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Documentary about anxiety taps Michael Phelps

em>By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press /em> NEW YORK (AP) — A new documentary about anxiety argues that everyone to some extent suffers from stress, nerves and social fear. And, to make their point, the filmmakers have enlisted as Exhibit A the most decorated Olympian in history. Michael Phelps appears in 'Angst' to share his story of being bullied and depressed, leading to severe anxiety. The swimmer, winner of 28 Olympic medals, would look in the mirror and not like what he saw. 'Once I opened up about that and things that I had kept inside of me for so many years, I then found that life was a lot easier. I got to the point where I understood that it's OK to not be OK,' he says in the film. 'Angst,' an IndieFlix film designed to be screened at schools and community centers, features candid interviews with children and young adults discussing their anxiety, along with advice from mental health experts and resources and tools. Phelps is like a muscular explanation mark for what the filmmakers wanted to show — that even world champions can feel low. 'I'm grateful because my mission with this film is to help make the world a better place and I believe he is so additive on that level,' said Scilla Andreen, CEO and co-founder of IndieFlix. 'If we can introduce prevention, self-care and well-being to our children — even in the pre-K and kindergarten years — they can have a completely different life.' Andreen hopes the film will reach more than 3 million people around the world from 25,000 community and school screenings. 'Angst' was filmed in the U.S. and United Kingdom and is appropriate for children starting at age 10. 'Anxiety is totally treatable,' she said. 'It can be a precursor to so many things that can then lead to addiction, homelessness, dropping out of school and a host of other mental health challenges.' Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health challenge in the U.S., impacting 54 percent of females and 46 percent of males, with age 7 being the median age of onset, according to the World Health Organization. The American College Health Association has found that undergraduates reporting 'overwhelming anxiety' jumped to 62 percent in 2016 from 50 percent in 2011. 'Talking about it is the most effective thing you can do and, of course, the last thing you want to do,' said Andreen. In addition to talking, writing about your feelings or connecting to music can help. 'Anything that helps you to take a break from the anxiety and move the energy to the front of the brain.' Andreen, whose distribution streaming service embraces projects that push for social change, was bullied as a child and learned something about herself while working on the film. 'Everyone has anxiety. And I learned in making the movie that I have social anxiety. I never even knew that. I just thought I was born less than everyone else and that was my lot in life. I would always have to work harder, try harder, never fit in,' she said. 'I don't feel so alone.' In addition to the documentary, IndieFlix is creating a web-based series on anxiety to dig deeper into the issue and has produced a virtual reality component that allows users to experience a panic attack firsthand. Andreen believes anxiety levels are so high in part because of the pace of modern life and the amount of time people spend with their electronic devices, which takes away from connecting in person and developing empathy. 'We need more face time with each other,' said Andreen, a former Emmy-nominated costume designer. 'We just stopped doing it. We're out of practice, that's all.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnOct 12th, 2017

‘House With a Clock in Its Walls’ ticks to No. 1 in theaters

NEW YORK (AP) --- The gothic family fantasy "The House With a Clock in Its Walls" exceeded expectations to debut with an estimated $26.9 million in ticket sales at the weekend box office, while audiences showed considerably less interest in Michael Moore's Donald Trump-themed documentary, "Fahrenheit 11/9", than his George W. Bush-era one. "The House With a Clock in Its Walls" was easily the biggest draw on a quiet weekend at North American movie theaters, where the other three new wide releases all disappointed or downright flopped. "Fahrenheit 11/9" opened with $3.1 million in 1,719 cinemas --- a huge debut for most documentaries but a fraction of the $23.9 million opening ge...Keep on reading: ‘House With a Clock in Its Walls’ ticks to No. 1 in theaters.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

Michael Moore’s new film a call to action for democracy

Filmmaker Michael Moore calls on Americans to take back their democracy in his new documentary "Fahrenheit 11/9" exploring Donald Trump's ascension to the most powerful job in the world. The title references November 9, 2016, the date that Trump's win in the presidential election was announced, heralding a seismic shift in US politics. It's also an unofficial sequel to his "Fahrenheit 9/11" that took aim at another Republican president, George W. Bush, and was the highest grossing documentary of all time. On the red carpet late Thursday for its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, Moore said: "Hope right now is the death of us, hope is passive, hope is wishfu...Keep on reading: Michael Moore’s new film a call to action for democracy.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Homeward-bound Schooling set for next phase at Asian Games

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The hardest lap for any swimmer is usually the one coming home. That's when they have to try their hardest, giving it everything they have to get to the finish. Singapore's Olympic gold medalist Joseph Schooling is about to discover what that means when he's not in the competition pool. After spending the last nine years in relative anonymity in the United States, the 23-year-old Schooling is getting ready for the second half of his sporting career back in southeast Asia, knowing he probably won't be able to walk down the street or go for dinner without being noticed. "It's everywhere but it shows that they support you and they're excited to see you, and so you can't complain," Schooling said. "You can never brush aside your fans. You've always got to reciprocate so I'm completely fine with it." Schooling is competing this week at the Asian Games in Indonesia, where he has entered in the 50- and 100-meter butterfly races, three relays and the 50 freestyle. He will bid to defend his title in the 100 butterfly on Wednesday. Despite leaving Singapore in his teens to chase his dream of winning an Olympic gold medal, the island-state has always been in Schooling's heart. But so too has Texas, where he has been studying at University and training under the watchful eye of Eddie Reese. Schooling will complete his economics degree later this year before returning to Singapore, but will take back two permanent reminders of his time in the U.S. that changed his life. One is the tattoo on his left shoulder of the University of Texas mascot, the Longhorn. The other, inked after he won Rio, is the Olympic rings on his right bicep. The Longhorns won the NCAA national title four years in a row while Schooling was on the team and he credits his time there for helping him win the ultimate prize when he beat American great Michael Phelps for the Olympic title in the 100 fly. "It's great, it's a different atmosphere, great teammates," Schooling said. "I feel like it's the perfect environment for high performance." Schooling wants to keep swimming through to the 2024 Olympics in Paris and, although he hasn't made a final decision on his training plans, he has spent the past few months practicing with Singapore's new high-performance unit and likes what he sees. Australia's Stephan Widmer, who helped Libby Lenton and Leisel Jones win Olympic titles, has been appointed performance director at the institute while Gary Tan is the national head coach and Sonya Porter, who has extensive experience coaching in the U.S., is the technical director. Schooling's biggest challenge could be how to deal with his celebrity status but after he held off Phelps on the biggest final lap of his life to date, he's confident he can manage. "It takes some getting used to but at the end of the day if you focus on what you're doing and you don't care about outside distractions it's ok," he said. "I like being in that position and I don't see it as a burden at all.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018

Phelps: Saving a life more important than a gold medal

    LOS ANGELES, Unites States – Olympic swimming great Michael Phelps has opened up again about his ongoing battle with depression, hoping he can help others who struggle with the disease. "I'd like to make a difference, I'd like to be able to save a life if I can," Phelps said Friday, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Phelps lauds ‘Superman’

LOS ANGELES, United States — Superstar Michael Phelps offered a Twitter shout-out to Clark Kent Apuada after the 10-year-old broke his 23-year-old meet record in the 100m butterfly at the Far West International Championship at the weekend. “Big congrats to #clarkkent for smashing that meet record!!! Keep it up dude!! #dreambig” Phelps, a 23-time Olympic […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

10-year-old Pinoy shatters Phelps swimming record

Young Filipino-American swimmer Clark Kent Apuada recently shattered Olympic legend Michael Phelps’ 23-year old record. Carrying the name of fictional superhero Superman, Apuada clocked in 1:0 Source link link: 10-year-old Pinoy shatters Phelps' swimming record.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

10-year-old Pinoy shatters Phelps swimming record

Young Filipino-American swimmer Clark Kent Apuada recently shattered Olympic legend Michael Phelps' 23-year old record. Carrying the name of fictional superhero Superman, Apuada clocked in 1:0.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

LOOK: Michael Phelps congratulates Pinoy Clark Kent

MANILA, Philippines – A new swimming phenom has been recognized by the most decorated Olympian Michael Phelps himself. Filipino-American Clark Kent Apuada earned Phelps' praise after the 10-year-old shattered his 23-year-old junior record in the 100m butterfly last Sunday, July 29.  "Big congrats to #clarkkent for smashing that meet ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

The 10-year-old Filipino ‘Superman’ who beat Michael Phelps’ record

Aptly-named ten-year old swimmer Clark Kent Apuada is making headlines everywhere in the sporting world after breaking a  record once held by the legendary Michael Phelps. ‘Superman’ The Filipino-born Apuada recently won at the 2018 Long Course Meters Far Western International Age Group Championships for the 100-meter butterfly, clocking in 1:09:38. to beat the Olympian’s record […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

Michael Phelps praises 10-year-old Fil-Am Clark Kent for breaking record

Olympic medalist Michael Phelps praised 10-year-old swimmer Clark Kent Apuada, a Filipino-American, for breaking his 1995 swim record. The retired competitive swimmer went on Twitter today, Aug. 2, to extend his congratulations and give the proverbial pat in the back for Apuada's achievement. Shortly after Phelps' tweet, CBS correspondent Jamie Yuccas replied that she showed Apuada, also nicknamed "Superman," the tweet. The overjoyed 10-year-old could only thank Phelps for being recognized and say "whoa!" Apuada broke Phelps' 1:10.48 record for the 100-meter butterfly of the Long Course Meters Far Western International Age Group Championships, which was set in 1995. ...Keep on reading: Michael Phelps praises 10-year-old Fil-Am Clark Kent for breaking record.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

Pinoy junior tankers smash long-standing records in U.S.

MANILA, Philippines – Filipino-Amercian swimmers Clark Kent Apuada and Nicole Oliva recently shone in separate tournaments, breaking long-standing records both in the US and the Philippines.  The 10-year-old Apuada, nicknamed "Superman," made headlines last July 29 after he shattered Michael Phelps' 23-year-old junior 100m butterfly record, clocking 1:09.38 in the Far Western ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

Fil-Am Clark Kent breaks Michael Phelps 23-year old record

At a very young age, Filipino-American Clark Kent Apuada is already living up to his name. Ten-year old Apuada broke a 23-year old record previously held by Michael Phelps when the former competed in the 10-and-under age group of the Far West International Championship in California. The aptly-nicknamed 'Superman', who swims for the Monterey County Aquatic Team, clocked in at 1:09:38 in the 100-meter freestyle, more than a second faster than the 1:10.48 set by the American sporting legend in 1995. The Filipino-American elementary school pupil went on to win six more events in the duration of the meet. Phelps eventually went on to win 28 Olympic medals, 23 of them gold in the course of five Olympic Games. It's never too early to dream as the 10-year old has already set his sights for the Olympic Games, hoping to be one of the best someday. Apuada started swimming at four but had just been into competitive swimming since he was six. "I love swimming because I have a lot of people supporting me and my coaches are always there for me and my parents are always there," Clark said in a story posted on CNN. Dia Rianda, Clark's coach, said in the same article: "This kid is unlike any other young man that I've ever coached. He's always stood out, he's just, he's kind of a savant of sorts." Cynthia Apuada, the boy's mother, said in a story posted on Huffington Post that she was drawn to the name Clark and that her husband's favorite superhero is Superman. That's how the young Apuada's name came to be. “We’re always just telling people his name is Clark,” Cynthia said. “But when they realize his full name, people just call him Superman.” Could we see the best Filipino-blooded swimmer since Teofilo Yldefonso, who revolutionized the sport in the 1920's?   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018

10-year-old Fil-Am Clark Kent breaks Michael Phelps’ swim record

A 10-year-old swimmer nicknamed "Superman" broke a record made by Michael Phelps set in 1995. Clark Kent Apuada, a Filipino-American, overcame the 1:10.48 record set by retired competitive swimmer Michael Phelps in 1995. The young swimmer competed in the 2018 Long Course Meters Far Western International Age Group Championships for the 100-meter butterfly on July 29. He clocked in at 1:09.38, according to a post by the Salinas Aquatic Center MCAT on Facebook. Apuada's time slashed off over a second from Phelps' record, which had gone unbroken even as the competitive swimmer went on to win numerous Olympic medals. Apart from breaking Phelps' record, the young swimmer also hel...Keep on reading: 10-year-old Fil-Am Clark Kent breaks Michael Phelps’ swim record.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018

WATCH: Scarlet Snow Belo learns how to dive

Fans of Scarlet Snow Belo know that the three-year-old is a jack-of-all-trades even at a very young age. Now, the social media darling learns another skill to add on her impressive record: diving into the water a la Michael Phelps. Scarlet Snow's official Instagram page on Friday, June 29, shared a video of her practicing her newfound skill. "Peoples, can you score my dive from 1 to 10 like in the Olympics please?" fans were asked. Arms up, feet wide open, the toddler excitedly executed the diving position. Her swimming instructor can be heard jokingly saying, "You are not a baby shark, you're a diving little girl," in the background. When she was given the "go" signal, the ...Keep on reading: WATCH: Scarlet Snow Belo learns how to dive.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

Michael Jordan s Chicago finale commemorated with limited-edition Bulls jersey

It was June 14, 1998 when Michael Jordan, whom many ascribe to as the Greatest of All Time, stuck a 15-foot dagger in the hearts of the Utah Jazz faithful, giving the Bulls an 87-86 victory in Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals, sealing his sixth championship. Twenty years later, MJ’s Chicago curtain call will be commemorated with a forthcoming 10-part ESPN Films and Netflix documentary series, “The Last Dance,” and a special-edition Michael Jordan Bulls jersey. The jersey, which releases May 31, comes in three versions: an Authentic away (as worn for the last shot) as well as Swingman versions of the Bulls’ home and away looks. Each jersey is equipped with NikeConnect technology, which will unlock access to select “The Last Dance” content prior to the series premiere in 2019. The Authentic will come in a soft touch box with a clear window and magnetic closure and will retail for $400 (roughly Php21,000). The two Swingman jerseys will sell for $120 (roughly Php 6,300). “The Last Dance” will tell the story of one of the greatest icons and most successful dynasties in sports history, Michael Jordan and the 90s Bulls, with footage from the team’s last championship run in the 1997-98 season and interviews with Jordan seen for the first time ever, along with other key figures from the Bulls’ championship teams and luminaries from basketball and beyond. The special-edition Bulls jersey will also celebrate Friends of the Children, a national non-profit that selects the most vulnerable children aged 4-6 from high-poverty schools and the foster care system in the United States and pairs them with a paid, professional mentor who stays with them from kindergarten through graduation......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 21st, 2018

WATCH: The New Teaser of Alexander McQueen’s Documentary

The life of another fashion designer is being turned into a documentary and we can't wait to see it. McQueen is going to be a "visual masterpiece" about the life of Alexander McQueen. It was directed by Ian Bonhte and produced by Peter Ettedgui. According to Nylon, the two "explored the brilliant life of the designer, who suffered from anxiety and depression, up until he took his own life in 2010." The documentary will include interviews with friends and family of the designer that will give an in-depth look on his personal life. McQueen is set to premiere on April 22 at the Tribeca Film Festival but until then, you can watch the 30-second teaser below and let us know what you...Keep on reading: WATCH: The New Teaser of Alexander McQueen’s Documentary.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 18th, 2018

Dear Kobe ... LeBron animated over Bryant scoring Oscar

By Tom Withers, Associated Press INDEPENDENCE, Ohio (AP) — LeBron James watched Kobe Bryant score big again. But he’s focused on a different shiny trophy than the one his former rival snagged Sunday night (MOnday, PHL time). James joined Magic Johnson, Shaquille O’Neal and other current and former NBA players to congratulate Bryant after the Los Angeles Lakers superstar won an Academy Award in the animated short film category. Holding his Oscar, Bryant later said, “I feel better than winning a championship, to be honest with you. I swear I do.” On Monday (Tuesday, PHL time), James said he watched Bryant’s film, “Dear Basketball,” which was based on a poem the five-time champion wrote in 2015 in advance of his retirement from playing, the night it debuted. “It was phenomenal,” James said. But while he and Bryant had a fierce on-court rivalry, James, who won acclaim for a supporting role in the comedy “Trainwreck” and owns a film production company, said he isn’t driven to match Bryant’s Hollywood haul. “Nah, it’s never been one of my goals,” he said of winning an Oscar. “But now that I’m in a movie and film and TV business and doing so many things, if at some point we can be nominated and win the Oscar, that would be something that I never thought that would happen for sure. We’ve got some things in the works, so we’ll see what happens.” James has served an executive producer for several TV series and his company is working on documentary about Muhammad Ali. He’s also planning a sequel to “Space Jam,” which starred Michael Jordan. During his acceptance speech, Bryant took a swipe at conservative commentator Laura Ingraham, who recently lectured James and Kevin Durant after they were critical of President Trump. “As basketball players we’re supposed to shut up and dribble,” Bryant said. “I’m glad we do a little but more than that.” Salute @kobebryant on that Oscar!! #WeAreMoreThanShutUpDribble #UJustContinueToSitBackAndWatch — LeBron James (@KingJames) March 5, 2018 James acknowledged Bryant’s line on Twitter, posting: #WeAreMoreThanShutUpDribble......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

With top-end videos, Quincy Jones opens ‘Netflix of jazz’

Calling it the "Netflix of jazz," legendary producer Quincy Jones is rolling out Qwest TV, a first global platform dedicated to on-demand jazz videos. The site launches Friday evening with some 400 titles available ranging from a previously unreleased documentary of late Swedish piano prodigy Esbjorn Svensson to concert footage from greats in jazz and related genres including blues master B.B. King, singer Bobby McFerrin and saxophonist Wayne Shorter. "I always wanted to make sure that people in the US and across the world could have access to high-quality content: both jazz and jazz-inspired," Quincy Jones, the producer behind mega-stars including Michael Jackson, to...Keep on reading: With top-end videos, Quincy Jones opens ‘Netflix of jazz’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

Preseason optimism fades to midseason anxiety at Everton

By Steve Douglas, Associated Press There was a preseason buoyancy surrounding Everton that hadn't been felt for years at this venerable English club. A rich financier was injecting lots of money to rebuild the squad and fund a move to a new $385 million stadium. Wayne Rooney made a sentimental return to his boyhood team. Ronald Koeman, a globally respected manager, pledged his loyalty after links with a vacancy at Barcelona. There was talk of a new-look and expensively assembled Everton side breaking the dominance of the Premier League's "Big 6," of bringing silverware to Goodison Park for the first time since 1995. Three months later, summer optimism had been replaced by midseason anxiety. Everton is drifting closer and closer to the relegation zone, is out of European competition already, has been without a manager for five weeks following the firing of Koeman, and is seemingly a club searching for an identity. Meanwhile, Rooney, the supposed savior, is spending much of his time on the substitutes' bench. Everton hosts West Ham in the league on Wednesday and could find itself in the bottom three with another loss. That the blow could be inflicted by a side managed by David Moyes, Everton's most successful manager of the past 20 years, would make it even more painful. Here's a look at the issues dogging Everton, an ever-present in England's top flight since 1954: ___ MANAGERIAL VACANCY Koeman was sacked on Oct. 23, two months into his second season in charge. Everton was in the relegation zone and was on a winless run of five matches at the time. The Dutchman still hasn't been replaced five weeks later, with former Everton player David Unsworth — the coach of the club's under-23 side — in temporary charge but increasingly looking out of his depth. The last two matches, a 5-1 home loss to Atalanta in the Europa League and a 4-1 loss at Southampton in the league, have clearly hurt Unsworth, a loyal and passionate Evertonian. Everton has failed in a bid to bring in Watford manager Marco Silva, one of the most highly rated young managers in Europe and someone who preaches an entertaining, attacking style of football. Now, sights are reportedly set on Sam Allardyce, a pragmatic 63-year-old coach who has a reputation as a so-called "firefighter" for getting teams out of relegation danger. It highlights Everton's lack of joined-up thinking, meaning fans are starting to have misgivings about those in charge of the club. ___ BOARDROOM CLASH One is a hard-nosed businessman, new to Everton. The other is a theater impresario and an old romantic when it comes to football, with links to Everton for nearly two decades. Farhad Moshiri and Bill Kenwright are proving uncomfortable boardroom partners, seemingly not on the same page when it comes to the identity of Koeman's replacement. Moshiri sold his stake in Arsenal to become the majority shareholder in Everton in early 2016 and was the driving force behind a summer spending spree of about $200 million on new players. He reportedly wanted Silva and prefers a big-name European coach. Kenwright, the chairman and former owner, reportedly favors a coach — preferably British — who knows the Premier League inside out. Hence, the potential move for Allardyce and earlier links with Burnley manager Sean Dyche. Talks are ongoing with "a few managers," Unsworth said on Tuesday. Therefore, the search, and the wait, goes on. It is resulting in a vacuum high up in the club that is harming the team on the field. ___ STRUGGLING TEAM Everton has won just three of its 13 league games and sits in 16th place in the 20-team league. The game against West Ham, which occupies the final relegation spot and is in need of a lift itself, is huge in the current context. The team was eliminated from the English League Cup in the last 16. The Europa League campaign was over after four group games and has been an utter shambles, with the only point after five fixtures so far coming at home to Cypriot team Apollon Limassol. Everton has conceded more goals than any other team in the Premier League (28 in 13 games) while Oumar Niasse, who started the season as an outcast and without even his own locker, is proving an unlikely source of goals at the other end, with five in seven league games before getting a two-match retrospective ban for diving. Aside from Niasse, it's difficult to know where the goals are going to come from. ___ POOR RECRUITMENT In hindsight, Everton got much of its preseason recruitment wrong. In signing Gylfi Sigurdsson and Davy Klaassen for a combined 70 million pounds and also luring back Wayne Rooney, Everton strangely brought in three players who best operate in the same position — behind the striker — and all lack pace. Koeman staked much on Rooney bringing experience and title-winning knowhow, but he has struggled to make an impact after a decent start to the season and been on the bench for the last two league games. The biggest problem of all was not adequately replacing Romelu Lukaku, last season's top scorer who left for Manchester United for 75 million pounds ($97 million). Another 55 million pounds was spent on goalkeeper Jordan Pickford and defender Michael Keane, yet Everton's defense is a mess. Spanish forward Sandro Ramirez and Croatian winger Nikola Vlasic are already fringe players whose game time has usually been confined to the Europa League. Despite the vast summer outlay, Everton might need to be busy in the transfer market again. "We need proven recruitment in January," Unsworth said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017