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Court sought to declare CPP-NPA a terror group

Court sought to declare CPP-NPA a terror group.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: pep pepDec 6th, 2017

Court’s terror declaration on communists may bring back Sison to PH–Cayetano

A move by the government to ask the court to declare the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) and its armed wing the New People’s Army (NPA) a terrorist organization, could help bring back its founder Jose Maria Sison to the Philippines, according to Foreign Affairs Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano. Sison, who has been living [...] The post Court’s terror declaration on communists may bring back Sison to PH–Cayetano appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsDec 8th, 2017

Robredo backs Duterte s declaration designating CPP-NPA as terror group

MANILA, Philippines — Vice President Leni Robredo on Wednesday threw her support behind President Rodrigo Duterte’s move to declare the Communist Party of th.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 6th, 2017

Reforms in water supplier sought

TACLOBAN CITY — A group of city village officials and another composed of water suppliers called on members of the board of directors of the Leyte Metropolitan Water District (LMWD) to step down and let Mayor Cristina G. Romualdez appoint LMWD board members. The call was made in light of a Supreme Court ruling that… link: Reforms in water supplier sought.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2017

Promising signs from Bulls young guns

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com In time, Zach LaVine’s return, development and eventual career arc will determine to a large extent how successful the Bulls’ Draft Night trade of Jimmy Butler to Minnesota was. For now, and until LaVine suits up this season and beyond, his value to Chicago is strictly to be determined. The two-time NBA Slam Dunk champ is back in the practice gym in his recovery from left knee (anterior cruciate ligament) surgery. Playing 1-on-1 with teammates, working out with the G-League Windy City Bulls in Chicago’s northwest suburbs and improving his timing and his conditioning, LaVine is penciled in to make his season debut before the end of 2017. Meanwhile, though, the Bulls have two other pieces to show from the Butler deal: stretch-four forward Lauri Markkanen and point guard Kris Dunn. Both have offered glimpses of what they can do and how they might fit into the team’s long-term vision that someday won’t prioritize losing. Markkanen, the lanky Finn by way of the University of Arizona, is averaging 13.8 points, 7.6 rebounds and in 30 minutes. He’s putting up 7.2 three-point shots per game and hitting 31.7 percent. His 140 attempts from the arc ranked 14th in the NBA – more than Bradley Beal (126), more than Carmelo Anthony (125) – and Markkanen’s 48 makes are the most by any player in his first 20 games. Dunn, whose disappointing 2016-17 rookie season with Minnesota essentially has gotten a reset, was at 12 ppg, 4.8 rpg and 4.2 apg after having 19 points, five rebounds and five assists in Thursday night's (Friday, PHL time) loss at Denver. The 23-year-old from Providence is shooting 43.2 percent on three-pointers (43.2 percent)  and his steal percentage of 3.8 – an estimate of the percent of opponents’ possessions ending in Dunn steals – ranked No. 1 in the NBA. Their trajectories have been somewhat different so far in 2017-18: Markkanen has been consistent while fighting through a flu bug and some road weariness, while Dunn has played his best most recently. But they’ve both contributed in ways that, aside from the Bulls’ relentless losing, suggests brighter days and in time a positive verdict on that headline-grabbing, bit-spitting trade. Markkanen: Stays cool, likes cold, shoots hot It’s fair to say that the Bulls, when they acquired Markkanen as the No. 7 selection in the Draft last June, got a sleeper. No, literally. That’s about all the 20-year-old native of Vantaa, Finland was able to do after a hectic spring leading up to the draft followed by a tortuous summer at the Las Vegas Summer League and a key role for his home country’s national team in the FIBA Eurobasket 2017 tournament. Markkanen’s single season at Arizona not only acclimated him to the American game, it earned him all-American status and a taste of the NCAA tournament before the Wildcats lost to Xavier. In the Euro competition, he averaged 19.5 points and 5.7 rebounds before heading to Chicago for an early jump on training camp. “When he came over here, he was exhausted,” Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said. “The week before training camp was completely lost time – he needed to recharge his batteries. So, we really didn’t know what we had. He was still tired when we started camp. We didn’t throw him out there for all the drills, just as part of the process in getting his body back. “But then every time he stepped on the floor, he showed a little more.” First Markkanen demonstrated he would crack the rotation. Then – when forwards Nikola Mirotic (facial injuries) and Bobby Portis (suspension for the punch that caused them) rendered themselves unavailable two days before the season opener – Markkanen was thrust into the starting lineup. Butterflies? Rookie mistakes? Not so much. Markkanen looked almost unflappable in averaging 17.2 points and 9.3 rebounds through his first six appearances, with a high of 25 points at Miami and double-doubles against San Antonio and Atlanta. “We had to adjust our offense,” Hoiberg said, “and put in some new things to try to get him the ball in different spots on the floor, because of his versatility to score.” Justin Holiday was one of the teammates who learned quickly to get the ball more often to the tall blond guy. “He’s playing consistent, and that’s a very mature thing to do in this league,” Holiday said. “What’s maybe surprising is his confidence in shooting the ball. He’s not afraid to shoot it.” Said Markkanen, whose father Pekka lettered at Kansas before returning home to play professionally: “I’m expecting big things from myself. I think that’s what motivates me every day. Whatever I do, I’m not satisfied. So, I try to set higher goals every time I step on the court. Try to do things better. “It’s going to get harder, I know that. I’m trying to face it like any other job. Just go at it positively, fight through it, put the work in, and I think it will work itself out.” At 20 games and counting, Markkanen will soon blow by the 37 he played in college, and the workload probably has something to do with his recent production; in his five most recent games before Thursday (Friday, PHL time), he shot 25.4 percent, including 11-of-39 from the arc. He says he has adjusted from one game to the next – “I don’t want to give my scouting report, but I try to add something new and figure out what they’re going to throw at me,” he said. He even drew praise from the great LeBron James after hitting four three-pointers in the fourth quarter of a preseason game against the Cavaliers. Markkanen hasn’t been fooled by Chicago’s relatively balmy late-autumn weather and has to be one of the few NBA players to welcome winter’s chill (“I’m actually looking forward to snow”). He isn’t flinching from the Bulls’ task at hand, either, which looks longer and more laborious with each lopsided defeat. “I understand this part of a process,” said Markkanen, who would appear to be on his way to the Rising Stars Challenge game at All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles. “We’ve got a young group. We’re having tough times. ... It’s about sticking together and having everyone know that. We can’t afford to not trust or not be a good teammate.” Dunn: Pushing a personal reset button Dunn’s young career was looking a little snakebit. He suffered a concussion in the first game he played for Minnesota in the 2016 Las Vegas Summer League. This time, he had to leave the Bulls’ Vegas entry early to attend to family matters. Then the point guard got hurt in a preseason game against Milwaukee Oct. 7 (Oct. 8, PHL time), winding up with an “open dislocation” of his left index finger. All those setbacks cost Dunn valuable learning time, as far as running first the Wolves’ and then the Bulls’ attacks. He never fully recovered from it last season, sputtering through a rookie season that fell far short of his and others’ expectations. His fellow Class of 2016 draftees had voted him the most likely to snag the Rookie of the Year award, but it went instead to Milwaukee’s Malcolm Brogdon, who’d been chosen in the second round 31 spots after Dunn. This time, Dunn was out of action until Chicago’s fifth regular season game. And the delay showed in his performances: 9.8 points per game, 4.5 rebounds, 3.4 assists, and 38.6 percent shooting in his first eight games. One Bulls insider said Dunn “had a lot going on in his head” from last season’s failures, even as he tried to get traction in Chicago. Said Holiday, 28, who went undrafted and bounced through five organizations in barely three years from 2013 to 2016: “When you’re young, man, everybody’s pushing. Who knows what was going on his head? He might have been trying to be perfect. Sometimes it takes time. It’s a big role. “But he has the confidence to do it, where last year maybe he didn’t have as much confidence. All you can really do is go out and play hard, and if it works out, it works out.” Over Dunn’s past seven games before Thursday (Friday, PHL time), he was a more effective, more efficient player: 13.6 ppg, 4.9 rpg, 5.0 apg, while averaging 2.1 steals and 27.7 minutes. He had made 9-of-15 three-pointers, compared to 6-of-21 to start the season. Already in the five weeks he’s been active, he has played about 30 percent of the total minutes he got in 78 appearances for Minnesota’s Tom Thibodeau. The Bulls have been 3.6 points better when he’s been on the floor, too. That’s not enough to tip outcomes, but keep in mind the Wolves were 2.6 points worse a year ago with Dunn in the game. He played probably his best NBA game Tuesday against Phoenix, scoring 24 points on 10 of 16 shooting with eight assists, four rebounds and four steals. If not for a couple of egregious turnovers among his four, he might have agreed with Hoiberg’s “terrific” assessment. That performance came 48 hours after Dunn had scored two points and missed all six of his field-goal attempts against Miami. Hoiberg sought him out and demanded that the second-year guard play more aggressively, and Dunn proved his coach right. “He called me out,” Dunn said. “When a coach calls you out, you try to play as hard as you can. I had to get through my mind, ‘Go out and play the way I used to play. With that aggression. On defense, on offense. Try to stay down in errors as much as I can and get everybody involved.’ “I want to be an elite point guard one day and I understand, the best point guards don’t make those killer turnovers. If I want to reach my goal, I have to get better each and every day in practice, watch film and, y’know, think a little smarter when you’re playing.” Some have suggested Boston’s Marcus Smart as a legitimate comparison for Dunn, given their defensive aptitudes and challenges both face when shooting from range. Dunn is a huge fan of Smart, but believes he can be a full-service, top-notch playmaker. Mostly, he finally looks comfortable with this reset to his NBA experience. “Individually for me, it is a reset,” Dunn said. “I say this is my first year because I didn’t get too many minutes and I didn’t play the right position in Minnesota. I was a two, a three, sometimes a one. But this is my first year of [regularly] playing the point guard. As a team, we don’t have Jimmy, we don’t have [Rajon] Rondo, we don’t have Dwyane Wade, so we’re all trying to figure it out. Everybody is trying to step up and come together as a unit.” With LaVine’s debut now weeks rather than months away, the Bulls – and their skeptical fans – will be able to more fully judge the yield from that Butler trade. Two out of three so far are giving glimmers of hope. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2017

SC justice accused of leaking documents

MANILA, Philippines — A civic group on Monday sought the SC to probe one of its justices for allegedly leaking court documents pertinent to the impeachment c.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 27th, 2017

What do gov t circulars operationalizing Duterte s war on drugs say?

MANILA, Philippines – A group of lawyers is asking the Supreme Court (SC) to declare the war on drugs of the Philippine National Police (PNP) unconstitutional. The Free Legal Assistance Group (FLAG) on October 11, 2017 filed petitions for injunction and prohibition against ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017

Duterte to declare NPA as terror group

Duterte to declare NPA as terror group.....»»

Category: newsSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsNov 20th, 2017

3 senators support Duterte plan to tag NPA as terrorist group

At least three senators weresupportive of PresidentRodrigo Duterte'splan to declarethe New People's Army(NPA) a terrorist group, noting that the communist rebelshadlong beenlabeled "terrorists" by a local court and the United Statesanyway.   "Only a president with Duterte's guts can declare the NPAs as terrorists and that's what who they are for quite a long time," Lacson,a formerpolice chief, said ina text message to reporters onMonday.   "Their ideology has been gone more than a decade ago. They burn, destroy, kill innocent civilians to terrorize; they terrorize to sow fear and harass helpless civilians; they harass to extort under the guise of revolutionary t...Keep on reading: 3 senators support Duterte plan to tag NPA as terrorist group.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 20th, 2017

Former member of Ethiopia Marxist regime apologizes in court

THE HAGUE — A former member of a Marxist group that seized control of Ethiopia in the 1970s in a bloody purge known as the Red Terror apologized yesterday fo.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2017

Maute cases transferred from Cagayan De Oro to Taguig RTC

MANILA, Philippines - The rebellion cases against arrested members and supporters of the Maute terror group may now proceed after the Supreme Court (SC) orde.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 18th, 2017

What the Qatar crisis means for Hamas – CNN News

When Palestinian militant group Hamas announced its new charter to the world, it wasn't from Ramallah or Gaza City, but from the Sheraton hotel's gilded Salwa Ballroom in Doha. It was no surprise that Hamas chose Qatar. It's the home of outgoing Hamas leader, Khaled Meshaal, and much of his senior leadership. &'8220;Qatar is quite important for Hamas,&'8221; said H.A. Hellyer, a senior non-resident fellow at the Atlantic Council. &'8220;Qatar provides strong financial aid to the occupied Palestinian territories and is a safe haven for a number of Hamas leaders.&'8221; The recent crisis in the Persian Gulf region is putting that relationship in jeopardy. Earlier this month, nine countries including Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt, and Bahrain cut diplomatic ties with Qatar and imposed financial embargoes of varying severity. The announcement was the culmination of a feud that had been simmering for years. The nine countries accused Doha of assisting terrorist organizations, providing support for the Muslim Brotherhood and of being far too cozy with Iran. Ironically perhaps, Qatar's relationship with Hamas had not been among the biggest issues dividing the region. Unlike the US, Britain, and Europe, all of which designate Hamas as a terrorist organization, Arab states &'8212; including Qatar &'8212; do not. This was something Qatar's Foreign Minister sought to remind people in an interview with Russia's RT, in response to a call from his Saudi counterpart that Qatar stop supporting Hamas. &'8220;The US views Hamas as a terror organization. But to the rest of the Arab nations, it is a legitimate resistance movement. We do not support Hamas, we support the Palestinian people,&'8221; Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani said. &'8220;Hamas' presence [in Doha] is coordinated with the US and the countries in the region, and it's part of our effort to mediate between the Palestinian factions to reach reconciliation.&'8221; For its part, Hamas says it is being squeezed unreasonably. &'8220;The Gulf Countries are pressuring Qatar to cut relations with resistance organizations. This is unacceptable and we refuse this pressure,&'8221; Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoom said in a statement to CNN. &'8220;We are a resistance movement and the whole world is a witness to this.&'8221; Hamas is seen as having been under a series of pressures for the last few years, reflected in some significant internal changes. Last month, a new leader was announced &'8212; Ismail Haniya taking over from long-time leader Meshaal &'8212; at the same time as the militant group issued its new charter. While Israel pointed to the fact the new document continued to espouse violent resistance, and a commitment to the &'8220;rejection of the Zionist entity,&'8221; others observers said the document's description of a Palestinian state with the borders existing on the eve of the Six Day War in 1967 provided evidence of a new moderation. As Hamas rank and file were digesting those changes, so the leadership was suddenly forced to pay careful attention to diplomatic developments. Hellyer sees two main reasons the nine regional allies are turning their attention towards Hamas. &'8220;First, Hamas has ties to the Muslim Brotherhood organization, which puts it in the firing line of Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia,&'8221; Hellyer says. &'8220;But I think this has more to do with a western audience. The Saudi rulers took advantage of Trump's recognition of them as a powerful actor in the region and that might have encouraged them.&'8221; Al Jazeera, based in Qatar, has been a thorn in the side of regional autocrats for years. Qatar's regional influence also comes from support for Islamists, whether it is the Muslim Brotherhood and Hamas at one end of the spectrum, or Al Qaeda at the other. Doha has used this sway to negotiate with various groups including the Taliban, as well as to help negotiate ceasefires between Israel and Hamas. In late 2010 and into 2011, Qatar saw its influence throughout the Middle East rise sharply. Al Jazeera, already a thorn in the side of Arab autocrats, reported extensively on the Arab Spring. The Al Jazeera Arabic channel grew additional roots in Egypt after the uprising and election of Mohamed Morsy who hailed from the Muslim Brotherhood. The international community praised the new Egyptian president for bringing a swift end to a war between Gaza militants and Israel that same year. In the long run, though, as it unraveled across the region, the Arab Spring proved to be disastrous for Hamas, which saw the number of countries it could call a friend whittled away. &'8220;Hamas had very strong relations with Syria, Egypt, Qatar, Turkey and Iran,&'8221; says Mustafa Barghouti, an independent Palestinian politician. &'8220;Things have changed over time so they had to diversify relations.&'8221; Before 2012, the Hamas leadership was based out of Damascus. Tensions grew between the militants and the regime of Syrian President Bashar Al Assad as revolution gripped the country. Eventually, Hamas sided with the rebels and cut ties to some extent with Syria, Hezbollah, and Iran. &'8220;Hamas lost a lot in the uprisings,&'8221; says Hellyer. &'8220;This is one of the reasons why Qatar stepped in.&'8221; Qatar, a strong supporter of both the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and Hamas, took advantage of the situation. In the fall of 2012, the head of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited the Gaza Strip becoming the first world leader to do so under Hamas control. The emir inaugurated projects worth hundreds of millions of dollars. In the vacuum left [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 13th, 2017

the terror and torment of Turkey’s jailed journalists – The Guardian

Scores of imprisoned Turkish journalists face a Kafkaesque nightmare of legal limbo, farcical charge sheets, maltreatment and even solitary confinement in the country that locks up more reporters than any other in the world. A series of Guardian interviews and written exchanges with several of those jailed as a result of a sweeping media crackdown found a huge mental burden on the incarcerated, as well as tough social and intellectual restrictions. “I have been broken and twisted in more ways than I can imagine,” says the recently released novelist Aslı Erdoğan (no relation to the president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan), who spent five days in solitary confinement at the start of four months of pretrial detention. Mehmet Altan, a journalist awaiting trial for supposedly attempting to bring down the government describes his life in prison as an environment “where no needs of a mature mind are met. It is like wearing striped pyjamas. It is a very narrow life without any joy or feeling to it.” “Never have I seen this much wrongdoing,” said Barış Yarkadaş, an MP in the opposition Republican People’s party (CHP) and a member of the media commission that monitors journalists’ arrests and provides them with legal aid. The media crackdown followed a coup attempt last July that left more than 200 people dead and more than 1,400 injured. The purges have led to tens of thousands of civil servants, members of the police, military and judiciary as well as academics and journalists being either detained or dismissed for alleged links to the network of Fethullah Gülen, an exiled preacher blamed for instigating the coup. Opponents of President Erdoğan say the purges have turned into a witch-hunt against dissidents in government, academia and the media, to stifle them before a historic referendum in April that would grant sweeping powers to the president. The CHP says 152 journalists are behind bars and 173 media outlets have been shut since the coup attempt, including newspapers, magazines, radio stations, websites and news agencies. More than 2,500 journalists have been laid off because of the closures and 800 have had their press cards revoked, with many also having their passports confiscated. The government only acknowledges that 30 journalists are in prison. In November, a dozen journalists at Cumhuriyet, Turkey’s oldest newspaper and a bastion of opposition to Erdoğan, were arrested and most have remained in custody without formal indictments. The government has threatened to appoint a trustee board to manage the publication’s affairs in a move that would silence its critics. Many Kurdish outlets have been shut and often recreated under different names after accusations of propaganda on behalf of the PKK. Kurdish journalists have been repeatedly arrested while reporting on demonstrations against the government, only to be quickly released after one hearing, in a practice seen as an attempt to intimidate them. Last month Deniz Yücel, a German-Turkish journalist who works for Die Welt newspaper, was formally arrested because of his reporting on the hacking of the personal emails of Berat Albayrak, the energy minister and Erdoğan’s son-in-law. “Turkey now has the dubious honour of being the world’s biggest jailer of journalists, and free media in the country is in its death throes,” Amnesty International said after Yucel’s arrest. Aydın Doğan, head of the Doğan Group, which publishes one of the country’s leading newspapers, the Hürriyet, was recently summoned to court after an article published by the paper indicated there was discomfort in the military about what was happening politically – a move interpreted as a call for the military to intervene in politics. Some observers have described the accusations levelled against some leading journalists as bizarre. Ahmet Şik, an investigative journalist who is in prison, was accused of propaganda on behalf of the Gülen network, even though he authored a book called The Imam’s Army that exposed the group’s corrupt practices. “It’s a bit like arresting Martin Luther King for being a member of the Klan,” said one rights worker. Cumhuriyet has also often reported on the damaging influence of the Gülenists, who once shared power with the ruling Justice and Development party (AKP). When the director of the newspaper’s board, Akın Atalay, returned from overseas to challenge the order for his arrest he was detained because investigators determined he was a flight risk. “We all know this is absurdity,” said Yarkadaş, the CHP lawmaker who recently visited the Cumhuriyet journalists in prison. “This is not rule of law. This is undermining the law. “The government is saying if you oppose the regime we are planning to plant in Turkey, you will find yourself in prison and we will isolate you from the outside world.” Media outlets also face financial pressures. Monitors say the government is leaning on businesses to avoid advertising in opposition newspapers in order to curtail their revenues. The result has been that the vast majority of mainstream outlets are either openly supportive of the AKP government or are mildly centrist in their politics. The only major opposition outlets are Cumhuriyet and Halk TV, a station close to the CHP, and Sözcü, a tabloid similar to the Sun in the UK. Opposition officials say the oppressive media environment has limited the debate around the referendum and masked many problems in the country, including a worsening economic crisis, high youth unemployment, spiralling tensions with the PKK, terrorism and foreign policy woes. They say the stifling of discussion [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2017

Presidential Trump – CNN News

President Donald Trump reached for poetry and conjured a vision of common national purpose Tuesday during his first address to Congress, shifting his tone from the dark, searing approach of his previous big speeches to the nation. Trump adopted a statesmanlike cadence, hitting notes of inspiration. For once, this most unorthodox of politicians struck a conventional presidential posture as he sought to stabilize his administration after a tumultuous five weeks in office. Though his language was more lofty and unifying than normal, Trump gave little quarter on the substance of his policies on issues ranging from trade, defense, immigration and counterterrorism. The result was a populist, nationalistic prescription that he said would yield &'8220;a new chapter of American greatness.&'8221; &'8220;From now on, America will be empowered by our aspirations, not burdened by our fears, inspired by the future, not bound by failures of the past, and guided by a vision, not blinded by our doubts,&'8221; Trump said, from the Speaker's rostrum in the House of Representatives. During a vitriolic campaign and a raucous start to his term, Trump has done little to reach beyond his base of deeply committed voters who revile the kind of political elites that the President was staring down as he spoke on Tuesday. But, beset by the lowest approval ratings of any new commander-in-chief of modern times, Trump made a palpable effort to court voters who didn't support him with an offer to lay down the battles of the past. In fact, his address ticked almost all the boxes of a traditional State of the Union style appearance. &'8220;I am asking all citizens to embrace this renewal of the American spirit. I am asking all members of Congress to join me in dreaming big, and bold, and daring things for our country,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;I am asking everyone watching tonight to seize this moment. Believe in yourselves. Believe in your future. And believe, once more, in America.&'8221; It was an uplifting and unifying message that many Americans have rarely heard from Trump, who argued &'8220;the time for trivial fights is behind us.&'8221; While Trump is not solely responsible for the coarsening of political life, his brash, Twitter-fueled approach has rocked the nation's politics. The question now is whether the President was previewing a new, more sober political persona or whether he will return to his old habits. The change in his tone was evident from the first moments of his speech when he condemned the recent spate of threats against Jewish community centers, vandalism at Jewish cemeteries and the shooting of two Indian men in Kansas. He said the violence was a reminder that &'8220;while we may be a nation divided on policies, we are a country that stands united in condemning hate and evil in all its very ugly forms.&'8221; The comment followed heavy criticism of Trump for not addressing such violence. The new President entered the House chamber to thunderous applause and spoke of the &'8220;renewal of the American spirit.&'8221; A senior White House official said Trump wrote the speech himself with input from almost every member of his presidential team of advisers. In the emotional high point of the speech, Trump turned to the first lady's box and acknowledged Carryn Owens, the widow of a US Navy Special operator, William &'8220;Ryan&'8221; Owens, who was killed in an anti-terror raid in Yemen in the first major military engagement of the new administration. His less explosive presentation style was welcomed by many lawmakers. &'8220;Donald Trump did indeed become presidential tonight, and I think we'll see that reflected in a higher approval rating,&'8221; Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, said on CNN after the speech. &'8220;The Donald Trump I heard tonight was a lot more focused and disciplined and subdued, and it was a lot more uneventful in a good way,&'8221; moderate House Republican Charlie Dent told CNN's Tom LoBianco. &'8220;There were not a lot of distractions tonight, this speech was much better than the inaugural speech.&'8221; North Dakota Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, who is up for re-election next year in a state that Trump carried, said the President delivered a &'8220;very good speech.&'8221; &'8220;It was delivered with a sense of 'this is who I am, this is what I want to accomplish' and I think the goals are great,&'8221; she said. &'8220;How we get there is the $10,000 question.&'8221; Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer said on CNN that Trump's &'8220;speeches and the realities are very, very far apart.&'8221; &'8220;Until his reality catches up with his speeches, he's got big trouble,&'8221; Schumer said. The looks on lawmakers' faces during Trump's speech Though his rhetoric was soaring, Trump still struck hardline notes. He overruled national security adviser H.R. McMaster, according to a senior administration official, to warn of &'8220;radical Islamic terrorism.&'8221; Hitting themes familiar from his campaign, Trump vowed to restore &'8220;integrity and the rule of law to our borders.&'8221; &'8220;We will soon begin the construction of a great, great wall along our southern border,&'8221; Trump said, drawing Republican cheers even as he didn't mention his earlier promise that Mexico would pay for construction. &'8220;As we speak tonight, we are removing gang members, drug dealers, and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our very innocent citizens. Bad ones are going out as I speak, and as I promised throughout the campaign&'8221; While such language could please conservatives, Trump sent shockwaves through Washington earlier Tuesday [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 1st, 2017

SC grants TRO vs curfew ordinances of 3 LGUs

THE Supreme Court (SC) on Tuesday has temporarily stopped the implementation of curfew ordinances in three local governments units after a youth group last week asked to Court to declare them unconsti.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 26th, 2016

CA affirms Ivler’s sentence in road rage killing

The Court of Appeals (CA) has affirmed the sentence meted by a trial court against Jason Ivler for the murder of Renato Ebarle, Jr. in a road rage incident in 2009 In a 32-page decision dated November 28, 2017 penned by Associate Justice Ramon Cruz, the CA’s 14th Division junked Ivler’s appeal which sought to [...] The post CA affirms Ivler’s sentence in road rage killing appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated News16 hr. 32 min. ago

Switzerland expels French-Tunisian man over terror fears

GENEVA, Switzerland – Swiss police said Saturday, December 16, they had expelled a person facing criminal charges in Switzerland for suspected links to a terrorist group, over fears he poses a threat to national security. Federal police confirmed to the Agence France-Presse (AFP) their "decision to expel a person who is ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 17th, 2017

New IS-inspired group actively recruiting members for terror attacks

THE battle in Marawi City may have ended, but the war is not over. This became evident on Friday after the Armed Forces of the Philippines  (AFP) said that Islamic State-inspired groups in Mindanao were ramping up its recruitment drive to beef up its fighters for terror attacks. During the “Bangon Marawi” news briefing in [...] The post New IS-inspired group actively recruiting members for terror attacks appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

WESM price ruling to make consumers pay P17B

The ruling of the Court of Appeals (CA) to void high prices at the Wholesale Electricity Spot Market (WESM) from November to December 2013 would result in the passing on of charges totaling P17 billion to consumers in Luzon, a consumer group warned on Wednesday. Once the verdict takes effect, a typical household would pay [...] The post WESM price ruling to make consumers pay P17B appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsDec 14th, 2017

Recruiter of terrorists charged

GOVERNMENT prosecutors yesterday indicted a woman arrested in Taguig City last October for allegedly recruiting through social media fighters for the ISIS-linked Maute terror group who attacked Marawi City. In a resolution, the Department of Justice indicted Karen Aizha Hamidon with 295 counts of inciting rebellion before the Taguig City….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsDec 13th, 2017

Duterte on martial law extension, Dela Rosa on Carpio, Ongpin case | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: President Rodrigo Duterte singles out one armed group in his letter to Congress asking for a one-year extension of martial law in Mindanao.  Philippine National Police chief Ronald dela Rosa questions why Supreme Court Senior Associate Justice Antonio Carpio thinks police are ignoring big-time drug lords.  President Rodrigo Duterte will fire ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 12th, 2017