Advertisements


Cybersecurity firm: US Senate in Russian hackers crosshairs

PARIS — The same Russian government-aligned hackers who penetrated the Democratic Party have spent the past few months laying the groundwork for an espionage.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 13th, 2018

Cybersecurity firm: US Senate in Russian hackers crosshairs

PARIS — The same Russian government-aligned hackers who penetrated the Democratic Party have spent the past few months laying the groundwork for an espionage.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Finnish firm detects new Intel security flaw

PARIS, France – A new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday, January 12. F-Secure said in a statement that the flaw had nothing to do with the "Spectre" and "Meltdown" vulnerabilities recently ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Republicans lose patience with FBI on Russia, Trump campaign ties information – CNN News

Top Republicans in Congress expressed their dissatisfaction Wednesday about getting answers from the FBI, as lawmakers trying to investigate Russia's meddling in the US election say they've continued to see no evidence of President Donald Trump's claim that he was wiretapped by his predecessor. The FBI's decision to brief the Senate Judiciary Committee comes after the committee's Chairman, Sen. Chuck Grassley, threatened to not schedule a vote for Rod Rosenstein to be deputy attorney general unless his panel got the FBI briefing he and the committee's top Democrat, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, requested weeks ago. Grassley &'8212; a stalwart Republican with a powerful post &'8212; expressed his exasperation the FBI hours before a private meeting at the Capitol with Comey. He called the scheduled meeting a &'8220;positive step,&'8221; but also added: &'8220;I don't want to say that's enough at this point.&'8221; Grassley said he was frustrated that officials haven't been as forthcoming as lawmakers would like, and said his committee hasn't been given the respect it deserves for its oversight of the executive branch. &'8220;That's very irritating,&'8221; Grassley told CNN. He wasn't the only Republican venting his displeasure: Sen. Lindsay Graham, who sits on a subcommittee that's seeking FBI answers, said earlier that he would subpoena the agency for information if it wasn't provided to him and fellow subcommittee member Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse. &'8220;We wrote a letter &'' Sen. Whitehouse and myself &'' wanting to know if there's evidence of a warrant issued by the Trump campaign,&'8221; the South Carolina Republican told CNN's Chris Cuomo on &'8220;New Day. &'8220;He hasn't answered that letter or confirmed if there's a real investigation of the Trump campaign.&'8221; &'8220;He needs to answer the letter and give the nation some information about what's going on here,&'8221; Graham said. Whitehouse and Graham said later Wednesday they had received a letter from the FBI saying they would respond to their questions next week in a classified letter. It was also announced Wednesday that Comey will testify at the House Intelligence Committee on March 20 hearing and there will be a second hearing in the committee March 28, the committee's chairman said. In a Fox interview with Tucker Carlson Wednesday, the President defended his decision to tweet about wiretapping before producing evidence by hinting &'8212; again without evidence &'8212; that more information will emerge in the weeks to come, presumably proving his point. &'8220;Wiretap covers a lot of different things,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;I think you're going to find some very interesting items coming to the forefront over the next two weeks.&'8221; House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes said he does not believe Trump's claim that Obama wiretapped him, but said it's possible Trump communications may have been gathered in &'8220;incidental&'8221; intelligence collection. &'8220;I don't believe Trump Tower was tapped,&'8221; Nunes told reporters Wednesday. &'8220;We don't have any evidence that that took place and, in fact, I don't believe &'8212; just in the last week of time, the people we've talked to &'8212; I don't think there was an actual tap of Trump Tower,&'8221; Nunes said at a news conference in reference to the claim originally made by Trump several weeks ago. Nunes and Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said they want to see any evidence of wiretapping by their March 20 hearing or they may also issue a subpoena for the records. Asked if he had seen any evidence that Trump aides spoke with Russian officials other than Russian ambassador to the US Sergey Kislyak, Nunes said, &'8220;Not that I'm aware of.&'8221; But Schiff added: &'8220;I wouldn't answer that question as categorically as my colleague. We're not privileged to talk about the contents of the investigation but, you know, I think we need to be very precise when we talk about this. And I just don't think that we can answer it categorically in this forum.&'8221; Nunes and Schiff also sent a letter to the FBI, CIA and National Security Agency demanding information on the leaks regarding Russia's contact with Trump advisers by Friday. The two leaders of the House investigation said their work has been stalled so far by trouble accessing computers used by the director of national intelligence &'8212; Schiff said he has been taking handwritten notes when he views evidence. The two have not yet interviewed former national security adviser Gen. Michael Flynn and declined to say whether he would appear at a public hearing. Schiff added that he is very concerned about Trump adviser Roger Stone's admission that he communicated with &'8220;Guccifer 2.0&'8221; &'8212; who was later determined by intelligence agencies to be a Russian hacker or group of hackers. Stone has described his contact with Guccifer as limited to a &'8220;brief exchange with him on Twitter&'8221; and any suggestion otherwise, he told CNN, is &'8220;a fabrication.&'8221; The White House has vacillated on Trump's claims in the last two days. Press secretary Sean Spicer said Monday that Trump did not mean literally that Obama personally wiretapped him. But on Tuesday, Spicer said Trump was &'8220;extremely confident&'8221; he would be vindicated by the evidence. &'8220;I think there's significant reporting about surveillance techniques that existed throughout the 2016 election,&'8221; Spicer said, without providing any examples. &'8220;He feels very confident that what will ultimately come of this will vindicate him,&'8221; Spicer said. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Wednesday he never gave Trump any reason to believe the GOP candidate [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 16th, 2017

‘I think it was Russia’ – CNN News

President-elect Donald Trump said for the first time Wednesday he believes Russia was responsible for hacking ahead of the election but contemptuously rejected allegations that Moscow mounted a campaign to compromise him. In his first news conference since winning the election, a combative Trump made clear he will not mute his style when he is inaugurated in nine days. He lashed out at media and political foes alike in a bravura performance. The Trump Tower press conference confirmed the President-elect's deep desire to quickly assert power once he's sworn in. He insisted on moving speedily &'8212; too speedily for some Republicans in Congress &'8212; to replace Obamacare. He also pledged swift action on building a wall along the border with Mexico and nominating a new Supreme Court justice. But it's also clear Trump will take office amid persistent questions about his relationship with Russia. While Trump was at the podium, his nominee to become secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, faced tough questions on Capitol Hill about whether the incoming administration will view Russia with sufficient skepticism. At the news conference, Trump finally conceded he believes Russian President Vladimir Putin's intelligence agencies were behind hacks on Democratic computers ahead of the election but argued that wouldn't happen again. &'8220;I think it was Russia,&'8221; Trump said. Putin &'8220;should not be doing it. He won't be doing it. Russia will have much greater respect for our country when I am leading it than when other people have led it.&'8221; Trump, who has vowed to improve relations with Russia despite some Republican opposition, said he did not know if he would get along with Putin and noted it's possible he won't. But he could not resist a swipe at his defeated Democratic election rival, Hillary Clinton. &'8220;Do you honestly believe Hillary would be tougher on Putin than me?&'8221; he asked. He added that Russia is not the only nation that hacks US targets and accused Democrats of not having sufficient cybersecurity programs. The news conference opened with the incoming White House press secretary, Sean Spicer, slamming a &'8220;political witch hunt&'8221; following reports that Russian operatives claim to have compromising personal and financial information about Trump. Vice President-elect Mike Pence also criticized the media before introducing Trump, who kept up his criticism of US intelligence. &'8220;I must say that I want to thank a lot of the news organizations here today because they looked at that nonsense that was released by maybe the intelligence agencies,&'8221; Trump said. He said any such move by the agencies would be a &'8220;tremendous blot on their record.&'8221; &'8220;A thing like that should never have been written, it should never have been had and it certainly should have never been released,&'8221; Trump said. The news conference follows exclusive reporting by CNN on Tuesday that classified documents presented last week to President Barack Obama and Trump included the allegations about Russia. The allegations were presented in a two-page synopsis that was appended to a report on Russian interference in the 2016 election and drew in part from memos compiled by a former British intelligence operative, whose past work US intelligence officials consider credible. Intel chiefs presented Trump with claims of Russian efforts to compromise him 01:38 The FBI is investigating the credibility and accuracy of these allegations, which are based primarily on information from Russian sources, but has not confirmed many essential details in the memos about Trump. The news conference, delayed from December, was scheduled for Trump to outline how he will address questions about possible conflicts-of-interest related to his vast business empire. Trump appeared beside a large pile of files he claimed were pertinent to the companies that are going to be placed in a trust to be run by his sons. He reiterated that he doesn't plan to release his tax returns, saying they are under audit and don't include relevant information After taking a handful of questions, Trump turned the event over to Sheri Dillon, an attorney who was on hand to discuss Trump's business interests. She said Trump planned to put in place a structure that will &'8220;completely isolate him from the management of the company.&'8221; &'8220;He further instructed that we build in protections that will assure the American people that the decisions that he makes and the actions he takes as President are for their benefit and not to support his financial interests,&'8221; she said. Trump will place all his financial and business assets in a trust, Dillon said. The Trump Organization, meanwhile, will not enter into any new deals abroad and all domestic deals will be subject to a heavy vetting process. The firm will also appoint a new ethics officer, she said. The President-elect has also terminated a number of deals set to close shortly, a step that had cost him millions of dollars, she said. Dillon argued that the decision had been made not to put all Trump's assets in a blind trust or to divest of all his assets because it would be impractical. She also said that Trump should not be forced to destroy the business that he had built up. &'8220;President Trump can't unknow he owns Trump Tower,&'8221; Dillon said, explaining why a blind trust would not be a workable solution to addressing conflicts of interest issues while he is President. Dillon said Trump would take other actions to avoid the appearance of a conflict over the Emoluments Clause [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2017

PHL urged to spend $22.8 billion on cybersecurity

THE PHILIPPINES needs to spend $22.8 billion (P164 billion) on cybersecurity between 2017 and 2025 to be in line with “global best-in-class countries,” according to new research commissioned by Cisco Systems, Inc. Citing the research “Cybersecurity in ASEAN: An Urgent Call to Action” carried out by consulting firm A.T. Kearney, Cisco said the Philippines only […] The post PHL urged to spend $22.8 billion on cybersecurity appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated News2 hr. 1 min. ago

Embrace China Telecom, Pinoys told

Filipinos should welcome China Telecom as the third player in the Philippine telecommunications industry, instead of dwelling on the possible security risk issues its entry poses, a cybersecurity expert said on Thursday. Rey Lugtu, president of digital transformation consultancy firm Hungry Workhorse, said Filipinos should give China Telecom or other foreign telcos a chance to [...] The post Embrace China Telecom, Pinoys told appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsJan 11th, 2018

Russia firm eyes investment in Philippines

MANILA, Philippines — A Russian company is planning to put up the first pipeline coating facility in the Philippines, making the country its production hub f.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 23rd, 2017

Russia firm eyes building pipeline plant in Bataan

A Russian company expressed interest to the Board of Investments (BOI) to construct a pipeline coating facility in the Philippines, the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) said on Friday, in another indiction of the country’s increasing attractiveness to foreign investors. According to Trade Secretary Ramon Lopez, Igor Shaporin, BT SVAP LLC’s chairman of the [...] The post Russia firm eyes building pipeline plant in Bataan appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2017

Russian cyberfirm Kaspersky appeals ban in US court

SAN FRANCISCO, USA – Embattled cyber security firm Kaspersky Lab said on Monday, December 18, that it is asking a federal court to overturn a ban on its products being used by US agencies. Allegations that Moscow-based Kaspersky, which sold more than $600 million of anti-virus software globally in 2015, knowingly or unknowingly ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 19th, 2017

UK warns government agencies not to use Kaspersky software

LONDON — Britain's cybersecurity agency has told government departments not to use antivirus software from Moscow-based firm Kaspersky Lab amid concerns abou.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2017

Hackers could get even nastier in 2018 – researchers

WASHINGTON, DC, USA – After a year marked by devastating cyber attacks and breaches, online attackers are expected to become even more destructive in 2018, security researchers said Wednesday, November 29. A report by the security firm McAfee said the ransomware outbreaks of 2017 offer just a taste of what's to come ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017

Canadian pleads guilty in 2014 Yahoo hacking case

MANILA, Philippines – A Kazakhstan-born Canadian man pleaded guilty for playing a role in helping Russian spies hack into Yahoo email accounts.  Cyberscoop reported  Karim Baratov was charged for his role in a 2014 data breach affecting Yahoo . The breach allowed hackers to steal information tied to 500 million Yahoo accounts.  He pleaded ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017

Pimentel lauds possible entry of 3rd telco player in PH

Senate President Aquilino "Koko" Pimentel III welcomedon Tuesday the proposed entry of a third telecommunications company in the country from China, saying it is the only way to force the two giantlocal telcos to improve their services.   Pimentel was apparentlyreferring to Smart Communications Inc.and Globe Telecom.   "A third telecommunications firm is exactly what our country needs to end a telco duopoly mired in mediocrity; a situation that has allowed them to hold the Filipino consumer hostage to poor communications and data services," Pimentel said in a statement.   "By acting decisively to address this problem, the President is showing the kind of ...Keep on reading: Pimentel lauds possible entry of 3rd telco player in PH.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017

GFNi inks agreement with Russian firm

GLOBAL FERRONICKEL Holdings, Inc. (GFNi) has inked an agreement with Russian firm Vi Holding LLC, whose expertise involves low-cost mineral processing. In a statement, the country’s second-largest nickel producer said the memorandum of cooperation and partnership was signed by its Chairman Joseph C. Sy and Vi Holding Chairman Valery N. Krasnov. President Rodrigo R. Duterte […] The post GFNi inks agreement with Russian firm appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsNov 14th, 2017

Russian firm, FNI to construct nickel plant

Russian firm, FNI to construct nickel plant.....»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 14th, 2017

Massive data breach has cost Equifax nearly $90 million

SAN FRANCISCO -- A massive security breach that hit Equifax has cost the US credit bureau nearly $90 million so far, a figure that is set to rise further, its chief financial officer saidon Thursday. The company, which gathers data on consumers to help lenders determine borrowers' creditworthiness, revealed in September that hackers had stolen the personal details, including names, dates of birth and social security numbers, of nearly 146 million people. In the third quarter, "we incurred a one-time charge related to the cybersecurity incident of $87.5 million," John Gamble said during a conference call on quarterly results. Equifax is forecasting between $60 and $75 million in spen...Keep on reading: Massive data breach has cost Equifax nearly $90 million.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 11th, 2017

ASEAN summit targeted by hackers: report

A hacking group previously linked to the Vietnamese government or working on its behalf has broken into the computers of neighboring countries as well as a grouping of Southeast Asian nations, according to cybersecurity company Volexity......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

WILL DOTS LEAD TO TRUTH? | Watch: Poe notes ‘connections’ of Divina law firm to Atio Castillo case

Connecting the dots: that's what Sen. Grace Poe sought to do Monday, at the resumption of the Senate hearing on the fatal hazing of Horatio "Atio" Castillo III. Citing the “connections” of the high-profile law office headed by lawyer Nilo Divina of the University of Santo Tomas (UST) Faculty of Civil Law, the senator said such may provide critical links in the case of the freshman UST law student who died early morning of Sept. 17, 2017......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

Tax haven secrets of ultra-rich exposed – BBC News

A huge new leak of financial documents has revealed how the powerful and ultra-wealthy, including the Queen’s private estate, secretly invest vast amounts of cash in offshore tax havens. Donald Trump’s commerce secretary is shown to have a stake in a firm dealing with Russians sanctioned by the US. The leak, dubbed the Paradise Papers, contains 13.4m documents, mostly from one leading firm in offshore finance. BBC Panorama is part of nearly 100 media groups investigating the papers. As with last year’s Panama Papers leak, the documents were obtained by the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, which called in the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) to oversee the investigation. The Guardian is also among the organisations investigating the documents. Sunday’s revelations form only a small part of a week of disclosures that will expose the tax and financial affairs of some of the hundreds of people and companies named in the data, some with strong UK connections. Many of the stories focus on how politicians, multinationals, celebrities and high-net-worth individuals use complex structures of trusts, foundations and shell companies to protect their cash from tax officials or hide their dealings behind a veil of secrecy. The Paradise Papers show that about £10m ($13m) of the Queen’s private money was invested offshore. It was put into funds in the Cayman Islands and Bermuda by the Duchy of Lancaster, which provides the Queen with an income and handles investments for her £500m private estate. There is nothing illegal in the investments and no suggestion that the Queen is avoiding tax, but questions may be asked about whether the monarch should be investing offshore. There were small investments in the rent-to-buy retailer BrightHouse, which has been accused of exploiting the poor, and the Threshers chain of off-licences, which later went bust owing £17.5m in tax and costing almost 6,000 people their jobs. The Duchy said it was not involved in decisions made by funds and there is no suggestion the Queen had any knowledge of the specific investments made on her behalf. The Duchy has in the past said it gives “ongoing consideration regarding any of its acts or omissions that could adversely impact the reputation” of the Queen, who it says takes “a keen interest” in the estate. Wilbur Ross helped stave off bankruptcy for Donald Trump in the 1990s and was later appointed commerce secretary in Mr Trump’s administration. The documents reveal Mr Ross has retained an interest in a shipping company which earns millions of dollars a year transporting oil and gas for a Russian energy firm whose shareholders include Vladimir Putin’s son-in-law and two men subject to US sanctions. It will again raise questions about the Russian connections of Donald Trump’s team. His presidency has been dogged by allegations that Russians colluded to try to influence the outcome of last year’s US election. He has called the allegations “fake news”. Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal has called for an investigation, telling NBC News that Mr Ross had given Congress the impression he no longer held shares in the shipping company. “Our committee was misled, the American people were misled by the concealment of those companies.” Most of the data comes from a company called Appleby, a Bermuda-based legal services provider at the top end of the offshore industry, helping clients set up in overseas jurisdictions with low or zero tax rates. Its documents, and others mainly from corporate registries in Caribbean jurisdictions, were obtained by Süddeutsche Zeitung. It has not revealed the source. The media partners say the investigation is in the public interest because data leaks from the world of offshore have repeatedly exposed wrongdoing. In response to the leaks, Appleby said it was “satisfied that there is no evidence of any wrongdoing, either on the part of ourselves or our clients”, adding: “We do not tolerate illegal behaviour.” Essentially it’s about a place outside of your own nation’s regulations to which companies or individuals can reroute money, assets or profits to take advantage of lower taxes. These jurisdictions are known as tax havens to the layman, or the more stately offshore financial centres (OFCs) to the industry. They are generally stable, secretive and reliable, often small islands but not exclusively so, and can vary on how rigorously they carry out checks on wrongdoing. The UK is a big player here, not simply because so many of its overseas territories and Crown dependencies are OFCs, but many of the lawyers, accountants and bankers working in the offshore industry are in the City of London. It’s also about the mega-rich. Brooke Harrington, author of Capital Without Borders: Wealth Managers and the One Percent, says offshore finance is not for the 1% but the .001%. Assets of around $500,000 (£380,000) would just not meet the offshore fees the schemes would need, she says. Well, it is a lot of cash. The Boston Consulting Group says $10tn is held offshore. That’s about the equivalent of the gross domestic products of the UK, Japan and France – combined. It may also be a conservative estimate. Critics of offshore say it is mainly about secrecy – which opens the door to wrongdoing – and inequality. They also say the action of governments to curb it has often been slow and ineffective. Brooke Harrington says if the rich are avoiding tax, the poor pick up the bill: “There’s a minimal amount the governments need to function and they recoup what they lose from […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

DICT on top of probe into hacking of Senate staff emails

MANILA, Philippines—A task force on cybersecurity will meet on Monday to probe the hacking of emails of opposition senators’ staff, a ranking official from t.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 13th, 2017