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Cheat Sheet: Camila Cabello Got Us Inspired To Wear Our Trusty Sneaks With Attitude!

We played style-me-up with one of her collab footwear projects!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnApr 4th, 2018

Dua Lipa, Garbine Muguruza inspire brand to create versatile, stylish workout line

Inspired by its women’s global collective including Dua Lipa, Karlie Kloss, Shay Mitchell, Hannah Bronfman and Garbiñe Muguruza, adidas introduces a capsule fitness collection designed to support women from sunrise yoga to happy hour HIIT and all the moments in between.  The Statement Collection offers stand-out looks curated for women who take a diverse approach to training and demand performance wear as versatile as they are. More than 20 complementary pieces feature in the collection - including bras, tights, jackets, footwear and accessories, which come together to inspire bold training looks from street to studio. Floral camo and geometric prints inspired by Stella McCartney feature dynamic designs and cooling fabrics for maximum style and performance, whatever the workout.  The Statement Collection is built around adidas’ three sports bras “All Me”, “Don’t Rest” and “Stronger For It”. Each is engineered to support a range of different body types and training activities, from low to high intensity. The curation of the collection was inspired by women who take different approaches to working up a sweat, their insights and ideas informed a versatile selection of statement pieces which come together as a distinctive workout wardrobe designed to unleash creativity. Josefine Aberg, VP of Design for adidas Training, said: “Women are driving the global fitness movement by abandoning routines and embracing a versatile approach to training without skipping a step in style. That exact attitude inspired this capsule collection that covers women from the moment they hit the street through their most powerful sessions of sweat." "This statement collection has vibrant hues and standout prints that harmonize for the ultimate fitness wardrobe, designed to be as strong and bold as the women wearing them,” she added. The Statement Collection dropped last October 22 online and in stores last November 1. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 16th, 2018

Cheat Sheet: Look Like Your Favorite 2018 Movie And TV Icons This Halloween!

From Lara Jean to Rachel Chu, here are some makeup ideas you can wear even after Halloween is over......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

Cheat Sheet: Check Out These Celebrity-Approved Ways To Level Up Your White Sneaker Game!

Gentlemen, listen up. Here’s how to wear your sneakers like a celeb!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 19th, 2017

Cheat Sheet: 9 Times Julia Barretto Inspired Our 'OOTD Picks

These easy-to-copy outfits are totally relatable......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 5th, 2017

Cheat Sheet: Channel Your Inner Boho And Opt For Organic Pieces For Your Personal Sanctuary!

It's not how big the house is but how happy the home is!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 4th, 2018

LOOK: Pinoy athletes dress up for Halloween

Halloween has been known as more of a tradition in the Western Hemisphere, but in recent decades the Philippines has caught the case of spooky fever. The holiday of course is known to feature people costumed asking for treats, but if denied, give a trick instead. Our athletes of course were not denied a chance to showcase their vivid imagination and stand out for their magnificent costumes. Mel Gohing (Creamline Cool Smashers) as Daenerys Targaryen Creamline libero Mel Gohing decided to wear a costume inspired by 'The Dragon Queen' Daenerys Targaryen in the hit HBO series Game of Thrones portrayed by English actress Emilia Clarke. Gohing, though hastily prepared for the Halloween party of her team over at Luna in Bonifacio Global City, never gave a doubt on who was she going to be. "It seems to me that a queen who trusts no one is as foolish as a queen who trusts everyone." - Daenerys Targaryen Last minute costume for the #CreamlineHalloween 😂 #LunaCoffee pic.twitter.com/OFBlaXN72R — Melissa E. Gohing (@GOHINGMELISSA) October 31, 2018 Michele Gumabao (Creamline Cool Smashers) as Elle Woods (Legally Blonde) The recent winner of Miss Social Media and Miss Dream Girl in the recently-concluded Miss Globe 2018 in Albania, Gumabao dazzled with her looks as lawyer Elle Woods of the Legally Blonde movie series, most famously portrayed by Reese Witherspoon. MG even brought with her the adorable Brie, her super adorable Maltese pupper to go along with the character of Woods.          View this post on Instagram                   Guess who we are !!! @cardybrie and I played dress up at the #creamlinehalloween party at @lunacoffeeph this afternoon and it was so much fun! The whole team came straight from practice and still looked fab 😂😂 Dress by @mikeeandrei Hair by @davegrona A post shared by Michele Gumabao (@gumabaomichele) on Oct 30, 2018 at 3:40am PDT Gabe Norwood (Rain or Shine Elasto Painters) as Mr. Potato Head The Rain or Shine and Gilas Pilipinas veteran and his whole family dressed up for the occassion in their area, with his wife dressed up as Mrs. Potato Head. The children completes the role as Andy's toys from the hit Disney-Pixar film series Toy Story, with one dressed as intergalactic ranger Buzz Lightyear, one as his best friend Sheriff Woody, and their youngest as one of the three-eyed alien toys picked up from a toy crane.         View this post on Instagram                   Andy’s toys are on the move 🎃 A post shared by Gabe Norwood (@gnorwood5) on Oct 29, 2018 at 1:27am PDT Alyssa Valdez and Jia Morado (Creamline Cool Smashers) as sumo wrestlers  The tandem of Alyssa Valdez and Jia Morado seem to be inseparable even when it comes to Halloween parties. Valdez and Morado, who forged their partnership in Ateneo, continue to thrive with the PVL team. Seen through Creamline manager Karlo Santos' Instagram stories, the ladies dressed up as sumo wrestlers and hopped up and down while they showed off their costumes. Jema Galanza (Creamline Cool Smashers) as Stitch The Adamson alumna wore a Stitch costume to the affair, and in full gear. Stitch of course, it the savage, yet lovable alien that crashed in Hawaii in Disney's movie and subsequent series 'Lilo and Stitch'.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 1st, 2018

Cheat Sheet: How Joey Mead King Keeps Her Crowning Glory Shine

Learn the secrets to her super healthy hair!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

Bring sexy back in your everyday look with these back-baring outfits

Dresses or blouses with low-cut backs aren't just for parties or for GNOs, they can also be elegant and wearable for just about any occasion---may it be an office presentation, or any other formal event. Just look at Princess Eugenie and her back-baring wedding gown which she consciously chose to highlight the scar she got from a surgery to treat her scoliosis. We loved her fashion statement so much that we made a list of outfits you can wear, inspired by that very wedding dress. If you have a similar story as Princess Eugenie's, and was inspired enough to want to show off your scar, too---or if you just want to highlight your sexy back, here are our picks for chic and elegant back-bar...Keep on reading: Bring sexy back in your everyday look with these back-baring outfits.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

Cheat Sheet: Check Out These Free/Cheap But Challenging Workout Apps You Can Use Right At Home!

Transform your home into a gym with these workout apps!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

Camila Cabello leads nominations at MTV EMAs

Camila Cabello leads nominations at MTV EMAs.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 6th, 2018

PBA: Kiwi 'coach' wants TNT to love basketball again

A new "coach" is trying to harness TNT's immense talent and it's working so far. Mark Dickel, tapped by the KaTropa from New Zealand to join their staff mid-way through the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup, has been doing well so far in his initial stint in the Philippines. Dickel, who is officially acting as a consultant for TNT, has helped newly-promoted head coach Bong Ravena lead the team to renaissance of sorts in the conference. Following Sunday's 23-point comeback against Northport, Dickel and Ravena are 2-0 with TNT and the KaTropa have recovered from a nightmare 1-4 start to make it back to .500 basketball. "Not too much structurally. You know the previous coach [Nash Racela] has done a really good job, I mean, hes a really good coach, we have really good players," Dickel said when asked what he's changed with TNT since arriving to the team a couple of weeks back. "For me it was just a matter of trying to get them to enjoy basketball again and finding their love of the game again. So thats really what I focused on. And to have other really good coaches helping me like Bong, Alton, coach Eric, it makes a big big difference. So really its just trying to make it enjoyable for them and hopefully that translates to the court. We have a good talent in our team. Its just how we gonna play hard enough to win every game," he added. Aside from making the game more "enjoyable" and infusing a new attitude and culture to TNT, Dickel has put an emphasis on defense. The KaTropa, despite having many defensive-minded coaches in their history, were never really known as a defense-first team. In the fourth quarter of TNT's game against the Batang Pier, the KaTropa broke out a full-court press. That, among other thigs, helped the flagship MVP team complete a 23-point comeback. "It's something that we wanna focus on. If you allow the other teams to play they're gonna score on you," Dickel said on TNT's defense. "So defense has to be our focus, otherwise we're really beatable. That's one thing we're working on but its difficult too because the other players are really good and its not usually until the third or fourth quarter that you can wear them down enough so that the pressure is effective. So its just a matter of staying the course," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 30th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Cheat Sheet: A Quick Guide To Stanning K-Pop Group iKON

Check out your new favorite ult group!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018

Mourinho enters calm spell as Man United wins 2-0 at Burnley

LONDON (AP) — After the furor that followed straight Premier League defeats for Manchester United, Jose Mourinho's team produced a routine 2-0 victory over Burnley on Sunday. Romelu Lukaku's first-half double put United in control before the second half briefly took a dramatic turn when Burnley goalkeeper Joe Hart saved Paul Pogba's penalty kick and substitute Marcus Rashford was sent off for violent conduct only 11 minutes after coming on. "Even with 10 men for 15 minutes the team was the team that had the chances to score," Mourinho said. "We are all very happy that the boys can go for their international week with the feeling (of winning)." Tottenham, which set alarm bells ringing at Old Trafford by winning 3-0 there six days ago, was unable to carry that momentum to Watford, which came from behind to secure a 2-1 victory at Vicarage Road. Watford has won all four of its Premier League games and joins Liverpool and Chelsea with a maximum total of 12 points at the top of the table. Arsenal, meanwhile, joined United on six points as it secured a first away victory under Unai Emery with an entertaining 3-2 win at newly promoted Cardiff. After storming out of his news conference following United's defeat to Tottenham, demanding "respect, respect" from the media, Mourinho was much calmer ahead of his side's trip to Burnley, and the approach may have brought rewards on the field. Mourinho will have been especially pleased by United's improved defensive performance as it claimed a first clean sheet of the league season. Both the Portuguese and his squad will enter the international break with confidence that United's worst Premier League start for 26 years is firmly behind them. SMALL DRAMAS The only dramas for United this time concerned Pogba's penalty miss and Rashford's red card, but Mourinho wasn't critical of either. After Rashford was fouled in the box, Pogba — who has already scored two penalties this season — had his spot kick saved by Hart. "I never blame a player for missing penalties," Mourinho told BBC Sport. "I blame the ones who refuse to go up there. Paul's scored some good ones for us." The frustration of the penalty miss appeared to affect Rashford more than Pogba and within a minute of the miss the England striker had been sent off. Burnley defender Phil Bardsley tackled Rashford before kicking him in the aftermath of the challenge. Rashford attempted to take matters into his own hands, pushing his forehead into Bardsley's face, and was sent off. "I would say it was naive," Mourinho said. "It was a kid and a very experienced man. Bardsley's been in the game for 20 years and Marcus is a naive boy." SPURS STUNNED With Tottenham having taken the headlines last round with a statement victory over Manchester United, some seemed to forget that both teams held perfect records as Spurs made the short trip to face Watford on Sunday. By the end, there was only one perfect record to talk about — Watford's. The win for Javi Gracia's team was made all the more impressive by the fact Spurs took the lead shortly after halftime, as Abdoulaye Doucoure found his own net as he attempted to clear Lucas Moura's cross. The usually reliable Spurs defense would have been confident of seeing out victory from there, but was undone in the simplest fashion. Troy Deeney and Craig Cathcart both headed in set pieces in the space of seven minutes to turn the match around and keep Watford level with Liverpool and Chelsea at the top of the table. GUNNERS DUO STRIKE It's still early days in Emery's reign as Arsenal manager, but Sunday's win at Cardiff may prove a pivotal moment for the Spaniard. For the first time this season he opted to include both Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Alexandre Lacazette in his starting lineup and was rewarded with a first away victory in the Premier League. While there are still major defensive concerns for Arsenal, the play of the strike duo suggests Emery has a combination that will cause problems for any defense. Shkodran Mustafi gave Arsenal an early lead before Victor Camarasa leveled with Cardiff's first goal of the season in first-half stoppage time. Aubameyang struck after the break as Lacazette flicked the ball into his path, allowing the Gabon forward to find the bottom corner from outside the box. However, Arsenal was pegged back once more as Danny Ward headed the home side level with 20 minutes remaining. Not to be denied, the inspired Lacazette hit an unstoppable effort in at the near post with nine minutes remaining to finally see off Cardiff, which is still looking for a first win of the season......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Casual look with a professional vibe

With the rising informal work settings inspired by the start-up culture, most professionals wear casuals these days, even on weekdays. But wearing casuals doesn’t mean being sloppy or over-dressed. Since there are so many styles to choose from, one only needs to figure out what will work in his job environment. To wear or not [...] The post Casual look with a professional vibe appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Cheat Sheet: 5 Ways To Plan A Group Vacay Painlessly

Here are a few tips for your next barkada getaway......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 24th, 2018

Camila Cabello beats Beyonce, Drake for top VMA prizes

Cuban-born Camila Cabello beat out heavy hitters Beyonce, Bruno Mars and Drake to take home the two top prizes at the MTV Video Music Awards (VMAs) on Tuesday (Philippine time). Cabello, 21, was chosen artist of the year and won video of the year for her Latin-flavored hit “Havana,” while rapper Cardi B picked up […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018