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Cops make more child cybersex arrests, rescues

MANILA, Philippines — Authorities in the Philippines have rescued four girls and arrested a mother and two other women for allegedly livestreaming sexually e.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 12th, 2017

Cops vs drugs

THE Philippine National Police is not totally out of the war on drugs as its members may still make drug-related arrests and seize illegal drugs during operations like checkpoints and raids, a senior PNP official told the Journal Group yesterday. However, PNP Director for Operations Director Camilo Pancratius P. Cascolan….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2017

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race

The Philippine’s lone representative Dexter Daquigan collared second-place finishes in the two classic car races held in Sepang, Malaysia, last weekend amid a challenge from top drivers hailing from Southeast Asia and the United Kingdom. Daquigan’s all-Filipino crew and team were able to tune his classic Mini Cooper to make it capture podium positions of… link: Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race

The Philippine’s lone representative Dexter Daquigan collared second-place finishes in the two classic car races held in Sepang, Malaysia, last weekend amid a challenge from top drivers hailing from Southeast Asia and the United Kingdom. Daquigan’s all-Filipino crew and team were able to tune his classic Mini Cooper to make it capture podium positions of [...] The post Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Ken Chan takes on a challenging role in GMA Network’s My Special Tatay

BEGINNING September 3, witness how a father’s love for his child conquers life’s challenges in GMA Network’s newest afternoon program, My Special Tatay. This original series is headlined by one of the most talented actors in the Kapuso Station, Ken Chan, who is all set to make another mark on the small screen as he […] The post Ken Chan takes on a challenging role in GMA Network’s My Special Tatay appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018

South Korean equestrian rides above scandal to bag bronze

A South Korean athlete who was left out of the Asian Games squad four years ago to make way for the horse-riding daughter of the country's "Rasputin" bagged bronze in the individual dressage on Thursday. Kim Hyeok told AFP that his brush with Chung Yoo-ra, the child of a woman jailed alongside former president Park Geun-hye in a massive corruption scandal, had made him tougher at this year's Asiad in Jakarta. "It was difficult four years ago because I trained a lot," Kim, 23, said. "But I didn't think about those events today. I am better than four years ago and those events have made me stronger." Electronics giant Samsung paid for some 3.65 billion won ($3.25 million) w...Keep on reading: South Korean equestrian rides above scandal to bag bronze.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Acing Aspirations

HAILING from the city of Ormoc, Arnel Aparis was a small town boy with big dreams. As a child, he always admired leaders who made a difference. Observing those people he looked up to so much, he thought to himself: “I should also try to make a difference in this world.” And so he did—in… link: Acing Aspirations.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

PNP: No ‘kid-gloves’ treatment vs cops in anti-drug ops cases

The Philippine National Police (PNP) on Friday assured the public that policemen with pending cases related to anti-illegal drug operations were not being given "kid-gloves" treatment following reports that some of them were even being promoted. PNP Spokesperson Sr. Supt. Benigno Durana said, however, policemen implicated in the drug war should also be given due process. "We would want to make sure that while the accused drugs suspects should be given due process, we should also give due process to the ones running after the criminals," Durana said in a Palace briefing. "So that's precisely what we have done in the case of those implicated in the Kian delos Santos case," he adde...Keep on reading: PNP: No ‘kid-gloves’ treatment vs cops in anti-drug ops cases.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2018

‘Western Visayas cops raised the bar’

WESTERN Visayas police director, Chief Superintendent John Bulalacao believes that Police Regional Office (PRO)-6 was able to raise the bar as far as police service is concerned. “Undeniably, we are today gearing towards the same direction – we want to raise the bar even higher to make us truly deserving of the mandate “To Serve […] The post ‘Western Visayas cops raised the bar’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsAug 14th, 2018

Cone: We’re the Gin Kings but Beermen still ‘PBA kings’

Dethroning San Miguel Beer is one thing but taking its place as the best team in the PBA today is a different case altogether. Barangay Ginebra foiled San Miguel's bid to repeat as Commissioner's Cup champion but head coach Tim Cone said the Beermen still sit atop the PBA mountain. READ:Ginebra dethrones San Miguel, cops PBA Commissioner's Cup title "I think they see us as a threat to their perennial crown. They are, perennially, they're the king," said Cone after winning his third title with Ginebra on Wednesday night. "Even though, we're the Gin Kings, they (Beermen) are the PBA kings." READ:Finals setback will only make San Miguel 'hungry,' says Lassiter San Miguel hadn't been...Keep on reading: Cone: We’re the Gin Kings but Beermen still ‘PBA kings’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Major grudge match for Garbrandt, Dillashaw tops fight card

By Greg Beacham, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Cody Garbrandt and T.J. Dillashaw have one of the UFC's most compelling feuds of recent years. This beef is rooted in betrayal and tribalism, and it led to the demolition of a once-cordial relationship between training partners. The feud persisted even after Dillashaw knocked out Garbrandt and took his bantamweight title belt last year, following months of verbal sparring and pre-fight scuffling. Their rematch at Staples Center on Saturday night is the main event of UFC 227. It's also the chance for a particularly personal victory for both men, who declined to shake hands at their ceremonial faceoff Thursday in downtown Los Angeles. "I prefer to be respectful," Dillashaw said Thursday. "I prefer to be a martial artist, so I like a respect level, but I don't mind the drama, either. I'm going to use it to my advantage." Garbrandt (11-1) and Dillashaw (15-3) actually have plenty in common. They're both well-conditioned, gifted strikers who became elite competitors at Team Alpha Male, Urijah Faber's famed gym in Sacramento. They've also both become first-time fathers in the nine months since their last bout. But they simply haven't gotten along ever since Dillashaw won the bantamweight title and also left Alpha Male in 2014. To make an epic story short, Dillashaw says he was thrown out because he wouldn't break ties with coach Duane Ludwig, who had just split acrimoniously from Faber. Several Alpha Male fighters, including Garbrandt, say Dillashaw turned his back on them. "Let him say what he wants, but that motivates me," Garbrandt said. "If you say you're going to ruin my career and basically take food out of my child's mouth, that's fine. I didn't need any more motivation with my new son, and while I'm coming off my first loss, I've been more motivated than I ever have out of any win." Any viewer of the pay-per-view show can't miss the clear contrast between Garbrandt, the rural Ohio product with prominent neck tattoos, and Dillashaw, the clean-cut college graduate with a California surfer look. But the rematch primarily is a collision of two fighters with legitimate reason to think they're the best in the 135-pound division. Garbrandt rocketed to the top of the class, winning the belt less than two years after entering the UFC. He lost his title in equally stunning fashion last November to Dillashaw, who reclaimed the strap he had lost to Dominick Cruz nearly two years earlier. During his ascent, Garbrandt appeared to be the archetype of the most compelling lighter-weight fighters. He was slick, athletic, stylistically well-rounded and powerful enough to generate knockouts — and he looked the part of a mixed martial arts star, right down to those tattoos that spread down his resplendently multicolored arms. Garbrandt's neck is covered by large wings flanking a diamond, with the words "SELF MADE" atop his sternum. He seemed ticketed for superstardom — until Dillashaw, the former Cal State Fullerton wrestler whose only losses in the last six years were on debatable split decisions, wrecked the narrative with his fists. Immediately after their bout at Madison Square Garden, Garbrandt claims he tried to quash their grudge, but Dillashaw rejected him. Dillashaw says he isn't to blame for not wanting Garbrandt around him. "You've got me by the throat before, and that pushed me overboard," Dillashaw said, recalling a past scuffle between the two. "What's changed now? Just because I slapped you upside your face, what's different? Why have you got to be fake?" While Garbrandt doesn't accept the blame for this state of affairs, he insists he has grown and changed since his wife, Danny, gave birth in March to their first child, a son named Kai. But Garbrandt also angrily declined to apologize this week for a series of racially insensitive tweets from his early 20s. "I've never felt entitled to anything in my life," Garbrandt said. "I feel like everything happens for a reason. I've been given second chances my whole entire life. ... T.J. is a tough adversary. He's skilled. He's a good competitor. He doesn't like to lose either. That's what's great about this rivalry.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

Filmmaker Louie Ignacio on the hardest part of directing child actors

The hardest task for a director is to make child actors say curse words, steal and pretend to do drugs for the sake of art, according to Louie Ignacio, director of the gritty drama "School Service." "I made them do bad stuff here. They didn't know all these things before taking on the project, but they had to learn them because they're actors," Ignacio said of child thespians Therese Malvar, Felixia Dizon, Kenken Nuyad, Ace Cafe, Santino Oquendo and Celine Juan, who plays the lead character Maya. The film is an entry in the 2018 Cinemalaya Philippine Independent Film Festival, which will run from Aug. 2 to 13 at the Cultural Center of the Philippines in Pasay City. Maya, 8, ...Keep on reading: Filmmaker Louie Ignacio on the hardest part of directing child actors.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018

Mommy Melai adopts ‘color-coded’ discipline method

Comedienne-TV host Melai Cantiveros has a unique way of disciplining her two daughters: she uses color codes to warn them when they misbehave. Melai is married to actor Jason Francisco and is a proud mom to Amelia, 4, and Stella, 1. "I use colored hangers. I raise the pink hanger as a warning sign. If Mela (Amelia) sees me with the black one, that means I'm really, really mad at her," the comedienne said. "I don't really hit Mela---I just tap her. Panakot lang whenever she doesn't listen and becomes too naughty. It works for her. Mela has grown up to be very disciplined." Whenever she'd use the black hanger on her child, Melai said she would also make sure to explain why she...Keep on reading: Mommy Melai adopts ‘color-coded’ discipline method.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 30th, 2018

Spain rescues nearly 500 migrants at sea in a single day

A man gives water to his child as they rest at the harbour of Tarifa on July 24, 2018, after an inflatable boat carrying 135 migrants was rescued by the Spanish coast guard in the Mediterranean. /.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 25th, 2018

More complainants vs 8 cops in shakedown surface

The families of two arrested drug suspects appeared yesterday at the National Capital Region Police Office to file separate complaints against the eight Muntinlupa City policemen who allegedly extorted P400,000 in exchange for the release of a woman and her seven-year-old child last week, police said......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

Arrests after India mob lynches man over WhatsApp child abduction rumor

NEW DELHI, India – Indian police said Sunday they have arrested 25 people after a man was killed by a mob in the country's latest lynching over suspicion of child kidnapping sparked by rumours on WhatsApp.  The men were arrested over the murder of 27-year-old Mohammad Azam who was attacked ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 15th, 2018

4 Munti cops nabbed for kidnap, extortion

The National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) raided the Muntinlupa City police headquarters Friday night and arrested four policemen accused of extorting money in exchange for the release of a woman and her seven-year-old child......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018

4 Munti cops nabbed for kidnap, extortion

The National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) raided the Muntinlupa City police headquarters Friday night and arrested four policemen accused of extorting money in exchange for the release of a woman and her seven-year-old child......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018

PBA: Gutsy Grey rescues Globalport from elimination in Commissioner’s Cup

With Ed Daqioag all over him, Jonathan Grey launched the shot that would end or extend Globalport’s campaign in the 2018 PBA Commissioner’s Cup. Grey’s corner triple found the bottom of the net and proved to be the difference for the Batang Pier who rallied from as much as 12 points down to stun top-seeded Rain or Shine, 114-113, on Tuesday at the Araneta Coliseum. The second-year swingman wound up with a conference-high 22 points, the last three of which rescued his team from elimination. Eighth-seeded Globalport found itself chasing down the Elasto Painters for majority of the matchup. Rain or Shine even had a 12-point lead at the midway mark of the third quarter and was still ahead, 112-110, inside the last two minutes. Grey and Maverick Ahanmisi then traded splits from the stripe to put the score at 113-111 in favor of E-Painters with 16.2 ticks to go on the clock. Off a timeout, head coach Pido Jarencio put the ball, and his trust, on his starting guard who did nothing but come through. Rain or Shine still had 11.2 seconds to make something happen, but reinforcement Reggie Johnson bobbled the inbound pass from Chris Tiu and both of Johnson and Ahanmisi missed their game-tying tries. When the buzzer sounded, Jarencio and his wards were celebrating a stunning upset of the top seed that forces a do-or-die matchup for a semifinals spot on Thursday. Grey had the heroics, but Malcolm White showed the way for the Batang Pier all game long and totalled 28 points and 16 rebounds. Stanley Pringle was also all over the court and finished with 21 markers, nine boards, and nine assists. For the Elasto Painters, Johnson topped the scoring column with 24 points on top of 15 rebounds and six assists. Five other teammates were also in double-digits, including Raymond Almazan who had his own 17-point, 11-rebound double-double. Without an answer for Grey’s heroics, though, they have just lost their twice-to-beat advantage in the quarterfinals. BOX SCORES GLOBALPORT 114 – White 28, Grey 22, Pringle 21, Anthony 11, Elorde 7, Taha 6, Tautuaa 6, Javelona 4, Espinas 3, Guinto 3, Teng 3, Arana 0 RAIN OR SHINE 113 – Johnson 24, Almazan 17, Yap 16, Ahanmisi 15, Daquioag 14, Tiu 10, Norwood 9, Belga 8, Torres 0 QUARTER SCORES: 24-26, 52-60, 83-91, 114-113 —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 10th, 2018

Morning Tip Q& A: Mohamed Bamba

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst They have come seemingly all at once -- new, freakish size in the NBA with the ability to put the ball on the floor, shoot from deep and block everything that moves. Kristaps Porzingis begat Joel Embiid, who begat this year’s group of young big men who have grown up facing the basket rather than with their backs to it. Among the most intriguing of the 2018 Draft class is Mo Bamba, the 20-year-old from Texas via Harlem, where he grew up -- fast, as city kids tend to do, learning the game on the hardtops around New York City, while his parents, natives of Ivory Coast, wondered what the increasing fuss was around their son. He, on the other hand, has tended to handle the attention with aplomb and a smile. In a group full of long, tall people, Bamba still stands out, with an insane wingspan of 7'10" that allows for court coverage the likes of which hasn’t been seen. Bamba has been in the spotlight for a while -- the Westtown (Penn.) High School team on which he played featured teammates like Cam Reddish, a blue-chip guard who’ll play for Duke next season -- and played against the likes of the No. 1 pick in 2018, Deandre Ayton. At Texas, he starred for Coach Shaka Smart, himself among the biggest names in the sport. After one season in Austin, where he shattered the school record for blocked shots in a season, Bamba declared for the Draft, assured he’d be a high Lottery pick. But Bamba has also shown a willingness to work on what he doesn’t -- or, at least, didn’t -- do that well. He went to California for weeks with noted player development coach Drew Hanlen, who deconstructed Bamba’s jumper from the ground up. Hanlen lowered Bamba’s shot pocket, adjusted his fingers on the ball and eliminated a hitch Bamba had before shooting. Bamba displayed much improved form before the Draft, but even if he couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn, he was going high -- and, he did, to the Orlando Magic with the sixth pick overall. Desperate to regain relevance in the East, the Magic hired Steve Clifford after he was fired by Charlotte to try and improve their awful defense. At the least, Clifford inherited ridiculous size on his roster, with Bamba joining 6'10" second-year forward Jonathan Isaac and newly re-signed 6'9" forward Aaron Gordon. Bamba must show he can be a killer on the floor like Embiid, and will work to make that happen. The only significant question about him coming into the Draft was the consistency of his motor at Texas. In Las Vegas this week for Summer League with his new team, Bamba is getting his feet wet while keeping them firmly planted to the ground. David Aldridge: I know you’ve spent a lot of time with Drew on the shot. What feels better now? Mo Bamba: Everything. The mechanics are so much cleaner now than they were in college. I think the difference between college and now is just a matter of just repetition, being able to change my jump shot dramatically because of how much I’ve gone in and worked on it. DA: So with time, you can basically improve anything? MB: Yeah, my jump shot is night and day. DA: He also told me that one thing he wanted to keep working with you on after the Draft was, you have a little jump to your left when you shoot? MB: Yeah, that’s a bad tendency that I have. That’s something Drew didn’t want to change. He changed a lot of things, and that’s one of the best things about working with Drew -- he knows boundaries, and he knows how much is too much. That’s one of the things he didn’t want to change right off the bat. But that’s something I’ve been conscious of and something I’ve been working on since he pointed it out. DA: Given where you played high school, was there more pressure on you playing for Westtown or playing for Texas? MB: I’d say there was more pressure playing -- well, actually, it was both, equal. My sophomore year at Westtown, there was a lot of pressure, because I was at a program that had never won a state championship, and had gotten to the finals three or four years in a row. At Texas, I was coming to a team that hadn’t made the NCAA Tournament the year before. So I’d say it was pretty equal. DA: I would imagine playing on a team like that in high school, with Cam and all the others, maybe prepared you not only for college, but playing in the pros. MB: Yeah, Cam can go. He’s a really good basketball player. And I know for a fact I’ll see him here next year. DA: What was Harlem like to grow up in, day by day? MB: It was, when people ask that, I pretty much tell them that you just grow up fast. You’re making decisions at a very young age that most kids don’t even come close to making. I credit a lot of my success to being from Harlem, growing up there. DA: Harlem’s changed a little the last few years. MB: Yeah, gentrification is real. It’s real. DA: What was it like seeing that demographic shift? MB: Well, I was kind of there before gentrification kind of really hit. Obviously there was a bunch of condos that went up and it was pretty cool to see. It was every time I came back home -- I’d see a new development going up. DA: Best advice your parents ever gave you? MB: I wouldn’t say it was direct advice or a quote. I’d say the best thing my parents passed on to me was to let me make my own mistakes and figure out on my age how to kind of see the world on my own. Growing up as the youngest child, one or two years after your siblings, obviously that’s great. You’re learning without truly making the mistakes on your own. But at some point in your life, you’re gonna have to learn on your own. You’re gonna have to fall to rise. DA: Conversely, then, what’s the biggest mistake you’ve made so far? MB: I’d say that the biggest mistake I’ve made so far was not committing to Texas earlier. I think waiting was awesome. I was very methodical about waiting, very strategic about what I wanted in a university. But at the same time, if I could go back, I probably would have committed my junior year, so I could hit the ground running and build the relationships, get to know people. DA: How much freedom did Shaka give you when you were there to try things on the floor that might not necessarily be good for the team, but could be good for you individually down the road? MB: Coach Smart, he’s given me so much freedom to sort of grow into who I was. That’s been a big thing in my life -- my parents and all of my coaches. Coach Smart did a great job of just letting me come to terms with myself, as a basketball player and a person. DA: I saw in one of your interviews before the Draft that you don’t think people really understand you when you say you’re a unicorn. So define that for me as you see it. MB: Well, I mean, people kind of have a concept of what it means. To me, it’s just someone who makes plays that have never been seen before -- a seven-foot big guard, those are all unicorns to me. DA: You played against Ayton and guys like Jarrett Allen (the Nets’ first-round pick in 2017) in high school, and I know how much you’ve looked at Joel Embiid on tape. Are you guys the new normal when it comes to the next generation of bigs? MB: Yeah, I think this is becoming a theme, and you’ll see it more and more with guys coming out of high school. One of the guys you’ll see coming up is James Wiseman (the 6'11" rising senior center currently playing at East High School in Memphis, and who is considered by many to be the top college prospect in the Class of 2019). He’s younger, but he does a lot of the things that I do, that Deandre does, that Jarrett does. It’s refreshing to see so many people that can do what I do. DA: If you were six-feet tall instead of seven, what would you be doing? MB: I’d have to be around the game, like a scout or a GM, something around the game. DA: How did the basketball bug bite you so hard growing up? MB: Honestly, it’s just my competitive nature. It bleeds over into other aspects of my life. But basketball is just something that I really excelled at, and whenever I hit kind of adversity, or whenever I do something that makes me vulnerable enough to get better and to ask for help, I just took this and ran with it. DA: Since you’re a kid, I have to ask you how good you are at Fortnight? MB: I play recreationally. One of my best friends is really good at it, and whenever I play him I get Ws. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018