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Chito Miranda reveals reason for hospital visits of son Miggy

Image: Instagran/@chitomirandajr Chito Miranda breathed a sigh of relief as he revealed the reason for his son Miggy's hospital visits in the past few months. Miranda narrated his family'.....»»

Category: newsSource: philippinetimes philippinetimesMay 17th, 2018

Neri Naig defends son s speech development, appeals to bashers: Relax lang kayo

Neri Naig and son Miggy. Image: Instagram/@mrsnerimiranda Neri Naig, like any mother, would defend her child through thick and thin. The actress and wife of Parokya ni Edgar frontman Chito Miranda.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 6th, 2018

Too much screen time is no. 1 reason for teenage sleep problems, says new survey

According to a new poll, nearly half of United States parents say their teens experience regular sleep problems, with many believing that too much screen time is to blame. The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan questioned 1,018 parents with at least one child aged 13 to 18 years old on their child's sleep habits, asking what they think may be causing sleep disturbances. Nearly half of the parents (43 percent) reported that their teens have problems falling asleep at night or wake up in the night and struggle to get back to sleep. Of these parents, around 25 percent said their teens experienced these sleep problems o...Keep on reading: Too much screen time is no. 1 reason for teenage sleep problems, says new survey.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

LOOK: Haslem reveals why he chose to return to Heat

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — Udonis Haslem arrived at the Miami Heat facility for a workout one day last week, and was told he needed to sign a waiver before he took the court. The reason: Technically, he wasn't on the team. "That was a little weird, having to do that," Haslem said. It won't be a problem for the next year. Haslem officially signed his one-year, $2.4 million contract with the Heat on Monday, a deal that was struck last week and finally became official when he put pen to paper. Haslem will enter his 16th NBA season, all with the Heat, and that means the Miami native will be with his hometown franchise for more than half of its 31-year history. "For the hometown kid in me, that means the world," Haslem said. "I wish I understood how big that is right now, because I really don't, but I know it's big." Haslem was the seventh-oldest player in the NBA last season — and will rise at least one spot on that list this season, with the retirement of San Antonio's Manu Ginobili. Vince Carter is 41 and will play for Atlanta, Dirk Nowitzki is 40 and back with Dallas, and Haslem is 38. "It's great to have our captain back," Heat President Pat Riley said. The others who played last season and are older than Haslem are Jason Terry, Damien Wilkins and Jamal Crawford. They all remain unsigned for the coming season. So, too, does Dwyane Wade. He and Haslem are the only two players who were part of all three Heat championship teams. Haslem said he's busily recruiting his business partner — the pair shares several off-court interests, including a pizza chain — to come back as well. "My mindset has always been for us to finish it together," Haslem said. "I want us to do a whole season together. Experience the road, dinner on the road, go through that whole process. I want us to experience that together." Wade tweeted his congratulations to Haslem when the deal was signed. "You are (the) most selfless person I've ever met," Wade said in his tweet. Congrts to my brother @ThisIsUD on season number 16 coming up! You are thee most selfless person I’ve ever met!— DWade (@DwyaneWade) September 11, 2018 Haslem appeared in only 14 games last season, and hasn't had much of a role with the Heat in the last three seasons. Haslem believes he can still play — he has kept himself in tremendous condition — but knows that he probably won't have a big on-court presence again. Still, a meeting with Heat coach Erik Spoelstra last week helped seal the deal to return. "Me and Spo were honest with each other," Haslem said. "Honesty is not always telling somebody what they want to hear. And we both have gotten to that point in our careers where we value each other's opinions, whether we want to hear them or not. We trust each other. We root for each other. We both have the best interests of this team in mind." But even if he doesn't get much in the way of minutes, Haslem knows he's valued. Spoelstra raves about the way he interacts and mentors teammates, and Haslem said that was a huge part of his decision as well. "It's about my love for the organization and my love for the guys," Haslem said. "It wasn't about me. If I was looking for playing time, I could have gone someplace else or played in China or something. But at the end of the day, would it have made me as happy as being around this organization and being around these guys? No, I don't think it would.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

98-year-old man visits paralyzed wife in hospital by walking nearly 6 miles

How far are you willing to go in the name of love? For one man, 6 miles by foot, every day. A concerned citizen recently picked up a 98-year-old man he saw walking on a highway in Rochester, New York. Apparently, the old man walks 6 miles daily to the hospital for two weeks now to visit his paralyzed wife. "Pick[ed] up this guy on side of [the] highway...390 north/490 east," wrote one Dan Bookhart in a post he shared via Facebook last Aug. 14. He uploaded a photo of the old man sitting on the passenger seat of his car. Bookhart said the man was very disoriented and did not know his name, although he said that he is 98 years old. The concerned citizen recounted that all the o...Keep on reading: 98-year-old man visits paralyzed wife in hospital by walking nearly 6 miles.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

PBA: Hotshots end NLEX s perfect start

NLEX's perfect start is no more. Magnolia demolished the Road Warriors in the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup, taking a convincing 102-72 win Wednesday at the Big Dome. An undermanned NLEX crew entered the game with a 2-0 mark despite missing several key pieces including its head coach and the Hotshots fully took advantage of that fact. Magnolia dominated all game, opening up a 31-12 lead in the first quarter and never let go.  "We prepared hard for NLEX's offense," head coach Chito Victolero said. "In their last two games, they averaged 113 points. We want to limit them under 90 and I'm proud of my players, they did a good job on defense," he added. Former Best Import Romeo Travis played his first PBA game in three years and scored 21 points and had 13 rebounds for the Hotshots. Mark Barroca was the top local for the Hotshots with 13 markers. For the Road Warriors, Olu Ashaolu finished with 21 points. The burly import will have to conced his roster spot to Aaron Fuller for now as he deals with a knee injury. Despite the loss, NLEX keeps first place for the moment with a 2-1 record.   The Scores: Magnolia 102 - Travis 21, Barroca 13, Simon 12, Gamalinda 10, dela Rosa 10 Reavis 8, Melton 7, Jalalon 6, Sangalang 5, Mendoza 4, Ramos 4, Herndon 2, Pascual 0, Brondial 0, Abundo 0. NLEX 72 - Ashaolu 21, Tiongson 8, Fonacier 6, Ighalo 6, Mallari 5, Quinahan 5, Rios 5, Paniamogan 4, Monfort 2, Baguio 2, Miranda 2, Galanza 2, Gotladera 2, Tallo 2, Marcelo 0, Soyud 0.  Quarters: 31-12, 55-30, 76-52, 102-72   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

1 killed, another hurt in Pangasinan gun attack

SAN CARLOS CITY -- An unidentified gunman killed a 39-year old mango sprayer and injured his 70-year-old neighbor on Tuesday afternoon (Aug. 15), police said. Roger Masiglat was getting out of his house in Doyong village when the gunman shot him several times. Masiglat managed to run towards his neighbors' houses, but the gunman pursued and shot him again. Physicians pronounced him dead on arrival at the Pangasinan Provincial Hospital. The gunman accidentally shot Ernesto Gargantilla, who was resting in a hammock in his porch. He was being treated at the Pangasinan Doctor's Hospital, said investigator SPO1 Edwin Miranda. The police were looking at security camera footag...Keep on reading: 1 killed, another hurt in Pangasinan gun attack.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

Duterte visits hospital before SONA

Duterte visits hospital before SONA.....»»

Category: newsSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

Duterte visits hospital for routine checkup on eve of 3rd Sona

President Rodrigo Duterte visited the Cardinal Santos Medical Center in San Juan City on Sunday, the eve of his third State of the Nation Address (Sona). But presidential spokesperson Harry Roque said there was nothing to worry about the President's health. "I confirm that the President had a routine medical check up at Cardinal Santos Hospital tonight before rehearsing for the SONA," Roque said in a statement. "He spent about an hour and a half for the routine examination. He was declared to be in good health," he added. The President went to Malacaang after his hospital visit to rehearse for his third State of the Nation (Sona). /atm...Keep on reading: Duterte visits hospital for routine checkup on eve of 3rd Sona.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

Filipino model Jachin Manere reveals participation in ASNTM as reason behind her hiatus

Up-and-comingsupermodel Jachin Manere has just booked one of the most explosive gigs of her career: she is officially a contestant on the latest season of Asia's Next Top Model. This, she cites, is the the reason why she has been keeping a suspiciously low profile in the last two months. Jachinhas steadily beenon the radarfor quite some time now. At18, she booked her first ever go-see and joined the ranks of top models at Professional Models Association of the Philippines (PMAP), the country's premiere modeling agency, even without any prior modeling experience. Within the years, the now 21-year-old muse has built up her portfolio. She has graced multiple runways shows, magazin...Keep on reading: Filipino model Jachin Manere reveals participation in ASNTM as reason behind her hiatus.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

US health official reveals fentanyl almost killed his son

NEW YORK, United States --- The head of the nation's top public health agency says the opioid epidemic will be one of his priorities, and he revealed a personal reason for it: His son almost died from taking cocaine contaminated with the powerful painkiller fentanyl. "For me, it's personal. I almost lost one of my children from it," Dr. Robert Redfield Jr. told the annual conference of the National Association of County and City Health Officials. The AP viewed a video of his speech, which he delivered Thursday in New Orleans. Redfield declined to speak about it Monday, except to say in a statement: "It's important for society to embrace and support families who are fighting to ...Keep on reading: US health official reveals fentanyl almost killed his son.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

Duterte visits 10 wounded soldiers in Isabela

President Rodrigo Duterte visits to Camp Melchor F. Dela Cruz Station Hospital in Gamu town to check on the condition of 10 wounded-in-action soldiers. CITY OF ILAGAN, Isabela, June 22 (PIA) --Follow.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2018

PBA: Kiefer pulled out from All-Star Game for undisclosed reason

Something's up with Kiefer Ravena. Several members of the PBA Press Corps in Iloilo City reported Sunday that the NLEX rookie had to be pulled out from the 2018 All-Star Game featuring Gilas Pilipinas and the Visayas All-Stars. According to the reports of Manila Bulletin's Jonas Terrado, ESPN5's Jan Ballesteros, Spin.ph’s Karlo Sacamos and Philippine Daily Inquirer’s Randolph Leongson, Ravena was called back to Manila by the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas. PBA Commissioner Willie Marcial confirmed the development himself but refused to give any further details other than a press conference is scheduled for Monday to clear everything. Ravena traveled to Iloilo City to participate in the final leg of this year's All-Star festivities. Kiefer was supposed to start for the Visayas All-Stars under Chito Victolero.   ---   Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 27th, 2018

Saudi man stabs Filipino nurse on duty in private hospital

A Filipino nurse working in Saudi Arabia is now in stable condition after being stabbed several times by a Saudi national, according to a statement issued on Sunday by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA). Emergency room nurse Rolando Mina, 29, was on duty in a private hospital when he was attacked by a 22-year old Saudi man for a still unknown reason. The attack was recorded by the hospital's closed circuit television system. The attacker, whom the DFA statement did not identify, was immediately arrested. The Philippine Consulate in Jeddah dispatched case officers to assist Mina and coordinate with Saudi authorities who are handling the case. Consul General Edgar Bada...Keep on reading: Saudi man stabs Filipino nurse on duty in private hospital.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 20th, 2018

LOOK: Sharon Cuneta visits Gary Valenciano after his heart bypass operation

MANILA, Philippines –  Actress Sharon Cuneta was one of the many close friends of Gary Valenciano who visited him at the hospital, following his heart bypass operation on Sunday, May 6. On Instagram, Sharon, shared that she had a doctor's check-up for her lipoma surgery and dropped by to see ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 9th, 2018

What Is the Reason Behind Dating Unattractive Men?

This column may contain strong language, sexual content, adult humor, and other themes that may not be suitable for minors. Parental guidance is strongly advised. What is it with Playboy bunnies and politicians buying their silence? As scandal upon scandal reveals the irredeemable baseness of men who present themselves as anti-hypocrisy crusaders, it's impossible not to notice their propensity to date and sometimes impregnate Playboy playmates. Which then results in money changing hands not exactly for services already rendered, however willingly, but for mouths to remain shut. So not only did Trump's personal attorney Michael Cohen pay off Stormy Daniels, the porn star, to ...Keep on reading: What Is the Reason Behind Dating Unattractive Men?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 22nd, 2018

Towns, Timberwolves return home in big hole against Rockets

By Dave Campbell, Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The first taste of the NBA playoffs for Timberwolves All-Star Karl-Anthony Towns has been rather bitter, thanks to the three-point-happy Houston Rockets. The two-game totals tell a frustrating story for the 22-year-old: just 13 points, 5-for-18 shooting and a 2-0 deficit in the series against the Rockets. Towns has found himself the subject of pointed criticism from analysts, fans and even his own team. The switch-heavy Rockets have double-teamed Towns to a stifling effect, and the Timberwolves sure haven’t helped their seven-footer out by getting him the ball in favorable situations in the post. “They’re coming to double. He knows that. He has to face up, be strong with the ball, make quick moves,” point guard Jeff Teague said. “But we have to figure out how to get him running, get him some easy buckets.” The team’s struggles have taken a little luster off Minnesota’s first postseason home game in 14 years, but the fans who remember the Timberwolves reaching the Western Conference finals in 2004 will surely be eager to witness the playoffs in person no matter the daunting challenge in this first round. “This organization, all of our fans, they deserve this moment,” Towns said. And they want a win. The Timberwolves host the Rockets on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time) in Game 3. Earlier in the day, Miami takes on Philadelphia in the Eastern Conference and New Orleans hosts Portland, both in Game 4. Later, Utah visits Oklahoma City in Game 3. Towns tried his best to shrug off the bad vibes and stinging rebukes when speaking with reporters on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “You dwell too much on the past, you forget that you’ve got to take care of the present,” Towns said. The chatter on TV and Twitter, he said, has escaped him. “I live my life very Amish-like,” Towns said. “Other than video games, I don’t think I have a reason for electronics. It’s a life that I’ve always loved.” ___ 76ERS AT HEAT 76ers lead 2-1. Game 4, 2:30 p.m. EDT (2:30am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: It’s simple: The team that has imposed its will is 3-0 in this series. Philadelphia took the pace where it wanted it in Games 1 and 3. Miami out-toughed the 76ers in Game 2. The Heat have to find a way to keep Philadelphia’s 3-point shooting in check; the 76ers made 18 shots from beyond the arc in Game 3. Joel Embiid is back from a concussion and a broken bone around his eye, and an already-confident Philadelphia bunch seems to have even more swagger now. KEEP AN EYE ON: 76ers guard Marco Belinelli. The 76ers are 25-6 when he plays and 14-1 when he scores at least 15 points. In this series, he’s 13-for-27 on shots from 20 feet and deeper, and many of those makes have been daggers for Miami. PRESSURE IS ON: Heat center Hassan Whiteside . Backups Kelly Olynyk and Bam Adebayo have played a combined 145 minutes in this series, while Whiteside has played only 41, with 11 points, nine fouls, seven turnovers and three field goals in the three games. There’s no room for error now for Miami, so either Whiteside will figure it out fast in Game 4 or the Heat will get someone else into his spot. HISTORY LESSON: This is the fourth time in Dwyane Wade’s career that the Heat have trailed an Eastern Conference opponent 2-1. In the three previous Game 4s in that scenario, Miami has won all three with Wade averaging 26.7 points in those second-round games against Indiana (2004 and 2012) and Toronto (2016). ___ TRAIL BLAZERS AT PELICANS Pelicans lead 3-0. Game 4, 5 p.m. EDT (5am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: The sixth-seeded Pelicans are on the cusp of a surprising sweep of the third-seeded Blazers, and their margin of victory has grown in each game. They dominated Game 3, leading by as many as 20 points in the first half and 33 in the second. Veteran guard Rajon Rondo has masterfully run the offense, and the Pelicans have played unselfishly with a different scoring leader in each game: Anthony Davis with 35 in Game 1, Jrue Holiday with 33 in Game 2 and Nikola Mirotic with 30 in Game 3. KEEP AN EYE ON: Portland’s body language, intensity and aggressiveness. Guard Damian Lillard challenged the Blazers to ramp up those aspects of their game, stressing that the Pelicans were “a lot more aggressive than we were and we didn’t dish it back out. I think in the playoffs and in a situation like this, when a team is coming for you like that, you’ve got to maybe go out of your way to do it back, even if that means foul trouble or some altercations happen out there.” PRESSURE IS ON: Lillard. The Pelicans have sold out to stop the Portland star, who missed 9-of-14 shots in Game 3. “It’s either going to be a tough shot, or I’ve got to give the ball up,” Lillard said. “I’ve got to trust making the right play, and when it comes time I’ve got to take my chances and I’ve got to take those tough shots.” INJURY UPDATE: Blazers starting forward Evan Turner missed Game 3 because of a toe injury in Game 2. The team did not update his status on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). ___ ROCKETS AT TIMBERWOLVES Rockets lead 2-0. Game 3, 7:30 p.m. EDT (7:30am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: The Rockets cruised to a 20-point victory in Game 2 despite only 12 points on a staggering 2-for-18 shooting performance by James Harden. After squandering their chance to steal Game 1 on the road in a three-point loss, the Wolves are back home in a big hole against the team with the best record in the NBA. They’ll need a big boost from a home crowd celebrating the team’s return to the postseason to send the series back to Houston for a Game 5. KEEP AN EYE ON: Gerald Green. The 32-year-old journeyman, once acquired by the Wolves in the franchise-altering 2007 trade that sent Kevin Garnett to Boston, made five three-pointers in Game 2 for postseason career-high 21 points. PRESSURE IS ON: Timberwolves coach Tom Thibodeau. Though cornerstones Towns and Andrew Wiggins are getting their first taste of postseason, Thibodeau and veterans Jimmy Butler, Jamal Crawford, Taj Gibson and Teague he brought in last summer have plenty of playoff experience. The Wolves have been largely directionless on offense against the Rockets and their underrated defense. INJURY UPDATE: Rockets forward Ryan Anderson, who has sat out the first two games with a sprained ankle, is likely to play in Game 3. Forward Luc Mbah a Moute, who dislocated his shoulder in the second-to-last game of the regular season, said this week he wouldn’t rule out a return in this series. ___ THUNDER AT JAZZ Series tied 1-1. Game 3, 10 p.m. EDT (10:00am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: In the first two games, the higher-rebounding team has been the winning team, with Game 1 going to Oklahoma City and Utah taking Game 2. A critical part of this trend will be Thunder center Steven Adams and his presence on the floor. He played just 22 minutes in Game 2 before fouling out. The Thunder will have to do better against Utah center Rudy Gobert and forward Derrick Favors, who combined for 31 rebounds in Game 2. KEEP AN EYE ON: Russell Westbrook. He has taken a secondary role at times in this series, but that might change. With Oklahoma City’s inability to close in Game 2 after leading in the fourth quarter, Westbrook could look to be more of a scorer in Game 3. He’ll need more help from Carmelo Anthony, who has made just 11 of 31 field goals in the series. PRESSURE IS ON: George. The man who called himself “Playoff P” before the series began came out with 36 points and eight three-pointers in the opener. He followed that with a dud, just 18 points on 6-for-21 shooting. INTRIGUING MATCHUP: Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell vs. Thunder guard Corey Brewer. Mitchell used his speed to slice through the Thunder defense for 13 of his 28 points in the fourth quarter of Game 2 . He was essentially unstoppable once he decided to stop shooting three-pointers. The Thunder could be forced to put George on him more if Brewer struggles defensively again. ___ AP Basketball Writer Tim Reynolds in Miami and AP Sports Writers Cliff Brunt in Oklahoma City and Brett Martel in New Orleans contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 21st, 2018

The ‘walking’ ‘santos’ that guard Sen. Loren Legarda and family

There's a compelling reason Sen. Loren Legarda believes in prayers. Prayers, she is convinced, and her devotion to Our Lady of Manaoag, saved her twice from cancer. At one point, the senator was already due for surgery when physicians in a New York hospital found carcinoma cells in her thyroid. She prayed, got a second opinion in another hospital, and the cells turned out to be benign. Legarda was raised in a family steeped in tradition, where art, culture and religious ways were part of everyday life. She recalls a childhood in which talking and taking a shower were absolutely prohibited during Good Fridays: "We were instructed to contemplate God's word alone because that ...Keep on reading: The ‘walking’ ‘santos’ that guard Sen. Loren Legarda and family.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 26th, 2018

Magnolia rides on Lee s 27 points to even semis series

Paul Lee bounced back big time after a scoring slump in the series opener by pouring 27 points in Magnolia’s 99-84 PBA Philippine Cup semifinals Game 2 win over NLEX on Monday at the MOA Arena that evened the best-of-seven series to 1-1. Lee waxed-hot with a 9-of-19 field goal shooting to erase a disappointing eight-point performance in Game 1 two nights ago when the Road Warriors drew first blood in a hairline, 88-87, in a match that saw the Hotshots lose Marc Pingris to an ACL tear on his left knee. "We're so happy with Paul kasi nasa attack mode siya eh. Sa start pa lang talagang gusto na niyang manalo," said Hotshots coach Chito Victolero.  Ian Sangalang had 18 points and eight rebounds, Mark Barroca scored 11 while Rome Del Rosa and Aldrech Ramos contributed with 10 markers each for Magnolia, which had a 9-of-18 shooting behind the rainbow arc.     Peter June Simon, who was quiet in the first three quarters, made eight consecutive points capped by back-to-back triples to open the fourth period as Magnolia built an 80-64 separation with 9:48 left. The lead ballooned to 87-70 on a jumper by Lee with 5:30 remaining.     Magnolia opened a 44-32 second quarter lead on an Sangalang jumper with 2:38 remaining before marching at halftime with a 48-39 advantage.     Sangalang poured 15 points in the first two quarters on 7-of-10 field goal shooting while Lee got 12 markers at halftime. Alex Mallari finished with 13 points to lead the Road Warriors while Rabeh Al-Hussaini had 10 markers. Kiefer Ravena, who had 16 markers in the Game 1, was limited to only nine points and seven assists.   The Scores: MAGNOLIA (99) -- Lee 27, Sangalang 18, Barroca 11, Dela Rosa 10, Ramos 10, Jalalon 9, Simon 8, Reavis 4, Brondial 2, Gamalinda 0, Mendoza 0. NLEX (84) --- Mallari 13, Quiñahan 13, Al-Hussaini 10, Ravena 9, Miranda 8, Alas 6, Fonacier 6, Tiongson 6, Soyud 5, Baguio 4, Taulava 4, Ighalo 0, Monfort 0. Quarter Scores: 27-20, 48-39, 70-62, 99-84.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Magnolia plays NLEX

WINNING six out seven games entering into a playoff series is something else, one that merits attention. For this reason, Magnolia Hotshots coach Chito Victolero has valid reason to be somewhat wary of NLEX when they clash in the PBA Philippine Cup best-of-7 semifinal series starting today at the Smart….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsMar 9th, 2018