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EDITORIAL - Crime central

Drug trafficking isn’t the only crime being perpetrated with the supervision of convicts in the New Bilibid Prison......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJul 3rd, 2018

EDITORIAL - Cops-turned-criminals

About two weeks ago, a rookie policeman arrested for rape indicated that this was the kalakaran or standard practice in dealing with crime suspects and their relatives in the Philippine National Police......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

Crime City? Killings in Cebu rise as mayor, cops feud

CEBU CITY, Philippines – October 4 was supposed to be a big day for crime fighting in Cebu province. After a drought in operations that extended for months for the Central Visayas command, police director Chief Superintendent Debold Sinas decided to hold a one-time, big-time operation . No law ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 10th, 2018

Crime rate in Central Luzon down by 22.11%

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO, Pampanga, Sept. 25 (PIA) -- Crime rate in Central Luzon dropped by 22.11 percent in January-August 2018 compared to the same period last year.During the recent meeting.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

Crime rate in Central Luzon down by 22.11%

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO, Pampanga, Sept. 25 (PIA) -- Crime rate in Central Luzon dropped by 22.11 percent in January-August 2018 compared to the same period last year.During the recent meeting.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

More city execs dispute PNP crime rate report

Olongapo City Mayor Rolen Paulino on Monday disputed an assertion made recently by Director General Oscar Albayalde, Philippine National Police chief, that the city was a "hotbed" of illegal drugs. "Olongapo is the second most peaceful place in the country and that is backed with figures from no less than PNP Region 3 (Central Luzon)," Paulino said in a statement. Citing records, he said Olongapo recorded 189 crimes from Jan. 1 to Aug. 19. The same records showed Olongapo was the second-ranking city with a high crime solution efficiency, computed at 55.03 percent, against top-ranking Bataan province (60.87 percent) and third placer Bulacan province (52.95 percent). On Su...Keep on reading: More city execs dispute PNP crime rate report.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 27th, 2018

24th NCPW in CV to Kickoff in Siquijor

CEBU CITY, August 15 (PIA)--Siquijor Province will host the 24th National Crime Prevention Week (NCPW) launching in Central Visayas. The week-long celebration kicks-off in Siquijor this August 30, 20.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

EDITORIAL - Crime and punishment

It’s been nine years, but at least sanctions are being handed down in connection with a corruption scandal in the Philippine National Police......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2018

EDITORIAL - New drug traffickers

It has to be the safest control center for organized crime......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2018

Japanese crime boss held in Thailand after ‘yakuza’ tatts go viral

  BANGKOK - A retired Japanese crime boss has been arrested in Thailand ending more than 14 years on the run after photos of his 'yakuza' tattoos and a missing little finger went viral.   The fugitive, Shigeharu Shirai, 72, was arrested by a SWAT team on Wednesday in the sleepy central Thai market town of Lopburi while he was out shopping.   Japanese authorities have called for his arrest over an alleged role in the shooting of a rival in Japan in 2003, after which he fled to Thailand, married a Thai woman and drifted into a seemingly peaceful retirement.   That was until a Thai local posted some photos of the diminutive, frail-looking retiree...Keep on reading: Japanese crime boss held in Thailand after ‘yakuza’ tatts go viral.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 11th, 2018

EDITORIAL - Cutting off funding

Terrorism, insurgency and organized crime need funds – lots of it......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 7th, 2017

Pooled Editorial: November 23

On this day (November 23) eight years ago, a crime that set new records in vileness was committed on a hilltop in Sitio Masalay, Barangay Salman, Ampatuan, Maguindanao......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsNov 26th, 2017

EDITORIAL - Worst in impunity

Violence related to organized crime and terrorist activities by groups linked to the Islamic State placed the Philippines in the worst spot in the Global Imp.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2017

Aaron Hernandez had severe CTE; daughter sues NFL, Pats

em>By Jimmy Golen, Associated Press /em> BOSTON (AP) — Tests conducted on the brain of former football star Aaron Hernandez showed severe signs of the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and his attorney said Thursday that the player’s daughter is suing the NFL and the New England Patriots for leading Hernandez to believe the sport was safe. In a news conference at his offices, Hernandez’s attorney Jose Baez said the testing showed one of the most severe cases ever diagnosed. “We’re told it was the most severe case they had ever seen for someone of Aaron’s age,” Baez said. Dr. Ann McKee, the director of the CTE Center at Boston University, concluded that the New England Patriots tight end had stage 3 of 4 of the disease, and also had early brain atrophy and large perforations in a central membrane. The lawsuit filed in federal court in Boston on Thursday claims that the team and league deprived Avielle Hernandez of the companionship of her father. It is separate from a $1 billion settlement in which the league agreed to pay families of players who suffered brain damage because of repeated head trauma while playing football. NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy declined comment, saying the league had not seen the lawsuit. Baez said Hernandez had been playing football because the NFL led him to believe it was safe. “Those representations turned out to be false,” Baez said. CTE can be caused by repeated head trauma and leads to symptoms like violent mood swings, depression and other cognitive difficulties. Hernandez killed himself in April in the jail cell where he was serving a life-without-parole sentence for a 2013 murder. His death came just hours before the Patriots visited the White House to celebrate their latest Super Bowl victory. CTE can only be diagnosed in an autopsy. A recent study found evidence of the disease in 110 of 111 former NFL players whose brains were examined. CTE has been linked with repeated concussions and involves brain damage particularly in the frontal region that controls many functions including judgment, emotion, impulse control, social behavior and memory. “When hindsight is 20-20, you look back and there are things you might have noticed but you didn’t know,” Baez said. A week before his suicide, Hernandez was acquitted in the 2012 drive-by shootings of two men in Boston. Prosecutors had argued that Hernandez gunned the two men down after one accidentally spilled a drink on him in a nightclub, and then got a tattoo of a handgun and the words “God Forgives” to commemorate the crime. Baez said he deeply regretted not raising the issue of Hernandez having CTE during his murder trials. He said they did not blame CTE for the murders because Hernandez’s defense was actual innocence. A star for the University of Florida when it won the 2008 title, Hernandez dropped to the fourth round of the NFL draft because of trouble in college that included a failed drug test and a bar fight. His name had also come up in an investigation into a shooting. In three seasons with the Patriots, Hernandez joined Rob Gronkowski to form one of the most potent tight end duos in NFL history. In 2011, his second season, Hernandez caught 79 passes for 910 yards and seven touchdowns to help the team reach the Super Bowl, and he was rewarded with a $40 million contract. But the Patriots released him in 2013, shortly after he was arrested in the killing of semi-pro football player Odin Lloyd, who was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee. Hernandez was convicted and sentenced to life in prison; the conviction was voided because he died before his appeals were exhausted, though that decision is itself being appealed. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 21st, 2017

Shadowy group calls for Duterte’s ouster

MANILA – A shadowy group called Patriotic and Democratic Movement or PADEM, composed of disgruntled military and police officers and members, has called for the ouster of President Rodrigo Duterte and cited 10 reasons for its action. It accused Duterte of treating the military and police as his private armies and for betraying and violating public trust. It also urged Filipinos to join PADEM in condemning and fighting Duterte and his administration and to stage mass actions and demand the President’s ouster. In a manifesto, Antonio Bonifacio, who claimed to be PADEM’s spokesman, called on members of the military and police to also join the people in demanding Duterte’s resignation and also his administration. It said the group is working for the withdrawal military and police support for Duterte.  “We urge all Filipinos as individuals and as groups in whatever social sector, field, institution or organization to exercise their right of assembly and expression to undertake mass actions demanding the ouster of Duterte and his administration. We call on our fellow officers and members of the AFP and the PNP to join the people in demanding the resignation or ouster of Duterte and his administration.” “We pledge to work for the withdrawal of military and police support for Duterte and his administration in conjunction with mass mobilization of the Filipino people in millions to manifest their demand for the resignation or ouster of Duterte and his administration. Upon the change of administration, we pledge to follow the principle of civilian supremacy and support a new civilian administration, in accordance with the 1987 Constitution and the rule of law,” the manifesto, released by Bonifacio &'' believed to be a nom de guerre – said. PADEM also condemned and holds accountable for gross crimes in betrayal of public trust and in violation of national sovereignty and democratic rights of the Filipino people. It cited the following reasons as alleged crimes of Duterte:   Treating the AFP and the PNP as these were his private armies and practising favoritism and violating professional and service standards in the promotion and assignment of officers; Corrupting the PNP and the AFP with a system of monetary awards for the extrajudicial killing of alleged illegal drug users and of NPA suspects; Condoning and protecting top-level illegal drug lords; Emboldening/inciting police officers to engage in extrajudicial killings of poor suspected illegal drug users and pushers by publicly telling officers to plant evidence and by guaranteeing their pardon and promotion in case of conviction; Aggravating corruption in government and criminality through the collusion of Duterte trustees and crime syndicates; Allowing China to occupy maritime features in the West Philippine Sea and to violate Philippine sovereign rights upheld by decision of the Arbitral Tribunal in accordance with the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea; Bungling the operations in Marawi City and indiscriminately destroying lives and property through aerial bombings, artillery and mortar; Favoring certain Chinese businessmen and Duterte relatives and cronies in the award of projected infrastructure projects using loans from China; Betraying the sovereign rights of the Filipino people by making the Philippines a debt vassal of China and offering to China the oil and gas resources under the West Philippine Sea as collateral for Chinese loans; and Seeking to replace the partnership with the United States in matters of national security with an even more lopsided relationship with China and Russia.  Television network GMA reported that the military has reiterated its support for the administration of Duterte and strongly denied PADEM’s allegations. Military spokesman Brigadier General Restituto Padilla said the entire Armed Forces of the Philippines, along with all the men and women of the uniformed services and all their civilian personnel, stand by the government and support Duterte, their commander-in-chief. Padilla said the accusations and issues cited by the group are unfounded and uncalled for. “Such issues are clearly politically motivated and a matter that the AFP does not and will not subscribe to,” GMA quoted him as saying, adding, they are the constitutionally mandated protectors of the people and will stand by law-abiding citizens whenever and wherever they are needed. “Having affirmed this, the AFP, however, will not hesitate in acting against forces who shall undermine the stability and security of our country and those who wish to destabilize our nation thru unconstitutional means,” he said. Communist rebels had previously said that the Central Intelligence Agency is plotting to oust Duterte alongside the plan to assassinate Jose Maria Sison, founder of the Communist Party of the Philippines. Sison, in a statement he issued in May, said those who continue to support him assert that performance in a year is not enough basis for a final judgment and that there is more than enough time ahead for him to accomplish promises that have most impressed them, such as the eradication of the drug problem, criminality, and corruption. He said Duterte has, in fact, pleaded that he needs three or four more years to bring about the significant changes that he previously thought would be done in six months’ time. His promised campaign against the pork barrel and other forms of corruption of the Aquino regime has not yet materialized. “Where he has been most successful at, projecting himself as a strong leader by calling on the police and the public to kill drug addict-pushers, he has attracted the most severe and sustained condemnation by institutions, the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2017

EDITORIAL - Dangerous streets

The brutal crackdown on drugs and crime is supposed to make the streets safer. From recent developments, it looks like this isn’t happening......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 6th, 2017

EDITORIAL - From crime to politics

Since the 1980s, Ozamiz City’s Parojinog clan has been linked to crime. Patriarch Octavio Parojinog Sr......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 30th, 2017

Yemen family fears drone strikes under Trump – The Guardian

Every day, as they hear the whine of the drones overhead, the Tuaiman family waits for Donald Trump to finish killing them. The drones used to hover about once a week over al-Rawdah, the Yemeni village where the family lives, sending children running for cover. Now, according to Meqdad Tuaiman, the drones come every day – sometimes three or four times. Usually they arrive in the afternoon. Other times they come after sundown and linger until sunrise. The drones have not fired their weapons in four months, but their patrols have intensified since late January, when Trump took office. Meqdad, a 24-year-old used-car salesman and occasional pipeline guard, considers it no coincidence. In October 2011, Meqdad’s father, Saleh, and his 17-year-old brother Jalal were killed in a drone strike after they drove into the desert to find some missing camels. Another brother who was with them – Ezzaldeen, 14 – escaped the blast and hid until morning, when he found the two shattered bodies. In 2014, the Guardian gave Meqdad’s 13-year-old brother a camera to record his daily life. In January 2015, he too was killed in a drone strike. US drone strikes in Yemen are a key part of the campaign against al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), but the Tuaiman family denies any links to terrorism and say the family has never received any explanation from either US authorities or their Yemeni government allies. According to Meqdad, his brother Ezzaldeen has started to say: “They’re going to kill me next.” Under the Trump administration, airstrikes have escalated dramatically in Iraq and Syria, sending claims of civilian casualties skyrocketing. Airstrikes have also increased in Yemen, where the US campaign against Islamists has played out alongside a tangled civil war, which has already drawn in regional rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran. The Trump administration is considering plans to deepen US involvement in the civil war, which pits Iranian-backed Houthi rebels against the Persian Gulf states who support the exiled president Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. The Tuaiman family feels pinioned between the two campaigns: its support for Hadi aligns them with the US – even as they fear being marked for death by US drone strikes. In Washington, Obama was criticized from the right for being too risk-averse even as human rights monitors said his administration’s guidance on avoiding civilian casualties was to lax. And under Trump, the guidance is a dead letter, an administration official recently told the Guardian. “Under Obama, Republicans constantly expressed concerns that White House micromanagement of how and where drones were deployed – and unrealistic rules of engagement for drone strikes – hampered US counterterrorism strategy. Even without formal guidance, Trump can reverse this by devolving strike authority to lower-level officials, and signal an acceptance for more strikes and thus more civilian casualties,” said Micah Zenko, who studies counterterrorism at the Council on Foreign Relations. Meqdad fears that Trump intends to make good on a promise he made in 2015: “When you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families.” US officials deny plans to implement such a policy, which legal experts say would constitute a war crime. But with three dead relatives, Meqdad is disinclined to rule it out. “Basically, we felt that [Trump has] no respect for human life. We felt very afraid”, Meqdad said, in a telephone interview arranged by the human rights group Reprieve. Meqdad said that if the US possesses any evidence against his family, “please bring it to court. We’re ready to explain in any US court.” From the Tuaiman’s Yemeni home to Iraq and Syria, the pace of US airstrikes has increased in recent weeks. Central Command has denied relaxing any relevant rules of engagement. Yet it has acknowledged, a December devolution of decision-making that made it quicker for US military “advisers” fighting alongside Iraqi forces in Mosul to call in airstrikes. “I think philosophically the president has made it very clear that he wants to give the commanders on the ground much more flexibility to execute their mission, especially when it comes to defeating Isis,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said on Monday. US air force statistics show that since December, the US dropped vastly more bombs on Iraq and Syria than ever before in the two-and-a-half-year old war. In January, US warplanes loosed 3,600 munitions, followed in February by another 3,440. (March statistics are not yet available.) That blew away the previous high-water mark for monthly weapons releases: 3,242 in November 2015. The UK-based monitor group Airwars has said claims of civilian casualties caused by the US and its allies have risen so sharply that it lacks the resources to continue monitoring those alleged to have been caused by Russia, which the US had once criticized for indiscriminate bombing. In March 2017 alone, Airwars has tracked allegations of nearly 1,000 civilians killed in Iraq and Syria attributed to the US-led coalition. The Pentagon says it investigates credible claims of civilian deaths. But in Mosul, mass deaths apparently resulting from a 17 March US airstrike have caused international outcry and prompted the Iraqi government to pause its offensive. A similar trend is at work in Yemen. As of Wednesday, Trump’s 69th day in office, the US had conducted 37 drone strikes or raids beyond declared battlefields, at a rate of one strike every 1.8 days, said Zenko. Those strikes and raids have overwhelmingly focused on Yemen. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 30th, 2017

What is South Korea’s take on the killing? – BBC News

Only a few people know why VX was chosen &'' presumably by North Korea &'' as the chemical agent of Kim Jong-nam's assassination, and they're not talking. The (perhaps unwitting) women who smeared his face with the highly toxic oil are unlikely to know much about the substance. And the men who left the terminal in Kuala Lumpur for Dubai even as the victim staggered around seeking medical help are not about to share their secrets with anyone far from Pyongyang. But in South Korea, there is much speculation. Was it a deliberate signal from the North that nuclear isn't the only weapon of mass destruction just over the border? Or was it simply an effective way of killing a reclusive man in a public place? It has certainly raised the temperature in South Korea. Monday's Joongang Daily says: &'8220;The government must take steps immediately to protect the country from chemical weapons dangers.&'8221; The editorial raises the spectre of North Korea supplying terrorists with the substance (in the same way it may have helped Pakistan with nuclear technology and Syria with missile development). The editorial continues: &'8220;North Korea is known to have chemical weapons from 3,000 tonnes to 5,000 tonnes. It could threaten the world if Pyongyang sells any of these weapons to Islamic militants or other extremists to secure hard cash.&'8221; There is no doubt that the attack has sent a tremor of fear through the defector community in South Korea. Fugitives who were previously easy to contact have gone to ground. Thae Yong-ho, the diplomat who defected from the London embassy last year, already had bodyguards as he went incognito around Seoul but they would not have been able to protect him against a seemingly innocent member of the public just coming up and smearing him with a speck of VX. Two years ago, the American ambassador in Seoul was lucky to survive when his face was slashed with a blade in public. How much easier it would be to kill someone with a mere trace of a chemical. The great advantage of poisoning for the assassin is that it can be perfectly targeted and it kills with little immediate fuss. Only scientific examination afterwards reveals the cause. Those behind Kim Jong-nam's killing watched, then left. Alexander Litvinenko, a fugitive spy from Russia, took tea with two former KGB agents in London in 2006 and died three weeks later of poisoning by radioactive polonium-210, believed to have been administered in the cup. The BBC producer, Georgi Markov, was murdered at a bus stop in central London in 1978 but his killer vanished in the crowd seconds after the victim felt the pin-prick from an umbrella used like a syringe to inject the fatal poison. He had been a thorn in the side of the Bulgarian communist government but so simple and bloodless was the killing that nobody was ever identified as the perpetrator. The efficiency of poison as a means of assassination is leading North Korea watchers in South Korea to think that there was no great intention to send a signal by using VX specifically. Koh Yu-hwan, of Dongguk University, thinks that VX was chosen because of its efficiency; North Korea &'' or at least leader Kim Jong-un &'' allegedly wanted Kim Jong-nam dead and VX offered certainty. It also offered the possibility that the death would pass as being from natural causes, at least for the time before a serious post-mortem scientific examination could take place. Chang Yong-seok, of Seoul National University's Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, adds: &'8220;North Korea was already under immense pressure over its efforts to develop nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles, and also its human rights issues. Things will get even more complicated for Pyongyang if its chemical weapons issues are thrown into the mix.&'8221; There are benefits and costs to Pyongyang of being caught red-handed. On the one hand, it would send a signal to dissidents that there will be no escaping the regime's ruthlessness. On the other, it also says to North Koreans that the regime at the top is insecure and fratricidal. News from outside does get into North Korea and the revelation that one ruling Kim was allegedly having his half-brother bumped off could scarcely strengthen the regime in the people's eyes. &'160; As a columnist in Daily NK puts it: &'8220;With the influx of information pouring into North Korea, more of its citizens are learning for the first time of Kim Jong-nam's existence, prompting them to speculate on the motive for the assassination.&'8221; There is some speculation in South Korea about the role of the two women suspected of carrying out the hit job. One researcher told the Associated Press news agency that the theory VX had been mixed from two innocuous chemicals into a deadly combination on the victim's face was unlikely. The expert said that VX could be produced in this way but not reliably. It is more likely that it was applied in its deadly form by people wearing protective gloves. &'8220;The security camera footage shows one of the women heading to the bathroom to wash her hands after attacking Kim. If she touched VX with her bare hands, she wouldn't have had the time to do even that,&'8221; the researcher told AP. If the means of murder is causing debate, the motive is not. In dynasties with hereditary rule, brothers are [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2017

Central Luzon cops, Koreans to cooperate on crime prevention

Central Luzon cops, Koreans to cooperate on crime prevention.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 1st, 2017

EDITORIAL - Waiting for closure

Two years on, the wounds of Mamasapano have not healed. And the reason is the same one that torments many people in this country who have lost loved ones to crime and terrorism: justice has been elusive......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 25th, 2017