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Sin tax bill for cigarettes certified urgent

Sin tax bill for cigarettes certified urgent.....»»

Category: newsSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsMay 28th, 2019

Senate OKs measure ending ‘endo’

The Senate yesterday gave its nod to the bill ending the abusive practice of labor-only contracting or “endo.” Voting 15 for and none against, senators approved on third and final reading Senate Bill 1826 which seeks to strengthen workers’ right to security of tenure and amend provisions of the Labor Code. The bill was certified […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsMay 22nd, 2019

Villanueva urges Palace: Certify end-Endo as urgent bill

Villanueva urges Palace: Certify end-Endo as urgent bill.....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsSep 28th, 2016

Villanueva urges Palace: Certify end-Endo as urgent bill

Villanueva urges Palace: Certify end-Endo as urgent bill.....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsSep 27th, 2016

Mga employer hinimok suportahan ang anti-endo bill

Hinikayat ng Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) ang mga employer sa bansa na itagu­yod ang mga karapatan ng mga  manggagawang Pilipino sa segu­ridad ng panunungkulan at tulu­ngan ang gobyerno na pigilin ang iligal na mga kontraktwalisasyon o endo. The post Mga employer hinimok suportahan ang anti-endo bill appeared first on Abante News Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  abanteRelated NewsJun 16th, 2019

Five things we learned from Game 4 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 105-92 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 4 of the 2019 NBA Finals on Friday at Oracle Arena: 1. Dynasties eventually become ‘die-nastys’ Will we get one more game at Oracle Arena? The scene of so much Golden State wonderfulness the past five seasons? A building about to be abandoned when the Warriors move from Oakland to a state-of-the-art arena across the Bay? Hold up. Asking one more game out of the Warriors seems a lot at the moment. These guys just suffered their second consecutive home playoff loss by 10 points or more, something that hasn’t happened to this franchise in 50 years. After three straight games scoring precisely 109 points, the Warriors came up 15 short Friday (Saturday, PHL time). They are 0-9 overall this season when held to double digits, and 0-11 in the playoffs during the Steve Kerr era, when they score 94 or fewer. And now they’re on the wrong side of a 3-1 deficit, lacking everything from certain healthy bodies to an edge, a sharpness that was missing in the second half. Granted, Golden State once held a 3-1 edge in a Finals, all the way back in 2016 … when LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and the Cavaliers chased them down and became the only Finals team to claw out of such a chasm. The Warriors did the same to Oklahoma City in the 2016 Western Conference finals. So they not only have a blueprint, they have the know-how and an opportunity to do it again. Like Kerr before him on Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) postgame podium, Warriors forward Draymond Green spoke of simply trying to win one basketball game, the next game, as the proper way to dig out of this series hole. But then he dropped his guard and mentioned winning three in a row, something the Warriors have done often. But they’re a whole year removed from doing that in a Finals (last year’s sweep of the Cavs) with a healthy Kevin Durant. This is a more worn-down, tired team. In fact, Game 4 was more than Golden State’s 102nd game of 2018-19, regular and postseason combined. It was the 102nd playoff game of their five consecutive Finals runs, which means they have crammed an extra season-plus into their schedules compared to the underachievers on lottery teams sitting at home. From the looks of it Friday (Saturday, PHL time), these guys are ready to be toppled, like the Lakers in 1989 and again in 2004, like the Heat in 2014 and the Cavaliers last June. The boisterous Raptors fans who staged their takeover of the Warriors’ building after Game 4 were merely mirroring what their favorite team did on the court from halftime on. Golden State could not stop it. Rudy Tomjanovich might still be inclined to scream into the darkness. (“Never underestimate the heart of a champion!”) But pride only takes you so far, and that’s mostly what the Warriors have left. 2. Third quarter? That’s Toronto’s now It took the Raptors more than 18 minutes to score 30 points Friday night (Saturday, PHL time), stymied by the pace of the game and particularly Golden State’s scrappy, hustling defense. Immediately after halftime, it took Toronto only 12 minutes to put up 37. The time of death for Golden State on Friday was immediately after Kawhi Leonard drained consecutive three-pointers – “F-you” shots, teammate Fred VanVleet memorably coined them – that boosted Toronto from a four-point deficit to a 12-point advantage. The Warriors already had played well enough to rightly feel they should have had a bigger cushion; falling behind so rudely seemed to buckle the defending champs. That they feel third quarters are their birthright made the switcheroo intolerable. “We had a big problem with the third quarter in Game 2,” Toronto coach Nick Nurse said. “We had to make some adjustment there to try to combat the way they come out of the half. We made the decision to put Fred in, [first] in Game 3 and then Game 4 again. Mostly it's to try to keep up pace of our offense going. It gives us two point guards out there that can push the ball, get it in and get it going, and it kind of paid off. “I know Kawhi's two big three's to start the half really changed the whole feel of everybody. Everybody was like, ‘Okay, man, we know we are here, let's go,’ and we just kind of kept going from those two three's.” For the Warriors, who have done that to so many others, turnabout was a pain in the rump. “Oh, this sucks,” Draymond Green recalled thinking as Toronto took control of the quarter. “It sucks really bad. You just try and do whatever you can to change it. Get a stop, get a bucket, get some momentum.  Every time we did, they answered.” Green was asked about the difficulty of rattling the stone-faced Leonard with whatever defensive tactic Golden State could muster, and brushed the question aside. “I don't think you're ever going to rattle Kawhi. Not sure we used that word one time in our scouting report, ‘We're going to rattle him,’” Green said. But it’s not just Leonard now. It’s the Raptors. Time after time, whenever Golden State revved up with a couple of scoring possessions, signaling to their fans they ready to make a run, Toronto snuffed it with a three-pointer or a well-executed pick and roll. They’ve got a team of Kawhis-in-training, unflappable lately if not as inscrutable. “Most teams will take cues from their leaders or their star players, so I think that spreads around a little bit,” Nurse said. But he also praised vets such as Marc Gasol, Danny Green, Kyle Lowry and VanVleet for how steady they’ve been. Now, with the temptation to imagine hoisting a championship trophy, the Raptors might be expected to buy into the stat that, of the 34 teams in The Finals who have led 3-1, 33 of them got their rings. But this team is so focused, so resolute in taking care of business down to the smallest and most mundane task, that all Nurse might have to do is remind them how many aspiring champs won three games in a Finals and still headed into summer empty-handed. (It's 19.) No trophy, no rings. 3. A surge from Serge The chemistry between Serge Ibaka and Kyle Lowry was evident in their playful banter on the podium Friday night. Each slipped into his role, Lowry as the instigator, Ibaka as the target of his playful jibes. “You joining me?” Lowry asked, as Ibaka got to the podium a half minute after him. “Serge Ibaka, everybody. You all know him. Nice outfit. Worth a lot of money. Is that jacket real leather?” “Yes, it’s real leather,” Ibaka said. "Pants too tight, he can't even sit down,” Lowry said. On court, Ibaka’s defensive impact and 20 points in reserve dampened a lot of Warrior enthusiasm. There are nights when Ibaka comes across like Chief in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” a large, lumbering and rather stiff option near the rim with very little to say. Some nights, he even seems to be asleep. But still waters often run deep, too deep for the Warriors in Game 4, it turned out. Ibaka’s here-today, gone-tomorrow shooting touch had him playing in a way that none of Golden State’s three centers – DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney or Andrew Bogut – could match. “Once he gets into the series," Nurse said, "which he did in Game 3 with the blocked shots and the rebounding and stuff, he seems to stay in the series. He usually gives you all of it.” Said Lowry, about knowing when a Serge surge is coming: “He doesn't say anything. When Serge is effective defensively is when he's at his best. I think the scoring just comes. We're going to make sure he gets that pick-and-pop jump shot, he's rolling … When he brings that intensity and that fierceness, it's kind of tough to stop him on both ends of the floor.” 4. Stephen Curry had a bad game One of the most famous pieces of magazine journalism ever was entitled, “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold,” by Gay Talese, a profile written when Sinatra obviously was ill of body and temper, and didn’t even grant Talese an interview. So our headline kind of tells the story as his did: Curry, one of the top five players in the NBA and probably the greatest overall shooter of all time, was not his two-time MVP self. He wasn’t even the Game 3 version (47 points). The Warriors point guard scored 20 fewer points in this one, and was 2-of-9 from three-point range. He missed all five of his shots from the arc in the first half and he picked up some obvious frustration fouls. Curry played 43 of the 48 minutes, and Golden State was outscored by 11 points when he was on the court. “It wasn’t his best game,” Kerr said. Evaluating Curry, for the Warriors, was going to come down to breaking down video and keeping the faith. Evaluating him, for the rest of us, is getting complicated these days by a sense that Curry did not get his due in past Finals – at least in terms of winning the Bill Russell Award as Finals MVP. But that’s no excuse to don rose-colored glasses every time he hits the floor. As scintillating as his performance was in defeat Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) as the Warriors’ only healthy threat, his Game 4 work was raggedy and unproductive. “They have been aggressive all series and trying to take space away from me and Klay,” Curry said. “I missed some shots early that I usually make, especially from the three-point line. But overall, I thought I got good looks.” Every game doesn’t need to be a referendum on the level of Curry appreciation. He might have deserved more consideration as Finals MVP in 2015, when Andre Iguodala snagged it with a strong performance in the clinching game. And even though Kevin Durant was an easy choice in 2017, there were some who felt Curry was more essential (including this voter). In some cosmic and just way, Curry probably should have been recognized with hardware somewhere among the three. But all signs are pointing to Leonard now, so Curry might have to muddle along with "only" those two Maurice Podoloff trophies for regular-season MVP, along with his All-NBA berths and assorted accolades, his ginormous contract and bounty of commercial endorsements, three rings (unless this series turns around) and a better life than most people who’ve ever walked the planet. 5. Durant to play in Game … 8? It’s possible that Durant will come walking through Rick Pitino’s proverbial door and seize what’s left of the championship series by the throat, playing like the two-time Finals MVP he is. Failing that, if there’s a Game 6, maybe that’s the night Durant at least does a Willis Reed impersonation, limping through the Oracle tunnel to a thunderous roar and hitting a couple of early shots to inspire his teammates to something special. (There still, alas, would be a pesky Game 7 for which to account, back in Toronto, likely muddying the drama.) Then again, maybe Durant doesn’t come back at all. For The Finals or with the Warriors, period. Speculation at this point is all over the map. Some think the Warriors planned to hold him out until things got really dire, to buy extra healing time and maybe not use him at all. Others now believe Durant’s rehab process of his strained right calf back-slid to some degree on Thursday, when he participated in a checkpoint workout with the training staff. A few folks think he never was going to return, regardless. After all, the All-NBA forward hasn’t played since May 8 (May 9, PHL time), missing nine fairly important games. This is a league where injuries typically face an “If this were a playoff game, would he play?” threshold. Durant has been nearly as absent from this NBA postseason as LeBron James. Look, all injuries are different, and even the same type of injury can have different timelines with different sufferers. Klay Thompson rushing back from his hamstring issue after skipping only Game 3 is at the crazy-resilient end of the durability scale. Kevon Looney basically rose from the ashes, giving the Warriors a rim runner and 10 points with six rebounds in 20 minutes off the bench. He had been ruled out for the rest of the series after suffering a rib cartilage fracture in his crash to the floor in Game 2. After anticipation of Durant’s availability got out in front of his reality for a few days, the chatter is more tempered now. There’s a shrug and a whiff of uncertainty folded into every mention. If Durant had his Thursday workout, he would have played Friday (Saturday, PHL time). If he had a setback … Heck, at this point it might be more pragmatic for the medical peeps to declare him out and let the Warriors who’ve come this far see this through, yea or nay. “As far as KD, there's been hope that he will come back the whole series,” Draymond Green said. “So that's not going to change now. Obviously we hope to have him, but we'll see what happens. We don't make that final call, he don't really even make that final call.  His body will tell him if he can get out there or not. And if he can, great. And if not, you still got to try to find a way to win the next game.” The Warriors had been holding out hope for Durant’s return as if he was their ace in the hole, imagining him with zero rust or rhythm issues once back and no limitations on his gait. But he has passed the “In case of emergency, break glass” point of urgent help possibilities. Now Durant resembles more the keg hanging from a Saint Bernard dog’s collar. It’s a nice idea, but when was the last time one of those dogs saved somebody who literally drank from the little barrel? Toronto is in a foreign land, by NBA standards. But it ain’t the Alps. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 9th, 2019

‘No time for ROTC, other urgent measures’

enate President Vicente Sotto III clarified yesterday that the 17th Congress is not likely to hold a special session to pass bills President Duterte had certified as urgent, including the measure seeking to revive the mandatory Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program for senior high school students......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 4th, 2019

Senate approves higher tax on tobacco products

The Senate last night approved the proposal to increase the excise taxes on tobacco products, a measure President Duterte certified as urgent......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2019

Pagpasa sa Mandatory ROTC bill, pinamamadali ni P-Duterte

Manila, Philippines – Nagpadala na ng sulat si Pangulong Rodrigo Roa Duterte kay Senate President Vicente Sotto III na nagsesertipikang urgent o agarang ipasa ang panukalang batas na gawing mandatory ang Reserve Officer Training Corps […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  remateRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2019

The end of ‘endo’

Tinawag na historic ni Senator Joel Villanueva, principal author ng End Endo Bill, ang pagpasa ng panukala sa Senado. “This has been 20 years in the making. Thank you so much dear colleagues for all your support. To God be the glory!” aniya sa social media.   Ni: Quincy Joel V. Cahilig ISA sa pinaka […] The post The end of ‘endo’ appeared first on PINAS......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinasglobalRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2019
Category: newsSource:  manila_shimbunRelated NewsMay 29th, 2019

Excise tax sa tobacco product niratipikahang urgent bill ni PDU30

Manila, Philippines – Pinal nang naratipikahan ni Pangulong Rodrigo Duterte ang urgent senate bill na nagpapataw ng mataas na excise tax sa mga produkto ng tabako. Bagamat wala pang inilabas na dokumento, kinumpirma naman ito […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  remateRelated NewsMay 28th, 2019

Palace certifies & lsquo;urgent& rsquo; higher tobacco tax bill

Palace certifies & lsquo;urgent& rsquo; higher tobacco tax bill.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 28th, 2019

Two Cebu business leaders agree with Endo bill

CEBU CITY–Two business leaders gave positive reactions to Senate’s approval on third reading of the Endo bill. On Wednesday, May 22, the Senate Bill No. 1826, also known as the Endo Bill, was approved on third reading. Read more: Senate OKs proposed measure to finish off ‘endo’ Virgilio Espeleta, president of the Cebu Chamber of Commerce […] The post Two Cebu business leaders agree with Endo bill appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2019

Senate approves end endo bill

Senate approves end endo bill.....»»

Category: newsSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsMay 22nd, 2019

Akbayan’s pro-women laws lauded for women’s month

Mindanao civil society groups are raising public support for the urgent passage of five pro-women measures pushed by Akbayan Partylist in the 17th Congress in time for Women’s Month this March. The Junior Chamber International (JCI), the Women’s Action for Gender Equality (WAGE), Balaod Mindanao, Citizens Watch for Good Governance (CWGG), and the Philippine Muslim Women Council, Inc. each expressed support for the Universal Healthcare Bill, the Expanded Maternity Leave Bill, the Safe Streets and Public Spaces Bill, the 4Ps Institutionalization Bill, and the Marawi Compensation Bill......»»

Category: newsSource:  kagay_anRelated NewsApr 28th, 2019

Labor groups urge Duterte to certify anti-contractualization bill as urgent

Labor groups urge Duterte to certify anti-contractualization bill as urgent.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 4th, 2017

Labor groups urge Duterte to certify anti-contractualization bill as urgent - Rappler

Labor groups urge Duterte to certify anti-contractualization bill as urgent - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsJan 4th, 2017

Bill mandates parking space when buying car

The bill making proof of parking space as mandatory requirement in a purchasing motor vehicle has been revived in the House of Representatives, with its principal author issuing a strong appeal that it be made part of the urgent solutions to the worsening.....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsDec 28th, 2016

Surigao Rep urges Duterte to certify as urgent bill reviving PC

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews /26 October)&''  Surigao del Sur Rep. Johnny Pimentel is urging President Rodrigo Duterte to certify as urgent House Bill 3768 which proposes to revive the Philippine Constabulary (PC). Pimentel is proposing that the elite Special.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsOct 26th, 2016