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Cops make more child cybersex arrests, rescues

MANILA, Philippines — Authorities in the Philippines have rescued four girls and arrested a mother and two other women for allegedly livestreaming sexually e.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 12th, 2017

Cops vs drugs

THE Philippine National Police is not totally out of the war on drugs as its members may still make drug-related arrests and seize illegal drugs during operations like checkpoints and raids, a senior PNP official told the Journal Group yesterday. However, PNP Director for Operations Director Camilo Pancratius P. Cascolan….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2017

Faeldon’s son nabbed in drug bust | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: Cops arrest son of Nicanor Faeldon , 3 others in Naga drug operation 4 Chinese sentenced to life in prison for operating floating shabu lab DICT orders NTC to make phones unlockable after initial lock-in period Trump's son-in-law Kushner possible next chief of staff – U.S. media Miss USA apologizes over 'xenophobic' remarks vs Miss Cambodia, Miss Vietnam {module ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 14th, 2018

Spurs earn largest win of the season, beat Clippers 125-87

By Raul Dominguez, Associated Press SAN ANTONIO (AP) — LaMarcus Aldridge scored 27 points and the San Antonio Spurs won their fourth straight, topping the Los Angeles Clippers 125-87 on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) for their largest win of the season. Rudy Gay added 21 points and DeMar DeRozan had 14 points and seven assists for San Antonio. The Spurs held an opponent under 100 points for the third straight game while winning the first four games of a six-game homestand. Tobias Harris had 17 points for Los Angeles and Danilo Gallinari and Avery Bradley added 15 apiece. The Clippers have lost two straight and 4-of-5. San Antonio held Los Angeles to 20 points in the third quarter, extending its lead to 24 points and enabling Spurs coach Gregg Popovich to rest his starters in the fourth. The Clippers' only lead came in the opening 2.5 minutes of the game. TIP-INS Clippers: Harris was cut across the bridge of his nose when DeRozan swiped down in an attempt to strip the Clippers forward of the ball. Harris had to have a bandage placed on his nose before re-entering. . Guard Lou Williams missed his second straight game after injuring his left hamstring Dec. 10 against Phoenix. Williams is expected to miss two weeks. . Forward Luc Mbah a Moute has sat out 24 straight games with a sore left knee. . The Clippers are 13-71 against the Spurs in San Antonio. Spurs: San Antonio forward Davis Bertans returned after missing two games following the birth of his first child. Bertans had five points and four rebounds in 17 minutes. . The Spurs' 38 points in the first quarter were two shy of matching their season high of 40, which they set Oct. 22 (Oct. 23, PHL time) against the Lakers. . Bryn Forbes joined Danny Green and Gary Neal as the only Spurs players to score 1,000 points and make 150 three-pointers in their first 150 games with the team. UP NEXT Clippers: At Oklahoma City on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time). Spurs: Host Chicago on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 14th, 2018

Serena Williams, Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray all confirmed for Australian Open

Serena Williams will make her return to the Australian Open for the first time since winning in 2017 when eight-weeks pregnant, it was confirmed Wednesday, with virtually all the world's top 100 players due at Melbourne Park. That includes injury-prone Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray. Williams returned from giving birth to her first child to reach the 2018 Wimbledon and US Open finals, but suffered upset losses in both to leave her stuck on 23 major wins. Australian Open organisers said she was among the entries for the opening Grand Slam of the year as she attempts to equal Margaret Court's record of 24. Her appearance will mark her first major since her controversial ran...Keep on reading: Serena Williams, Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray all confirmed for Australian Open.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

Bicam panel OKs bill aimed at making land travel safe for kids

A measure that would make land travel for children safer was approved by the bicameral conference committee on Monday. Senate Bill No. 1971 --- "An Act Providing for the Special Protection of Child Passengers in Motor Vehicles and Providing Appropriations Thereof" --- aims to give protection to infants and young children from serious injuries and death arising from road crashes and other traffic-related incidents. The Senate Committee on Public Services, chaired by Sen. Grace Poe, and the House Committee on Transportation, chaired by Catanduanes Rep. Cesar Sarmiento, agreed to adopt major provisions in the Senate version. READ:Senate OKs bill for safer child travel The Senate...Keep on reading: Bicam panel OKs bill aimed at making land travel safe for kids.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 26th, 2018

EDITORIAL - Dirty cops

The reports are enough to make ordinary law-abiding folks run for their lives when they see a policeman approaching......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 26th, 2018

Nobel winner highlights importance of education

The Philippine government should make sure that every Filipino is given an education, a Nobel laureate said on Friday. “Education means development of human ingenuity. Every child in the Philippines…READ The post Nobel winner highlights importance of education appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2018

De Lima wants Senate probe on alleged proliferation of child cybersex abuses | News

Detained Senator Leila de Lima has filed a resolution seeking a Senate probe into the continued proliferation of child cybersex abuses in the country despite the existence of at least five laws design.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsNov 20th, 2018

Nieky Holzken ready to make an impact in ONE Championship

Nieky Holzken is not letting his difficult past get in the way of his goal of becoming a ONE Super Series World Champion ahead of his promotional debut in the co-main event of ONE: WARRIOR'S DREAM on 17 November at Stadium Istora in Jakarta, Indonesia. Touted by many as one the greatest kickboxers in the world today, Holzken revealed that his difficult past eventually led his focus on honing his skills in martial arts. The sport, he says, molded him to become a better person through years of training. "I was a problem child. I got kicked out of school when I was 9. I had to go to another school. I did not enjoy school. I was very smart, but I didn’t want to learn. If I could do it again, I would do it differently," Holzken shared. "I trained with Ramon Dekkers, Cor Hemmers, and Sjef Weber. Sjef was very good with my boxing, and Ramon and Cor with kickboxing. It gave me personality, character, and respect," he added. Other than refusing to learn in school, "The Natural" also shared that he was raised out of a broken family. He ultimately took something positive out of the situation, and used it to motivate himself to become a good father. "My parents separated, and I only had contact with my father’s family, and no contact with my mother. It made me very hard, and it helped me along the way," he revealed. "I want my children to live with a mom and dad who are together. What I experienced definitely makes me a better dad," he stressed. Having learned from his past and with a goal in sight, Holzken is bent on impressing in his ONE Championship debut as he aims to become one of the organization's world champions in the very near future. "To win in my debut would be great. I want to become the World Champion in ONE," he quipped......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

Senate OKs bill for safer child travel

The Senateon Mondaypassed on third and final reading a measure that would give protection to infants and young children from deaths and serious injuries arising from road crashes and other traffic-related incidents. Senate Bill 1971 or "An Act Providing for the Special Protection of Child Passengers in Motor Vehicles and Providing Appropriations Thereof" got the unanimous vote of 20 senators. Once signed into law, the bill would make traveling for children safer. Senator JV Ejercito, author and sponsor of the said measure, said the bill mandates drivers of private vehicles "to secure a child, 12 years old and below, in a child restraint system while transporting a child on a roa...Keep on reading: Senate OKs bill for safer child travel.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 8th, 2018

Bergman & Almodóvar: Odd couple at Fiesta Película

"Persona," one of the most influential films of all time, is widely regarded as Ingmar Bergman's masterpiece. It contains some of the most memorable images in cinema, notably the shot of a child touching a woman's face projected onto a screen, and the shot of two women looking into a mirror then folding into each other and overlapping. "Persona" has inspired a host of parodies about depression and psychoanalysis, so to the first-time viewer it may seem oddly familiar. We tend to forget that when the movie premiered in 1966, it was so new and obscure that critics did not know what to make of it. I admit to being one of those first-time viewers. I've seen Bergman's "The Seventh S...Keep on reading: Bergman & Almodóvar: Odd couple at Fiesta Película.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 7th, 2018

Cool mom and her ‘kool’ kid

A mother’s love knows no boundaries and she will make sure to provide her child with the best. Ever since Kristine Hermosa-Sotto became a mom to four kids, her priorities changed. With no regrets, she chose to leave show business for a while so that she could spend time with her kids and see them […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 6th, 2018

Garcia to Tomas: Meet cops regularly

WITH the growing peace and order concerns in Cebu City, Councilor Raymond Garcia has urged Mayor Tomas Osmeña to take action. “I don’t like to make any comments until and unless an investigation is made because it’s hard to listen only to one side without listening to the side of the police,” Garcia said when… link: Garcia to Tomas: Meet cops regularly.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsOct 5th, 2018

Hilary Duff sick of paparazzo who ‘stalks me down like prey’

  While Hilary Duff is no stranger to paparazzi, being hounded by photographers is something that will always make her feel "uncomfortable"---especially now that she's set to give birth to her second child.   In an Instagram post, the singer-actress posted a video of a recent encounter with a paparazzo, who had been tailing her around Los Angeles while she ran some errands.   "This guy has been at my son's soccer game this morning, then followed me to my sister's house. He was basically parked in her driveway to get photos," she wrote on Instagram.   "I politely asked him to let me be, but he continued to follow and stalk me down like prey for...Keep on reading: Hilary Duff sick of paparazzo who ‘stalks me down like prey’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2018

Melania Trump forges ahead as first lady with Africa trip

WASHINGTON — With a wave and tweet, first lady Melania Trump headed for Africa on Monday on her first big solo international trip, aiming to make child well-being the focus of a five-day, four-country tour that will take her to every corner of the vast and impoverished continent. The first lady opens her first-ever visit… link: Melania Trump forges ahead as first lady with Africa trip.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race

The Philippine’s lone representative Dexter Daquigan collared second-place finishes in the two classic car races held in Sepang, Malaysia, last weekend amid a challenge from top drivers hailing from Southeast Asia and the United Kingdom. Daquigan’s all-Filipino crew and team were able to tune his classic Mini Cooper to make it capture podium positions of… link: Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race

The Philippine’s lone representative Dexter Daquigan collared second-place finishes in the two classic car races held in Sepang, Malaysia, last weekend amid a challenge from top drivers hailing from Southeast Asia and the United Kingdom. Daquigan’s all-Filipino crew and team were able to tune his classic Mini Cooper to make it capture podium positions of [...] The post Daquigan cops second in Asia Classic Car Malaysia Race appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Ken Chan takes on a challenging role in GMA Network’s My Special Tatay

BEGINNING September 3, witness how a father’s love for his child conquers life’s challenges in GMA Network’s newest afternoon program, My Special Tatay. This original series is headlined by one of the most talented actors in the Kapuso Station, Ken Chan, who is all set to make another mark on the small screen as he […] The post Ken Chan takes on a challenging role in GMA Network’s My Special Tatay appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018

South Korean equestrian rides above scandal to bag bronze

A South Korean athlete who was left out of the Asian Games squad four years ago to make way for the horse-riding daughter of the country's "Rasputin" bagged bronze in the individual dressage on Thursday. Kim Hyeok told AFP that his brush with Chung Yoo-ra, the child of a woman jailed alongside former president Park Geun-hye in a massive corruption scandal, had made him tougher at this year's Asiad in Jakarta. "It was difficult four years ago because I trained a lot," Kim, 23, said. "But I didn't think about those events today. I am better than four years ago and those events have made me stronger." Electronics giant Samsung paid for some 3.65 billion won ($3.25 million) w...Keep on reading: South Korean equestrian rides above scandal to bag bronze.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018