to be fun for us.” The next Warriors medical update will arrive Thursday afternoon (Friday, PHL time). And another one Friday (Saturday, PHL time) just prior to tipoff. All along, the Warriors have led everyone to believe that it’s only a matter of time before they’re fully healthy. But will it be in time? And even then, will it be enough against a Toronto team suddenly thinking big? Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 6th, 2019

National volleyball teams get PSC support

The national women's and men's volleyball teams will receive the full support of the Philippine Sports Commission. Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. got a shot in the arm from the PSC as the full line-up of their seniors pools are set to receive their monthly allowance and use of facilities inside the Rizal Memorial Complex. "Siyempre happy kami kasi recognized na kami ng PSC. Siyempre mas magiging smooth na rin ang takbo ng team, then yung relationship sa PSC," said women's head coach Shaq Delos Santos on Tuesday. The Nationals, who are preparing for the 30th Southeast Asian Games on November, are currently processing their medical examinations and other requirements for their PSC ID.  "Hopefully magtuloy-tuloy pa, kaya nga gusto rin namin mga coaches and sina (LVPI secretariat) Ma'am Marissa (Andres) at sina sir (LVPI president) Peter (Cayco) na matapos muna rin namin sa medical nila at 'yung mga kailangan para at least wala na kami po-problemahin para more on focus na lang kami sa training," said Delos Santos. The National women's team was supposed to start its scheduled Tuesday and Thursday training sessions this week but some members of the pool are yet to finish their respective PSC requirements.  Delos Santos said that they will start their training next week, plot a suitable schedule for their training camps in China and Japan as well as their planned stint in the Philippine Superliga Invitational in October.  The Nationals didn't receive monthly stipends from the PSC during the women's team's preparation and participation in the 18th Jakarta-Palembang Asian Games and the AVC Asian Cup in Thailand last year. Alyssa Valdez banners na women's pool with team captain Aby Maraño, veterans Aiza Maizo-Pontillas, Mika Reyes, sisters Dindin Santiago-Manabat and Jaja Santiago, Majoy Baron, Denden Lazaro, Dawn Macandili, Jia Morado, Ces Molina, Mylene Paat, and MJ Phillips. Also in the pool are first-timers Kath Arado, Tots Carlos, Angel Cayuna, Ced Domingo, Jema Galanza, Eya Laure, Jerrili Malabanan, Kalei Mau, and Alohi Robins-Hardy.   The Dante Alinsunurin-mentored men's pool is composed captain Johnvic de Guzman, Marck Espejo, Ranran Adbilla, Mark Alfafara, Bryan Bagunas, Kim Dayandante, Joven dela Vega, and Rex Intal. Also joining the team are Fauzi Ismail, Jack Kalingking, Jessie Lopez, Jeffrey Malabanan, Kim Malabunga, Rikko Marmeto, Ricky Marcos, Ish Polvorosa, Francis Saura, Jayvee Sumagaysay, Peter Torres, and Joshua Umandal. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 4th, 2019