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Dela Rosa s 2018 call to cops: Let s bring back PNP s good image

MANILA, Philippines – For 2018, Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa wishes nothing more than a better police force. So when it was time for his last new year's call before he retires, he called on cops to always strive to be better and to avoid ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerJan 13th, 2018

Renaldo Balkman’s redemption in the Philippines begins with a win

Renaldo Balkman was welcomed with open arms by Filipinos as he helped Alab Pilipinas score their very first winning streak in the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League. The Puerto Rican posted a 17-point, 11-rebound double-double in his debut for the Philippine side on Wednesday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. Joining forces with fellow new reinforcement Justin Brownlee, they led their new team to a convincing victory versus Westports Malaysia. For each and every cheer he received, Balkman was nothing but appreciative. “It felt great. Today was a great day to be back in the Philippines,” he said. The win and the warm welcome were more than enough to overcome the grueling day he just had – taking a long flight to Manila where he arrived in the morning, jetlagged and sleepless. “It felt good. I didn’t expect it, but the past is the past,” he said. The six-foot-eight forward was referring to the incident he figured in back in 2013 as a reinforcement for Petron in the PBA. In the dying seconds of the Blaze Boosters’ game against Alaska on March 8, he was livid following what he felt was a non-call by the referees. He wound up shoving game officials, his coaches, and his teammates Ronald Tubid and Arwind Santos. The incident ended with what is the most infamous image he has in the minds of Filipinos – him putting his two hands around the neck of Santos. Not long after the incident, then-PBA commissioner Chito Salud banned Balkman for life and fined him PhP 250, 000. Just like he has done in recent interviews, however, the now 33-year-old said he has moved forward from the incident. “I did lots of things since then and tonight, it wasn’t on my mind, it wasn’t on my head. I just went out there to play basketball,” he shared. All that matters for Balkman now is to help Alab Pilipinas bring back the title to Manila. As he put it, “I’m on a mission to win a championship here,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Daquis returns to old form, Cignal sees bright things ahead

Coming into the 2018 Philippine Superliga Invitational Conference, head coach Edgar Barroga challenged seasoned hitter Rachel Anne Daquis to turn back the hands of time and show that she can still pull the trigger. The open spiker heeded the call and worked doubly hard to bring back the same form that once made Daquis the brightest volleyball star in the country. “Chinallenge ko kasi si Rachel kasi kung titignan niyo medyo pababa na ‘yung laro niya,” Barroga said. “Sabi ko (sa kanya), Chel, sumunod ka lang sa mga gagawin ko, trust ka lang marami akong ipapagawa sayo, icha-challenge ulit kita.” Daquis averaged 15.25 points in the preliminary round and led Cignal to an unbeaten run into the semifinals. A misstep in the knockout Final Four may have spelled doom for the HD Spikers’ back-to-back title journey but it didn’t dampen the fact that Daquis performed well for Cignal.   “Personally syempre nagpakundisyon ako, so talagang ‘yung motivation ko na talagang gustung-gusto ko silang… unang-una syempre mapa-champion. Pero syempre step-by-step ‘yun,” said Daquis, who scored 18 points in Cignal’s 25-15, 22-25, 25-20, 25-18, win over Smart-Army in the battle for third as the HD Spikers salvaged a podium finish. “Patient ako sa process na yun, so ito ibinigay ni Lord ‘yung third place, masayang-masaya kami kasi from seventh nu’ng first time kami hinawakan ni coach naging third,” said Daquis, who gave FEU its last UAAP crown back in 2008 and collected numerous titles in the commercial leagues including five in the PSL. “So happy ako and sobrang cooperative ng teammates ko and ng coaches so yun talaga yung nagdala.” Barroga praised the dedication of Daquis, who, despite her age of 30 and numerous achievements, kept her feet on the ground and was willing to listen and train under his guidance.   “Ayun marami siyang mga ginagawa tapos kung mapapansin niyo puro mabibilis ‘yung play niya tapos tinuturuan ko pa rin siyang mag-dive, mag-roll sa ensayo so sobrang na-challenge siya although may konti siyang nararamdaman,” said Barroga. “Very satisfied (sa performance ni Rachel) lalong lalo na itong (last game),” he added. “Ine-esxpect ko na lalabas ang laro nilang lahat kasi ito na ‘yung pinakahuling laro namin for this season.” Daquis was thankful for the patience and guidance of Barroga. “For coach Edgar kasi, nilabas nya lahat eh. Yung talent mo, lahat ng skills na pwede mo palang gawin. Yung mga nagagawa mo nung college, nagagawa mo ulit ngayon,” she said. “So grabe yung tiwala nya. Ang sarap mag-ensayo kasi magugulat ka, ibabalik nya yung ganitong laro mo, ibabalik nya yung ganitong mga spikes. So sobrang happy ako and thankful kay coach Edgar.” With Daquis back into her dangerous form, Cignal is now looking at a good run come All-Filipino Conference. “Next siguro in preparation para sa All-Filipino, we’ll try to recruit more competitive (players) at saka para makasabay tayo doon sa malalakas na teams,” said Barroga.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 26th, 2018

La Salle stays spotless in Filoil Preseason after dropping UE

De La Salle University is yet to falter in the 2018 Filoil Flying V Preseason. Alvin Pasaol and University of the East did their best, but the Green Archers just leaned on total team effort to fend them off for a 71-62 decision on Friday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. Returning player Mark Dyke topped the scoring column for the Taft-based team with 18 points on top of nine rebounds and flanking him were twin towers Taane Samuel and Justine Baltazar who had 12 and 11 markers, respectively. The Red Warriors were still in the game to start the final frame only to see Samuel and Baltazar impose their will inside to fuel La Salle to what was ultimately their fifth win in as many games in the tournament. Pasaol paced UE with 20 points. They put up another good fight which eventually ended as their second straight loss in four starts. Meanwhile, Colegio de San Juan de Letran sent a statement to NCAA rival Jose Rizal University with a 23-point beatdown, 94-71. Bong Quinto was unstoppable and finished with 17 points while JP Calvo masterfully orchestrated the attack with 18 markers of his own to go along with seven assists, five rebounds, and two steals to help the Knights improve to 3-2. On the other hand, the Heavy Bombers remained winless through six games despite the best efforts of Darius Estrella who had 17 points to his name. In other results, Adamson University bounced right back into the winners’ circle via a 67-61 victory versus Arellano University while Far Eastern University is still streaking after charging through University of Sto. Tomas, 86-82. BOX SCORES FIRST GAME LETRAN 94- Calvo 18, Quinto 17, Balanza 11, Batiller 10, Ambohot 9, Taladua 8, Fajarito 6, Agbong 5, Balagasay 4, Celis 4, Mandreza 2, Yu 0, Galvelo 0, Pambid 0. JRU 71- Estrella 17, Mendoza 11, Bordon 10, Dela Rosa 8, Esguerra 6, Padua 5, David 4, Ramos 4, Mallari 2, Steinl 2, Silvarez 2, Dela Virgen 0, De Guzman 0. QUARTER SCORES: 20-9; 49-32; 71-61, 94-71 SECOND GAME ADAMSON 67 – Sarr 15, J Espeleta 12, Ahanmisi 11, Lastimosa 9, Mojica 7, Manganti 4, Orquez 4, Zaldivar 2, V Magbuhos 2, Colonia 1, W Magbuhos 0, Camacho 0, Maata 0, Bernardo 0. ARELLANO 61 – de la Torre 16, Concepcion 11, de la Cruz 8, Alcoriza 5, Sera Josef 5, Abdurasad 4, Ongolo Ongolo 2, Meca 2, Abanes 2, Camacho 2, Santos 2, Bayla 1, Dumagan 1, Filart 0, Labarda 0, Chavez 0, Cahigas 0, Alban 0, Codinera 0. QUARTER SCORES: 19-15, 34-28, 50-38, 67-61. THIRD GAME LA SALLE 71 – Dyke 18, Samuel 12, Baltazar 11, Caracut 9, Santillan 6, Melecio 5, Corteza 4, Go 2, Capacio 2, Lim 2, Tolentino 0, Pastor 0, Manaytay 0. UE 62 – Pasaol 20, Varilla 8, Ph Manalang 8, Bartolome 8, Acuno 4, Maloles 3, Lacap 3, Gagate 2, Strait 2, Antiporda 2, Gallardo 2, Conner 0, Dimayuga 0, Cullar 0, Sobrevega 0. QUARTER SCORES: 16-12, 30-30, 52-46, 71-62. FOURTH GAME FEU 86 – Nunag 16, Escoto 15, Comboy 8, Stockton 7, Inigo 6, Ramirez 6, Gonzales 6, Orizu 6, Ebona 4, Cani 4, Tolentino 4, Bayquin 2, Parker 2, Tempra 0, Alas 0, Casino 0, Bienes 0, Jopia 0. UST 82 – Huang 23, Cansino 20, Zamora 16, Lee 8, Marcos 6, Lorenzana 4, Cosejo 2, Agustin 2, Asuncion 1. QUARTER SCORES: 30-18, 49-38, 71-60, 86-82. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 25th, 2018

Draw of another title lights postseason path of Warriors

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst One of the Golden State Warriors’ people, walking out of Smoothie King Center Sunday (Monday, PHL time), summarized the team’s season so far in detailing Kevin Durant’s 38-point performance against the Pelicans in Game 4 of the Western Conference semifinals. “Sometimes, people forget,” he said, a wry smile on his face -- and, yes, they do. With all that has gone on around the league this season, the Warriors’ storyline hasn’t been quite as eyeballed nationally this season compared with previous years. (Not that they should care. It’s just an observation.) The Cleveland Cavaliers blew things up last summer and reformed in the fall, blew it up again in the winter and reformed again in the spring. The Boston Celtics are displaying amazing resilience through seemingly devastating injuries to put themselves on the brink of another conference finals. The Philadelphia 76ers have their Fun Bunch. There was Paul George’s trade to Oklahoma City (and all that entailed, now and later) and the Toronto Raptors’ dramatic and successful changes throughout the year. And, at the forefront, there was the Houston Rockets’ rise as a legit and serious challenger to the Warriors in the Western Conference. During the regular season, the Warriors’ energy and productivity dropped off ever so slightly, like the planet killer in “The Doomsday Machine,” one of the all-time best original “Star Trek” episodes, after the doomed Commodore Decker drove a Shuttlecraft right down its throat. (Of course, Captain Kirk figured out to destroy it. Dude, come on. This is James Tiberius Kirk we’re talking about.) And at the end of the regular season, they were hit with a series of body shot injuries: Stephen Curry’s MCL strain, Durant’s ribs, Klay Thompson’s thumb injury, Draymond Green’s hip, and on and on. Those all sapped their continuity and made them look mortal down the stretch of the 2017-18 season, and the Warriors went 7-10 as the season waned. But, after dispatching the Kawhi Leonard-less Spurs in five games in the first round, and taking a 3-1 lead on the Pelicans now, they’re again on the precipice of the Western Conference finals. A date with Houston is looming and a chance at a third title in four seasons is still on their racket. “I think as the playoffs go on, every series requires a different intensity level,” Green said last week. “I think we met that standard that it takes to win playoff games at the level we’re at right now, which is the second round. It’s not our first rodeo. We’ve been here a lot of times and we know what it takes.” Steve Kerr rolled the “Hamptons Five” lineup out Sunday (Monday, PHL time), the Lineup Formally Known as Death -- Curry, Thompson, Andre Iguodala, Green and Durant. It’s been their trump card for almost two years, the lineup that can’t be solved by the opposition, even as it’s chipped away at most of Golden State’s other conventional units. Durant went for 38, and the Warriors rolled to a 118-92 win and a 3-1 series lead. They didn’t use it much this season -- that quintet only played 127 minutes together this season, after logging 224 minutes last season -- because of all the injuries, because they tried to limit their biggest players’ minutes and because using Iguodala as a starter thins out Golden State’s bench. The Warriors’ most frequently used five-man unit this season featured Zaza Pachulia at center; among five-man units leaguewide that played 200 minutes or more together this season, per NBA.com/Stats, that quintet was third in the league in Offensive Rating, at 118.6. But Pachulia hasn’t played a minute in the playoffs, and if the Rockets are the Warriors’ next opponent, he may not play much then, either, against Clint Capela. Kerr often points out that the Warriors have six centers on the current roster, and most of them have gotten at least a little run at various points. But after JaVale McGee was ineffective in Game 3 against New Orleans Friday (Saturday, PHL time), Kerr pulled his trump card. It’s still a game-changer, and when a season comes down to a best-of-seven series, one game can be the difference. “We all bring the best of each other,” Curry said of the Hamptons unit. “We increase the pace of the game, but the versatility [is] at the defensive end -- Andre, Draymond, KD shoring up the paint, switching a lot of the screens and the action from the offense and Klay doing what he does on the perimeter. I think the biggest thing offensively is that we’re all playmakers, try to look for the best shot, stay within ourselves and just make the right play.” Going back to the old playlist may give the Warriors comfort in what has been another drama-filled season, with the contretemps about being disinvited from the White House by President Trump in September getting things off to a rollicking start. But the end of the season was what raised eyebrows around the league. Curry’s absence down the stretch combined with a teamwide ennui -- “I really don’t like talking about it,” Thompson said -- that gave potential playoff opponents hope they might be able to catch Golden State napping. The Warriors’ boredom showed up most at the defensive end. After being in the top seven in both unadjusted and adjusted Defensive Rating in each of the last four seasons -- including first in the league in both categories in the first championship season of 2014-15 -- Golden State fell to 11th and 12th, respectively, in the regular season. They came out of the All-Star break focused -- they were fifth in the league in Defensive Rating on March 1. But all the injuries blunted their momentum, and the scariest of all -- a serious injury to second-year guard Patrick McCaw in Sacramento March 31 (April 1, PHL time) -- shook the team more than people on the outside realized. “Throughout that time, we had spurts,” Durant said. “We played a great OKC team. We went in there and won. Then we lost to Indiana by 20, and then it’s like, when you’re riding just on emotion a lot, you tend to go up and down. It’s like a roller coaster. I think that’s what it was. We had those spurts where we played well and played a focused game, but then Patty goes out, boom, and there was just so much that went on with that. Then Steph goes out with a freak injury. So much went on with that. I think we were just so up and down emotionally it kind of blinded us from our goal, which was to be good every single night as basketball players.” McCaw’s injury -- a bone bruise suffered when he fell after a dunk attempt against the Kings, which required him to be carried off the court in Sacramento on a stretcher -- hit everyone hard. “When Pat got injured, I think that took a little bit out of us,” Durant said. “It took a little bit out of Steve as well. You could just feel it, when Steph went out, then I went out, then Draymond, then Klay. Our emotions were so up and down. When your emotions are, you have too many emotions in the game of basketball, it can kind of blind you from what you really have to do. This is a technical game. So when you put too many emotions into it, it kind of took us away from what we wanted to do.” McCaw, who played in 57 games this season, was not only a part of Kerr’s rotation. He is also a well-liked person who was getting better on the floor. He was re-evaluated last week and will be checked out again in a month. Though he’s been traveling with the team during the playoffs, his season is almost certainly over. And as his injury came during the Warriors’ many injuries down the stretch, its chilling effect was multiplied. “It definitely got to everybody,” Green said. “Kind of the uncertainty of not knowing what’s going on with him. The rotations. Everybody’s like, ahh, kind of tiptoeing around, trying to make sure you get to the playoffs healthy. A lot of that makes a difference. I mean, that’s our brother. To see him down like that, not be able to walk off the court under his own power, him not being around us for two or three weeks, it was kind of like the unknown. It sucked. And I think it definitely had an effect on everything.” But Durant doesn’t like the metaphor of the proverbial switch being turned on at playoff time explaining the team’s improvement the last couple of weeks. “I don’t like when you call it a switch,” he said. “Because guys come in and get extra work in every single day. They work on their bodies every day, they get treatment. You come in here any time, you see guys in here working on their games. I think when you say ‘a switch turned on,’ if guys went cold turkey on everything as professionals during the season, and just tried to pick it up in the playoffs, I think that’s turning on a switch. Mentally, focus-wise, game plan-wise, I think you can turn on a switch, because you can lock in on an opponent, you know their tendencies, you can just focus in on one group of players instead of one day it’s San Antonio, the next day it’s Phoenix, next day it’s Sacramento. You’re going so up and down. If that makes sense. “So I think everybody’s putting in that work individually all year, and as a team, you know, stuff has to come together. We have to focus in on what we need to do, game plan wise, tendency wise, just try to take away things. I think that’s where you kind of turn it up just a bit.” Golden State has performed in fits and starts in the first two rounds. The Spurs didn’t have enough firepower to be a serious threat, but they played hard and were increasingly effectively on defense as the series went on. The Warriors didn’t really have an answer for LaMarcus Aldridge after Game 1. New Orleans had, until Sunday (Monday, PHL time), been more and more successful at making the Warriors shoot contested shots. That certainly gibes with Curry’s return after five weeks. He’s healthy, but rusty. After his adrenaline-filled return last Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) in Game 2 against the Pelicans, he made just 14-of-33 from the floor in the two games in New Orleans. There was talk afterward about breakthroughs for Curry cardiovascularly. The next few games will tell whether Curry is truly recovered and ready to be two-time Kia MVP Steph … or will he just be on the floor (as he was for long and important stretches in the 2016 playoffs after returning from a Grade 1 knee sprain). The Warriors still made The Finals, but Curry wasn’t Curry against Cleveland, and everyone, starting and ending with LeBron James, knew it. No one in NBA history has changed the geometry of basketball more than Curry, and when he’s on the floor, the ball starts flying around. “Our formula is simple: if we out-pass people, we win,” Warriors forward David West said. “Ball movement. With guys going in and out of the lineup, it causes moments where guys try to carry the load, maybe try to shoulder the load individually. But the strength of the group is the group.” But the Warriors can still throw so many different things and people at you. Iguodala shot a career-worst 28.2 percent on three-pointers in the regular season. He’s at 39.3 percent in the 2018 playoffs. Does anyone doubt he was biding his time until the postseason? No one wearing an NBA uniform is in better shape than the 34-year-old Iguodala, no one is smarter about the game or matchups, and no one is a prouder, fiercer competitor. The 2015 Finals MVP brings his bag of intangibles with him on the road even more than at home, as he did Sunday. In that game, he was making life miserable for the Pelicans’ Nikola Mirotic, creating deflections, making the right reads and impacting the game despite scoring just six points. Kerr likened him to Scottie Pippen after Game 4, but Iggy wasn’t buying it -- “Steve just does that to make sure I don’t get mad ‘cause I don’t shots,” Iguodala quipped. He may be right. But Iguodala and Green have a mind meld defensively that’s at the heart of the Hamptons’ effectiveness. “Andre and I, we’re usually on the same page,” Green said. “Two guys who really think the game, especially on that side of the ball. Sometimes we can talk things out and it works perfect and not say a word, and know what each other’s going to do. It definitely helps our team out defensively kind of having two coaches out there on the floor on that side of the ball.” Whether it’s switching to guard each other’s man, running at an open shooter to close before the ball gets there with the other man rotating, they know what the other guy is going to do. And that second or so the Warriors save defensively keeps them from being broken down. “How fast can you make that decision?,” Green says. “How demonstrative are you going to be about that decision? Are you going to second guess that decision? That’s usually when it doesn’t work; if you’re going to go, just go. That’s kind of the motto that Andre and I go by. If you’re going to go, just go; everybody else fall in line and rotate, and we’ll work it out from there.” And while Green and Rajon Rondo have been exchanging pleasantries throughout this series, Green didn’t pick up his first postseason technical foul until Sunday (Monday, PHL time). He’s been under control, coming up to the edge without going over. Someone without access to the internet asked Kerr if he’d ever played with anyone who instigated or tried to get under the skin of opponents. It’s a testament to Kerr’s comic timing that he actually did wait a beat before answering. “I did play with Dennis Rodman,” he said. Never be fooled by Kerr’s overall pleasant disposition and quick-with-a-quip acuity, though. He is a fierce competitor that wants to win big, the same as his current point guard, who is similarly underrated on the competition scale. Kerr has seven rings as a player and coach, and it’s not a coincidence he’s frequently been around teams that got it done in June. But the Warriors are playing for even bigger stakes than just winning the 2018 title. Legacies are created this time of year. A third title in four seasons, with four straight Finals appearances, would put Golden State in very rarified air in the modern game. San Antonio won three titles from 2002-07. But the Spurs, famously, never have won back-to-back titles. The Kobe Bryant-Shaquille O’Neal-led Lakers, which won three straight from 2000-02, are the closest modern-day team to pulling off what the Warriors are trying to accomplish. Before then, you’re talking about the Michael Jordan-led Chicago Bulls, with six titles in eight seasons -- the two non-title seasons coinciding with Jordan’s sojourn to the minor leagues of baseball. Moreover, the Warriors are the hub around which the modern NBA now spins. And that is an even bigger legacy. Almost everyone (hi, Thibs!) tries to play the way Golden State does now -- the quick hitters, ball movement, pace. Teams do it in different ways. The 76ers look very different than the Warriors, with Joel Embiid their centerpiece of operations, and with 6'10" Ben Simmons taking up so much space with the ball in the halfcourt. The Rockets look different still as there’s not a ton of ball movement. There’s just an unending series of screen and rolls with Chris Paul and James Harden with the rock, looking for the inevitable open man in the corner or way, way behind the three-point line. A lot of things have happened the last 15 years to lead us where we are now. The league changed almost all the rules regarding zone defense, and got rid of almost all defensive contact on the perimeter. Rockets GM Daryl Morey and others led the burgeoning analytics movement, which championed shooting more and more three-pointers as a primary means of scoring, not as a novelty. Mike D’Antoni’s Phoenix Suns went with Amar’e Stoudemire at center, surrounding him with four smalls that could all shoot it from deep, and scoring came out of its coma leaguewide. Kerr and Pelicans Coach Alvin Gentry have always been quick to credit D’Antoni’s influence on the modern game, starting in Phoenix and working through his current team in Houston. “He’s the guy that just eliminated the center position -- let’s just go small and fast and shoot more threes,” Kerr said of D’Antoni. “I was inspired by Mike, but I was also inspired by Pop (the Spurs’ Gregg Popovich) and Phil Jackson in terms of basic ball movement, screening. But pace is the name of the game these days, and people go about it in different ways. Ironically, Mike’s team (in Houston) is the slowest team in the league now. I didn’t see that coming.” But no one has put all of it together -- pace, small ball, shooting and defense -- like the Warriors have the last four seasons. The Rockets are the closest thing we’ve seen to Golden State, and they’re hungry, and they’re coming. And the Warriors and Rockets are just a win apiece away from seeing the clash of the Western Conference titans. They are in the middle of it, so they can’t stop and think about what it all means. We get that. But everyone wants to put a marker out there that’s hard to catch. LeBron is chasing a ghost. The Warriors have already made their mark on the game. They’re almost in position to do more. History is forever. “It’s important, because it’s what’s right in front of us,” Curry said Sunday. “We don’t think about the historical context of anything. For us, we have an amazing group of guys, amazing coaches sitting behind us. We’re appreciating the moment. That’s really all it is. You have tunnel vision for Game 5 at home, then a new series, hopefully (after that). The historic context doesn’t really seep into the locker room when it comes to what that means. It’s just about this year.” Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 8th, 2018

Kiefer scores 20 as Road Warriors beat Magnolia to tie series

It looks like were going to have a long series after all. NLEX has tied the 2018 PBA Philippine Cup semifinals against Magnolia, scoring a masterful 91-79 victory Friday at the MOA Arena to bounce back following back-to-back defeats. This best-of-7 affair will now reach reach at least a Game 6 as the Road Warriors have evened the count at two games each. "After back-to-back wins by Magnolia, we felt that this was a big game for us, do-or-die na nga," head coach Yeng Guiao said. "A 1-3 series deficit would have been a foregone conclusion, mas lalo na pag Magnolia kalaban mo. We had that sense of urgency tonight, paminsan-minsan naman kami ang swertehin. There's a bit of luck for us kasi our shots went in just like how their shots went in nung Game 3," he added. NLEX unleashed a 19-0 run bridging the second and third quarters to take a 55-39 lead and never looked back. The Hotshots were able to cut it down to seven later in the third but Kiefer Ravena took over for the Road Warriors in the fourth, scoring 11 points in the final period, including seven straight, to ice the victory. Ravena finished with a game-high 20 points on top of five assists while JR Quinahan added 14. Kevin Alas was good for 13 points, six rebounds, and five assists. As for Hotshots, Ian Sangalang had another double-double of 15 points and 14 rebounds but it wasn;t enough for Magnola to recover from its terrible start to the second half. Game 5 will be on Sunday at the Ynares Center in Antipolo. The Scores: NLEX 91 — Ravena 20, Quiñahan 14, Alas 13, Fonacier 10, Baguio 9, Soyud 9, Rios 5, Tiongson 5, Mallari 4, Al-Hussaini 2, Miranda 0, Taulava 0. MAGNOLIA 79 — Sangalang 15, Barroca 11, Lee 11, Jalalon 10, Dela Rosa 9, Ramos 9, Simon 6, Reavis 4, Gamalinda 2, Pascual 2, Brondial 0, Herndon 0, Melton 0, Mendoza 0. Quarters: 25-20, 41-39, 69-59, 91-79.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 16th, 2018

Storylines abound after 2018 NBA All-Star draft

NBA.com staff report There is an alternate universe in which LeBron James and Kyrie Irving are once again teammates, where the Warriors' star quartet is divided, and where players who very recently exchanged barbs must now share locker rooms. Welcome to the world of the 2018 NBA All-Star Game, which sports a very different twist after Thursday's (Friday, PHL time) inaugural draft in which team captains James and Stephen Curry selected their teammates. Here is what we know: James had the first pick, Curry the second, and so on, back and forth until the rosters were set. We do not know in what order the players were picked despite the valiant efforts of TNT's Ernie Johnson. The dust has settled and the rosters are set, with the line between East and West officially dissolved. The focus is squarely on players rather than conference. Here's a look at the most intriguing takeaways after Thursday's (Friday, PHL time) results: Hello Old Friend The offseason parting between LeBron James and Kyrie Irving was dramatically awkward, with the latter leaving the former in order to show his athletic independence. Irving has since proved capable of leading the Celtics to contender status despite the opening-night loss of fellow All-Star swingman Gordon Hayward. James, meanwhile, has been forced to do much of the heavy lifting while the rest of his teammates have either plateaued (Kevin Love), dropped off (J.R. Smith, Tristan Thompson) or been unavailable (Derrick Rose, Isaiah Thomas). The Cavs have suffered as a result, posting one of the worst records in the league since the calendar flipped to 2018. Could it be that James is hoping to recapture some of his old magic by temporarily reuniting with Irving? Or does he just miss/like the guy despite their on-court differences? "To be able to team up back with Kyrie is always special, along with Kevin Love," James said during a post-drat interview with TNT. "Just for us to have another weekend to bring some of the memories we had when we were all together. Kyrie was available on the draft board. He's one of the best point guards we have in our league. So, it was an easy choice for me." Other reunions are scattered among Team LeBron's roster. Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant will enjoy an encore of their much publicized All-Star get-together last season. The Thunder guard will also play with his old college teammate, Kevin Love, for the first time since they both represented the Western Conference in the 2012 midseason classic.   Bench Mob. #TeamLebron #NBAAllStar A post shared by @ kevinlove on Jan 25, 2018 at 4:23pm PST Don't forget, too, that Pacers guard Victor Oladipo is making his All-Star debut alongside Westbrook, the man many now think held back the former No. 2 overall pick in Oklahoma City. After putting up his worst numbers since his rookie year while playing alongside Westbrook, Oladipo is enjoying a career year while guiding the upstart Pacers to the middle of the playoff pack. I Never Can Say Goodbye Some teammates are just meant to stay together. Curry and James certainly struggled to separate several dynamic duos, including those from the Timberwolves (Butler/Towns), Pelicans (Davis/Cousins), Wizards (Beal/Wall) and Raptors (Lowry/DeRozan). The NBA teammates not sticking together are those from Golden State and Boston. James managed to chip away at the Warriors' dominant quartet, selecting Kevin Durant for his squad before Curry made sure to keep Klay Thompson and Draymond Green on his own team. Curry also selected Al Horford, presumably at some point after James took Irving. What Have You Done For Me Lately? Most All-Stars already come with a bag full of accomplishments under their belts, and this year is no exception. How they are distributed, however, is interesting to note. Everyone who made the team this year and has won an All-Star Most Valuable Player award in the past is on Team LeBron. Good luck guessing which one will make a push for a repeat at that honor (assuming someone new doesn't beat them to the punch). Meanwhile, the majority of most recent Olympic gold medalists resides on Team Stephen: Jimmy Butler, DeMar DeRozan, Draymond Green, Kyle Lowry and Klay Thompson. Team LeBron sports three Olympians from that year: Cousins, Durant and Irving. One skill that surely matters on All-Star weekend is simply putting the ball in the bucket. And wouldn't you know it, Team Stephen sports the top three scorers in the league in Harden and Giannis Antetokounmpo. Of course, Team LeBron carries the next four names from that scoring leaders list. It's Too Late to Apologize Some words you can't take back, and it would be difficult to see Russell Westbrook or Damian Lillard doing so after recent events. Oklahoma City's star guard took exception to teammate Paul George not being voted in as an All-Star, proceeding to call out the Warriors for having four players so honored. Then he targeted another player, and though he didn't use names, it seemed pretty clear that he was talking about  Lillard when he referred to "guys complaining about being snubbed so they can get in." Lillard has been extremely vocal on social media about not making the All-Star teams the last two years despite both those seasons marking career years. That was after making the All-Star team in 2014 and 2015. The Blazers guard seemed to pick up on the hint, and he responded directly to his Western Conference counterpart. "I respect Russ a lot, so it was kind of disappointing to see him say that," Lillard said prior to Wednesday's game against the Minnesota Timberwolves. "Because he's played against me, he's played against our team, he knows what I've accomplished. Not just this year, but over my career." Will the point guards clear the air, or will tension linger heading into the game? Also worth monitoring: does James' All-Star selection of Kevin Love mean all is well between the much-maligned forward and his team? Reports surfaced earlier this week that several Cavaliers expressed frustration with Love's recent illness that caused him to miss most of a game and a practice. Perhaps the King's stamp of approval will silence that once and for all. If it doesn't, Charles Barkley will surely continue to defend Love's case......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 26th, 2018

The journey doesn t end here : former champ Eduard Folayang remains motivated following loss to Martin Nguyen

Eduard Folayang's magical run as ONE Championship lightweight world champion is over.  Friday night at ONE: Legends of the World in Manila, Folayang was on the wrong end of a brutal knockout loss to now-two division world champion Martin Nguyen. It was a painful end to what was an insipiring journey to the top for the Team Lakay superstar, and the image of seeing the Pinoy hero getting seperated from his senses is one that will remain with Pinoy fight fans for a while.  Days after the loss, Folayang released a statement via ONE Championship, reassuring everyone that he's fine after the match's violent end.  "First and foremost, I thank God for His protection. At this point, I assure my followers and the fans of Team Lakay that I am alright and there is nothing to be anxious about. I am still in good physical condition." Folayang said. "I extend my heartfelt gratitude to ONE Championship for seeing that I get the best medical attention after the match. Folayang went on to thank the Filipino fans who came and supported him and Team Lakay, Friday night.  "I take this opportunity to thank my countrymen for their support not only to me but to the entire Team Lakay athletes who competed last November 10 at the Mall of Asia Arena. My heart is overwhelmed with the outpouring of their encouragement. We hope we can pay it forward. As for Nguyen, the Baguio City native congratulated the new champion and added that this isn't the end of the line for 'The Landside." "I tip my hat off to Martin Nguyen. He did his homework well and came very prepared. Because of this, my hunger for improvement remains unsatiated. This is a big lesson learned. I believe challenges inside and outside the cage always bring out the best in us. I assure you that the journey doesn't end here." The former champion has been in the same situation before. Following a devastating KO loss to lightweight contender Timofey Nastyukhin back in 2014, Folayang went on an amazing run which led him to the top of the lightweight division.  ONE Championship chairman and CEO Chatri Sityodtong fully believes that the Pinoy warrior can once again rise to the top of the heap. "I expect Eduard to shine again."  Sityodtong said during the post-fight presser.  As for now, Folayang will likely take a break as he and the team prepare for what's set to be an eventful 2018. "The odds were not in my favor last Friday. Nevertheless, Team Lakay and I will exert our best efforts to wave our Philippine flag more triumphantly in 2018."     Eduard Folayang quotes courtesy of ONE Championship.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 13th, 2017

Coach Brad Stevens excited for fully healthy Celtics

NBA.com staff report Five days from now, the Boston Celtics will hold their first official training camp practice as they (and every other NBA team) begin preparation for the 2018-19 season. After months of waiting and hoping, it appears everyone on the Celtics' roster -- including injured stars Gordon Hayward and Kyrie Irving -- will be ready to go come Sept. 25. Celtics coach Brad Stevens informed the media of that on Wednesday as he spoke at the BCSF Golf Tournament at Old Sandwich Golf Club in Plymouth, Mass. Stevens has been watching as the team has held an "open gym" at the Celtics' practice facility in Brighton and has been impressed with what he has seen, writes Gary Washburn of the Boston Globe. “As of last I’ve heard, we should have everybody full go,” Stevens said. “Everybody that’s been here has been playing five-on-five and been looking good. “The exciting part is that we should have a full group of guys healthy and ready to go. And the tough part is that we know we’ve got a lot to cover in a short amount of time.” Brad Stevens took a break from today's Shamrock Foundation golf tournament to give us an update on how the team is expected to look next week for training camp. pic.twitter.com/5xuHJvl3iY — Boston Celtics (@celtics) September 19, 2018 Stevens' comments about the health of the roster weren't much of a surprise, especially since Boston has been trending toward having everyone ready for camp all summer. Yesterday, Stevens said Irving and Hayward are looking much like their old selves on the court. “I saw him this morning at the facility and he looks good," Stevens said of Irving. "He’s worked really hard, I think he’s really excited and it’s good to see that. I think both he and Gordon will appreciate all the little things and all the mundane things even more, because Kyrie’s had the end of the season taken away from him twice in the last four years, and the one with us last year was such a shock because of the unfortunate event with the infection.” Irving and Hayward missed 22 and 81 games, respectively, with injuries last season. Irving missed the final 15 games of the 2017-18 season and the entire playoffs to repair his left knee. Hayward suffered a gruesome ankle injury just five minutes into his Celtics debut after defecting from the Utah Jazz via free agency last summer. Stevens told reporters he doesn't plan on playing anyone "a ton" in the preseason opener on Sept. 28 vs. the Charlote Hornets (Sept. 29, PHL time). In addition, he does not expect to rest Irving or Hayward during the season unless team trainers instruct him to do so. “Not my call at all,” Stevens said. “So the medical team comes and says this person can’t play in a back-to-back, then they don’t play in a back-to-back. If they can and it’s good for them, barring anything else unforeseen, then obviously they’ll play. “We haven’t sat in front of it and said that’s the case with certain guys yet and I’m not sure I anticipate that with either of those guys. They’ve made great strides.” Like Irving, Hayward has worked diligently to recover from his injury and Stevens has seen the progress in Hayward's recovery all along the way. The mental challenge in Hayward's comeback -- taking that first hit, playing at NBA speed and more -- is not something Stevens is worried about his star forward overcoming. “He’s been really diligent all the way through his rehab and progressing each step,” Stevens said. “I watched him through the steps of working out to going to one-on-one, to two-on-two, to three-on-three, and he can play some of the open gyms the guys are having. “Like anything, there’s always going to be a period of adjustment, but from my eye, and I think from everybody else that may have watched him work out, he looks like he’s looked before. That’s positive, I’d say.” Backup center Daniel Theis, who missed the Celtics' playoff run with a season-ending knee injury, has also looked solid in the workouts, Stevens said. Boston suffered minimal offseason roster losses among its key rotation players as only center Greg Monroe (who signed with Toronto) and guard Shane Larkin (who will be playing in Turkey) won't be back for 2018-19. Despite the loss of their starting backcourt last season, the Celtics still advanced to the Eastern Conference finals, falling to the Cavaliers in seven games. They are expected by many to be a top contender for the East title in 2018-19......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

ONE Championship: Eduard Folayang relishing opportunity to train in US

For the last month or so, former ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard Folayang has been putting in work in one of the most renowned mixed martial arts gyms in the world, the Jackson-Wink MMA Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  There, Folayang has been able to work with the likes of world champion producing mentors like Greg Jackson, Mike Winklejohn, and Brandon Gibson, as well was train with the likes of world-class MMA stars such as Carlos Condit, Holly Holm, Diego Sanchez, Michelle Waterson, and more.          View this post on Instagram                   One thing can change everything. A win. A loss. A smart decision. A bad review. A season of success. A season of failure. The color of your skin. According to the world, at least, it seems that one thing can determine who u are-or make u question it. #TimTebow Learning from the great @gregjacksonmma #jacksonwinkmma #teamlakay2018 #onechampionship @the.landslide @jayanthony714 A post shared by Eduard Landslide Folayang (@the.landslide) on Sep 7, 2018 at 1:10pm PDT           View this post on Instagram                   Selfie with the “natural born killer” @carloscondit to wrap the day😉 @jacksonwink_mma @onechampionship @the.landslide A post shared by Eduard Landslide Folayang (@the.landslide) on Aug 28, 2018 at 6:19pm PDT            View this post on Instagram                   “The Preacher’s daughter” @hollyholm #jacksonwinkmma #landslide2018 #albuquerque #newmexico #roadtoredemption @jayanthony714 A post shared by Eduard Landslide Folayang (@the.landslide) on Sep 13, 2018 at 11:42am PDT A proud representative of the Benguet-based Team Lakay stable - which has been regarded as one of the best MMA teams in Asia - Folayang has relished the opportunity of being able to learn and train in one of the most decorated gyms in the world.  The Jackson-Wink MMA Academy of course, has also been home to world champions such as Georges St-Pierre, Jon Jones, Rashad Evans, and many others.  "It was a good experience, I learned a lot of things, especially in the areas where we are still growing and learning, like the wrestling and the ground game." Folayang shared with ABS-CBN's Steve Angeles.  "Of course we also sharpened my striking." added Folayang, who's known for his thunderous punches, kicks, and elbows.  "Napaka-ganda, nabu-boost yung confidence, lalo na pag nakikipag-sabayan ka sa training sa mga nakikita mo na mga malalaki yung pangalan sa MMA, and you experience na makipag-laro sa mga nandito, so it’s really a big experience and a big learning lesson for me." he added.  Considered as the face of Philippine MMA, Folayang has been competing in MMA professionally since 2007, getting his start in the Philippine-based promotion URCC. Folayang was also one of the pioneer members of the Singaporean-based Asian MMA juggernaut ONE Championship, which held their first event in 2011, with Folayang as one of the featured stars.  In 2016, five years after debuting for the promotion, Folayang finally captured the ONE Championship Lightweight World title, defeating Japanese MMA legend and long-time champion Shinya Aoki via third-round TKO.  Folayang would defend the title successfully once, before losing to Martin Nguyen just a day shy of a year after winning the championship.  Since then, Folayang has bounced back impressively, picking up two consecutive wins against a pair of tough, unbeaten Russian grapplers.  The 33-year old Folayang is considered as one of the top contenders in the lightweight division, and could be next in line to challenge Nguyen for the title.  While there's no word yet on what's next for the Team Lakay star, Folayang maintains that it's best to be prepared just in case the call for a world title shot comes once again.  "I’m hoping that I can be able to regain what I had lost, so the best thing to do right now is to prepare, fix those areas where I lack, and sharpen those areas where I am strong." Folayang said. "Yun naman yung pinaka-the best na gagawin kasi wala pa naman yung schedule, hindi natin alam kung kailan darating yung schedule, pero ang pinaka-maganda ay handang-handa tayo whenever the title shot is given, hindi tayo malayo sa pag-kamit ng nawala sa atin." Right now, Folayang is just one of the many willing and deserving contenders in ONE Championship's talent-rich lightweight division.  Names like Aoki, Ev Ting, Timofey Nastyukhin, and Amir Khan are all looking to show that they too are deserving challengers to Nguyen's title.  "There’s a lot, it’s a stacked division in the lightweight division, and yung pinaka-maganda ay nakikita mo kung sino ang umaangat, sino ang nag-iimprove doon sa laban so yung talagang pinaka-magandang gawin talaga ay paghandaan kung sino yung mga magiging kalaban, and then of course you prepare well, kasi anytime they can give you the best." Folayang returns flies back to Manila on Tuesday.    H/T: Steve Angeles, ABS-CBN News  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

PBA: Hotshots end NLEX s perfect start

NLEX's perfect start is no more. Magnolia demolished the Road Warriors in the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup, taking a convincing 102-72 win Wednesday at the Big Dome. An undermanned NLEX crew entered the game with a 2-0 mark despite missing several key pieces including its head coach and the Hotshots fully took advantage of that fact. Magnolia dominated all game, opening up a 31-12 lead in the first quarter and never let go.  "We prepared hard for NLEX's offense," head coach Chito Victolero said. "In their last two games, they averaged 113 points. We want to limit them under 90 and I'm proud of my players, they did a good job on defense," he added. Former Best Import Romeo Travis played his first PBA game in three years and scored 21 points and had 13 rebounds for the Hotshots. Mark Barroca was the top local for the Hotshots with 13 markers. For the Road Warriors, Olu Ashaolu finished with 21 points. The burly import will have to conced his roster spot to Aaron Fuller for now as he deals with a knee injury. Despite the loss, NLEX keeps first place for the moment with a 2-1 record.   The Scores: Magnolia 102 - Travis 21, Barroca 13, Simon 12, Gamalinda 10, dela Rosa 10 Reavis 8, Melton 7, Jalalon 6, Sangalang 5, Mendoza 4, Ramos 4, Herndon 2, Pascual 0, Brondial 0, Abundo 0. NLEX 72 - Ashaolu 21, Tiongson 8, Fonacier 6, Ighalo 6, Mallari 5, Quinahan 5, Rios 5, Paniamogan 4, Monfort 2, Baguio 2, Miranda 2, Galanza 2, Gotladera 2, Tallo 2, Marcelo 0, Soyud 0.  Quarters: 31-12, 55-30, 76-52, 102-72   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

La Salle finishes fourth in South Korean tournament

While De La Salle University fell short of a podium finish in the 2018 Asia Pacific University Challenge, the experience they earned there will still go a long way as they commence a new era. The Green Archers fell to host Yonsei University, 80-92, last Saturday to wind up their campaign with a 2-3 record. That standing was only good for fourth-place in the invitational. Still, the Taft-based team welcomes the promising showings from the likes of scoring dynamo Aljun Melecio, hardworking forward Santi Santillan, and super rookie Encho Serrano. “Malaking tulong ‘to sa amin cause, first of all, we all know na yung team na ‘to is rebuilding so kailangang mabuo namin yung confidence namin sa isa’t-isa,” Melecio shared. He then continued, “Both on and off the court, yun yung nagawa namin.” In particular, Serrano, playing for the first time in green and white, showed several flashes of why he was once considered the top high school player in the country. “Masarap at masaya na makapaglaro na finally sa La Salle. Sobrang thankful ko rin kasi big experience para sa aking makalaro at makalaban yung mga team sa ibang bansa,” he said. A fully healthy team captain Kib Montalbo, who sat out much of the 2018 Filoil Preseason due to injury, was also a welcome sight. “Man’s greatest victory is to conquer himself. We learned a lot about mental toughness there,” he remarked. Now, La Salle will bring that experience to the looming UAAP Season 81. The Green Archers opened the tournament with back-to-back wins against Japan and Chinese Taipei before falling to UC Irvine, Russia-select, and Yonsei. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 13th, 2018

PBA: Is Justin Brownlee the greatest Ginebra import ever?

Justin Brownlee continues to work his magic for Brgy. Ginebra. After the 2018 PBA Commissioner's Cup, Brownlee now has three PBA titles in four conferences. The league's Best Import is a perfect 3-for-3 in the Finals. Since 2016, Brownlee and Ginebra have enjoyed nothing but success together. If he had his way, Justin would like to keep repping the barangay forever. "I wish forever," Brownlee said when asked how long he sees himself playing for Ginebra. "But I don't know man. Just see how it goes. I hope for a long time, but I'm just gonna see how it goes," he added. Ginebra's third championship with Brownlee has to be the hardest though. The Gin Kings started the conference at 1-5, losing their first two games with Brownlee. But then Ginebra caught fire, and with Justin leading the way, the barangay made it all the way to the Finals. Once it was time to challenge the mighty Beermen, Ginebra overcame a 1-2 deficit to dethrone San Miguel. "I kept saying, the team you know, the morale of the team, everybody was staying positive, everybody was still came to work every day very hard, and everybody still sustained their confidence even though we were 1-5," Brownlee said. "It felt like, I can just remember going to practice and the confidence of the team, it felt like we were 5-0. I feel that's a big thing we had this conference, everybody just stayed positive and just kept working hard even though we were down," he added. Many people are starting to call Brownlee as the greatest Ginebra import ever, his numbers and his accomplishments certainly help him make his case. Justin is happy with that but that's not what makes him go. Tomorrow, he'll be right back to work. "Man, that's a great compliment, I definitely love the compliment. You know I don't like to think of myself like that," Brownlee said. "I just want to keep doing good, and just keep working hard, and whatever comes with that, you know I'll take it," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 8th, 2018

PBA Finals: San Miguel s frustrations cost them their final timeout

It was a cruel turn of events for the San Miguel Beermen down the stretch in Game 4, Sunday evening.  After a June Mar Fajardo fastbreak dunk with 3:16 left in the game that put them up 83-78, the defending champions failed to put the ball in the hoop the rest of the way. Ginebra was able to build on a 9-0 run to close out the game and clinch the 3-2 advantage in the 2018 PBA Commissioner's Cup Finals, a run which may spell life or death between the two teams. San Miguel could have been up 3-2, but possible missed calls cost the Beermen some buckets, and may have helped the Gin Kings get on the fast break and score the all-important baskets. The Beermen were visibly frustrated throughout the entire ordeal, even resorting to quarreling and complaining to game officials during the final timeout. Coach Leo Austria carried his bottled-up emotions to the presser, trying to supress anger or frustration from the game partly because of the final ceasefire. "Yeah we tried our best to score, but a lot of banging inside…. and we did not get a good break. Some of the players are complaining because there’s a foul. And even in my last timeout, I wasn’t able to give an instruction because they keep on complaining so the timeout expired." Even though they squandered on their 2-1 series lead and are now down 3-2, hope is not lost for their cause, as the three-time and reigning Coach of the Year looks back on their road to the Finals. "I think the chance is still there. And siguro, the players, they will realize. There’s no time to be out-focused. There’s no time to relax. Our backs are against the wall." Regarding Renaldo Balkman's comments about the last three minutes of the game, he stressed that it was mere opinion, and admitted that the officiating is beyond their control.  "Everyone has his own opinion dahil he’s the one playing there and he feels there’s a lot of non-calls… of non-calls. It’s not a missed call. There’s non-calls, guys, so… They can feel it eh." "I’m not blaming anyone because we still have a chance to win that game if we’re ever to make that last possession." In their do-or-die Game 6 on Wednesday, backs against the wall, Austria assures that the Beermen will do everything to force a Game 7 on Sunday. "You can never know. It might happen that we might get the break of the game. So in the last three possessions, it could get 50-50 on our advantage, but you know, it’s beyond our control." __ Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

Pass rushers bring varying story lines for Cowboys in 2018

By Schuyler Dixon, Associated Press OXNARD, Calif. (AP) — DeMarcus Lawrence enjoys needling pass-rushing understudy Taco Charlton, who spent plenty of time in the offseason working out with the man who tied for second in sacks in the NFL last year for the Dallas Cowboys. "He's aggravating," Lawrence said, trying not to show that he was joking. "I go places in Dallas thinking I'm by myself and two seconds later, I see Taco walk in. Why is he always following me?" Maybe it's because Lawrence is coming off his best season at 14 1/2 sacks while Charlton is trying to deliver on first-round expectations in his second year. Add Randy Gregory working to get his career back on track after a year away from the NFL on a substance-abuse suspension, and these recent high draft picks by the Cowboys, all defensive ends, offer an interesting trio of story lines going into 2018. "Encore?" said Lawrence, who tied Jacksonville's Calais Campbell for second, 2 1/2 sacks behind Arizona's Chandler Jones. "You've just got to stay tuned. We're going to put on a big show this year." Gregory was activated from the non-football injury list Wednesday following a yearlong suspension over multiple violations of the league's substance-abuse policy. Coach Jason Garrett says the club did it to allow Gregory to be more active in morning walkthroughs at training camp in California. The Cowboys aren't in any hurry to have him participate in a full padded practice. "He's been away from football for a long time," Garrett said. "He did a good job of keeping himself in shape. But again, we don't want to compromise him early on here and put him a couple of weeks behind where he should be, so we're going to progress deliberately here." As for Lawrence and Charlton, it's full-speed ahead. Here's an overview of all three players a week into camp: LAWRENCE'S MOTIVATION The Cowboys put the franchise tag on Lawrence at the end of his four-year rookie deal, and there weren't any contract discussions of substance before the deadline to sign a long-term deal expired. Lawrence, who gets $17.1 million guaranteed this season, was the first pass rusher drafted by the Cowboys after they released franchise sacks leader DeMarcus Ware in 2014. Dallas traded up to early in the second round to get him. He didn't get his first sack until his second season and had just nine through three years before a quick start in 2017 led to his breakthrough. Now the 26-year-old is playing for a big payday. "As a kid, they tell you the sky's the limit. They lyin' to you," Lawrence said. "You set your own limits. That's why I said, 'Secure the bag,' because I'm going out there each and every day and showing my son and showing my family I set my own limits." CHARLTON'S MODEL The former Michigan player is actually three sacks ahead of Lawrence's pace. Charlton had three as a rookie after the Cowboys took him late in the first round. If nothing else, he knows patience is part of the formula. The 23-year-old Charlton's debut in the NFL was Lawrence's first season without an injury or season-opening suspension, which Lawrence served in 2016. "I talk trash, like, he didn't do nothing," Charlton said. "That's kind of how we wing it, 'Ah, you didn't do nothing. Ah, you did this, I'm going to go faster.' It pushes us to go to that next level. Him doing what he did last year pushed me to try to do that same thing." Charlton seems much more at ease, speaking freely and frequently with reporters during camp. "The comfortability level is probably the biggest thing," he said. "There's not so much where I'm wide-eyed seeing what's going on. I roll out here like I belong and I can do whatever I need to do to progress." GREGORY'S LONG ROAD The former Nebraska standout has been suspended for 30 of the past 32 regular-season games for multiple violations of the substance-abuse policy. Gregory was considered a first-round talent when he slid to near the end of the second round of the 2015 draft over off-field concerns that included a positive test for marijuana at the combine. While he was cleared to return by Commissioner Roger Goodell not long before training camp, Gregory hasn't spoken to reporters. Garrett hesitated to indicate when Gregory might practice for the first time. "You have brothers falling the wrong way, do you give up on them? No," Lawrence said. "We say togetherness, we say family for a reason. Randy's my brother. We stuck by him for this long time and it's time for him to ball now." Defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli, also the defensive line coach, said it's a first for him to have a player back after not seeing him for a year and a half. "Each night we have a chance in our meetings, we visit," Marinelli said. "He knows the progression that he's got to go through. He's not going to walk out there and it's going to happen. As talented as he is, it doesn't work that way. And he knows that.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

JRU’s coach Vergel admits: ‘Now, we’re rebuilding’

HOW’D THEY DO LAST SEASON? 11-8 overall, third-seed after eliminations, lost in stepladder playoffs to San Sebastian YES, THEY’RE STILL HERE: MJ Dela Virgen, Darius Estrella, Jed Mendoza WELCOME TO THE FAMILY: Ry Dela Rosa, Andrei Dulalia, Agem Miranda GOOD LUCK ON FUTURE ENDEAVORS: Abdul Wahab Abdul Razak, Ervin Grospe, Gio Lasquety, Abdel Poutouochi, Teytey Teodoro WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM JRU? Truth be told, nobody knows anything at all about JRU. “Now, we’re rebuilding. Parang ang naiwan sa aking players, aapat lang from past season. I’m not expecting too much kasi bago nga yung team namin.” – head coach Vergel Meneses Longtime veterans Ervin Grospe and Gio Lasquety have graduated and NCAA 94 was supposed to be the Teytey Teodoro show. Only, Teodoro departed from Shaw Boulevard due to circumstances yet to be disclosed. Now, Jed Mendoza is the only known commodity for head coach Vergel Meneses and it’s high time for him to take the next step into becoming a go-to-guy. “Ang sabi ko sa kanya, let your teammates get involved. I’m not asking you to shoot every time or score 30 points. You need your teammates para ma-open yung floor for you.” – head coach Vergel Meneses But fear not, Heavy Bombers faithful, a ray hope may very well be found in Darius Estrella, a former NCAA Juniors MVP who was having flashes of brilliance before tearing his ACL a year ago. WHO IS/ARE THE PLAYER/S TO WATCH OUT FOR FROM JRU? Clearly, JRU’s one and only answer to this question is Mendoza who won the Most Improved Player last year and only looks to improve even more. Much also rests on the shoulders of Estrella who has no time to waste in getting back to his old self. Coach Vergel also has promising pieces coming in in the form of former University of the East do-it-all player Agem Miranda and double-double machine Andrei Dulalia as well as ex-San Beda HS’ solid contributor Ry Dela Rosa. For the first time in years, the Heavy Bombers won’t have a foreign student-athlete so expect the locals to go all-out and all-heart. “Ang sinasabi ko sa mga players ko, just keep working hard, just keep fighting. I’m not asking you for a win, na every game, kailangan tayong manalo. Ang hinahanap ko lang sa kanila at magtatrabaho sila every game.” – head coach Vergel Meneses WHY SHOULD WE ROOT FOR JRU? Coach Vergel Meneses is the longest-tenured head coach in the NCAA and he has made the Final Four in all but three of his eight years on the coaching chair. “We’ll be there every game, fighting. Yun lang ang masasabi ko. Sa nakikita ko, yung puso ng mga bata compared to last time, maganda.” – head coach Vergel Meneses If, somehow, some way, he gets the Heavy Bombers to the playoffs once more, could anybody even question his coaching credentials? WHERE WOULD JRU BE AT THE END OF NCAA SEASON 94? Unfortunately, as much as everybody loves them some Vergel Meneses, he and his boys would be watching the Final Four at home or at school. As always, JRU could pull off upsets, but those would be few and far between. WHEN IS JRU’S FIRST GAME IN NCAA SEASON 94? JRU’s first game in the season is a home game in their Shaw Boulevard campus. Visiting them there on July 12 will be Mapua. As always, all of the #GalingNCAA will be on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA, LIGA HD, and livestream. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

Meet the 2018 World Cup All-Pogi Starting XI

The members of the World Cup All-Pogi Starting XI are not necessarily the starters in their respective teams.  This is a different kind of Starting XI. The kind that makes viewers want to stay plastered to their screens not just for the goals, but for those brief moments of close-ups that make the wait worth it. Our Pogi Starting XI follows the classic 4-4-2 formation. These fine fellas bring the “beautiful” to the beautiful game. Here we go.   GOALKEEPER Alphonse Areola, FRA   🇫🇷🆚🇵🇪 📍Ekaterinburg Arena 🕔 17h @equipedefrance #FRAPER #fiersdetrebleus A post shared by Alphonse Areola (@areolaofficiel) on Jun 21, 2018 at 12:19am PDT He may be the third choice keeper for Les Bleus but this 25-year-old, 6’3” Frenchman born to Filipino parents is definitely first in our hearts.   DEFENDER Gerard Pique, ESP   Focus A post shared by Gerard Piqué (@3gerardpique) on Dec 4, 2017 at 10:45am PST If Shakira thinks he’s hot, who are we to say otherwise?   William Ekong, NGA   End of a good camp with the @ng_supereagles. We keep working and improving. Thanks everyone for your support 🇳🇬🦅🙏🏽 A post shared by William Troost-Ekong (@wtroostekong) on Mar 28, 2018 at 8:32am PDT Ekong has Dutch and Nigerian ancestry and the 6’3” centre back’s fine mix of physical attributes from both sides of his family tree is more than evident.   Ramin Rezaeaian, IRN   ٨٠ ميليون نفر،يك ملت،يك ضربان قلب.. همه براي تيم ملي ايران ❤️🇮🇷🇮🇷🙏 80 milion people, One Nation, One Heart Beat.. Iran ❤️🇮🇷🙏i A post shared by Ramin Rezaeian (@raminrezaeian) on Jun 11, 2018 at 11:07am PDT Mr Rezaeaian owns the Derek Zoolander-approved Blue Steel 100%, and then some.    Gotoku Sakai, JPN   新しいスパイクを履いていいトレーニングできてます👍 #HereToCreate #X18 #スプリントスパイク #createdwithadidas A post shared by GotokuSakai_official (@sakai_go1123) on Jun 6, 2018 at 5:31am PDT Describing Gotoku-san as kawaii doesn’t even cut it. He’s an American-born Japanese right back and he definitely stands out among the Blue Samurai.   MIDFIELDER Isco, ESP   2️⃣2️⃣🇪🇸😍 A post shared by Isco Alarcon Suarez (@iscoalarcon) on Jun 8, 2018 at 11:07am PDT Isco, full name Francisco Roman Alarcón Suárez, rocks the millennial beard like it’s nobody’s business.    James Rodriguez, COL   El mejor café del mundo 🇨🇴✌🏼 A post shared by James Rodríguez (@jamesrodriguez10) on May 24, 2018 at 3:39pm PDT James Rodriguez? More like James Reid. James is your college crush that never seems to age. Andre Silva, POR   É sempre uma honra ter a oportunidade de representar @portugal! Unidos lutaremos pelo nosso objectivo #ConquistaOSonho A post shared by André Silva (@andresilva9) on May 17, 2018 at 1:32pm PDT Boyish good looks? Check. Eyebrows to die for? Check. Until you see his pool-side photos on Instagram. Who you calling a boy?   Makoto Hasebe, JPN   MHSC (Makoto Hasebe Sports Club) 一昨日は藤枝校と浜松校の交流戦を行いました。開校以来、子どもたちの成長するスピードに驚いています。そして子どもたちが楽しんでいる姿が何よりも嬉しいです。特別講義を傾聴する子どもたちのキラキラした目をみて改めて頑張ろうと思えた素晴らしい時間でした。 #mhsc #fujieda #hamamatsu #藤枝 #浜松 #藤枝総合運動公園サッカー場 #素晴らしい環境 #来年度の新しい校舎開校に向けて生徒もコーチングスタッフも募集しています #puma #長谷部誠 A post shared by 長谷部誠 Makoto Hasebe (@makoto_hasebe_official) on Dec 25, 2017 at 2:14pm PST That smile alone can net him a starring role in a Japanese telenovela   FORWARD Cristiano Ronaldo, POR   Parabéns meu querido filho! Estas a ficar um homem!👏🏽8️⃣🎂❤️ A post shared by Cristiano Ronaldo (@cristiano) on Jun 17, 2018 at 2:38am PDT A virtual lock not only for the Pogi Starting XI but also for the Pogi Hall of Fame.   Radamel Falcao, COL   Vamos a defender esta camiseta con el 💯 % de nuestras fuerzas, energías y capacidad. 🇨🇴 // we are going to fight for this colors with all our energy, strength and ability. A post shared by Falcao (@falcao) on Jun 13, 2018 at 2:40pm PDT He chopped off his lustrous locks for a trendy ‘short at the sides and longer at the top’ cut and the transformation is akin to Jon Bon Jovi shedding the glam-rock hair in the 90’s. Or long hair, short hair, we don’t care.   MANAGER Herve Renard - MAR Monsieur cuts a dashing figure in the touchline with his sun-kissed locks and striking blue gaze. Reminds one of an old-school Hollywood movie star, a classic European playboy or a striking yet dangerous Bond villain. Catch the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA, LIGA HD and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Hawks could turn deep supply of picks into draft-day trade

By Charles Odum, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — As the only general manager holding three first-round picks in Thursday night’s (Friday, PHL time) NBA draft, including No. 3 overall, Atlanta’s Travis Schlenk has been a popular target for trade talk. Overall, the Hawks have four picks in the top 34. That’s more than enough depth to attract interest, but the rebuilding Hawks are even more attractive trade targets because they also have about $20 million in salary cap space. That creates more attractive options for a team needing to unload a contract in a trade. Schlenk says he is answering every call and considering all options — including the possibility of trading up or down from the No. 3 spot. It’s an exciting time for Schlenk, who never held such a high draft pick in his previous job as assistant GM with the Golden State Warriors. “This is the highest pick that I’ve been a part of,” Schlenk said last week. “At Golden State, the highest pick we had was six. So it’s exciting. Having the four picks, along with the third pick, we get a lot of phone calls, which is exciting as well, and we’re going to go through all the options that are presented to us and make the best decision, hopefully.” He says he’s comfortable with the idea of opening the 2018-19 season with four rookies. Schlenk is planning the Hawks’ future with a new coach. Former Philadelphia assistant Lloyd Pierce was hired on May 11 to replace Mike Budenholzer, now the Bucks coach. Schlenk might use his first pick to select a forward-center to pair with 2017-18 rookie John Collins. Among players who could be available are Duke’s Marvin Bagley III, Michigan State’s Jaren Jackson and Mo Bamba of Texas. Guards Luka Doncic of Slovenia, Trae Young of Oklahoma and forward Michael Porter of Missouri could be alternatives for Schlenk. Pierce stressed defense in his first news conference in Atlanta. Schlenk said it’s important to land players with balanced offensive and defensive skills. “Obviously when you look at the best teams in the league, the majority of the time they’re good defensive teams,” Schlenk said. “But at the end of the day, if you’re not scoring 100 points you’re probably not winning, so we’re going to look for guys that are two-way players, who can play defensively, but also we’ve got to be able to score the ball on the other end.” Bagley qualifies as that two-way talent, but he could be drafted at the No. 2 spot by Sacramento. “I put a lot of work into this and I think I’m the best player in the draft,” Bagley said after his draft workout in Atlanta last week. “I mean that in the most humble way possible, not to be cocky.” Phoenix is projected to select Arizona center Deandre Ayton with the top pick. Jackson is an accomplished shot blocker with less polish on the offensive end. He is regarded by many to have the potential shooting skills to develop into a well-rounded NBA big man. With point guard Dennis Schroder’s future in Atlanta uncertain, the Hawks can look for talent at any position. Their wealth of picks could make it easier to take a chance on Doncic, who has the skills to play multiple positions even though his ability to create space in the NBA has been questioned by some critics. “I’ve maintained all along, and I honestly believe this, we’re going to take the best player,” Schlenk said. “We’re in a situation where we’re looking to add the most talent we can, and we’re going to get a good player at the third pick.” The No. 3 spot is the Hawks’ highest since 2007, when they selected Al Horford at No. 3. Atlanta also has the No. 19 and No. 30 picks in the first round and No. 34 early in the second round. Those selections give Schlenk a wealth of options, including a deal for a higher pick next year. Schlenk said he has considered if the possibility to “trade back to collect more assets would be advantageous.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

Consensus Mock Draft: Ayton a lock? Bagley rising, Doncic falling

By Drew Packham, NBA.com The Consensus Mock Draft is a compilation of the best mock drafts around the web. We bring them together to come up with a good estimate of how the 2018 NBA Draft could play out. For the first time in their history, the Phoenix Suns have the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft. But what will they do with it? Go with talented big man DeAndre Ayton, who played college ball nearby at Arizona? Or do they go with the international phenom Luka Doncic, who has been one of the most celebrated players in Europe? We'll find out June 21 (June 22, PHL time). Until then, we'll continue to monitor the Mock Drafts around the web to come up with a clearer picture of what might go down. Some notes as we enter the final week before next Thursday's (Friday, PHL time) draft: - There's now a complete consensus at No. 1: Deandre Ayton appears to be the pick here, as the Suns get their big man to rebuild around. Previous looks had the Suns going with Luka Doncic, but now all 10 mock drafts have Phoenix going with the talented big man who played down the road at Arizona.       - The real intrigue begins at No. 2. Luka Doncic once appeared to be a lock at this spot, but it now appears the Kings are leaning toward either Duke’s Marvin Bagley III or taking a chance on Michael Porter Jr. (Sacramento is reportedly high on Porter, and could even trade down if they think they could get him lower.)       - Things will really get interesting at No. 3. In our look at the 10 mock drafts, no player appears three times (Jaren Jackson Jr.). Doncic, Bagley and Trae Young each appear twice.       - Doncic’s spiral is fascinating. He now appears most commonly at No. 4 to the Grizzlies (four times), and one site (NBADraft.net) has him slipping all the way to Dallas at No. 5. Doncic has long been considered one of the Top 2 prospects and most-NBA ready despite being just 19-years-old, thanks to strong experience in Euroleague action with Real Madrid.       - Seven of the 10 mocks have Bagley going No. 3 to the Hawks. The other three have Michigan State's Jackson heading to Atlanta.       - Oklahoma guard Trae Young has seen his stock rise a bit. Two mocks currently have him going to the Hawks at No. 3, but no one expects him to fall past the Knicks at No. 9.       - Miami shooting guard Lonnie Walker IV has seen some increased buzz since our last look. He previously appeared on just three of our 10 mocks, but now shows up in six mocks, as high as No. 10 to the 76ers (twice) and most commonly at No. 13 to the Clippers (three times).       - No one seems to have any idea where Michael Porter Jr. will land. In a surprising update, Basketball Insiders and USA Today both have Porter going No. 2 to Sacramento. But two mocks also see him falling as far as No. 8 to Cleveland. Porter could be a pivotal piece to this year’s draft.       - One player gaining some ground in the mocks is Kentucky swingman Kevin Knox. In our first look he only appeared on a few mocks, but now he shows up in the lottery on eight of the 10 mocks. The Ringer has him going at No. 7 to the Bulls, but most see him landing in the end of the lottery.       - After the top pick, the rest of the lottery appears to be anyone's guess. Bagley appears six times at No. 2 and Mo Bamba shows up six times at No. 6 to Orlando, but no one else shows up more than five times at any draft position. This should change between now and June 21, but for now there's a lot of uncertainty.       - Nine players appear on all 10 mocks we survey: Ayton, Doncic, Bagley, Jackson, Young, Bamba, Porter, Mikal Bridges and Wendell Carter Jr. MOST COMMON PICKS No. 1 (Suns): Deandre Ayton (10) No. 2 (Kings): Marvin Bagley III (6) No. 3 (Hawks): Jaren Jackson Jr. (3) No. 4 (Grizzlies): Luka Doncic (5) No. 5 (Mavericks): Jaren Jackson Jr. (4) No. 6 (Magic): Mohamed Bamba (6) No. 7 (Bulls): Michael Porter Jr. (3) No. 8 (Cavaliers): Wendell Carter Jr. (5) No. 9 (Knicks): Mikal Bridges (4) No. 10 (76ers): Mikal Bridges (4) No. 11 (Hornets): Kevin Knox, Miles Bridges (3) No. 12 (Clippers): Collin Sexton (4) No. 13 (Clippers): Robert Williams (5) No. 14 (Nuggets): Kevin Knox (3) Most common (above): Pick at which the player is most commonly projected, with number of mock drafts in parentheses. For example, Deandre Ayton is projected to go first in all 10 of the mock drafts listed below. Top 14 (below): To calculate the consensus, we awarded 14 points for every mock draft in which the player went first overall, 13 for second, continuing to one point for the final lottery pick. The player with the highest point total represents the top overall selection, which is as follows: No. 1: Deandre Ayton | Phoenix Suns Arizona | Position: C | Height: 7-1 Status: Freshman Most Common: 1 (10) Physical specimen who has size to shine in post, but agile and talented enough to develop outside game; should contribute from Day 1 to whomever lands him No. 2: Marvin Bagley III | Sacramento Kings Duke | Position: PF | Height: 6-11 Status: Freshman Most Common: 2 (6) ACC Player of the Year has all the makings of a small-ball center or power forward who can make defenses sweat -- all while rebounding at a prodigious rate No. 3: Luka Doncic | Atlanta Hawks Real Madrid | Position: SG/SF | Height: 6-8 Status: International Most Common: 4 (5) Versatile Slovenian is one of most NBA-ready international prospects ever; talented distributor who can play both guard positions No. 4: Jaren Jackson Jr. | Memphis Grizzlies Michigan State | Position: PF | Height: 6-11 Status: Freshman Most Common: 5 (4) Outstanding defender who boasts an emerging offensive game that gives him great two-way potential No. 5: Michael Porter Jr. | Dallas Mavericks Missouri | Position: SF | Height: 6-10 Status: Freshman Most Common: 7 (3) Teams will be wary of his back injury which limited him to just three games at Mizzou, but he can shoot, which with his length, makes him a valuable weapon No. 6: Mohamed Bamba | Orlando Magic Texas | Position: C | Height: 7-0 Status: Freshman Most Common: 6 (6) Long, talented defender was second in the country in blocked shots per game last season (3.7) and fourth in total blocks (111), drawing comparisons to Rudy Gobert and Clint Capela No. 7: Trae Young | Chicago Bulls Oklahoma | Position: PG | Height: 6-2 Status: Freshman Most Common: 8 (3) Talented scorer led the nation in scoring (27.4) and assists (8.7) per game, but will need to improve on defensive end in NBA No. 8: Wendell Carter Jr. | Cleveland Cavaliers Duke | Position: PF/C | Height: 6-10 Status: Freshman Most Common: 8 (5) Do-it-all big man draws comparisons to Al Horford; has huge hands that allow him to catch and score in the paint, while also having the physicality to finish through contact No. 9: Mikal Bridges | New York Knicks Villanova | Position: SG/SF | Height: 6-7 Status: Junior Most Common: 9, 10 (4) The All-Big East first team selection who helped Villanova to a title is considered one of the best two-way prospects, drawing comparisons to Kawhi Leonard No. 10: Miles Bridges | Philadelphia 76ers Michigan State | Position: SF/PF | Height: 6-7 Status: Sophomore Most Common: 10, 11 (3) The first team all-Big 10 selection averaged 17 points and 7 rebounds a game for the Spartans and was a finalist for the Wooden Award No. 11: Collin Sexton | Charlotte Hornets Alabama | Position: PG | Height: 6-2 Status: Freshman Most Common: 12 (4) Was second in SEC in scoring (19.2 per game); his toughness and competitive streak are viewed highly by pro evaluators, even drawing comparisons to Russell Westbrook No. 12: Kevin Knox | LA Clippers Kentucky | Position: SF/PF | Height: 6-9 Status: Freshman Most Common: 11, 14 (3) Showed potential as a perimeter threat and was an all-SEC freshmen team selection while starting 37 games at Kentucky No. 13: Lonnie Walker IV | LA Clippers Miami | Position: SG | Height: 6-4 Status: Freshman Most Common: 13 (3) A long, explosive, athletic shooting guard who put points on the board in bunches from the perimeter and on the break No. 14: Robert Williams | Denver Nuggets Texas A&M | Position: PF/C | Height: 6-9 Status: Sophomore Most Common: 13 (5) Was an SEC all-Defensive Team selection, finishing in Top 20 nationally both in defensive rating and total blocks; questions remain about consistency of effort MOCK DRAFTS ESPN.com 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Marvin Bagley III 3. Jaren Jackson Jr. 4. Luka Doncic 5. Mohamed Bamba 6. Wendell Carter Jr. 7. Michael Porter Jr. 8. Trae Young 9. Kevin Knox 10. Mikal Bridges 11. Shai Gilgeous-Alexander 12. Collin Sexton 13. Lonnie Walker IV 14. Miles Bridges Last updated: June 14 The Ringer 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Marvin Bagley III 3. Luka Doncic 4. Michael Porter Jr. 5. Jaren Jackson Jr. 6. Mohamed Bamba 7. Kevin Knox 8. Wendell Carter Jr. 9. Trae Young 10. Mikal Bridges 11. Collin Sexton 12. Miles Bridges 13. Lonnie Walker IV 14. Zhaire Smith Last updated: June 13 NBADraft.net 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Marvin Bagley III 3. Trae Young 4. Jaren Jackson Jr. 5. Luka Doncic 6. Mohamed Bamba 7. Mikal Bridges 8. Michael Porter Jr. 9. Wendell Carter Jr. 10. Miles Bridges 11. Collin Sexton 12. Shai Gilgeous-Alexander 13. Zhaire Smith 14. Robert Williams Last updated: June 13 SI.com 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Marvin Bagley III 3. Jaren Jackson Jr. 4. Luka Doncic 5. Michael Porter Jr. 6. Mohamed Bamba 7. Trae Young 8. Wendell Carter Jr. 9. Mikal Bridges 10. Lonnie Walker IV 11. Kevin Knox 12. Collin Sexton 13. Robert Williams 14. Shai Gilgeous-Alexander Last updated: June 12 USA Today 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Michael Porter Jr. 3. Marvin Bagley III 4. Luka Doncic 5. Jaren Jackson Jr. 6. Mohamed Bamba 7. Wendell Carter Jr. 8. Trae Young 9. Collin Sexton 10. Mikal Bridges 11. Miles Bridges 12. Lonnie Walker IV 13. Robert Williams 14. Kevin Knox Last updated: June 15 SB Nation 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Luka Doncic 3. Jaren Jackson Jr. 4. Trae Young 5. Marvin Bagley III 6. Mohamed Bamba 7. Miles Bridges 8. Michael Porter Jr. 9. Mikal Bridges 10. Wendell Carter Jr. 11. Shai Gilgeous-Alexander 12. Collin Sexton 13. Robert Williams 14. Chandler Hutchison Last updated: June 11 Bleacher Report 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Marvin Bagley III 3. Mohamed Bamba 4. Luka Doncic 5. Jaren Jackson Jr. 6. Trae Young 7. Michael Porter Jr. 8. Wendell Carter Jr. 9. Mikal Bridges 10. Lonnie Walker IV 11. Miles Bridges 12. Collin Sexton 13. Robert Williams 14. Kevin Knox Last updated: June 11 Net Scouts 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Luka Doncic 3. Marvin Bagley III 4. Jaren Jackson Jr. 5. Mohamed Bamba 6. Wendell Carter Jr. 7. Michael Porter Jr. 8. Trae Young 9. Collin Sexton 10. Miles Bridges 11. Kevin Knox 12. Shai Gilgeous-Alexander 13. Robert Williams 14. Mikal Bridges Last updated: June 5 CBS Sports 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Marvin Bagley III 3. Luka Doncic 4. Michael Porter Jr. 5. Jaren Jackson Jr. 6. Mohamed Bamba 7. Trae Young 8. Wendell Carter Jr. 9. Collin Sexton 10. Mikal Bridges 11. Miles Bridges 12. Robert Williams 13. Shai Gilgeous-Alexander 14. Kevin Knox Last updated: June 15 Basketball Insiders 1. Deandre Ayton 2. Michael Porter Jr. 3. Trae Young 4. Luka Doncic 5. Marvin Bagley III 6. Jaren Jackson Jr. 7. Mohamed Bamba 8. Wendell Carter Jr. 9. Mikal Bridges 10. Miles Bridges 11. Kevin Knox 12. Robert Williams 13. Lonnie Walker IV 14. Troy Brown Last updated: June 13 ESPN Insider: Jonathan Givony SI.com: Jeremy Woo Net Scouts: Carl Berman Bleacher Report: Jonathan Wasserman Basketball Insiders: Steve Kyler CBS Sports: Gary Parrish SB Nation: Tom Ziller  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018