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Children, not age, will affect LeBron s retirement plan

MANILA, Philippines — Cleveland Cavaliers' star LeBron James said his kids will play a big factor in the length of his career.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarJan 12th, 2018

Hontiveros dares Sanofi to compensate all kids who got Dengvaxia

  Akbayan Senator Risa Hontiveros on Tuesday challenged Sanofi Pasteur to compensate all the children given the Dengvaxia vaccine on top of refunding the P1.4 billion for the unused vaccine.   In a statement, Hontiveros said that while she welcomed the French pharmaceutical company's move to reimburse the cost of the unused Dengvaxia, she asserted that the "ethical response is for Sanofi to do more."   "Reimbursement is not enough. Over and above its plan to pay back the government for unused Dengvaxia vials, I call on Sanofi to shoulder the health needs of the affected children and compensate their families. Even pending the result of the evaluation by ...Keep on reading: Hontiveros dares Sanofi to compensate all kids who got Dengvaxia.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 16th, 2018

The 17 best PBA photos of 2017

Sure, the PBA has seen some trying times this year but to say  that the league is dying would be complete exaggeration. The games were still good. the stories were still compelling, and the stars were still shining bright. Was it a perfect season? Not a chance. But the PBA is still doing relative well. Well enough that everyone was happy. For the most part. And to celebrate a year that has come and gone, here are some of the best photos captured by ABS-CBN Sports for 2017, in no particular order of course but all of them are great. Happy New Year and here's to another great year for the PBA and basketball in general. Let's do this.   James Yap playing outside the Purefoods franchise? Still weird. James Yap and PJ Simon playing against each other? Weirder.   Allein Maliksi is without a doubt the most unapologetic scorer in the PBA. He had a run in the Philippine Cup where he was setting new career highs for every game and Star was destroying opponents by 25 points. He's with Blackwater now though.   2017 was not a good year for Alaska. Still, it's nice to see Calvin Abueva still Beastin' out there. Never change, Calvin.   Now that they're both healthy at the same time, here's to seeing more head-to-head games between this two. The PBA and Philippine basketball in general needs more of June Mar Fajardo vs. Greg Slaughter.   Terrence Romeo: scoring champion, fashion icon, king of swag both on and off the court. My goodness, bro.   You think Justin Brownlee is clutch? Why don't you ask the barangay. Pretty sure they will say hell yes Justin Brownlee is clutch.   This photo pretty much sums up The Rematch for coacn Norman Black and the Meralco Bolts. We need to see a Ginebra-Meralco part 3 in the Governors' Cup for 2018. Please.   The Fast and the Furious forever. There are no words for this. Happy retirement, Mr. Helterbrand.   If everything goes according to plan, we can call this the smiles that launched a Grand Slam. The PBA better be ready for the super, superteam that is the San Miguel Beermen with Christian Standhardinger.   The Gin Kings might as well own the Philippine Arena. Ginebra is setting attendance records left and right at the massive INC facility. More importantly, they keep on winning there. The barangay is 5-1 in Bulacan including one Game 7 win for another championship.   James Yap used to be the face of the Purefoods franchise and Marc Pingris was the team's heart and soul. Now, Ping is all of that and then some.   Taken just moments before the Beermen completed a Philippine Cup hat trick to capture the Perpetual trophy. This San Miguel team is a special group.   Chito Narvasa's highly-controversial term as PBA Commissioner ended this year. However, perhaps his most controversial move was approving the much-maligned Kia-San Miguel trade for the no. 1 pick of the 2017 Draft. This was from the press conference that triggered the PBA Board impasse. Overall just not a good look. It was impactful, but not good.   He might be slowing down a little bit but Jayson Castro is still a force to be reckoned with. The Blur might just get to a new gear in 2018. Watch out.   He finally beat his inner demons and Mac Cardona found his way back in the PBA this year. Welcome back, Captain Hook.   Kiefer Ravena was ready for the PBA two years ago. Two games into his first pro season, the Phenom is already proving his worth. This was his first PBA dunk. There should be more to come.   Nash Racela is one brave soul. He spent the entire season trying to beat San Miguel teams in order to win a title for TNT. The KaTropa didn't end up winning anything but coach Nash sure got into the skin of the SMC teams. Here he is trying to plead for a foul because officials are supposedly favoring Ginebra. While that's not proven, if 2017 was any indication, 2018 should be even more fun for coach Nash and the San Miguel teams.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 31st, 2017

The legend of Kobe Bryant s career

Five championships with the Los Angeles Lakers. 33,570 points, third all time in NBA history. Eighteen All-Star selections. Fifteen All-NBA selections. Four All-Star MVPs. Two Finals MVPs. The 2007-08 regular season MVP. Together, those stats and accomplishments only begin to tell the legacy Kobe Bryant left both in the NBA and the basketball world at large. As the Los Angeles Lakers get ready to retire Bryant's No. 8 and No. 24 jersey on Dec. 18 (Dec. 19, PHL time), take a look back at some of the stories, videos and highlights from the best moments in Bryant's unique career. The Young Kobe * Quote history: Kobe arrives on the scene in L.A. * Quote history: Bryant's legacy begins in Lakerland * Aldridge: Bryant ends his career his way (Editor's note: Column is from 2015-16 season) VIDEO *  Kobe's debut in 1996 *  Kobe comes up short vs. Jazz in 1997 *  Top 10 plays from Kobe's rookie season *  Top 10 plays from Kobe's second season Three-peat time for Lakers * Quote history: Kobe, Phil, Shaq and the new-look Lakers * Quote history: A three-peat to remember in Los Angeles * Quote history: Unique (yet strained) Shaq-Kobe dynamic * Finals moments: Kobe takes over in Game of 2000 Finals * Aldridge: Bryant remembers his role as top bad guy to many fans (Editor's note: Column is from 2015-16 season) VIDEO *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 1999-2000 *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 2000-01 *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 2001-02 The 81-Point Game! * Quote history: A game like no other for Bryant * Even today, outburst still amazes Kobe himself VIDEO *  Every basket ... in 3 minutes *  Kobe 81: The morning of the game *  Kobe 81: Early signs pointed to a big night *  Kobe 81: In second half, 'things started getting crazy' *  Kobe 81: 'You get in a zone and stay there' *  Kobe 81: History made at Staples Center *  'I didn't know it would be that big' of a night *  Kobe tweets thoughts about game in 2013 *  Photographer recounts shooting 81-point game *  NBA stars of today reflect on Kobe's game *  Kobe drops 62 on Mavs in three quarters *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 2005-06 season Renewed glory & final lap *  Quote history: Championship days return for Lakers, Bryant *  Quote history: Injuries short circuit twilight of career *  Quote history: 'Our Michael Jordan' to a generation *  Lakers.com: Crunching numbers from Bryant's jersey history *  Aldridge: Final game a more than fitting finale for Bryant (Editor's note: Column is from 2015-16 season) *  Powell:  For a generation, Kobe was 'our Michael Jordan' VIDEOS *  Top 10 plays from Kobe's MVP season *  Relive Lakers' run to 2009 title *  Relive Lakers' run to 2010 title *  Kobe's best plays vs. every team *  All-Access: Ultimate look back at Bryant's career *  Kobe's best play from each of his All-Star Game appearances *  Final All-Star Game introduction *  Kareem Abdul-Jabbar reads Kobe's retirement poem || Kareem's ode to Bryant *  Bryant reflects on amazing career *  Taking stock of Kobe's impact on NBA *  The Starters: What was Kobe's best moment? *  The Starters: Kobe's best dunk? *  The Starters: Kobe more memorable as No. 8 or No. 24? *  The Starters: Is Kobe a top-three all time Laker? *  LeBron, Curry, others bid adieu to Bryant *  Fans say farewell to their idol *  All-Access: Kobe's 60-point finale vs. Utah *  A farewell speech to remember *  Top 10 games in Kobe's career MORE KOBE VIDEOS TOP PLAYS *  Kobe's top 10 career-best plays *  Kobe's top 10 plays wearing No. 24 *  Kobe's top 10 plays wearing No. 8 *  Great playoff 3-pointers in Kobe's career *  Milestone baskets in Bryant's career *  More milestones: 25K points || 30K points || Youngest to 33K *  Best moments from Christmas Day games *  Four straight games of 50+ points in 2007 *  Kobe vs. MJ: Similarities and differences *  Through the years: Kobe vs. LeBron James *  Through the years: Kobe vs. the Celtics *  Through the years: Kobe vs. Michael Jordan *  The Starters: Top 10 games in Kobe's career *  The Starters: Kobe's best season? *  Best moments at Staples Center: In season || In NBA playoffs REFLECTING ON KOBE *  Shaquille O'Neal recalls Lakers heyday with Kobe *  Charles Barkley praises Kobe's career *  Reggie Miller reflects on Finals showdown with Kobe *  Inside The NBA: The legacy of Kobe *  Players around NBA reflect on Kobe *  Defending Kobe * Players reflect on facing Kobe * Derek Fisher shares four untold Kobe stories.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 18th, 2017

Oladipo, Sabonis helping Pacers move forward

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com INDIANAPOLIS – Victor Oladipo has a fever and the only prescription is ... no, not more cowbell. Cowbell might make sense, if you factor in Oladipo’s love of and commitment to music (his debut R&B album has been available since Oct. 6). But the fever currently afflicting Oladipo, shooting guard for the Indiana Pacers, has nothing to do with extracurriculars and everything to do with the odes and anthems he’s been performing within the confines of 94 feet by 50 feet. If the fifth-year guard out of Indiana University, by way of the Orlando Magic and Oklahoma City Thunder, looks comfortable in his new star turn for the Pacers, well, just remember that’s your word. Not his. “You could say I’m comfortable with the people here,” says Oladipo, who spent three seasons with the Hoosiers before becoming the No. 2 pick in the 2013 NBA Draft. “I played in front of these fans, they mean a lot to me and I gave a lot to them just like they gave a lot to me while I was in college. “But I’m never comfortable in any situation I’m in. I will never be comfortable. That’s what kind of makes me get up and work every day. It’s like, never be satisfied. Because for some reason, ever since I was a little kid, I always wanted more.” Oladipo’s eyes just about glow after a weekend practice as he delves into his unflagging intensity. He doesn’t undercut it with a smile or a token laugh. This is real heat. “Maximize my talent and exhaust my potential,” he says. “In order to do that, I’ve got to come to work every day. That’s my thought process. Wake up each day and be great that day.” Each day would include tonight, when Oladipo will share center stage at Bankers Life Fieldhouse with the more decorated and once-beloved star who preceded him in the Pacers lineup. Paul George, a four-time All-Star and Olympic gold medalist during his seven seasons in Indiana, was due to face his old team for the first time since being traded to Oklahoma City in July. It was a parting necessitated by George, who had made clear his desire to sign a maximum-salary contract with the Los Angeles Lakers in the summer of 2018. But the trade was orchestrated by Kevin Pritchard, the Pacers’ president of basketball operations, and Chad Buchanan, their general manager, who surprised the NBA by swapping George to OKC for Oladipo and big man Domantas Sabonis. You want intense? The initial reaction to that deal was intensely negative, quickly reaching hysterical proportions. The Pacers immediately were mocked for having traded George for nickels on the dollar. Reports out of Boston characterized Indiana’s POBO as more of a bobo for allegedly spurning a Celtics’ offer of multiple players and draft picks. *Takes a well deserved nap for 3 hours ** Opens Twitter: pic.twitter.com/xWNYaVfKTy — Myl3s Turn3r (@Original_Turner) July 1, 2017 The west is sick!!!! Best conference in the world!!!! — Patrick Beverley (@patbev21) July 1, 2017 Vic to the Pacers?! He might as well run for governor while he's at it! — Cody Zeller (@CodyZeller) July 1, 2017 Former Thunder star Kevin Durant called the move “shocking” and of George said “Indiana just gave him away.” Among much of the media that covers the league, there was a general feeling of “rubes” afoot -- that the Pacers had been snookered in taking back an overpaid ($21 million annually through 2020-21) second-tier talent and an overbilled guy who had disappeared in OKC’s postseason. And now? Not so much on any of those fronts. ‘He knows how good he is’ George’s stats are down in the “OK3” core he’s formed with reigning Kia MVP Russell Westbrook and aging Carmelo Anthony. The Thunder (12-13) are the NBA’s consensus disappointment, team category, with nearly a third of their season in the books. Sabonis has boosted the Pacers off the bench in a half dozen ways. And Oladipo has all but earned himself a spot on the Eastern Conference All-Star team while speeding his new team’s fans past their heartbreak over George’s jilting. Generally, the best trades in sports are win-win, but for Indiana right now, a bit of win-lose has made the start of 2017-18 downright sublime. “We happened to really like Sabonis in the draft,” former Pacers president and ongoing consultant Donnie Walsh said last week. “We wanted more of everything in the trade too. But when it came down to it, we had this offer with Oladipo, who we also liked. They’ve come in here and the more they’ve been here, the more we like ‘em. We’re happy.” The Pacers also are 16-11, two weeks ahead in the victory column over their 42-40 finish last season that was good for a playoff berth. Oladipo is the biggest reason why, averaging more points per game (24.5) than George ever has. The 6'4" guard who attended famous DeMatha High in Hyattsville, Md., spent much of last season being beaten up for his contract and negligible impact in Oklahoma City. He had taken grief earlier for his status as the second pick in 2013, a lofty status not of his doing. And here he was again in the summer, hearing it all over again for a transaction he didn’t design. “He came in with a chip [on his shoulder],” Pacers coach Nate McMillan said. “I thought he should come in with a chip.” Some would have flinched from the pressure. A few might have curled up, full blown fetal. Oladipo has gone entirely the other way. “His confidence is at an all-time high,” backup point guard Cory Joseph said. “He knows how good he is.” As Joseph spoke after the Pacers’ upset of Cleveland Friday, a game in which Oladipo scored 20 of his game-high 33 points in the third quarter, a lilting voice drifted from behind the scenes in the home dressing room. “Look at it right now, he’s singing in the shower,” Joseph said, tilting his head and laughing. “He’s confident. You guys are all in here, he’s just singing. He’s a confident guy. Everybody in this locker room, everybody in this organization definitely welcomes that.” Trade not driving Oladipo’s breakout season Don’t misunderstand. The critics still are out for Oladipo. “My mom told me yesterday I need to work on my free throws,” he said with an eye roll after practice Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). She had noticed, during her son’s run of big games in December -- 36 points at Toronto, 27 vs. Chicago, 33 against the Cavs the night before her chiding text -- that he had missed 18-of-31 foul shots. This, by a career 80 percent shooter from the line. “I’m over that,” Oladipo said. “I’m not going to miss no more. I’ll make ‘em next time. And if I miss ‘em, I’ll make ‘em the next. If that’s my problem right now, I think I can fix it.” Twenty-four hours later, Oladipo took 13 free throws against Denver and made 11. He scored 47 points in all, hitting 15-of-28 shots and half of his 12 three-pointers. The comeback victory in OT got the Pacers to 4-for-4 on their six-game homestand and continued to shrink whatever chip it was that the 25-year-old was shouldering. “In the beginning of the year, I said, ‘I don’t have a chip. I have a brick house on my back,’” Oladipo said. But not anymore, right, now that some folks are referring to it as “the Victor Oladipo trade” rather than “the Paul George trade?” “That’s what I feel like every morning, no matter what’s going on,” he said. “I don’t even think about the trade, honestly. It’s in the past for me. People’s opinions are going to be there whether you like it or not. From the outside looking in, I guess you could say [then] that was a great trade for OKC. That’s what they believed. But it wasn’t going to change the way I worked. It wasn’t going to change my approach.” This step up in status is considered perhaps the most difficult an NBA player can make. Suddenly, opposing coaches are X&O-ing him to death. The player dogging him up and down the court is the other guys’ best defender. Often, they’ll send double-teams to get the ball into one of his teammates’ hands. “He hadn’t had that,” McMillan said. “When he was in OKC, the game plan was focused on Westbrook. When he was in Orlando, he was just a young player. Now he is seeing the defenders like a LeBron [James], like a [DeMar] DeRozan, what these stars are seeing. He’s seeing the best defenders and he’s seeing teams game-plan to take him out. “Learning how to play and be consistent every night with that challenge is something he’s going through.” Oladipo’s quick success with the Pacers has kept any crowd critics at bay. They were pre-disposed to like him just as their rebound date after George, but had he underperformed, Oladipo’s service time in Bloomington wouldn’t have protected him for long from criticism. But now, it’s George who likely will get the harsh reception. Oladipo, overtly after each of the recent victories, has made it clear to the home fans via some emphatic pointing and body language that the Fieldhouse happens to be his house. “I don’t say it, they say it,” he said. “I just do the gesture and they do the rest of the work for me. I let them do all the talking. We feed off them -- when they’re into it, we play better. I don’t know why, that’s just how basketball’s always been. They’re our sixth man and we need ‘em every night.” Oladipo’s breakout season has been bolstered, too, by the Pacers’ second-through-15th men. Those who already were in Indy knew how valuable George was at both ends. Those who, like Oladipo and Sabonis, were new this season were within their rights to be as skeptical as the national headlines of the guys coming in trade. Go-to guy emerges for Pacers OKC was a specific challenge, Oladipo having to learn on the fly how to fit his own darting, ball-heavy style to only the second man in NBA history to average a triple-double. Westbrook’s usage was off the charts, rendering the other Thunder players to supporting cast whether suited to that role or not. Just like that, Oladipo had to catch and shoot as someone to get Westbrook into double digits in assists. It wasn’t his nature and it made for an individually forgettable season. “I had a role. I tried to play that role to the best of my ability. And I improved certain areas of my game in that role,” was all he’d say Saturday, stiffly, about the OKC experience. Said Walsh: “I felt like he was going to get a different opportunity here. ... When he got to Oklahoma City, he was playing wih a guy who was averaging a triple-double. And he liked Russell Westbrook. But he comes here, he’s got an opportunity to be ‘our guy.’ “I think he might have been looking for that. I never asked him. He’s a really cool guy. He knows what he wants to be, I think.” Oladipo needed this and the Pacers needed him to need it. With George gone, they were like a smile missing a front tooth. The other teeth weren’t just going to move up in the pecking order -- no matter how good young big man Myles Turner is -- and replace the one they’d lost. If they were going to have any success this season, if McMillan was going to be able to coach and adjust in his second year taking over for Frank Vogel, the players needed to fill their roles and welcome this new addition. That’s why this tale of Oladipo’s growing success is about what the Pacers have done for him, as much as it is what he’s done for them. “We didn’t really present it like that,” McMillan said, “because we were still trying to develop who our ‘go-to guy’ was. He has been slowly taking on that role through the things he’s done. I haven’t had to say anything. He’s making good decisions with the ball. And the guys are getting a feel for what we’re doing down the stretch because we’ve had some success, and we’ve had it with Victor having the ball.” Chemistry change for Pacers There might be NBA teams with chemistry as solid as the Pacers’ right now, but it’s hard to imagine there are any with better. It’s more than mere relief that someone has stepped up, easing their own loads a bit. It is a genuine eagerness for Oladipo to max out, for each of the rest of them to do the same in whatever lane they’re riding. “Vic’s been everything at this point,” Turner said. “He’s done a great job of stepping up and being that guy, being that dude. It’s amazing to have that when you’re going through a situation where it’s a brand-new team. We’re still learning each other and he’s showing that he’s ready.” Did Turner know this would happen and, if so, when? “First couple days he started texting me in the summertime,” the big man said. “I saw what his mindset was, and I loved it from the jump. He carried that right in when we started playing pickup this summer. “Vic’s been traded, what, [two] times? He finally comes back home and he has a team that’s telling him to go, telling him to be him. I don’t think he had that with his former teams. Now that he’s here and he’s doing that, I’m pretty sure he’s [enjoying it].” Said Joseph: “He’s been a beast for us and he’s going to continue to be a beast for us. ... He’s been running with that opportunity and opening eyes around the world.” Even strong-willed, uber-confident Lance Stephenson, has backed up for Oladipo. “There’s no hate, know what I mean?” he said over the weekend. “Some guys get mad about somebody doing good. This team wants its teammates to do good. That’s what’s going to make us even better.” Oladipo keeps referring to the other Pacers in a legit lubricating of the “no I in Indy” process. “Honestly I think it’s the personalities and the men that we have in this locker room,” he said. “My teammates are phenomenal people -- not just basketball players, phenomenal people. When you surround yourself with great people, people who sincerely care about you and your team, the chemistry just comes naturally.” Sabonis shows glimpses of success, too The other guy in the trade, Sabonis, has developed more organically, his maturation seemingly inevitable regardless of locale when you tote up his youth, his work ethic and his bloodlines (son of Hall of Famer Arvydas Sabonis). He has gone from that rookie who logged just six minutes in the Thunder’s five 2017 playoff games against Houston to an essential piece in McMillan’s rotation. “Once I got traded, I knew this was a great opportunity for me to show people what I can really do,” said Sabonis, the No. 11 pick in 2016. “I was a rookie last year. Everything was new. Here, I’m being used more at the 5. That’s more the position I’ve been used to playing my whole life.” Sabonis’ minutes are up from 20.1 in OKC to 24.6 off Indiana’s bench. His scoring has doubled from 5.9 ppg to 12.1. And his PIE rating has soared from 4.9 last season to 12.6, a sign of the versatility the skilled big man possesses. “I love Sabonis,” Walsh said. “His father was one of the greatest players in the world, so I don’t like that comparison -- it kills him. He [Domantas] is just more of everything you think he is. He’s stronger than you think. He can shoot the ball better. He’s got good hands, he can catch the ball. I’ve seen him make moves in game that I’ve never seen him make in practice.” Said Turner: “I played against Domas in college -- I knew what kind of player he was. I was excited when we got him. He’s gotten bigger and stronger since then, obviously, and he just didn’t have a chance to show himself last year. But he’s been big for us now, especially when I was out with the concussion. He stepped up huge in that role and we’ve played well since then.” The Pacers are playing faster this season, up from 18th in pace last season to 10th now, part of their improvement from 15th in offensive rating (106.2) to 6th (108.3). They’re doing better, too, in contesting shots and throttling opponents’ field-goal accuracy. The biggest reason why has been Oladipo’s blossoming. Whether due to the sunshine of new, happier surroundings or from that darker, more intense place, to prove cynics wrong. No one can now talk of the Pacers’ bungling of what, after all, was a deal to rent George, not to have him long-term. Fans at Bankers Life figure to boo George on his first visit back, with an inventory they haven’t needed or used on Oladipo. Some might see that as ingratitude, others as respect. It’s a little bit of love lost, too. “Look, they loved Paul when he was here,” Walsh said. “They guy is a great player. One thing I’ve always felt: These guys that play here, they always know more about what they want for their lives than we do. How you gonna argue with that? He treated us good, we treated him good. No bad blood here. I don’t know about fans.” Folks in Indy have a new crush now, one they hope lasts for a while. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 14th, 2017

How will the Spurs meld Aldridge, Leonard?

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com A top-three team in the Western Conference is ready to get its best player back from injury. He's someone who, last season, made first-team All-NBA, had a seat at the MVP roundtable and nearly chopped down the champion Golden State Warriors in a playoff game (before being chopped down himself). And this will be good for the San Antonio Spurs, most would agree. What’s less certain is what Kawhi Leonard’s return from an achy quadricep means for LaMarcus Aldridge, who looks comfortable playing the lead right now without his co-star, yet squirmed to find peace when he had to ride shotgun. The Spurs star could make his season debut on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) against the Mavericks. The Spurs’ season rides on a happy balance between the two and a way to once again lurk as the team that gives the Warriors a severe case of the creeps, more than any other in the West. Despite all the fuss made over Chris Paul joining James Harden in Houston, and the star-infused Thunder in Oklahoma City, it’s the same-old Spurs who spooked Golden State in Game 1 before losing the Western Conference finals. They were also the last non-Warriors team to reach the NBA Finals. And look who’s sitting a bounce pass from the top of the West, despite missing Kawhi all season? That opening playoff game last May against Golden State was a flash point for San Antonio. The series of events that followed managed to put Leonard in a bad place physically, saw Aldridge melt epically the rest of that series and generate trade talk in the off-season, forced a major sit-down/showdown between coach Gregg Popovich and Aldridge and then, out of seemingly nowhere and somewhat surprisingly, a peaceful resolution was reached and wins followed. “As you can see, based on the evidence,” said Aldridge the other day, “everything’s good.” Yes, it appears so. With Kawhi out of the lineup, the Spurs are doing what they usually do, using disciplined basketball to stamp themselves as a contender. Some nights, Aldridge has been a force, ripping double-doubles and looming large in close games. The ball is finding him in a greedy groove; Aldridge is taking almost 17 1/2 shots a game and the Spurs’ No. 2 shooter, Rudy Gay, is getting nine. As a result, his scoring average is up from a year ago, from 17.3 points per game to 22.6 ppg, matching his best production during his peak with the Portland Trail Blazers. Now in his third season with the Spurs, Aldridge has never felt this frisky and once again is leaning on his money maker: the floating 18-foot jumper. Most important, the Spurs are winning because of him, and Popovich is gloating over him. “Are you kidding?” Popovich said. “We’d be in the toilet if it wasn’t for L.A. He’s been a complete basketball player at both ends of the floor, great rebounding, defensively, running the floor, scoring. What’s really been great is his leadership. And him bringing it every night.” It’s a short sample size after 25 games, but Popovich and the Spurs are cautiously encouraged by this. The Spurs veered from their usual draft-and-develop ways when they signed Aldridge to a big free-agent contract three summers ago. Because of that, Aldridge was considered an outsider, someone who wasn’t a true Spur, but who was needed by a team that craved proven talent to remain a contender in the post-Tim Duncan era. But it’s been a learning process for Aldridge, Popovich and the Spurs. He came from the Blazers anxious to break free of a team that began to orbit around Damian Lillard, but wouldn’t you know it, Leonard turned into a superstar almost overnight after Aldridge arrived. The timing was good for the Spurs ... and awkward for Aldridge, who was forced to adjust his game with prodding from Popovich. Aldridge bit his tongue last season when he averaged his lowest point total since his rookie season. When Leonard suffered his ankle sprain against the Warriors, Aldridge suddenly had the burden of carrying the load, and he failed spectacularly for the rest of that series. He averaged just 11.3 points in the final three games and became low hanging fruit for critics. Popovich was asked the other day if Aldridge had to atone for that this season and the coach came to his player’s defense. “I don’t know if the word ‘atone’ is accurate,” Popovich said. “If your leading scorer and also your point guard (Tony Parker, who was also out against the Warriors) isn’t there, then it falls on someone else. If you take away the two top players from any playoff team, it’s probably going to be tough to move on. I don’t think he has anything to atone for.” Still, something wasn’t right; anyone could see that. Aldridge requested a summertime meeting with Popovich and came with demands. On the surface, that might seem a risky strategy, given the coach’s credentials vs. someone without a single title, and Aldridge knew he was walking on eggshells. “I didn’t know how it would go because he’s Gregg Popovich. I didn’t know how he’d take me saying things. I didn’t know what to expect, with me coming at a person a different way but I was very honest and I think he could tell this was maybe different from what he was used to. But I was not disrespectful. I was trying to express how I was feeling and he was very receptive to it. We kept talking and things got better. I was pleasantly surprised.” For anyone who thought one of the game’s greatest coaches didn’t have a humble side, guess again. Popovich said: “We broke bread a few times, talked about it, laughed about it, discussed what we thought needed to happen, and frankly 95 percent of it fell on me because I made an error in trying to change him too much. That might sound odd, but he’d been in the league nine years and there’s one way he plays on the offensive end and feels comfortable with. I tried to turn him into Jack Sikma, told him I was going to teach you how to play on the elbow, go on the wing, face up. It was confusing for him. It really didn’t fit his style of play. I was guilty of over coaching in a sense. “We came to an agreement on what had to happen. Well, on defense, I told him ‘I’m going to get on you like I do everyone else. But on offense, I don’t even want to talk to you. When they double you, kick it. Other than that, you be LaMarcus Aldridge.’ You see the result right now. He’s happy, confident and kicking everybody’s butt.” Every star player’s ego needs a degree of pampering, and Popovich did admit that dealing with Aldridge was different than any player he’s ever had, yet says there’s a reason for that. “When guys like Kawhi and Tony Parker and others came to me, they were young kids. When a guy’s been in a league nine years and is used to doing something and I try to take it away, that’s not right. That wasn’t very wise on my part.” Popovich didn’t pull rank in the meeting with Aldridge and if anything, he put his ego in check, something you see from coaches who haven’t accomplished one-fourth of what he’s done. But Pop has never strayed from the first rule in coaching players, especially the good ones: Keep them happy by any means necessary. “You gotta look at things and make it better as a coach,” he said. “It’s your responsibility. This was mostly me.” Here’s Aldridge this season so far: Back-to-back 33- and-41-point games a few weeks ago, sharper court awareness, better rebounding and passing than a year ago. Aldridge: “I was frustrated. I just wanted to help more and I think he understood that. Now I feel as confident as I was in Portland. I’m definitely being myself and playing my game and not overthinking and not worried about what’s going to happen if I don’t play well. I’m not a face-up guy. I like to have my back to the basket more. Pop’s given me the freedom to be myself again and that has shown itself on the court.” The issue, both say, wasn’t necessary the number of shots, though that was certainly one of the issues. It also was about the spot on the floor, when those shots needed to be taken. Aldridge said he has no problem with Leonard as the core -- he called Kawhi “our main guy” -- but wanted the same amount of comforts within the system. “He’s a go-to guy also,” said Aldridge. “The plan is to have him be the guy he is, and I be who I am now.” And there’s the key word: now. Leonard was bothered by the quad all last season and it didn’t respond quickly to offseason treatment. But now he’s nearly 100 percent and hopes a quick return to the level of last season when he jacked his scoring and finished third in the MVP voting, one spot ahead of LeBron James. Count Parker among the teammates who’ve said the obvious about Aldridge and how the power forward, in Leonard’s absence, has looked All-Star quality. “Everything’s going through him right now and he’s doing a better job knowing when to score and when to pass,” Parker said, “along with reading double teams and playing good defense.” But then Parker, the most senior Spur after Manu Ginobili, stressed that everyone, including Aldridge, must sacrifice for Leonard and not vice-versa, for the sake of the system and ultimately, wins. “When you play for the Spurs you don’t get a lot of big stats,” Parker said. “Now that Kawhi is out, he obviously has the ball more and he’s going to shoot more shots.” Then he added the kicker: “When Kawhi comes back we will share” -- Parker said while smiling -- “like we always do here.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 9th, 2017

UN execs hail MILF for removing children from its ranks    

        The Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) on Monday received a commendation from Unicef Philippines for removing 1,869 children from its ranks.   For completing the plan, the MILF was also delisted from the annexes of the Secretary General Annual Report on Children and Armed Conflict.   The Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, Ms. Virginia Gamba and UN Resident Coordinator in the Philippines Ola Almgren congratulated the MILF for promoting and protecting the rights of children.   "Today (Monday), we mark an important milestone for the boys and girls of the Philippines. ...Keep on reading: UN execs hail MILF for removing children from its ranks    .....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 4th, 2017

Temperature check at 20-game mark of 17-18 NBA season

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Twenty games is not a small sample size. At 20 games, much of what an NBA team is -- and much of what it will become -- is mostly well-established. Fourteen, 16, even 18 games into an 82-game schedule, it might be easy to understate and/or overstate a season. That round number of 20, though -- the closest a team can get in whole games to 25 percent of the regular season (24.39, actually) -- resonates. As our man John Schuhmann notes annually in his Power Rankings, what qualifies as one-fourth of the season carries a certain heft, in terms of who’s good, who’s not and who’s headed where over the remaining 60-62 games. The teams that are likely to be in the playoffs largely are known by now -- 14 of the 16 qualifiers in 2016-17 were above the lottery cutoff by Dec. 5, last season’s quarter mark -- as are those that are racing toward the bottom or merely churning about. Twenty games is no joke, in other words, which is why numerous NBA teams do some serious evaluating at this point each season. Those at or near the top (and those committed to the cellar) may not make course-altering decisions. The teams in the yawning middle might be particularly engaged right about now -- all 30 teams will have played at least 20 games by Friday morning -- in either fishing or cutting bait. The Miami Heat, at 10-9, will hit 20 at Cleveland tonight. They’re especially known for the so-called Rule of 20 owing to team president Pat Riley’s ways dating back to his New York and Los Angeles days. The thinking is, 82 games is too vast and ill-defined, splayed across six months or so, to allow for clear, concise judgments along the way. By the time you get a feel for where your team is headed, you’ve either already gotten there or been sidetracked. At 20 games -- and then again at 40 and 60 -- there’s an opportunity to correct one’s course or adjust one’s objectives. Lock into a starting lineup, pursue a trade, fire a coach, opt for Plan B or hitch up the shorts for a stretch drive, it’s only doable if the right markers are heeded. Some coaches will talk about “continuous improvement” as their overriding mission, but there are so many tiny variables from one game to the next: travel, schedule quirks, minor ailments. Better to go with a block of games. And to know when you can’t. “You have a pretty good idea of your general feel and context of your team,” Miami coach Erik Spoelstra said. “But that’s not always in cement. Just look at us last year. We didn’t really understand where we were. But you have an idea of what direction, usually, that your team is going in.” The Heat in 2016-17 had one of the most unusual seasons in league annals, going 11-30 after a Jan. 13 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks and then 30-11 in to finish the season. They were 7-13 after 20 games, then wound up barely missing a playoff berth on the season’s final night. This time around, the Heat seem to be a blend of last season’s good and bad, and their mediocre mark shows it. Spoelstra has rolled back a lot of the work between games to fundamentals and essentials, with the focus on building good habits. “We’ve got a ways to go,” he said. ‘We’re building habits. We’re building better behavior, all the little things that lead to winning, so hopefully we’ll be a much different team every 20-game block from here on out.” (Some even think 20 games is too many, too diffused and vague for the short attention spans players almost necessarily have to have when uploading mass quantities of opponent research for a homestand’s worth of foes. Hall of Fame coach Hubie Brown preferred to mentally break the season into eight-game chunks. Go 5-3 in enough of those, you’re almost assured of being a playoff team.) Twenty games in is a fragile time for coaches, as far as job security, as the Memphis Grizzlies’ David Fizdale found out Monday (Tuesday, PHL time). At 7-12, he and the Grizzlies had been given enough rope that management obviously felt a determination could be made. Memphis’ quick start, winning five of its first six, didn’t resonate nearly as much as its eight consecutive losses did. Not every franchise hits 20, 40 or 60 games on the nose before doing something dramatic. Phoenix Suns GM Ryan McDonough felt he needed to see only three games to fire coach Earl Watson. In 2015-16, the Houston Rockets pulled the plug on Kevin McHale after 11 games. But the last time Miami made a coaching change in season, Riley sent home Stan Van Gundy at 11-10 in 2005-06 and took over for the final 61 games. The Cleveland Cavaliers fired David Blatt 41 games into the 2015-16 season. And the last time each of these organizations -- Washington, Toronto, San Antonio, Minnesota, Golden State, Philadelphia, Sacramento and Chicago -- made coaching changes during the season, they did so after 17, 17, 18, 19, 23, 23, 24 and 25 games respectively. What have we learned about the league this season, with 20 games coming sooner than usual? * Boston’s acquisition of Kyrie Irving, its young starting forwards and a more tenacious defense than expected have more than made up for Gordon Hayward’s loss. * The day Philadelphia coach Brett Brown longed for finally has arrived. * Detroit, Indiana and New York might manage to overachieve their way into lower-seed possibilities. Washington’s window is closing before its eyes, and Milwaukee has flaws at both ends that won’t be solved if and when Jabari Parker returns. * Houston’s James Harden might snag the Kia MVP trophy many thought he deserved last spring. * Minnesota, Denver and Portland are for real in the West, while it’s getting late early in Oklahoma City. Carmelo Anthony was supposed to have left his sub-.500 records back with the Knicks. * The next man Memphis owner Robert Pera offers a full-time coaching position is going to speed-dial Lionel Hollins, Dave Joerger and Fizdale in some order. * A strong field of Kia Rookie of the Year candidates at least six deep from the Draft class of 2017 all might wind up slotting in behind the Sixers’ Ben Simmons. * The drama of the draft lottery might be greater than that of the playoffs decided several weeks later. * LeBron James still moves the Earth and the league when he firmly puts his foot down. Then there’s the best thing about the NBA season at 20 games: That means 62 more to go. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017

Board OKs plan for LeBron James’ ‘I Promise’ school in Akron

AKRON, Ohio --- The school board in LeBron James' Ohio hometown has approved the plan for a public school being created in partnership with the NBA star's foundation. The LeBron James Family Foundation says the "I Promise" School in Akron will be geared toward educating students who are at risk of falling behind. It will have longer days and begin classes in the summer --- weeks before other district schools --- to encourage information retention. It's scheduled to open next fall for third- and fourth-graders and add more grade levels in future years. The idea is based on the foundation's existing "I Promise" programs that encourage struggling students to stay in school. ...Keep on reading: Board OKs plan for LeBron James’ ‘I Promise’ school in Akron.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 29th, 2017

Slum mum shows birth control plan failures

MANILA, Philippines — At age 33 and raising six children in a slum named “Paradise Village,” Myrna Albos is Exhibit A for the country’s serial family plannin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 26th, 2017

Teen pregnancy, sexual abuse, bullying top PH youth concerns today – UNICEF

  Issues such as corporal punishment, teenage pregnancy, and sexual abuse are among the most pressing concerns that personally affect Filipino children today.   In a children's assembly organized by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), 32 children from all over the Philippines urged lawmakers and policymakers to listen and respond to their concerns.   UNICEF representative Lotta Sylwander stressed that progress and prosperity would mean little when the youth suffer from persistent poverty and illnesses.   "We listen to children speak powerfully about their plight. We must acknowledge these and more challenges are faced by Filipino chil...Keep on reading: Teen pregnancy, sexual abuse, bullying top PH youth concerns today – UNICEF.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2017

‘Declaring NPAs terrorists a threat to Lumad children’

President Rodrigo Duterte’s plan to declare the New People’s Army as a terrorist group have caused a chilling effect to the Lumad children in Mindanao, progressive groups said......»»

Category: newsSource:  davaotodayRelated NewsNov 20th, 2017

On point: Thomas making progress, could join Cavs earlier

By Tom Withers, Associated Press INDEPENDENCE, Ohio (AP) — Day by day, dribble by dribble, Isaiah Thomas looks a little more like an All-Star point guard — like himself. And just maybe like one who can rescue the reeling Cavaliers. Thomas has been increasing the intensity of his workouts and is making strong progress in his recovery from a serious hip injury that ended his 2016 season in Boston and delayed his debut with Cleveland. As Cavs coach Tyronn Lue and a member of Cleveland’s medical staff kept an eye on him from an adjacent floor at Cleveland Clinic Courts, Thomas broke a healthy sweat during a workout Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) under the guidance of assistant coach Phil Handy, who fired him passes and praise. Thomas worked on his three-pointer, man-to-man defense, conditioning, ball handling and free throws as he nears a return that may be coming sooner than imagined. Isaiah Thomas doing more and more. #Cavs pic.twitter.com/hdttYp9jxx — Tom Withers (@twithersAP) November 6, 2017 Although the team has not disclosed any change from its original timetable estimate of the end of December, it’s apparent that Thomas is getting closer. At 4-6, and lacking a second scorer to complement LeBron James, the Cavs might be tempted to rush Thomas along. But Lue said it’s imperative for the team to stick with its plan so as not to harm the 28-year-old. “We have to make sure he’s 100 percent,” Lue said Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) as the Cavs regrouped following an embarrassing loss to the Atlanta Hawks. “We have to worry about him as a player and a person. If he’s not right, not healthy, we don’t want to rush him back to set him back even more.” Thomas isn’t keeping his status any kind of secret. In the first few weeks of his rehab, he kept a lower profile as he worked out in the team’s facility away from reporters and cameras. Lately, he’s been front and center, giving everyone a glimpse of the strides he’s made in coming back from a torn labrum. Lue credited Cleveland’s training staff with a slow, steady approach in bringing along Thomas, who came to the Cavs in the blockbuster trade last summer that sent Kyrie Irving to the Boston Celtics. Irving and the Celtics have won nine straight and lead the Eastern Conference. Meanwhile, Cleveland has remained patient, although it’s clear that Thomas can’t wait to get back onto the floor in meaningful games. I️ just wanna HOOP!!!!! — Isaiah Thomas (@Isaiah_Thomas) November 6, 2017 “I just wanna HOOP!!!!!” he tweeted Sunday night (Monday, PHL time). The Cavs need him. Without Irving, the Eastern Conference champions lack a proven scorer to take some pressure off James. Thomas won’t help Cleveland’s suspect defense. In fact, it might be a little worse with him on the court, but its offense would go to another level with Thomas. He can drive. He can shoot. He can get to the line. “We still have a 30-point scorer, All-Star point guard that’s coming soon,” James said recently. “So that’s exciting.” Once he returns, Thomas is expected to move into the starting lineup, with Derrick Rose coming off the bench and running the Cavs’ second unit. It’s been dreadful starts by the Cavs’ first five that have been at the heart of their early struggles. Thomas could fix that, but until he’s ready, the Cavs have to come out with more energy and a greater sense of urgency. More Isaiah. pic.twitter.com/Gijxm5fUXc — Tom Withers (@twithersAP) November 6, 2017 Thomas should also help Cleveland’s woeful three-point shooting. The Cavs enter Tuesday night’s (Wednesday, PHL time) game against Milwaukee 25th in the league in three-point accuracy (33 percent) and tied for 16th in three-pointers made per game. Thomas made a Celtics record 245 3-pointers last season and knocked down at least one in 57 straight games. Against the Hawks, the Cavs started 3-of-25 from behind the arc and finished 10-of-36 — thanks mostly to Kyle Korver heating up during a fourth-quarter comeback. “We have guys that can shoot the ball,” said Kevin Love, who was taken to the hospital Sunday (Monday, PHL time) after falling ill. “I don’t know what it says on pace, but last year we really pushed the ball with ’Bron and Ky and really opened up the floor. But we’re just not shooting the ball well from three, and that has to change.” There need to be other changes, and Lue said it’s time for his team to begin making them. “Just have to keep attacking it,” he said. “Have to keep showing film and continue to keep talking about it. I think guys are embarrassed and we should be embarrassed of how we’re getting beat. Teams that we’re playing, having guys out, key guys out and still not being able to win. We all have to continue to keep searching and continue to keep fighting and continue to play hard.” And at some point, they might get some help......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

Nuggets, Bucks go against NBA’s guard-heavy grain

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com They’ve become the must-have accessory in the NBA (just ahead of designer headphones and hoodie warmups), the one player no team can do without, the one player that no team seems to lack. Yes, quality point guards are a dime-a-dozen group now in the NBA. They’re populating the league in such abundance that the Phoenix Suns didn’t flinch when they told disgruntled starter Eric Bledsoe to stay home or the hair salon -- whichever he preferred. It’s hard to find a serious playoff contender that doesn’t have one (and some have two). And then there are the Denver Nuggets and Milwaukee Bucks, who arguably have none. Partly by necessity and partly by choice, both teams are running their offenses through gifted big men and getting reasonably decent results. These two teams are building for a big run while also going against the NBA’s trend … and, by no coincidence, are the two most logical landing spots for Bledsoe in a trade. Pump the brakes, though. Neither seems to be in a rush because they’re weighing the merits of using young, non-traditional point guards as compliments to the centerpieces: Giannis Antetokoumnpo with the Bucks and Nikola Jokic with the Nuggets. Both are solid passers and act as triggers while their point guards orbit around them, defer to them and pick spots to command the ball. But when, if ever, will either team get cold feet and fall in line with the rest of the NBA? The Suns would like to know, but it could be a long wait if the Bucks get the right results from reigning Kia Rookie of the Year Malcolm Brogdon and the Nuggets likewise from Jamal Murray. Their teams are taking a wait-and-see approach with their development while leaning heavily on Antetokounmpo and Jokic’s respective playmaking. Their coaches are saying all the right things: Jason Kidd of the Bucks: “Malcolm knows how to play the right way. He’s getting better. We’re lucky to have him.” Michael Malone of the Nuggets: “I believe in him and [Murray] has to believe in himself.” Yet both coaches are acutely aware that Murray and Brogdon, because of their size, can also play off the ball. Murray, for one, might be better suited as a game-finisher anyway. Both teams are in play for Bledsoe or perhaps a veteran addition either at the trade deadline or in free agency next summer. Brogdon surprised the NBA in winning Rookie of the Year while Ben Simmons missed last season and Joel Embiid played only 31 games. Still, that doesn’t diminish what Brogdon delivered last season and his value to the Bucks now. He’s wiser than most NBA sophomores because he stayed all four years in college and, as a second-round pick, his sense of urgency and hunger was greater than that of lottery picks. Brogdon is a self-made grinder, a consistent player who rarely screws up and is already one of the Bucks’ better defenders. The Bucks know what they’re getting from him on a nightly basis. “I’m a lot more confident,” Brogdon said. “When you have a year of experience and also the experience of playing in the playoffs, it just makes a world of difference. I know what my role is. I feel I’ve found my niche with this team.” Yet, Brogdon’s four assists per game (in 32.1 minutes per game) ranks 38th among starting point guards mainly because of Antetokoumnpo, who handles the ball and runs the offense much like LeBron James does. Brogdon’s ability and willingness to blend with Antetokounmpo is helpful to a system that plays off the young superstar’s multiple skills. Giannis is off to an MVP-like start and the last thing the Bucks want to do is slow his roll. But Kidd also wants Brogdon to sharpen his point guard instincts as well. “We talked about it last year, understanding when it’s time to score, being able to play-make, understanding how to get a teammate a shot, just being consistent when learning how to run the show,” Kidd said. “He’s been able to run the offense and be a leader. “And really, it’s all about that, and understanding who hasn’t touched the ball. That’s what makes a point guard special in this league. Figure out how to get the ball to the right people at the right time. That’s the next step for Malcolm.” The Nuggets waited until the eve of the season to name their starter at point guard, although it was clear last year that Murray had pole position. He assumed the role late in the season from Emmanuel Mudiay (who started 55 games) and Jameer Nelson (40 starts) and kept the ball, starting seven games. That wasn’t the plan when the Nuggets took him No. 7 overall in the 2016 Draft. Mudiay was their point guard of the future and Murray, who didn’t play the position in college at Kentucky, was projected as a scoring guard. But Mudiay’s erratic shooting, limited range and inconsistent playmaking opened up the job, which Murray won almost by default after the Nuggets waived Nelson. Malone admitted that Muray’s edge on Mudiay, a superior athlete, was shooting. Malone wanted someone with deeper range next to Gary Harris to space the floor for Jokic and newcomer Paul Millsap. Problem is, Murray’s shooting (37.1 percent) has been Mudiay-like here in the early season. From Oct. 21-27, he missed 16 straight three-pointers and is making just 18.2 percent of his three-pointers (after shooting 33.4 percent in 2016-17). His defense remains an issue at times (100.6 Defensive Rating this season) and part of the Nuggets’ slow start could be pinpointed to Murray’s growing pains. “I think they drafted me for a reason,” Murray said. “I just go out there and play basketball. I’m not worried about missing. I just got to be thinking about the next shot.” Malone and the Nuggets are taking the long view and realize Murray, 20, is trying to master NBA point guard play on the fly. But if they’re anxious to make a significant move in the tough West this season, the Nuggets’ point guard position might need an upgrade at starter or backup. “He showed me he’s not afraid of the moment,” Malone said, who added that part of the learning experience for players such as Murray means to deal with the not-so-good days and “let them play through it.” The Nuggets and Bucks are hesitant to include Murray or Brogdon in trade talks for good reason: Both are on cheap rookie deals and are big parts of each team’s future. Teams rarely move players this quickly unless there’s a serious issue (think Chris Webber after his rookie season in Golden State) or a deal is too good to skip. It wouldn’t be a surprise if the Nuggets are trying instead to unload Mudiay in a package to Phoenix and the Bucks are selling some combination of John Henson and Matthew Dellavedova. There’s risk, too, in acquiring Bledsoe himself. He went rogue with the Suns and teams usually shy away from players with flapping red flags. If he came to Milwaukee or Denver and didn’t mesh with Giannis or Jokic, it would be a disaster. Until further notice, the Bucks and Nuggets are good to go with the status quo. Teams can gawk all they want at their lack of a true point guard … and then deal with the sight of a 6’11” Antetokounmpo reaching the rim in three steps, or with the sight of 6’10” Jokic throwing Bill Walton-like backdoor passes from the key. Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2017

BLOGTABLE: Would less games benefit the NBA?

em>NBA.com blogtable /em> NBA commissioner Adam Silver was quoted recently saying 'there's nothing magical about 82 games.' So what is the right number of games for the NBA regular season, and what would that schedule look like? * * * strong>David Aldridge: /strong>A 70-game schedule would, IMHO, be perfect for just about everyone concerned. Over the course of six months, that's just two fewer games per team per month. Fans would barely notice. But players would. While that doesn't sound like a major reduction, I think there would be an improvement in quality of play. Reducing to 70 while keeping the new mid-October start date of the regular season would also allow two significant changes: under my schedule, teams that get scheduled to play on Christmas Day on ESPN/ABC and TNT would get a mandatory four days off afterward to be with their families at home -- no games for any of those dozen teams after Christmas until Dec. 30. And, it would allow the league to make the post-All-Star break as long as it wants. A whole week? No games until the following Saturday/Sunday? Fine by me. Especially with the earlier trade deadline now in place, a whole week off for everyone would allow newly acquired players significant practice time with their new team. Now, owners would complain about losing six home games and the revenue they get from them. But, really: is a fan in Milwaukee really going to miss those second games against Indiana or Detroit or Charlotte in a given year? (And, vice versa for fans of those teams.) strong>Steve Aschburner: /strong>The right number is 82. The ideal schedule would look like this season’s or maybe something slightly airier. Let’s let the extra week folded into the 2017-18 schedule play out to see if it has the desired result in rest and recovery, and then maybe stretch things by an additional week next season. Better that than to cut back to, say, 66 games, which would reduce revenue for both the owners and the players, while ending much of the fun in comparing teams and stars across eras. Say bye, too, to modern players scaling lifetime statistical categories unless they plan to stick around for an extra three or four seasons. At some point, it no longer will make sense to argue about the superiority of the most highly conditioned, prepared and doted-upon athletes in history if they’re swaddled in bubble wrap relative to the legends of the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s who gutted out four games in five nights while flying commercially. strong>Shaun Powell: /strong> This marks the 50 year anniversary of the 82-game schedule, but it's really meaningless to have an intelligent conversation about shortening the schedule until players and owners and networks agree to shorten their wallets. And we know that's not happening. The ideal length would be 70-75 games but good luck getting owners to refund the networks about 15-20 percent, and the networks offering rebates to sponsors, and the players taking pay cuts. strong>John Schuhmann: /strong>I've long thought that 72 games -- three against each team in your conference, two against each team in the other conference -- would be a better number, further reducing back-to-backs and general schedule stress. Now, if we want to get to a 1-16 playoff format and a balanced schedule, then there would need to be a system that rotates your three-game opponents through the years. Gate and local TV revenue would suffer some, but a reduction in total games doesn't necessarily mean a reduction in national TV games. In fact, those national TV games would become more important and less likely to be hampered by injuries or fatigue. strong>Sekou Smith: /strong> I agree with the Commissioner, there is nothing particularly 'magical' about the 82-game schedule. There's only something sentimental about it, mostly because we've grown accustomed to that number over the course of the past five decades. The number of games is not relevant if the end goal is to find a sweet spot for player rest and the finest product that can be produced for the consumption of the basketball public. Perhaps a stretch provision of the current season is more important than a reduction in the number of games. We're already starting the season a week earlier this season, why not another week or two earlier? An improved NBA calendar, to me, is like an improved school calendar (for those of you with school-age children, you know where I'm coming from). The number of days stay the same. But the start and end date and the built in breaks are what really matter. Would a 12-game reduction to 70 regular season contests satisfy all involved? I think so, in many respects. It would also allow for a stretching of key dates (All-Star, trade deadline, Draft, free agency, etc.) over the course of the calendar. My ideal NBA season would include all of those key dates during the course of the regular season so that 'offseason' felt more like a break than it does now. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Cavaliers make it official, sign Dwyane Wade

em>Cleveland Cavaliers press release /em> CLEVELAND, OH – The Cleveland Cavaliers have signed guard Dwyane Wade, Cavaliers General Manager Koby Altman announced on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), from Cleveland Clinic Courts. “We’re extremely happy that Dwyane chose to join us in Cleveland and become a core part of helping us achieve success at the highest level,” said Altman. “Dwyane has proven time and time again that he is a leader and competitor of the highest caliber and that his focus is centered on the ultimate goal. The deep commitment and consistency that he has shown to the game as a 12-time NBA All-Star and three-time NBA Champion is remarkable and he’s going to be a difference maker on the court and in the locker room with our team.” Wade (6'4', 220) appeared in 60 games (59 starts) with the Chicago Bulls in 2016-17, averaging 18.3 points, 4.5 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.43 steals in 29.9 minutes. He scored at least 20 points on 26 occasions, including 30 points or more five times, and was one of only six players in the Eastern Conference to average at least 18.0 points, 4.0 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.4 steals last season. The Chicago native was originally selected by the Heat in the 2003 NBA Draft (fifth overall pick) and has gone on to earn 12 NBA All-Star selections (2005-2016), including nine as a starter, as well as MVP honors for the 2010 NBA All-Star Game in Dallas. Wade has reached the playoffs 12 times with three NBA Championships under his belt (2006, 2012, 2013) and was the 2006 Finals MVP. He has also been selected to the All-NBA First Team twice (2009, 2010), All-NBA Second Team three times (2005, 2006, 2011) and All-NBA Third Team three times (2007, 2012, 2013). The 6-4 guard has garnered All-Defensive Second Team honors on three occasions (2005, 2009, 2010) and was an All-Rookie First Team selection in 2004. Over his 14-year NBA career, Wade has played in 915 regular season games (904 starts) with averages of 23.3 points, 4.8 rebounds, 5.7 assists and 1.64 steals in 35.4 minutes. Entering the 2017-18 season, he ranks 34th in NBA history for points scored with 21,317. In postseason play, he has averaged 22.5 points, 5.3 rebounds, 5.0 assists, 1.55 steals and 1.01 blocks in 38.2 minutes over 172 contests (all starts). Wade ranks 11th on the NBA’s all-time postseason scoring list with 3,871 points, and his 174 blocks in the playoffs rank first among guards in NBA history. He spent his first 13 NBA seasons with the Miami Heat and left as the franchise’s leader in scoring (20,221 points), assists (4,944), steals (1,414) and games played (855), while ranking second in blocks (759) and fourth in rebounds (4,126). Wade has represented his country on the USA Basketball Team two times, winning a gold medal at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing and a bronze medal at the 2004 Summer Games in Athens. Wade is involved in many philanthropic efforts through his Wade’s World Foundation, which has a goal of providing support to various education, health and family service programs, particularly those that benefit underserved communities. He was recently awarded the Mannie Jackson Human Spirit Award at this year’s Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame. strong>DWYANE WADE STATEMENT: /strong> I've always dreamed of playing for the Chicago Bulls and I feel so fortunate to have fulfilled my dream this past year. The team is now heading in a different direction, which has made me reevaluate where I need to be in this phase of my career. Being a part of a team that is in the process of rebuilding doesn't align with where I want to be right now no matter how difficult that decision may be. In the hopes of pursuing a fourth championship, I've reached a deal with the Chicago Bulls and I am excited to share that I will be joining the Cleveland Cavaliers this season. There's no better place to be right now to continue to play and compete at the highest level. Cleveland believes in my talents and what I can bring to a championship contender both as a player and leader. I look forward to reuniting and playing alongside my brother LeBron. We’ve already won two championships together and I hope we win a third. This was an incredibly difficult decision and I am very grateful to the Bulls organization, my fans and the Chicago community for welcoming me home with open arms. It meant so much to me seeing my mom on the sidelines cheering me on as a Bull. I am so proud of the work we have been doing in the community and we plan to continue these efforts. It's been an honor and a privilege to play for my hometown. Chicago holds a very special place in my heart and will always be home to me. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

A cup winner in soccer, Rio Ferdinand now eyes boxing belts

em>By Rob Harris, Associated Press /em> LONDON (AP) — When Rio Ferdinand hung up his boots two years ago, a career competing in sports appeared over. Coaching jobs weren't considered. Only television punditry kept the former Manchester United and England captain in soccer. There was still something missing for Ferdinand in retirement. Leaving the field, didn't dim his competitive streak. The former defender was missing an outlet to channel the aggression that helped him win every major honor with United. Ferdinand has found it. At 38, he is planning an unlikely transition to become a professional boxer. 'It's a chance to really get my competitive juices flowing again,' Ferdinand told The Associated Press. 'I really do miss that.' There are financial benefits, too. Ferdinand is being bankrolled by a bookmaker whose branding was plastered over the backdrops at Tuesday's announcement. 'I don't look at this as a circus,' Ferdinand told the media inside York Hall, a shabby but renowned east London boxing venue. 'I'm not trying to disrespect anyone. I'm taking it seriously.' It is no stunt, Ferdinand maintained, despite the links to a betting company renowned for often tasteless stunts. There is, however, no prospect of Ferdinand entering the ring soon. A professional license is yet to be granted by the British Boxing Board. 'I've got the utmost respect for the boxing fraternity and I'm not saying I'm going to be a world champion,' Ferdinand said. 'I'm saying there are loads of hurdles to get over and I'm going to meet them head on.' Since his wife Rebecca died of breast cancer in 2015, Ferdinand has three children to bring up. 'They just said, 'Dad, don't get knocked out,'' Ferdinand said in an interview. 'I've got to maintain that respect once I walk through the front door. So I'll be doing everything I can do not to get knocked out.' That was the concern raised by Curtis Woodhouse, a former Sheffield United midfielder who went on to win the British light-welterweight title. 'My advice to Rio would be show the game the respect it deserves,' Woodhouse tweeted, flagging up the dangers of boxing. 'This is no joke, you can die 'playing' boxing.' Ferdinand, who is aiming to fight at cruiserweight, realizes that. 'I've accepted the challenge based on many nights thinking about what the potential downfalls are,' he said in response to Woodhouse's comments. 'But I want to go in there and give it a real good shot.' For now, there is a three-month training regime to get there. Ferdinand will be working on his technique and conditioning with former WBC super-middleweight champion Richie Woodhall, who has been involved with Britain's Olympic team. 'I wasn't that interested (in being the trainer), when they said it was going to be a retired footballer, in their 30s,' Woodhall said. 'But then when they said it was Rio, that changed my mind. I've always admired his attitude and his healthy living. 'He'll be a fairly small cruiser, in terms of the weight. He's tall and rangy.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2017

Reshuffle, retirement of senior officers won’t affect military programs, says Armed Forces chief

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Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsAug 30th, 2017

Govt ‘rightsizing’ to affect 900,000 workers–Diokno

THE Duterte administration’s plan to downscale government offices thru a “rightsizing” bill will affect at least 900,000 state workers, Budget Secretary Benjamin Diokno said Wednesday. Diokno was responding to the call by President Rodrigo Duterte during his two-hour second State of the Nation Address on Monday when he underscored the “rightsizing” of government to improve [...].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 26th, 2017

Italy steps up rescue plan for mafia children

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Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 7th, 2017

Progressive Auto Tax Plan Won’t Affect Industry Growth

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Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJun 9th, 2017