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Daily Diaries: 4 Love Lessons That Ariana Grande Taught Us In 'Thank U, Next'

There's no reason to be bitter if it was real......»»

Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnNov 5th, 2018

WATCH: Ariana Grande drops first episode of ‘Dangerous Woman Diaries’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll4PiBEWFvI&feature=youtu.be   Ariana Grande gives fans an all-access pass to her life as one of pop music's biggest stars with the first episode of her YouTube Originals series "Dangerous Woman Diaries."   Grande on Friday dropped the series' first episode titled "the light is coming" where she shared a behind-the-scenes look of her working on her latest album "Sweetener."   The 25-year-old singer talked about how personal the album feels to her compared to her previous records.   "As an artist, I want to love each project I work in their own special way, but this feels like the most 'me' an album has ever felt....Keep on reading: WATCH: Ariana Grande drops first episode of ‘Dangerous Woman Diaries’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2018

Ariana Grande releases documentary series on Youtube

MANILA, Philippines — As a love letter to her fans , Billboard’s 2018 Woman of the Year  Ariana Grande is releasing a behind-the-scenes, in-depth documentary series entitled Ariana Grande: Dangerous Woman Diaries.  The series will be up on Youtube beginning Thursday, November 29 (Friday, November 30 in the Philippines). {source}  ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 29th, 2018

‘Losing isn’t when you come in last or second; it’s when you don’t give your best’

Visit us on Instagram To be You; Facebook: To be You; e-mail inq.tobeyou@gmail.com The De La Salle University swimming team finished UAAP Season 81 last November on a high note. The women's swimming team (Lady Tankers) won third place, while the men's swimming team (Green Tankers) came in second. Among the members in the team is Green Tanker Rochmond Santos, 20, a third year sports studies major. Santos started swimming lessons when he was around nine years old. He didn't want to take the lessons, but his mother insisted. She told him that swimming was a "clean sport." He eventually fell in love with it. He wakes up at 5 a.m. daily, starts training at 6 a.m., attends c...Keep on reading: ‘Losing isn’t when you come in last or second; it’s when you don’t give your best’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 19th, 2019

James Corden parodies Ariana for Jeff Goldblum | Inquirer Entertainment

How do you express your thanks to the one and only Jeff Goldblum? James Corden did it by singing to the tune of Ariana Grande's "thank u, next." The television host sang his love for the.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018

Daily Diaries: So, How Does Phone Addict Isabelle Daza Manage Being A Millennial Mom?

'I never thought I could love someone more than I love myself.'.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

Autopsy finds rapper Mac Miller died from drugs and alcohol

LOS ANGELES --- Rapper Mac Miller died from an accidental overdose caused by a combination of cocaine, alcohol, and the powerful opioid fentanyl, a coroner's report released Monday said. The Los Angeles County coroner's report named Miller's cause of death as "mixed toxicity" of the three substances found in his system. The 26-year-old Pittsburgh native, who frankly discussed his depression and addiction in his rhymes, died suddenly on Sept. 7. He was known to many as Ariana Grande's ex-boyfriend, but had a devoted following that included some of the biggest names in hip-hop. Miller's personal assistant, making a daily visit to Miller's home in the San Fernando Valley sectio...Keep on reading: Autopsy finds rapper Mac Miller died from drugs and alcohol.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 6th, 2018

Ariana Grande announces Sweetener World Tour in 2019

LOS ANGELES --- Ariana Grande is ready to hit the road again and will begin a new world tour early next year. Grande announced Friday that her 42-date Sweetener World Tour will kick off March 18 in Albany, New York. It's the first North American tour for the "No Tears Left to Cry" singer since her Dangerous Woman Tour, which was suspended after a terrorist bombing killed 22 and injured more than 500 at Manchester Arena in May 2017. Grande resumed touring the following month after helping raise money for victims of the bombing at the One Love Manchester concert. Grande's upcoming tour will support of her fourth studio album "Sweetner," which debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard ...Keep on reading: Ariana Grande announces Sweetener World Tour in 2019.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 27th, 2018

Dance lessons

Or what dancing has taught me about life When I lost my father to cancer in 2011, I was devastated. My dad was the love and center of my life and that of my family’s, and the experience was beyond painful. Dancing was where I mainly sought release and healing. And I haven’t stopped since. […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 1st, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018

Daily Diaries: What Astrid From Crazy Rich Asians Taught Me About Being A Woman

God is a woman, and her name is Astrid Leong......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2018

Hey, Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson we have some furniture suggestions for you guys

After getting engaged, Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson also moved in together. If you follow them on social media, you would have seen snippets of their new place. If you have seen those posts, you also probably noticed that they don't have the much furniture. Pete even posted a series of photos showing their empty living room. And, yes, they are using a ladder as seating. Since they haven't furnished their space yet, we wanted to give them some suggestions of big pieces to get. We wanted to give some variety for their living room, bed room, and also kitchen. We even found a cool lighting fixture we think they might love. West Elm Valencia 3-Piece Terminal Chaise Sectional ...Keep on reading: Hey, Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson we have some furniture suggestions for you guys.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 22nd, 2018

Daily Diaries: What It's Like To Meet The Love Of Your Life And Not Be Able To Keep Them

There are certain people you never really get over with......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 24th, 2017

Urging love, Ariana Grande plans show for Manchester attack victims

Urging love, Ariana Grande plans show for Manchester attack victims.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 27th, 2017
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 18th, 2019
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 16th, 2019

Vice Ganda waxes comedic on harsh lessons learned from love

Vice Ganda waxes comedic on harsh lessons learned from love.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 11th, 2019

Patrick Beverley s trademark defense getting new test

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com There was a foul, followed by a stoppage in play, a scene replayed dozens of times in NBA arenas. Except in this case, the victim was former two-time Kia MVP Stephen Curry and the punisher was the notorious Patrick Beverley. And so the situation (of course) turned snippy. Beverley has fought against better players his entire basketball life and carries an underdog gene that tends to flare in these situations. That explains why he tried to slap the ball from the Warriors guard after the whistle. Curry wasn’t having it, and so there was a gentle shove. And then a shove was returned. Then a staredown with noses just inches from each other. Then a separation of bodies. This was Beverley doing what he does by reputation: namely, irritate and push his defensive aggression and agenda to the very limit … and then some. His “crime” was restricting Curry’s movement with a forearm. Sometimes Beverley gets away with it, but in today’s NBA, no longer with any regularity. Such is the new normal. He’s a defensive-minded player with the LA Clippers and works in a league that suddenly favors scoring and shooters. He’s quite possibly, in his estimation and that of others, someone who’s forced to evolve or perish. For him, there’s no other option. “It would be very hard,” Beverley said, “to come into the league today and try to play defense like we did years ago.” Before this season, the NBA's Points of Emphasis centered in part on freedom of movement. The goal is to help players move without barriers, which creates high-scoring games, which makes games more entertaining for fans. Halfway through the season, the evidence is convincing: Scores are up, stops are down. To date, 11 teams have an offensive rating greater than 110 and 18 teams are scoring more than 110 points per game. Last season, those numbers were six and six, respectively. For players born with height, wingspan and leaping ability, these defensive rules don’t handcuff them much. But Beverley buys his clothes off the rack, so to speak. He’s a shade over six feet and is therefore a normal man trying to make a living in a big man’s world. At 30, Beverley deals with players who are often taller and even quicker. It’s his job to make their life tougher -- but here in the new age of barely-contested shots and 120-point games, the opposite is ringing true. He’s averaging a career-high 3.6 fouls per game and can’t get away with much. As Draymond Green, a defensive demon himself and teammate of Curry’s said recently: “Defense is not allowed. You can’t really play defense in this league. I guess that’s not what they want.” ‘We’re forced to adjust’ Green's words are perhaps an extreme assessment and a touch of exaggeration. Fifteen teams averaged at least 106 ppg last season; now it’s 26. Calls are less forgiving, as only 13 teams are averaging 24 free throw attempts per game (it was five last season). The ball moves and there’s less restriction, which was the intention. And there appears to be little blowback in the basketball universe from those who observe and play. It’s just … accepted. For the most part. Even Beverley offers a shoulder shrug. “Guys who make a living off defense, we’re forced to adjust,” he said. This evolution of shifting away from certain defensive tactics is decades in the making. The NBA once allowed defenders to shove a forearm into the back of a post-up player, and subtle jersey grabs were often excused. And there was the hand-check, too. All have been outlawed. The game is far less physical, which means the “Bad Boys”-era Detroit Pistons would have little chance of winning one championship today (let alone two). The NBA has sought to distance itself from that brand of ball, from Pat Riley’s New York Knicks (and their “no free layups” mentality) and from the 85-80 scores that often stifled the creativity of the game. The result is a game that sees open lanes and quicker whistles, and less of what helped players like Beverley overcome tremendous odds to reach the NBA. “There is where we’re at,” he said. “They want to see more scoring, more up-and-down, more points and all that, which is understandable. Of course, it makes it hard for me.” Relishing his ‘instigator’ role This is Beverley’s sixth year in the NBA, but his 10th in professional basketball. His journey curved through various stops overseas before he became rooted with the Houston Rockets, his first true NBA home. It speaks to Beverley’s doggedness and his value, at least initially, as a defensive specialist assigned to the grunt work. With the rise in scoring point guards across the NBA landscape, Beverley’s role became more important, and difficult as well. In a typical week, Beverley could guard Curry, Russell Westbrook, Damian Lillard and opposing shooting guards, too. He brings an edge to the job that he learned from growing up on the West Side of Chicago to a single mother as well as a grandmother who adopted a dozen kids. Daily life was a chore. He was one of the main characters in the documentary “Hoop Reality,” the sequel to the acclaimed “Hoop Dreams.” Beverley was friendly rivals with former Kia MVP winner Derrick Rose since grade school and was actually a scorer in high school, averaging a state-best 37 points as a senior. After getting kicked out of Arkansas in 2008 after two years for academic issues -- a tutor wrote a paper for him -- he played three years in Russia and Greece before filling the point guard void on the 2012-13 Rockets caused by Kyle Lowry’s trade to Toronto the summer before. “I wouldn’t change one thing about how I got here,” he said. “Sometimes you don’t get in through the front door. Sometimes you don’t get in through the back. Sometimes you got to climb through the window. That doesn’t mean the opportunity wasn’t there. There’s a way; you’ve just got to find it.” He immediately became singled out for eyeball-to-eyeball defense that teetered on the edge. The moment that earned him a name was in the first round of the 2013 playoffs against Oklahoma City. He went for a steal on Westbrook in Game 2 while Westbrook signaled for a timeout, causing his knee injury five years ago. He still answers for that, even to this day; not that the play on the ball was reckless, but was it necessary? “I don’t go out there to hurt people, I don’t even know how to attempt to hurt somebody,” Beverley said. “I play hard, bring the edge. I’m an instigator. That gets me going. I like to bump people, to feel me getting into somebody’s jersey. I’m just different. I like contact, like physical play, like pushing and holding. But I’m not dirty.” Beverley hasn’t spoken with Westbrook -- their on-court relationship is clearly frosty -- and with the exception of Rose, he doesn’t encourage any friendships beyond his teammates. “I don’t talk to anybody,” he said. “I don’t want personal battles that take away from the team. I’m trying to win games. When I come to San Francisco or Oklahoma City or Portland, I know I’m going straight to my room because there’s people I got to be ready to play the next day. And I know they do the same. There’s respect that’s not being said. When it comes to Steph, Dame, Westbrook, I make sure I get my rest. But they get their rest, too. They know what I bring to the table.” A game that won’t change Beverley was an All-Defensive first teamer two seasons ago, both a career highlight and confirmation of his devotion to studying film and learning opponents’ tendencies. He has also overcome microfracture knee injury in 2017-18 that limited him to 11 games in his debut season with the Clippers. “I worked my ass off and I’m still working,” he said. “If it’s not one thing it’s another. Me getting hurt, coming back faster and stronger. Got kicked out of school, had to go overseas, knew I was going to the NBA anyway. I didn’t know how. But I knew. “This is bigger than me. It’s for my mom, grandmom, seeing how hard the women in my life worked to raise me. It’s not easy being a single mother raising a kid in the inner city but she made it happen. She taught me to stand on my own two feet and get the best out of hard work, which becomes part of your mindset, especially when you see two women doing it every day.” And now comes another challenge for Beverley and those like him. How do you thrive in a league that’s suddenly married to offense? “Maybe after the All-Star break they’ll stop calling ticky-tack fouls,” he said. “The better defender you are, the more you’re singled out. But I’m going to go out there and be Pat. Don’t care. Won’t change.” Beverley estimates that “70 percent” of the players he guards are rattled by him, to different degrees. He said “only a few don’t,” which he refused to name (for strategic reasons). The game may not be designed to help the underdog, average-sized player who brings intensity and defense. But there’s no sense waiting for Beverley to make excuses. He’s come too far for that. “When you’re done with this game, you don’t want to go around saying, ‘Man I wish I could’ve done this, put more time into that.’” Beverley said. “Every year I go out like a person fighting for my spot, fighting for my contract. That’s the way I train. That’s how I prepare. That’s why I’m still in the league.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2019