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Family arrested for kids’ cyber sex in Malabon

Three children were rescued in Malabon Friday night from their family, who allegedly used them for child pornography......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJun 23rd, 2018

2 other kids in Talaingod incident are now with their families – DSWD

    Two minors, who were among 14 children rescued in Talaingod, Davao del Norte, have already been returned to their families, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) said Tuesday.   In a statement, the DSWD said a "discharge conference" was conducted where the minors' identified family members and representatives of the Philippine National Police-Davao del Norte Women and Children Protection Desk were present.   During the conference, one child was turned over to the mother while the other was entrusted to the grandfather. /kga   RELATED STORIES Satur, over 70 militant leaders, Lumads 'illegally arrested' in Davao del ...Keep on reading: 2 other kids in Talaingod incident are now with their families – DSWD.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 11th, 2018

3 boys locked up inside dark CR for being noisy

A CRIMINOLOGY student and his friend were arrested for allegedly locking up three kids inside a dark comfort room as punishment for being noisy during a basketball game in Malabon City. Malabon city police chief Senior Supt. Harry Espela ordered the arrest of Reynaldo Cruz, 27, criminology student and resident….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2018

One Rohingya’s struggle to empower women in Malaysia – Al Jazeera

Tucked away upstairs at a shopping plaza in this city’s north end is a small storefront turned classroom for dozens of Rohinyga women and children. The sound of these women reciting English phrases, laughing and the occasional cries of kids can be heard in the stairwell. Its founder, Sharifah Husain, 24, said she wanted to do something to help women and children in her community, who are not allowed to work or study in Malaysia. “I noticed we didn’t have a Rohingya women’s organisation that was standing up for women – to be the voice of women,” Husain said. Husain comes from Buthidaung village in Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state. Her father fled to Malaysia when she was five-years old, fearing for his life. Husain was left behind with her mother and two younger siblings. The village was attacked soon afterward, so Husain’s mother took them to Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar – then known as Burma. Her recollection of the traumatic moment when a local mob attacked her village is hazy. It took place almost 20 years ago. But it mirrors the accounts of Rohingya refugees now in Bangladesh, who’ve recently fled the Myanmar’s army clearance operations and local Buddhist mobs. “My mother was arrested in Yangon and sentenced to prison for not having official [identification or travel] documents,” Husain recounted. “This left me in charge.” Husain can’t remember how long she spent in Yangon, but she said she was separated from her siblings and sent north to Mandalay and forced into servitude. She spoke to her father in Malaysia, over the phone, and he agreed to pay human traffickers to bring Husain and her siblings to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s largest city. All three, including Husain, were smuggled by land, into Thailand and Malaysia. At that time the Southeast Asia trafficking route wasn’t as defined as it is today. Human trafficking groups in Bangladesh and Thailand now make a lot of money off of poor, desperate refugees fleeing war and violence in Myanmar. Today, the concern faced by the Malaysia government is if it recognises its refugees then that could send a signal to more to make the perilous journey, now taken by sea from Myanmar and Bangladesh to sanctuary in Malaysia, where they don’t face violent persecution. The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, states there are 152,170 registered refugees in Malaysia. The majority are Rohingya, displaced from their homes in Myanmar, like Husain. But the amount of unregistered refugees varies widely from 40,000 to 140,000, according to Asylum Access Malaysia. “The big question is – when are the boats going to come? There’s no indication they will now, but there’s definitely a high possibility that they will. And once new groups arrive, that complicates [the] situation,” said Deepa Nambiar, Asylum Access Malaysia director. UNHCR runs what it calls a “parallel school system” for refugees in Malaysia, allowing children to  access basic, primary-level education. Refugee groups and local faith-based organisations fund these schools, staffed by volunteers. One-hundred and twenty-eight informal refugee schools in Malaysia access funding from the UN. It provides education to 7,154 children, according to UNHCR. Malaysia’s Prime Minister’s Office states 16,809 Rohingya refugee children are registered with UNHCR. This means about 10,000, or more, refugee children in Malaysia are unable to access any form of education. A dozen or so more informal refugee schools exist but rely solely on donations and are understaffed, said Asylum Access. “To live in Malaysia, yes you can live, but you don’t have a future. You are in a box. You can’t go out of the box,” Husain said. Husain has received no formal education in Malaysia. This is remarkable considering her drive to educate refugee women and children. Malaysians are supporting Rohingya Women’s Development Network by volunteering as teachers and support staff. Rohinyga Women’s Development Network started officially last year. But Husain has spent the last decade educating her community’s most vulnerable women and children in their own homes. “I have built up a trust. The men especially trust me. They feel safe sending their wives to our centre because they know me,” Husain said. Word has spread and more refugee families are now attending Rohingya Women’s Development Network classes, where they receive English-language instruction, leadership training and brand new self-defence classes. “We want to stop domestic violence. We want to stop child marriages in the community. We want to build up women’s empowerment,” Husain said. “We really need the Malaysia government to recognise us.” Husain is trying to change the mentality in the Rohingya and wider refugee community in Malaysia, that women and girls can’t study, work, or earn an income. She receives some funding from UNHCR to run programmes but uses her own money to keep them going. “Of course I have support from my family. My father is my hero. My husband is my hero. Both of these men have really pushed me forward,” Husain added. The Rohingya Women’s Development Network has teamed up with Asylum Access Malaysia on a refugee theatre project. This will allow refugee women to educate the community on issues of sexual violence. “What I think is so innovative about Sharifah and the team is that when we were discussing this project they said ‘we need to get men involved’,” Nambiar said. Husain is appealing to others in the refugee community to support initiatives set up by the Malaysia government and civil society groups to help […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

ISIS claims London terror attacks that killed 7; police arrest 12 in raids – Fox News

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the latest London terror attack through its propaganda wing Amaq News Agency, the SITE intelligence group reported Sunday. The terror network reportedly claimed a &'8220;detachment&'8221; of its fighters crashed a rented van into a crowd of people on London Bridge before going on a stabbing rampage Saturday night, killing seven people and wounding nearly 50 others. However, ISIS gave no evidence to back up its claim. Earlier on Sunday, British Prime Minister Theresa May condemned the “evil ideology” behind the London attacks. May addressed the attacks Sunday after a meeting of the government’s COBRA emergency committee. She called for a tougher stance against extremists and tougher controls on cyberspace to prevent its use by extremists. She said the measures were needed because “terrorism breeds terrorism” and attackers copy each other. Counterterrorism police carried out raids in east London and arrested 12 people in connection with the attacks. &'8220;Searches of a number of addresses in Barking are continuing,&'8221; London Metro Police said as the raids were being conducted. The homes raided included one belonging to one of the three terrorists who carried out the attacks, Sky News reported. &'8220;He's lived here for about three years,&'8221; neighbor Damien Pettit said. &'8220;He's one of our neighbors. I've said hello in passing more than 50, 60 occasions. He has two young kids. He was a very nice guy.&'8221; ISIS has claimed responsibility for a series of attacks in recent years &'8212; but police have pushed back in some instances. The terror network announced it was behind the deadly attack on a casino and shopping complex in the Philippines last Friday &'8212; but Manila police said the killer was a Filipino gambling addict heavily in debt, with no terror links. Saturday’s horror began around 10 p.m. local time when a white van veered off the road and barreled into pedestrians on London Bridge. The van’s three occupants then jumped out with large knives and attacked people at bars and restaurants in nearby Borough Market, police said. Elizabeth O’Neill said her son was stabbed in the stomach by a man who approached him and yelled “this is for Islam.” Daniel O’Neill, 23, suffered a 7-inch knife wound, she said, according to Sky News. He was recovering. &'8220;He had just stepped outside the bar for a second and a man ran up to him and said 'this is for my family, this is for Islam' and stuck a knife straight in him,” the mother said. Gerard Vowles, 47, told local media that he saw the three attackers stabbing a woman at the south end of London Bridge. He said he threw chairs, glasses and bottles at the attackers in a bid to stop them. &'8220;They went 'this is for Allah' and then they just started stabbing her multiple times,” he told Sky News. The Guardian quoted Vowles as saying, “They kept coming to try to stab me. They were stabbing everyone. Evil, evil people.” He added, according to the paper, &'8220;I want to know if this girl is still alive. I've been walking around for an hour and a half crying my eyes out. I don't know what to do.&'8221; Brad Myers, an American vacationing in London, told “Fox &'38; Friends” Sunday that he had just taken some pictures and was about to walk along the Thames River when he heard a noise. “Then I saw the van come on to the pavement and continue along the side of the road just right where I was a few moments before, just mowing down pedestrians,” he said. “Everyone was in shock,” he said. What he saw reminded him of the truck attack in Nice, France. “It’s crazy to think I was right there,” Myers said. Eight police officers killed the attackers after arriving on the scene within eight minutes. The officers fired 50 shots, London's assistant police commissioner Mark Rowley said at a press briefing Sunday, calling the number unprecedented. One of the bullets struck an innocent bystander. The person was recovering in a hospital. Rowley said that the officers had no choice. &'8220;The situation these officers were confronted with was critical &'' a matter of life and death &'' three armed men, wearing what appeared to be suicide belts, had already attacked and killed members of the public and had to be stopped immediately,&'8221; he said. It turned out the suicide belts were fake. Rowley said the van had been rented recently by one of the attackers. May said 48 people were injured and many had life-threatening injuries. Thirty-six remained hospitalized Sunday. A courageous cop was one of the wounded. He confronted the three knife-wielding terrorists armed only with a baton. He was stabbed in the face, head and a leg. He was in stable condition. British Transport Police Chief Constable Paul Crowther said of the officer that &'8220;it became clear that he showed enormous courage in the face of danger.&'8221; Crowther added that &'8220;for an officer who only joined us less than two years ago, the bravery he showed was outstanding and makes me extremely proud.&'8221; Those killed included a Canadian and a French national. May said the Thursday's national election would be held as scheduled because &'8220;violence can never be allowed to disrupt the democratic process.&'8221; Major parties suspended national campaigning Sunday out of respect for the victims. Speaking to Fox News from London, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said the latest [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2017

Thank You Very Much Drew Binsky for helping the kids and families in the communi…

Thank You Very Much Drew Binsky for helping the kids and families in the community for the fourth time! Thanks also to the After Six Group for the effort to help Carol with her son B1 and her Family for the Christmas Gift that all of the people who joined last night shared. Thanks again… link: Thank You Very Much Drew Binsky for helping the kids and families in the communi….....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated News9 hr. 59 min. ago

PBA: Compton proud of Banchero for playing through 'low blow'

Chris Banchero was not available for the media Wednesday after Game 4 of the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup Finals but his head coach was more than proud of his reaction despite taking a closed fist to his family's crown jewels. In the fourth quarter of Alaska's Game 4 win to tie the Finals at two games each, the TV replay clearly showed that Magnolia's Mark Barroca landed a closed fist on Banchero's nether region. No foul was called as Banchero went down in pain. Things remained a little testy between both point guards afterwards both overall, thing's didn't escalate any further. "We talked about being willing to take a punch and play through it," Compton said. "If somebody hits you, expect it, and then it seems like a lot of times, when you get hit and you hit back, they'll call you hitting back. Just play through it. He [Banchero] took the punch, and he kept going," Compton added. While Compton was happy about Banchero keeping his cool, the Alaska head coach was absolutely furious about the low blow he took from Barroca. Compton was not having it post-game and he's looking for some possible sanctions from the league. "If we're gonna get punched multiple times, and there aren't calls or suspensions, I've got a problem with it. You all saw it, right? We have an officiating crew that perhaps didn't see it, and I understand that. They can't see everything. But Jio punched us, somebody punched Mike in the testicles, somebody punched Chris in the testicles," Compton said. "I'm really curious if there's gonna be suspensions. Because if you're not gonna call it in the game, if you're not gonna have anything... punching, as we say in our family to our kids, the male part, that's literally a low blow. And I'm not happy about that one bit. That's dirty basketball," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 12th, 2018

Longtime friends James, Wade prepare for last meeting as opponents

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com LOS ANGELES — Friendships are never formed totally by choice, because fate demands a say-so in the process by creating the time and the place and in the curious case of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the basketball court. It was in Chicago, June of 2003, site of the NBA’s annual draft combine, the meet market for young players gathered to someday change the game, when Wade and LeBron had each other at wassup. In some ways, it was an unlikely pairing: Teenaged phenom from Akron, Ohio, fresh from the cover of Sports Illustrated and the high school prom who already had a national following; and an overlooked underdog from the Chicago suburbs who only became an acquired basketball taste weeks earlier after a searing run through the NCAA tournament. That day, Wade and LeBron went through the checkup lines for height and weight, vertical leap and whatever else the combines put rookies through and then during a break came the only measurement that counted, when one future Hall of Famer sized up the other. LeBron said: “Some things you can’t explain. Sometimes it’s just chemistry.” Wade said: “When you’re young and coming into the league, you find guys you have something in common with, then you continue to link and that’s what we did. It’s organic how we built this friendship.” Some 15 years later, the bond will endure, likely forever. The basketball part, however, ends Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) after the game when Wade, who’s calling it a career after this season, peels off his sweat-soaked Heat jersey and swaps it for a Laker top belonging to LeBron. It might qualify as the best trade of the NBA season, or at least the most emotional. "It's sweet and sour,” said LeBron, anticipating the moment at Staples Center. “The sweet part about it is I've always loved being on the same floor with my brother. And the sour part about it is that this is our last time sharing the same court.” Brother? How many folks with different blood can call each other that? True friendship is answering the phone at 3 a.m. instead of letting it ring, and reaching for the tab with longer arms, and above all, becoming a mattress when the other guy falls. Those tests were aced throughout the LeBron-Wade bromance that stretched through two Olympic teams, four years in Miami, two NBA championships and even 46 games in Cleveland together but of course was always put on hold whenever they were on opposite benches. This is best placed into proper context by Gabrielle Union, the actress and wife of Wade, who says ever so delicately about her husband in those friend vs. friend moments: “He wants to kill him. Drop three-balls on him.” Perhaps so, because as Wade says, “you always want to beat your best friend,” yet their competitive spirit is confined within the baselines and between the jump ball and buzzer. Then the teasing and bragging rights begin by text or call, almost instantly. This arrangement irked the old-school basketball culture, long cringing at the chummy ways of a new generation, believing that most if not all interaction should cease until the offseason, or even better, when careers are done. Wade and LeBron then turned up the volume on that subject when they linked up as teammates with the Heat in 2010, angering the purists and creating, at least initially, a team to be despised as well as respected. Not that Wade and LeBron regret that experience at all, or the noise that followed; this was, as Union observed, “far bigger than basketball.” The chance to be neighbors and watch their kids grow up together and celebrate championships on South Beach until well past sunrise was a priceless part of the bonding process, something neither will be able to duplicate as they begin a new phase of their relationship. The chance to let their hair down (well, Wade anyway) and loosen up, away from the crowds and the media, is something they could keep to themselves. Although: Mrs.Wade spilled a few friendship secrets the other day, with an ohmigod and a roll of the eyes. “They laugh a lot,” she said. “LeBron is silly. Dwyane is silly. They’re silly and goofy together. When they’re around each other it’s like a never-ending sleepover. That’s what it feels like when you’re in their orbit. They have an unspoken language and jokes and it’s like a show and everyone’s watching.” It helped that, in addition to being in the same sport, both LeBron and Wade became all-time greats, because like-minded and like-talented people tend to magnetize. It was LeBron who collected MVP awards and a huge social media flock at first, then Wade followed up by winning a championship first, and this created a mutual respect for each other’s abilities. It also allowed them to walk through the same exclusive doors together, for example, making a pair of Olympic teams and a batch of All-Star Games, therefore putting them in close company even before the Heat experience. From those moments, a relationship tightened. And when life threw airballs in their direction, one was there to help the other. “When I was going through the custody of my kids and that battle, he was someone I talked to constantly and told him what I was going through,” said Wade. “And vice versa, when he was going through things family-wise, I could talk to him and try to relate. You lean on guys who have similar stories and have gone through similar things in their lives to help with advice or just be there to listen.” Curiously, one of their few awkward moments happened when they became teammates in Miami initially. The transition, Wade admitted, was friction-free but not totally smooth. Superstars have egos. Adjustments were needed and were done and this was made possible by LeBron’s game, which is built on unselfish play. “It would’ve been easier if we went to a neutral site,” Wade said. “But because he came to Miami, it was my team before he got there. It was a little hard because of that, but once we got through the first year it was easy. He can play with anybody. He can go out and score or he can get 17 points and 20 assists. He knows if a guy hasn’t shot the ball in a while and how to get him going.” Their on-court chemistry was astonishing to witness at times, the best entertainment in basketball back then. They knew each other’s tendencies, spots on the floor and how to mesh. How many times did Wade toss a lob to a streaking LeBron for a dunk, or vice-versa? Along with Chris Bosh, this was one of the most productive link-ups in NBA history. Four years and four trips to the NBA Finals don’t lie. And true friendship is following your pal to Cleveland in winter, as Wade did last year in an awkward attempt to re-create the past. To this, Wade shook his head and laughed: “Yeah, yeah, you right about that.” While Wade is putting a bow on this retirement season, he marvels at his friend’s staying power and salutes LeBron’s decision to sign up with the Lakers and take on Los Angeles. “I think it’s great, something he wanted to do,” Wade said. “For a player to be able to map out his career the way he has been able to do, he’s doing it his way. This is the way he wanted, to end it here in L.A., on and off the court. His career is not over, but this is the last layer of his career.” And LeBron, reflecting on Wade’s NBA imprint, said: “D-Wade has definitely had a helluva career, obviously. A first-ballot Hall of Famer, a three-time champion and so on and so on. I mean, it speaks for itself. But what he's done for that franchise and what he's done for that community since he's been drafted has been a pretty good story.” This is curious timing, how the NBA schedule has Wade making his last trip to Los Angeles and against LeBron not long after Wade and Union, who have a home in L.A., recently welcomed a newborn daughter. The families spent Sunday (Monday, PHL time) together at the baby shower, then the farewell game tips 24 hours later. Union calls it the “end of a basketball brotherhood but the beginning of a real friendship with basketball gone” and Wade agrees. “When we first came into the league people couldn’t understand how we could be friends during the season," Wade said. "When I was in Cleveland for a game I’d go to his house the night before, we’d go to the movies and hang out and then we’d go at each other in the game. We’d laugh about that. We enjoy having a different relationship than what was done before us, but then going out and playing against him, I’d always want to whup his you-know-what. And vice versa. Just the times we shared. The moments when it’s not all been great, but to be able to have somebody to talk to and run things by. A lot of people don’t have a LeBron James to call up and say, 'Hey, I’m thinking about this, what do you think about it?’ That’s special.” What will also be special Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) is when Wade, as has been his routine after every game this season, swaps jerseys with an opposing player; this will be the 1,001st game of Wade’s dwindling NBA career. “Obviously this is something I wanted to do in my last year,” Wade said. “But of all the players in the league, LeBron is one of my closest friends so this one will mean a little more, because of the paths that we both went down as competitors against each other and as teammates. We’ll be linked together forever.” And what might be said between friends and competitors caught up in that moment? Wade offers this: “We’ll look at each other and say, 'Yo, this is it.’ It’s crazy that it happened so fast. We remember the night we got drafted like yesterday. But it comes fast. Just an ending of a chapter in both of our lives.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Alonzo assists dad Niño at Christmas bazaar stall

The celebrity father-and-son tandem of Nio and Alonzo Muhlach takes business seriously.   Aside from running his family's ensaymada business (found in malls in Metro Manila), Nio sells his son's preloved clothes in his Christmas bazaar stall at Robinsons Galleria in Ortigas.   On most weekends, you can find his 8-year-old son, Alonzo, there, too, helping his dad in their stall. When he's not busy in school, Alonzo is also active in show business. He was last seen in ABS-CBN's show, "Your Face Sounds Familiar Kids." ---BELLE BONDOC-ROBERTO...Keep on reading: Alonzo assists dad Niño at Christmas bazaar stall.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 6th, 2018

101 suspects nabbed on charges of illegal pornography in Korea

  SEOUL --- Over a hundred suspects have been arrested in Korea for making and distributing illegal film and child pornography, using overseas-based social media channels such as Tumblr and Twitter. Over a hundred suspects have been arrested for making and distributing illegal film and child pornography, using overseas-based social media channels such as Tumblr and Twitter, police said Tuesday. According to the Cyber Security Team of Northern Gyeonggi Provincial Police Agency, 101 people were arrested on charges of violating the Act on the Protection of Children and Juveniles From Sexual Abuse. Of those, nine suspects were indicted via a special crackdown on cyber sexual as...Keep on reading: 101 suspects nabbed on charges of illegal pornography in Korea.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

ACT Teachers solon denies teaching Lumad kids to fight gov t | ABS-CBN News

ACT Teachers Rep. France Castro, former Bayan Muna Rep. Satur Ocampo and 16 other were arrested last week over the alleged kidnapping of students at a Lumad school in Talaingod town......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2018

Six reasons to visit this family-oriented restaurant

Reason #2: Kids rule #MBMomsAndBabies Six reasons to visit this family-oriented restaurant Source link: Six reasons to visit this family-oriented restaurant.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2018

How ex-child star Kevin Zegers ‘hit the jackpot’

Kevin Zegers' film career included starring in the popular "Air Bud" movies, back when he was a kid actor. He eventually grew up before audiences' eyes, and took on riskier roles, such as the one in the acclaimed drama, "Transamerica." More recently, he appeared in "Fear the Walking Dead" as the suave villain Melvin. The 34-year-old actor, however, is unlike his most recent portrayal, as he is a happy family man---married for a couple of years already, and a father to twin kids. On Instagram, he often talks about his wife, Jaime Feld. "Lucky men find women like this: strong, loving, powerful, sensitive, successful and kind," Zegers wrote alongside one of her photos. "I'm proud ...Keep on reading: How ex-child star Kevin Zegers ‘hit the jackpot’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2018

PCSO, NBI padlock 5 Globaltech ‘peryahan’ in QC

  The Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO) and National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) have shut down five "Peryahan ng Bayan" of Globaltech Mobile Online Corporation in Quezon City. PCSO General Manager Alexander Balutan revealed this in a statement on Friday, adding that Wednesday's raids led to the arrest of 57 bet collectors of Globaltech. According to Balutan, the arrested persons will be facing charges for violation of Anti-Illegal Numbers Games Laws and Cyber Crime Law. Balutan said seized during the raid were four sets of desktop computers, fake PCSO identification cards, bet slips, and several pieces of documents as well as vehicles used for bet colle...Keep on reading: PCSO, NBI padlock 5 Globaltech ‘peryahan’ in QC.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 16th, 2018

LOOK: SM City Manila kicked-off the Christmas season with an English touch. Las…

LOOK: SM City Manila kicked-off the Christmas season with an English touch. Last November 9, SM's Christmas celebration was filled with children's favorite British characters like Harry Potter and Mr. Bean, as well as well-known artists Clowning Around Manila, Mapua Cardinal Singers, Sheena Belarmino of ABS-CBN's Your Face Sounds Familiar Kids, Uytingco Family and MJ… link: LOOK: SM City Manila kicked-off the Christmas season with an English touch. Las….....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

Keanna Reeves arrested for cyberlibel | News

Former actress Keanna Reeves, real name Janet Derecho Duterte, was arrested on Monday in connection with a complaint for cyber libel......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

Actress Keanna Reeves arrested over cyber libel charges

MANILA, Philippines – Actress Keanna Reeves, Janet Derecho Duterte in real life, was arrested by police on Monday, November 12. In a spot report, police said operatives from the Laguna Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) and the Calamba City Police Station arrested Reeves along Timog Avenue in Quezon City. They ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

Dengue-proof your family

Now with the dengue alarm which has reached outbreak proportions, there has never been any better tip in preventing the disease and dengue proofing the family than starting with the self. Now, parents who are protective of their kids go extreme lengths to keep their kids, especially when away from home, safe from mosquito bites. […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

LIST: Holiday treats for kids and kids at heart

Even before Christmas comes, feel the joy of the season through these novelties, movies and activities for the entire family......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 7th, 2018

Trusted houseboy nabbed for killing, robbing employer

In less than 48 hours, the Quezon City police arrested a houseboy accused of killing and robbing his employer on All Souls' Day. During questioning on Sunday, Donato Dollente, 51, confessed to killing Maria Joy Rima Maskario, a 55-year-old accountant. Her body was found in her apartment in Barangay Pasong Tamo on Nov. 3. Dollente had been working as an all-around helper and utility man for the Maskario family for over a decade, the victim's elder brother, Edgar, told reporters on Monday. He would report for work whenever a family member called him. Speaking to reporters, the suspect expressed regret for what he did, but claimed that he did not plan to rob and kill Maskari...Keep on reading: Trusted houseboy nabbed for killing, robbing employer.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 5th, 2018

MAJOR POINT: Finding Family Away From Home

I’ve been in the Philippines now for over 21 years. I can’t believe it has been that long, but I just checked my passport stamp the other day and sure enough my arrival stamp says August 2, 1997. So many things have happened since then that it puts me in this weird nostalgic state of mind thinking back to how I was back then. I had no idea what was in store for me when I decided to try my luck in professional basketball in the Philippines. I thought I knew. I thought I knew everything, but I really had no clue. I was recruited by a Filipino agent living in the United States to come to the Philippines to play basketball. This made me feel pretty special. I had put together a solid playing resume in high school and college and had played a year professionally in Denmark. I thought I would come to the Philippines, play basketball for 11 years, retire, go back to Michigan and get into coaching. That was my plan. It was pretty simple to me. I never thought about the people I’d meet or the relationships I’d build during my stay in the Philippines. And even though I knew nobody in the Philippines, I didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to go to the Philippines to play basketball. There were a few things I underestimated when I came to the Philippines back in 1997. Being from Michigan, the heat was a often times painful adjustment to get used to. I had never lived in a big city before, so Manila and its traffic was also something to get used to. I don’t speak Tagalog, so getting around that can still be difficult at times. The style of play here in the Philippines is different than I was used to, so I had to get used to that. But, the biggest adjustment for me was that I knew absolutely no one when I came to the Philippines. I had no friends. My mom is from Lawaan, Eastern Samar. She had only been back once since she had left the Philippines in the late 1960s. Most of my relatives on her side of the family still live in the province. So while, I have family in the Philippines, I don’t have any relatives in Metro Manila. So, here I was, on the other side of the planet with no family and no friends. Like most people, I like having friends. I had always had a close group of friends in high school and college. Playing a year in Denmark, not having my friends around was probably my biggest adjustment and I went through a rough period of homesickness there. Now that I was in the Philippines, I was in a different, but also similar situation. In my early years here in the Philippines, I played for two great teams. My first team was Tanduay Rhum. My first coach was Alfrancis Chua and my first boss was Boss Bong Tan. Both of those guys took great care of me. After four years with them, I was then traded to Barangay Ginebra. My boss there was Boss Henry Cojuangco. He also took great care of me. I had many great teammates through the years, including my years on those two teams. My teammates were very welcoming of me and I enjoyed my time on the court with those guys. However, when practice ended. My teammates would go back to their friends, family and responsibilities and I would go back to an empty condo unit. Everyday I would have practice in the morning from 9-12. After practice, I’d eat and then go find a gym to workout in. By the time I was done with my workout at 3 or 4 in the afternoon, I would then have to figure out what to do from 3 or 4 until the time I went to bed around 10 or 11. I thought a lot differently back then than I do now, so most of that time was wasted. I spent a lot of that time alone, bored, in front of the TV, just waiting for the day to end, so I could get up and do it again the next day. Although I was living my dream of playing professional basketball, it was strange for me to be living that life day after day after day. My first couple of years here, I didn’t have a car. I didn’t know my way around Manila. I didn’t know anybody outside of my team. I was living in Quezon City in a non-walkable area. It was a grind. I often wondered how long I could continue to stay on that type of grind. It wasn’t until after 18 months of living that way that I started to meet other Filipino-Americans that were going through similar experiences. In the late 1990s, the PBA landscape was much different than it is today. One thing that was a lot different, was there weren’t as many Fil-Ams as there are today. Having Fil-Am players playing in the PBA was still a new thing. There was a novelty about us. We were the new kids in school, in a way. Guys like Jeff Cariaso, Andy and Danny Seigle, Nic Belasco, Ali Peek, Noy Castillo, Rudy Hatfield and myself had played college basketball in the United States. The basketball fans here in the Philippines didn’t know who we were before we went high in the PBA Draft and then started playing in the PBA. Most of us were the only Fil-Americans on our teams. Upon meeting them, I found out that these guys were living the similar grind I had been going through. It’s hard to explain, but after meeting some of the other Fil-American basketball players, my life instantly got better. It was so refreshing to hear about their experiences. Although, we were all different and from different areas of the US, we were basically going through the same thing at near the same stage of our lives. We were all out here on our own trying to make it in professional basketball in country that was new to us. I found comfort in learning that other people were struggling with similar things that I was struggling with. There is always pressure to win in professional sports. My new friends helped me deal with that pressure. Learning about other peoples experiences in similar situations, having an outlet and having fun with new friends off of the court, helped bring balance to my life. I related to those guys. I smiled and laughed more when I was around those guys. Two guys in particular that helped me were Jeffrey Cariaso and Andy Seigle. Both of those guys are older than me and had been in the country and the PBA before I was. I looked to both of them for advice and valued their opinions. Jeff is from San Francisco was drafted in the PBA in 1995. By the time I had met Jeff in 1999, Jeff had won the PBA Rookie of the Year, had won multiple championships and was a multiple time PBA All-Star. Jeff was always a guy I respected for the way he handled himself on the court and off of it. Jeff was also a leader in the Fil-Am community here, organizing dinners and get togethers. Even today, it is nice to be able to message Jeff and he is still always willing to listen or give advice. Jeff will always shoot you straight. A friend like him is hard to find. Andy was the number one overall pick in the 1997 PBA Draft. At 6 for 10 Andy was the first Fil-Am from my generation to have big expectations put on his shoulders the very first day he stepped on a PBA court. Dealing with that pressure must have been tough, but Andy was one of the most accommodating, giving people I have ever met. Whenever he was doing something, he would invite me. Random days out of the blue, he would invite me to his house to have dinner with his family. Andy would host dinners at his house for holidays, where families from different teams would get together to celebrate. I was fortunate enough to eventually play with Andy at Ginebra, where we won three championships together. Having him in practice and as a friend made my life better in the Philippines. Just as Jeff and Andy helped me, I also tried to help new Fil-Americans that came to the Philippines after me. Rudy Hatfield came to Tanduay a couple of years after I had been there and I tried to show him the ropes. We became very close friends. When Jimmy Alapag and Harvey Carey were new to the country in 2002 and 2003, respectively, I tried help where I could. I can’t say I ever really mentored anybody, but I always tried to listen, and share. Even if I can only help you laugh or smile more, I know that can help. Those guys have also become close friends of mine. I know they have also helped others that have come after them. Since Alapag and Carey arrived, there have already been a couple generations of new Filipino American basketball players. I still see the younger Fil-Ams from different teams hanging out together. While I’ve heard that some people view that as Fil-Ams trying to separate themselves, I don’t believe that is true. Just like guys from the same province or same school are more likely to hang out together, young Fil-Ams are more likely to hang out together. It’s a natural thing to gravitate to things and people you relate to and have something in common with. It’s not the easiest thing to do, to go to a foreign country where you have no family and friends to start a new career. I know. I’ve been there. A lot of things have changed for me since 1997, when I first came to this country. I am now married and have two small children of my own. My wife, kids and her family provide my support system now, as I do for them. However, there was a time and a long time where I didn’t have that. My Fil-American friends were my family and support system. And while that wasn’t ideal, I was always taught to do the best with what you had. I’m thankful for what I had. Eric Menk played in the PBA from 1999 to 2016. Menk is a four-time PBA champion, three-time PBA Finals MVP and one-time PBA MVP (2005). He currently writes for ABS-CBN Sports weekly. Menk also has his podcast Staying MAJOR as welll as his own YouTube channel ......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018