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Don’t use gadgets in public places, PNP tells students

PHILIPPINE National Police chief Director General Oscar D. Albayalde yesterday said they have set into motion a massive nationwide security and public safety plan ahead of the school opening on June 4. The PNP chief’s foremost reminder to students when they return to schools: “Please refrain from using cell phones….....»»

Category: newsSource: journal journalMay 28th, 2018

LTFRB tells PUV drivers to honor students’ discount

By: Bryan N. Casaig THE Land Transportation Franchise and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) reminded the drivers of public utility vehicles to honor the 20 percent fare discount for students as classes resume this week. LTFRB board member Atty. Aileen Lizada said on Sunday that the discounted fare for students is in effect the entire year. “Reminding all […] The post LTFRB tells PUV drivers to honor students’ discount appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

‘I owe the people the duty to tell my story’ – Sereno

    BAGUIO CITY-- Drawing applause from Baguio law students, Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno reiterated on Friday she will not resign until she tells her story to the public, even asserting she now fights to keep the judiciary independent from outside forces.   "Judicial independence can only be realized when we allow our courts to exercise its constitutional mandate free of intimidation," Sereno pointed out during a forum on judicial reforms at the University of Baguio.   Sereno, who faces impeachment, said: "I will give an account of my actions as Chief Justice to the people. I don't owe anyone the duty to resign. I owe the people the duty t...Keep on reading: ‘I owe the people the duty to tell my story’ – Sereno.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 2nd, 2018

ARMM hires 75 new teachers for Maguindanao, more expected to get jobs

COTABATO CITY – Dozens of newly hired teachers for the province of Maguindanao were added to the roster of the Department of Education in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (DepEd-ARMM) on Monday, officials said. ARMM Governor Mujiv Hataman signed the appointment papers of 75 teachers and said  their profession is more of service and commitment than livelihood. “You chose this path because it is your passion — because you are committed and determined that you want our youth to learn. The regional government will not neglect your efforts and will provide what you deserve,” he said. Debunking the misconception that appointments in ARMM are tainted with corruption, Gov. Hataman said those appointed are qualified and do not have those so-called backers. A mechanism was made to ensure that appointees are well-distributed to schools that are in need. Along with the appointment order is a deployment order. In his first appearance as the newly appointed DepEd-ARMM Secretary, Atty. Rasol Mitmug, Jr. reminded the teachers that the region’s “youth is expecting to receive quality education.” “Sana maging daan kayong mga guro na matulungan ang mga batang magsumikap sa pag aaral dahil maraming kabataan ang umaasa na magkaroon ng maayos at dekalidad na edukasyon,” he told the teachers. One of the teachers, Elpigenia Apellido, a 41-year old single mother with two children, said: “Excited ako na may halong kaba.” Her appointment was 18 years in the making. Since her graduation in 1999, Apellido served as a factory worker in Luzon and also as a farmer in her hometown in Sultan Kudarat. During the past two years, she served as a volunteer teacher in Kulasi Elementary School where she did not receive compensation. Previously teaching in makeshift classrooms to underprivileged children, she is now eager to go back as a full-fledged teacher and help her students who usually go to school without basic supplies such as pens and notebooks.  “As a teacher and the second mother of my students, I play an important role in nurturing them for their future,” she said. “It’s never too late to reach for your dreams. I’m here now signing my papers, although long overdue, this serves as a message to everyone.” “Sacrifices have to be made along the way, but if you get the chance to go to school, do not miss it, since you never know when your break will come,” she said. Gov.  Hataman said the appointments comprised just the first batch of new teachers in the region. More appointees are expected to be made this year. “The process will be easier now. Our main goal is to finish all appointments, including senior high school, by first quarter of this year,” he said, adding, DepEd-ARMM will fill all teaching positions in nine schools divisions in the region in the first quarter of this year.   Newly hired teacher Sahira Kalipapa said the distance between her home and her school assignment may be challenging, but she is more excited to help her students. A 30-year-old resident of Datu Paglas North, she will be deployed to Darampua Elementary School in Sultan sa Barongis town, an hour away from her place. “Wala pong kaso sa akin ang layo, ang mahalaga po sa akin ay makatulong sa mga estudyante sa sarili kong probinsya,” Sahira said. Overwhelmed with joy as she signed her deployment order, she said: “It’s an answered prayer po. Sobrang saya po na finally teacher na po ako.” “Ang sarap po sa pakiramdam dahil alam namin na dumaan ito sa tamang proseso. Libu-libo ang applicants na kasabay ko dito at masaya ako na napabilang ako sa mga newly hired teachers,” she said.  Sahira said that she never thought of applying to other places outside the ARMM. “Mas pipiliin ko pa rin po ang lugar namin dahil mas kailangan po kami sa lugar namin,” she added. Applicants for teaching positions in the ARMM have to go through the Assessment and Competency Examination for Teachers that includes a panel interview and a teaching demonstration to evaluate their aptitude and proficiency for teaching. The process is meant to promote quality education in the region. Gov. Hataman said it helps guarantee that only qualified teachers will be hired. On January 4 this year, the appointment papers and deployment orders of the 192 public school teachers in Sulu were signed by the governor. “Our goal is to fill in all the teaching vacancies in the first quarter of the year,” he said. “Nandito kayo hindi dahil sa kung sino ang nag-recommend sayo, nandito kayo dahil dumaan kayo sa tamang proseso at alam namin na qualified kayo,” he said.  Another teacher, Johaira Ali, also thanked and praised Gov. Hataman for hiring them, saying, they waited for this for a long time. “I’m excited to be finally appointed by the ARMM Department of Education because I’ve been waiting for this for a long time,” she said.   Musarafah Ebrahim, a teacher who shared her own excitement, said: “I’m happy to be here. I’ve always found joy in teaching, and I feel like this is truly the job for me.” Qualified, not endorsed   Gov. Hataman told the teachers “I made sure to meet all of you today because I wanted to tell you personally that you are here not because of anyone’s endorsement, but because you are qualified. Atty. Mitmug reminded the teachers of their crucial role as educators. “Many of the youth here in the ARMM are hoping to receive quality education in our public school system, and the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJan 27th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Malacañang tells public to stay alert as 961 areas hit by flooding

MALACAÑANG ON Sunday reminded the public to “stay alert and safe” amid flooding and heavy rains in various parts of the country, especially in Metro Manila and parts of Luzon. “Sa mga lugar na nakakaranas pa rin ng pagbaha, hinihikayat po namin kayo na manatili sa mga evacuation centers na inihanda ng inyong lokal na… link: Malacañang tells public to stay alert as 961 areas hit by flooding.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

Why you should read 2 below-the-belt books

  Your mantra for the week: "One loving act can make a difference in the world."   As promised, here are more ways of developing your lovingness. As we make them a habit, we not only open doors to more harmonious relationships, but, also, the gates of success are left unobstructed.   11) Plant a tree, keep your immediate environment clean, and help improve a debilitating, negative social condition.   12) Remember to send birthday greetings to friends.   13) Keep the bathroom and toilet clean for the next user, whether in private or public places.   14) Watch your tone, you may sound like you are hating rather than loving. ...Keep on reading: Why you should read 2 below-the-belt books.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

Kidapawan LGU releases P11.2M to subsidize PTA, other school fees

KIDAPAWAN CITY (MindaNews / 2 Aug) – The local government of Kidapawan City has released P11.27 million from its Special Education Funds (SEF) as subsidy for the Parents Teachers Association (PTA) collection and other school fees so that there will be absolutely “no collection” from the 38,000 students in public schools here. The first release took […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

Fast-track infra projects, ARMM governor tells DPWH engineers

COTABATO CITY – Governor Mujiv Hataman of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) has asked the Department of Public […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

LA-bound LeBron leaves lasting gift, Akron always home

By Tom Withers, Associated Press AKRON, Ohio (AP) — LeBron James stood on a stage near one of the streets he walked as a troubled kid and looked out at thousands of faces. He felt connected to every one of them. While his three-year-old daughter, Zhuri, played at his feet, James watched as his mother, Gloria, raised a flag in front of a school that is perhaps his greatest triumph. His incredible life. Full circle. Before leaving for Los Angeles, James gave his hometown quite a gift. James, who ended his second stint with Cleveland earlier this month by signing with the Los Angeles Lakers, on Monday opened his I Promise School, a year-around learning center devoted to some of the city’s most challenged youngsters — ones just like him. For James, who recalled missing 82 days of school as a fourth grader while he and his mom “looked for stability,” the opening culminated years of planning by his family foundation. “This means everything,” James told The Associated Press in an interview before the public event. “I think this is the greatest accomplishment for me because it’s not just me. A championship is for a team, that’s for an organization and a city. But these kids, this is for generation after generation after generation and it’s for these kids, so it means everything.” It was an emotional day for James, who also made his first comments since signing the $154 million deal with the Lakers — a move still causing tremors across in the NBA. James recalled beating the odds of his youth when life was a daily struggle for him and his mom. Nothing was easy as the pair constantly moved and it was only with the help of others than James found structure. Now, he’s giving kids with the same problems a path. “There is no way I could have imagined this,” he said. “I remember our foundation having a bike-a-thon, and I never thought a five-mile bike ride would turn into a school. This is something I’m at a loss of words for.” As far as basketball, the 33-year-old superstar said the decision to leave Cleveland again was difficult, but he didn’t rule out a second homecoming with the Cavaliers. “Listen, I don’t close the chapter on anything or close the book on anything,” James said when asked if he would return to Cleveland to end his career. “But hopefully I can sit there one day and watch my jersey go up into the rafters, that’s for sure.” When James announced on July 1 that he was leaving the Cavs, Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert, who famously ripped him when he left the first time, said the franchise would retire “the famous #23 Cavs jersey one day down the line.” James was unaware of Gilbert’s pledge. “I didn’t hear that,” he said. “I haven’t been in the news. That’s awesome.” James led the Cavs to an NBA title in 2016, ending Cleveland’s 52-year championship drought, and to four straight Finals — a run he admitted he didn’t think was even possible when he returned in 2011 after four seasons in Miami. James didn’t offer many details about what prompted him to sign with the Lakers, but the lure of playing for one of the most successful franchises in all of sports was more than intriguing. “There’s no reason you should become a Laker, became a Yankee, become part of Man U [Manchester United], become part of some franchise or clubs and you don’t think about winning championships or winning at the highest level,” James said. “That’s what the history is all about.” James has his work cut out for him in Los Angeles. He’ll join a young team that added some interesting pieces — Lance Stephenson, Rajon Rondo, Michael Beasley and JaVale McGee — during the offseason but a squad that has a long way to go before it can challenge the two-time defending champion Golden State Warriors. “What my expectations are for the team, we don’t have any right now,” James said. “But we’re definitely going to be better than we were the previous year. I think there’s going to be months where we’re really good, there’s going to be months where we’re not so good and that’s just going to come from familiarity.” Unlike his previous forays into free agency, James didn’t waste any time making a decision. Once his eighth straight appearance in the Finals ended with a sweep against Golden State, James met with his family and agent before agreeing with the Lakers on the first day. “I did my due diligence after the season on the pros and cons of a lot of different teams, including the Cavs, including Philadelphia, including Houston and Los Angeles,” James said. “It wasn’t as quick as it may seem. It just wasn’t as July 9 as it was before. After talking to my family more than anybody, I felt this was the next step in my journey.” This trip will take him thousands of miles from home. But as James reminded students, family and friends in the closing moments of his remarks, he’ll never be far away. “No matter if I’m playing in Los Angles or not, Akron Ohio is always home for me,” he told the crowd......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

LA-bound LeBron opens school in Akron as part of legacy

AKRON, Ohio --- LeBron James is leaving home again and leaving behind something he says is more meaningful than any of his NBA championships. James, who this month ended his second stay with the Cleveland Cavaliers by signing with the Los Angeles Lakers, has opened a public school for challenged children in his hometown. The NBA great admitted to having "jitters" before the opening, an event he said is "going to be one of the greatest moments --- if not the greatest --- of my life." The I Promise School initially will house 240 third- and fourth-graders. The Akron school will expand each year, adding second and fifth grades next year and will have students from grades 1-8 by 2022. ...Keep on reading: LA-bound LeBron opens school in Akron as part of legacy.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 30th, 2018

Global Filipino Schools program reaches all 17 regions in the PH

About 214 schools across all 17 regions in the Philippines, latest of which are those in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), are being equipped with information and communications technology (ICT) tools and methodologies on 21st-century education through Global Filipino Schools (GFS) program. The GFS program is part of a long-term partnership between Globe Telecom and the Department of Education (DepEd), meant to forward 21st-century learning principles and ICT integration in public schools nationwide. It aims to transform public high schools into ICT centers of excellence by equipping students and teachers with the knowledge, skills, and tools needed for the 21st cen...Keep on reading: Global Filipino Schools program reaches all 17 regions in the PH.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 30th, 2018

UPV Public Health students campaign for School-Based Immunization in Iloilo

AS THE world celebrated International Youth Day on August 12, 2017, a team of students from University of the Philippines Visayas was awarded Grand Champion of Ideas Positive Run 7, for their “Project BAKUNANAYS” (Bakuna ng KabataanUgaliin Nang Anak ay di Sakitin). The team, called Team BakUNAWA, was composed of BS Public Health students from […] The post UPV Public Health students campaign for School-Based Immunization in Iloilo appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

City Hall releases salaries of 1,556 ‘summer jobbers’

The Bacolod city government started releasing on July 18, 2018 the salaries of 1,556 “summer jobbers” under the Special Program for Employment of Students (SPES) of the Public Employment Service Office (PESO). Bacolod Mayor Evelio Leonardia, Vice Mayor El Cid Familiaran, PESO Bacolod officer-in-charge Ma. Rebecca Balicas, and SPES officer-in-charge Marian Rosenda led the releasing […] The post City Hall releases salaries of 1,556 ‘summer jobbers’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

No classes in QC on July 23

Private and public schools in Quezon City will have no classes in all level on Monday, July 23, when President Rodrigo Duterte delivers his State of the Nation Address (SoNA) in Congress. Quezon City Administrator Aldrin Cuña announced the class suspension Thursday. The suspension is a precaution to students as protest rallies will be held […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

Fil-Am beauty products maker helps feed PH public school students

Kaya Essentials' Sara Meredith with some recipients of Kusina ng Kalinga's school lunches. CONTRIBUTED LOS ANGELES - It all began when Sara Meredith and her mother created a homemade hair.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

Formula E paves way for electric cars on and off racetrack

By Terrin Waack, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Unplug and go. Filling up a car is as simple as that, even if it's not gas flowing through the nozzle. Electricity is efficient. Formula E, a global electric auto racing series, steers the way — toward the future of not only its sport but also its industry. "You don't realize it," Mahindra Racing team principal Dilbagh Gill said, "but the second car from today that you're going to buy is going to be an electric car." America is one of Formula E's biggest targets. So, for the second consecutive time since the series' inception in 2014, Formula E took on the Brooklyn streets for a season-finale doubleheader of its 12-race schedule. The track length is 2.373 kilometers with Lower Manhattan in the backdrop as well as the Statue of Liberty. Techeetah's Jean-Eric Vergne became the fourth different driver to win the championship and Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler took home the overall team title. Confetti at the finish line marked the end of an era. In January, Formula E unveiled its new Gen2 car for next season. The current cars have a maximum power of 200kW, limited to 180kW during races, and they top out at 225 kph (140 mph). This model has been around since the series started and requires a mid-race car change because the battery runs out. The Gen2 car will run faster and longer. No more swaps. Performance has basically been doubled in just four years without changing the battery's fundamental chemistry. "I don't know if you remember before Formula E started, there was this whole perception that lithium batteries were a little bit dangerous — they were prohibited on airplanes, they caught fire on mobile phones," Panasonic Jaguar Racing sporting manager Gary Ekerold said. "Since we've run Formula E ... absolutely fine. Batteries are proven to be safe." But they're still monitored. A dielectric — non-conductor — fluid in the battery keeps it cool while the car runs. There's also a battery management system that constantly records data, monitoring temperature and voltage. When the car is charging, dry-ice blowers — Super Chillers — connect to the car and prevent overheating. It takes less than an hour to recharge a drained battery. "It's going to start reaching a stage where the time it takes to fill up your gas — 4 minutes and 40 seconds on average — is going to be the time it takes to charge your car," Gill said. Teams are given identical batteries. The chassis, or bodies, of the cars are also the same. Where teams can get creative are places such as the electric motor, inverter, powertrain and gearbox. Manufacturers get involved here. Everyday car names occupy pit lane. Audi and Jaguar already have teams. Nissan and BMW will next season. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche are joining for season six. "This is like a playground for them," Mahindra Racing driver Feliz Rosenqvist said. "When you get to the competitive side, you can always find new ways that maybe you wouldn't do on a normal car. You push the software and hardware." The steering wheel, which has a programmable screen, is also fair game. Things can get technical when the car gets broken down into specific parts and technology is thrown into the mix. But the basics remain: Energy is how far. Power is how fast. "It's still a racing car," Panasonic Jaguar Racing driver Mitch Evans said. "It looks like a racing car. It drives like a racing car." It just doesn't sound like the normal racing car. The roar of a combustion engine is missing. "That's normally like a sensor for your driving — how quick you're going, how you hear the revs — and now you can only hear the wind," Rosenqvist said. "It's more like riding a bike. As you increase your speed, you just start hearing wind." To spectators, the whizzing equates to an amplified toy car, go-kart or scooter. All electric, of course. It's not that disruptive to the public. Electric cars are the way of the future. They're already racing on city streets. They go rain or shine — only stop for thunder or lightning. And they're much better for the environment. "Your whole life runs on a battery," Gill said. "The time is now.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

46,366 tambays nabbed in Metro Manila over past month

A total of 46,366 individuals were rounded up for violating local ordinances on smoking, drinking and urinating in public places; curfew and being half-naked on the streets in Metro Manila over the past month, an official said yesterday. Source link link: 46,366 tambays nabbed in Metro Manila over past month.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

46,366 tambays nabbed in Metro Manila over past month

A total of 46,366 individuals were rounded up for violating local ordinances on smoking, drinking and urinating in public places; curfew and being half-naked on the streets in Metro Manila over the past month, an official said yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

South Korea to probe military plan to quell Park protests

SEOUL, South Korea --- South Korea's president has ordered an investigation into a revelation that the military drew up a plan to mobilize troops if protests worsened over the fate of his impeached predecessor last year, officials said Tuesday. Military intervention in civilian affairs is an extremely sensitive issue in South Korea, which was ruled by army-backed dictatorships for decades before achieving democracy in the late 1980s. During the harsh rules, authorities occasionally proclaimed a martial law and other decrees that allowed them to station combat soldiers, tanks and armored vehicles on streets or at public places like schools to prevent any anti-government demonstrati...Keep on reading: South Korea to probe military plan to quell Park protests.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 10th, 2018

Tambays

POLICE are busy accosting loafers or tambays on the streets, especially at night. As a reminder, Iloilo City has an ordinance against drinking in public places, especially on the streets, with some exceptions, of course, like leisure areas (Smallville). But a naughty friend told me that the police need not go far because tambays abound […] The post Tambays appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018