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Cybersecurity firm: US Senate in Russian hackers crosshairs

PARIS — The same Russian government-aligned hackers who penetrated the Democratic Party have spent the past few months laying the groundwork for an espionage.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 13th, 2018

NKorea gets second web connection via Russian firm

NKorea gets second web connection via Russian firm.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsOct 5th, 2017

A Brown, Russia firm forge deal to build agro irradiation centers

MANILA, Philippines — Listed A Brown Co. Inc. (ABCI) and partner Rusatom Healthcare, a division of Russian State Atomic Energy Corp......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 11th, 2017

Trump’s transgender military ban ‘not worked out yet’ – BBC News

The White House has not yet decided how it will implement the president's ban on transgender people serving in the US military. Mr Trump's surprise Twitter announcement on Wednesday has been met with criticism from rights groups. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the administration would work alongside the Pentagon to decide how to proceed. It is not yet clear how the announcement will affect current transgender service personnel. &'8220;The United States government will not accept or allow transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US military,&'8221; Donald Trump tweeted. &'8220;Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail.&'8221; Asked at a press briefing if troops on battlefields would be immediately sent back, White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the policy had yet to be worked out. &'8220;The decision is based on a military decision. It's not meant to be anything more than that,&'8221; she said. However, some US media outlets questioned the spending justification. The Washington Post drew attention to an analysis that the US military spends almost $42m (£32m) a year on the erectile dysfunction medication Viagra &'' several times the total estimated cost of transgender medical support. Meanwhile, Politico reports that the move was prompted by threats from Republican hardliners over a spending bill which would provide funding for Mr Trump's promised military spending and border wall plans. One Republican lawmaker had already tabled an amendment to the spending bill to prevent the military paying for transgender surgical procedures. The timing of this transgender ban is almost as interesting as the move itself. Why now? With the Trump administration being buffeted by the Jeff Sessions political death watch, the ongoing multi-prong investigation into the Trump campaign, the healthcare drama in the Senate and the impending Russian sanctions bill, perhaps the administration decided this was a good time to change the subject and rally conservative forces to his side. Republicans have long used cultural issues as a wedge to divide Democrats and energise evangelicals. As one White House insider acknowledged, this is straight out of that playbook. While Mr Trump campaigned as sympathetic to LGBT rights, he needs the traditional religious conservatives to stay loyal to him now, more than ever. The president's action will create a furore among liberals and the media commentators whose disdain for the current administration is not a new development. This is a fight the White House will welcome. The decision to allow transgender people to serve openly in the military was made by the Obama administration last year, with a one-year review period allowed for its implementation. The policy included a provision for the military to provide medical help for service members wanting to change gender. But in June, Defence Secretary James Mattis agreed to a further six-month delay. In 2016, the independent Rand Corporation estimated that about 4,000 US active-duty and reserve service members are transgender, although some campaigners put the figure higher than 10,000. Rand also predicted that the inclusion of transgender people in the military would cause a 0.13% increase in healthcare spending (approximately $8.4m). Kristin Beck, a retired elite Navy SEAL, issued a challenge to President Trump in an interview with Business Insider: &'8220;Let's meet face to face and you tell me I'm not worthy.&'8221; She said that during her decorated military career, she had been &'8220;defending individual liberty&'8221;. &'8220;Being transgender doesn't affect anyone else,&'8221; she said. &'8220;We are liberty's light. If you can't defend that for everyone that's an American citizen, that's not right.&'8221; Army reservist Rudy Akbarian, in Los Angeles, said: &'8220;My heart dropped a little bit, you know. It hurt.&'8221; &'8220;Not everyone responded well after learning I was transitioning,&'8221; he said. &'8220;But after spending time on missions and realising we all share the same love for the country, we worked together and got the job done. &'8220;The discrimination I'm facing now is from those outside the military &'' not the people who work with me.&'8221; Mr Trump said his decision was based on consultation with his generals, but there has been a mixed reaction. Former Defence Secretary Ash Carter, who lifted the ban last year under President Obama, said: &'8220;To choose service members on other grounds than military qualifications is social policy and has no place in our military.&'8221; Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Republican John McCain, said major policy announcements should not be made via Twitter. &'8220;Any American who meets current medical and readiness standards should be allowed to continue serving,&'8221; he added. Several British military generals also condemned Mr Trump's decision, including the commander of the UK Maritime Forces, Rear Admiral Alex Burton, who said &'8220;I am so glad we are not going this way.&'8221; &'8220;Each dollar needs to be spent to address threats facing our nation,&'8221; Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler, a long-time opponent of the Obama administration's position, said in a statement. &'8220;The costs incurred by funding transgender surgeries and the required additional care it demands should not be the focus of our military resources,&'8221; she said. Trump supporter and political commentator Scott Presler is among those who disagree with the military carrying the cost of such interventions. While disagreeing with the ban, he added that &'8220;generals know more about war than I do.&'8221; &'8220;I don't think this is an attack on the LGBT community &' I'm mixed, but I have confidence in the guidance that President [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 27th, 2017

‘Bangladesh bank hackers had local contacts’

SUNTEC CITY, Singapore – Cybersecurity experts expressed belief that hackers in the $100-million Bangladesh bank heist may have had contacts in the Philippin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 7th, 2017

Russia cancels meeting with US on improving relations amid updated sanctions – ABC News

The Russian deputy foreign minister has canceled his meeting with his American counterpart –- a long-planned summit to address more minor problems in the relationship –- because of the updated U.S. sanctions announced yesterday. Under Secretary of State Tom Shannon is traveling to London now, but he will not continue on to St. Petersburg Friday, as previously scheduled. The State Department officially announced his travel yesterday, seemingly caught off guard by Russia’s cancellation that dealt a serious blow to the Trump administration’s efforts to improve relations. In a strongly worded statement, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Rybakov said Russia was canceling the meeting because the U.S. ruined the circumstances by announcing updated sanctions yesterday and by not returning two Russian diplomatic compounds in Maryland and New York. &'8220;The new American jab will not go without reaction from our side, including practical reciprocal measures,&'8221; he warned. Rybakov went on to rail against America for the current state of poor relations between the two countries and declare that sanctions will never force Russia to &'8220;submit.&'8221; &'8220;In the U.S., of course, they can further soothe themselves with the illusions that they can 'pressure' Russia. Many previous 'waves' of American sanctions have not brought the result on which their initiators counted. Just as futile will be any new attempts to force the Russian side to 'submit,'&'8221; he said. But the State Department fired back, offering a strong defense of those sanctions, while clarifying that the announcement yesterday simply brought them up to date without adding anything new. The Treasury Department announced Tuesday that it was adding 38 pro-Russian individuals and entities to existing sanctions against Russia. &'8220;Let’s remember that these sanctions didn’t just come out of nowhere. Our targeted sanctions were imposed in response to Russia’s ongoing violation of the sovereignty and territorial integrity of its neighbor, Ukraine. If the Russians seek an end to these sanctions, they know very well the U.S. position,&'8221; said State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert in her own strongly worded statement. She added that the U.S. remains open to future discussions, but those sanctions will remain until Russia ends its occupation of Crimea and meets its obligations under the Ukrainian peace deal known as the Minsk agreement. President Trump and his Secretary of State Rex Tillerson have been advocating for improving relations with Russia, arguing that the world's two greatest nuclear powers should not be at odds and that there are areas of common grounds, like fighting ISIS. The planned meeting between Shannon and Rybakov would have been the second, after a May meeting in New York. The two senior officials were tasked by their bosses, Tillerson and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, to lead a working group to deal with &'8220;irritants&'8221; in the relationship -– including the Russian diplomatic compounds. The State Department confirmed earlier this month that returning those compounds would have been part of the discussions at Friday’s summit, despite bipartisan calls on Capitol Hill not to do so. Now, it seems, their return has become more uncertain. In addition to the current updated sanctions, the Senate voted overwhelmingly in favor of a bill last week that would expand sanctions on Russia and prevent the administration from making changes to any Russian sanctions without Congressional approval. The White House hasn't said if the president would sign the bill, but the Republican House leadership has held it up, citing a procedural issue that will delay a vote for now. Tillerson had expressed reservation about the legislation when testifying on the Hill last week, saying he needed &'8220;the flexibility to turn the heat up when we need to, but also to ensure that we have the ability to maintain a constructive dialogue.&'8221; After Russia scrapped Friday's summit, any sort of dialogue is expected to become more difficult.( The Russian deputy foreign minister has canceled his meeting with his American counterpart –- a long-planned summit to address more minor problems in the relationship –- because of the updated U.S. sanctions announced yesterday. Under Secretary of State Tom Shannon is traveling to London now, but he will not continue on to St. Petersburg Friday, as previously scheduled. The State Department officially announced his travel yesterday, seemingly caught off guard by Russia’s cancellation that dealt a serious blow to the Trump administration’s efforts to improve relations. In a strongly worded statement, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Rybakov said Russia was canceling the meeting because the U.S. ruined the circumstances by announcing updated sanctions yesterday and by not returning two Russian diplomatic compounds in Maryland and New York. &'8220;The new American jab will not go without reaction from our side, including practical reciprocal measures,&'8221; he warned. Rybakov went on to rail against America for the current state of poor relations between the two countries and declare that sanctions will never force Russia to &'8220;submit.&'8221; &'8220;In the U.S., of course, they can further soothe themselves with the illusions that they can 'pressure' Russia. Many previous 'waves' of American sanctions have not brought the result on which their initiators counted. Just as futile will be any new attempts to force the Russian side to 'submit,'&'8221; he said. But the State Department fired back, offering a strong defense of those sanctions, while clarifying that the announcement yesterday simply brought them up to date without adding anything new. The Treasury Department announced Tuesday that it was adding 38 pro-Russian individuals and entities to existing sanctions against Russia. &'8220;Let’s [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2017

A Brown partners with Russian firm Rusatom on use of atomic energy

MANILA, Philippines -  A Brown Co. Inc......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 21st, 2017

Jeff Sessions calls accusations of Russia collusion an ‘appalling lie’ – The Guardian

The US attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has rejected allegations that he took part in collusion with Moscow to influence the 2016 election as an “appalling and detestable lie”. In a heated, often testy hearing of the Senate intelligence committee, Sessions refused to answer questions about his discussions with Donald Trump, on the grounds that the president could claim executive privilege over those discussions at a later date. Under persistent questioning from Democratic senators, the attorney general repeatedly claimed he could not recall details of contacts between the Trump campaign and Russian officials. And in a startling admission from the country’s top justice official, he said he had not received, nor had he asked for, a briefing on Russian intervention in the 2016 presidential election. He said he could not recall any conversations with Trump about the Russian role in the election throughout the transition period. The US attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has rejected allegations that he took part in collusion with Moscow to influence the 2016 election as an “appalling and detestable lie”. In a heated, often testy hearing of the Senate intelligence committee, Sessions refused to answer questions about his discussions with Donald Trump, on the grounds that the president could claim executive privilege over those discussions at a later date. Under persistent questioning from Democratic senators, the attorney general repeatedly claimed he could not recall details of contacts between the Trump campaign and Russian officials. And in a startling admission from the country’s top justice official, he said he had not received, nor had he asked for, a briefing on Russian intervention in the 2016 presidential election. He said he could not recall any conversations with Trump about the Russian role in the election throughout the transition period. Over the course of more than two and a half hours, Sessions faced a hail of questions about his meetings with the Russian ambassador to Washington during the campaign, his recusal from inquiries over possible collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, and his role in the firing of the FBI director, James Comey At one point, Sessions, formerly a senator for Alabama, complained: “I’m not able to be rushed this fast. It makes me nervous.” Some of the most heated exchanges were over his refusal to talk about White House conversations on the Russia investigation and Comey’s dismissal on 9 May, even though Trump has not invoked executive privilege. Democrats on the committee reminded Sessions he was under oath. “You are obstructing this congressional investigation by not answering these questions,” Martin Heinrich, a Democratic senator from New Mexico, warned him. Sessions insisted: “I am not stonewalling. I am following the historic practices of the department of justice.” A justice department official later confirmed that “declining to answer questions at a congressional hearing about confidential conversations with the president is long-standing executive-branch-wide practice,” citing a 1982 justice department memorandum. The memorandum gives the president the right to invoke executive privilege to cover “military, diplomatic or national security secrets” and a more limited privilege in keeping law enforcement investigations secret. So far Trump has not invoked executive privilege, but Sessions argued the president could do so at a later date. “I am protecting the right of the president to assert it if he chooses, and there may be other privileges that apply,’’ he said. “At this point, I believe it’s premature for me to deny the president a full and intelligent choice about executive privilege.’’ The frustration of the Democrats on the committee turned to disbelief when Sessions said that since being sworn in as attorney general in February, he had not received a briefing on Russian meddling in the 2016 election, despite a consensus among US intelligence agencies that it represented a significant security threat. “You never asked about it?” Angus King, an independent, asked. “No,” Sessions admitted. At the outset of the hearing, Sessions delivered a prepared statement denying any contacts with Russian officials about the campaign. “I have never met with or had any conversation with any Russians or any foreign officials concerning any kind of interference in any campaign in the United States,” Sessions told the senators. “I have no knowledge of any conversations held along those lines by anybody in the Trump campaign.” He added, his voice rising in indignation: “I was your colleague in this body for 20 years, and the suggestion that I participated in any collusion or that I was aware of any collusion with the Russian government to hurt this country, which I have served with honor for over 35 years, or to undermine the integrity of our democratic process, is an appalling and detestable lie.” At his confirmation hearing on 10 January, Sessions told the Senate: “I did not have communications with the Russians,” a claim that was later proved untrue when the Washington Post revealed he had had two meetings with the Russian ambassador to the US, Sergey Kislyak, during the campaign. Sessions argued that his statement at the confirmation hearing was not a lie because of the context in which it was made, under questioning by the Democratic senator Al Franken of Minnesota about collusion. “He asked me a rambling question that included dramatic new allegations that the United States intelligence community had advised President-elect Trump that ‘there was a continuing exchange of information during the campaign between Trump’s surrogates and intermediaries for the Russian government’,” Sessions said. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 14th, 2017

The World: Sessions to face questions on Russia in high-stakes hearing

WASHINGTON -- US Attorney General Jeff Sessions will face questions on Tuesday about his dealings with Russian officials and whether he intentionally misled Congress as a Senate panel investigates the Kremlin's alleged involvement in the 2016 presidential election......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJun 13th, 2017

Trump asked me to let Flynn investigation go – CNN News

Fired FBI Director James Comey aimed a dagger blow at Donald Trump Wednesday, saying the President had demanded his loyalty, pressed him to drop a probe into ex-national security adviser Michael Flynn and repeatedly pressured him to publicly declare that he was not under investigation. Comey magnified the political crisis engulfing the White House by releasing his opening statement ahead of a blockbuster appearance on Capitol Hill on Thursday. The dramatic document sketched a stunningly detailed account of Comey's intimate meetings with the President, included direct quotes from Trump and revealed the former FBI chief's discomfort with the President's behavior. The testimony appeared to bolster the case of Trump critics who believe that the President may have obstructed justice and abused his power in his dealings with Comey, who he later fired. Comey said that Trump asked him to drop FBI investigations into Flynn centering on his calls with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the transition, which eventually led to his dismissal as national security adviser after it emerged he had lied about the conversations to Vice President Mike Pence. Interactive: The many paths from Trump to Russia He wrote that Trump said: &'8220;'I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.&'8221; &'8220;I replied only that 'he is a good guy.'&'8221; Comey wrote, describing a private meeting with Trump in the Oval Office on February 14, then added: &'8220;I did not say I would 'let this go.'&'8221; The exchange took place after a meeting between Trump and senior intelligence and homeland security officials, after which the President asked to speak to the FBI Director alone. Comey said in his testimony that he understood the President to be requesting that he drop the investigation into Flynn, who had resigned the day before. But he says he did not understand Trump to be referring to the wider Russia investigation. &'8220;Regardless, it was very concerning, given the FBI's role as an independent investigative agency.&'8221; Trump critics contended that this encounter appears to be tantamount to an inappropriate pressure on the FBI by the President, an allegation that if proven could have dire consequences for Trump's presidency itself. Comey's account of this encounter conflicts with Trump's own statements. At a press conference on May 18, the President was asked whether he had asked the FBI Director to pull the plug on the Flynn component of the Russia investigation. &'8220;No, No, next question,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;There is a criminal investigation going on of one of the President's top associations &' he gets fired, he is under under investigation and the President brings in the FBI Director and says 'please stop your investigation,'&'8221; said CNN's senior legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin. &'8220;If that isn't obstruction of justice, I don't know what is,&'8221; Toobin said. But Trump's defenders were quick to seize on the document as well, arguing that it supported Trump's claims that the former FBI chief had told him three times that he was not personally being investigated in the Russia probe. Comey wrote in his testimony that he twice told Trump he was not being investigated once before the inauguration and once when he was President and also said that he had told congressional leaders that the FBI was not &'8220;personally investigating President Trump.&'8221; Trump's camp argued that fact vindicated the President and sought to use it to sweep away the Russia questions that have been clouding his White House ever since the inauguration. &'8220;The President is pleased that Mr. Comey has finally publicly confirmed his private reports that the President was not under investigation in any Russian probe,&'8221; said Marc Kasowitz, Trump's personal attorney. &'8220;The President feels completely and totally vindicated. He is eager to continue to move forward with his agenda.&'8221; Trump's lawyer Michael Cohen told CNN, &'8220;Comey's statement released today needs to be carefully scrutinized as his testimony claims the president was concerned about the dossier.&'8221; The Republican Party also singled out the same helpful passages of Comey's testimony. &'8220;President Trump was right,&'8221; said Republican National Committee Chairwoman McDaniel. &'8220;Director Comey's statement reconfirmed what the president has been saying all along &'8212; he was never under investigation,&'8221; McDaniel said in a statement that did not mention the other aspects of Comey's testimony. The testimony was posted without notice on the website of the Senate Intelligence Committee, instantly electrifying Washington, which has been on edge for days ahead of Comey's planned testimony. The dramatic intervention was classic Comey: the towering FBI chief, branded a &'8220;showboat&'8221; by Trump, has a reputation for theatrical public coups, and his move will only intensify the anticipation for his appearance on Thursday. &'8220;The President feels completely and totally vindicated. He is eager to continue to move forward with his agenda.&'8221; Trump's lawyer Michael Cohen told CNN, &'8220;Comey's statement released today needs to be carefully scrutinized as his testimony claims the president was concerned about the dossier.&'8221; The Republican Party also singled out the same helpful passages of Comey's testimony. &'8220;President Trump was right,&'8221; said Republican National Committee Chairwoman McDaniel. &'8220;Director Comey's statement reconfirmed what the president has been saying all along &'8212; he was never under investigation,&'8221; McDaniel said in a statement that did not mention the other aspects of Comey's testimony. The testimony was posted without notice on the website of the Senate Intelligence Committee, instantly electrifying Washington, [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 8th, 2017

Russian hackers' 'fake news' behind Qatar crisis – report

Russian hackers' 'fake news' behind Qatar crisis – report.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 7th, 2017

Moscow says zero proof Russian hackers involved in Qatar crisis

Moscow says zero proof Russian hackers involved in Qatar crisis.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 7th, 2017

Leaked intel report shows Russian hackers probed U.S. voting systems

Leaked intel report shows Russian hackers probed U.S. voting systems.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 6th, 2017

Report: Russian hackers probed US voting systems

Report: Russian hackers probed US voting systems.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJun 6th, 2017

The World: Leaked intel report shows Russian hackers probed US voting systems

WASHINGTON -- A top secret US report showing that hackers from Russian military intelligence tried repeatedly to break into US voting systems before last year's presidential election raised new alarms Monday about the extent of Moscow's meddling......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJun 6th, 2017

Leaked intel report shows Russian hackers probed US voting systems

Leaked intel report shows Russian hackers probed US voting systems.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 6th, 2017

Vladimir Putin denies he has compromising material on Donald Trump – The Guardian

Russian President Vladimir Putin has denied he had any compromising material about US President Donald Trump. “Well, this is just another load of nonsense,” Putin said on NBC News’ Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly, when asked whether he had any damaging information on the Republican president. The remarks were the latest in a series of denials from Moscow that have had little impact so far on a political crisis in the United States over potential links between Russia and Trump’s inner circle. The issue will be front and centre this week in Washington, where former FBI director James Comey is due to testify on whether Trump tried to get him to back off an investigation into alleged ties between Trump’s election campaign and Moscow. Comey, who was leading the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s probe into alleged Russian meddling in last year’s US presidential election, was fired by Trump last month, four years into his 10-year term. Putin also told NBC he had no relationship with Trump and had never met him, regardless of Trump’s previous travel to Russia as a businessman. Putin noted that executives from perhaps 100 American companies were currently in Russia. “Do you think we’re gathering compromising information on all of them right now or something?” Putin asked, before saying: “Have you all lost your senses?” Have you all lost your senses? Vladimir Putin Trump has offered contradictory accounts of his relationship with Putin over time but has also said the two never met. He has called an FBI investigation into alleged ties between his campaign and Russia a “witch hunt” designed to undermine the legitimacy of his 2016 election win. Trump has also disparaged a dossier of unsubstantiated allegations that purported to show Russian intelligence operatives had compromising information about him, but which he has described as a “hoax.” US intelligence agencies concluded in January that Moscow tried to tilt the election campaign in Trump’s favour, including by hacking into the emails of senior Democrats, a charge the Kremlin denies. “They have been misled,” Putin told NBC, in an interview NBC said was recorded on Friday. “And they aren’t analysing the information in its entirety. I haven’t seen, even once, any direct proof of Russian interference in the presidential election.” Trump has denied any collusion but the FBI and congressional probes into the Russia matter have dogged the early months of his presidency. Former CIA director John Brennan said last month he had noticed contacts between Trump’s campaign associates and Russia during the 2016 election and grew concerned Moscow had sought to lure Americans down “a treasonous path.” After Comey’s dismissal, news reports emerged that Trump asked Comey to end the probe into former national security adviser Michael Flynnduring a February meeting in the Oval Office, the day after Flynn was fired for misrepresenting his contacts with the Russian ambassador, Sergei Kislyak. Flynn has declined to testify to the US Senate Intelligence Committee about his Russian ties, invoking his constitutional right to avoid self-incrimination. Putin downplayed Flynn’s appearance with him at a December 2015 gala dinner in honor of the Russian television network Russia Today (RT), which US officials consider a state-run propaganda outlet. “I made my speech. Then we talked about some other stuff. And I got up and left. And then afterwards I was told, ‘You know there was an American gentleman, he was involved in some things. He used to be in the security services’,” Putin said. “That’s it. I didn’t even really talk to him. That’s the extent of my acquaintance with Mr Flynn,” he added. Reuters has reported that Flynn and Trump’s son-in-law and close adviser, Jared Kushner, discussed with Kislyak the idea of creating a back channel between Trump and Putin that could have bypassed diplomats and intelligence agencies. Putin said he was unaware of any such discussion and criticized NBC for asking about contacts between the ambassador and the Trump administration. “You created a sensation out of nothing. And out of this sensation, you turned it into a weapon of war against the current president,” Putin said. … today we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading the Guardian than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So we think it’s fair to ask people who visit us often for their help. The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too. If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps to support it, our future would be much more secure.( “I made my speech. Then we talked about some other stuff. And I got up and left. And then afterwards I was told, ‘You know there was an American gentleman, he was involved in some things. He used to be in the security services’,” Putin said. “That’s it. I didn’t even really talk to him. That’s the extent of my acquaintance with Mr Flynn,” he added. Reuters has reported that Flynn and Trump’s son-in-law and close adviser, Jared Kushner, discussed with Kislyak the idea of creating a back channel between Trump and Putin that could have bypassed diplomats and intelligence agencies. Putin said [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2017

Experts see possible North Korea links to global cyberattack

SEOUL — Cybersecurity experts are pointing to circumstantial evidence that North Korea may be behind the global "ransomware" attack: the way the hackers took.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 16th, 2017

Cyber firm sees North Korea link to ‘ransomware’

SEOUL – A South Korean cybersecurity expert said yesterday there is more circumstantial evidence that North Korea may be behind the global “ransomware” attac.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 16th, 2017

Senate to probe unusable China trains

MANILA, Philippines — The Senate will initiate an investigation into the unusable Metro Rail Transit (MRT) train coaches purchased from a Chinese firm as pro.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2017

Russian hackers 'targeted Macron campaign'

Russian hackers 'targeted Macron campaign'.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 26th, 2017