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Century Pacific, Shakey& rsquo;s meet plastic-neutral goals, says Po

Century Pacific Food Inc. and Shakey’s Pizza Asia Ventures, two listed companies owned by the Po family, have achieved their goals of being plastic-neutral after converting 100 percent of their plastics into energy......»»

Category: financeSource: thestandard thestandardFeb 14th, 2020

CNPF, Shakey’s ‘plastic-neutral’

Century Pacific Food (CNPF) and Shakey’s Pizza Asia Ventures, both under the Po-led Century Pacific Group (CPG), said it has achieved its plastic-neutral target, after it recovers the equal amount of plastic it puts out through its products. This came after the consumer companies set the goal to become 100 percent plastic-neutral in 2019 in […] The post CNPF, Shakey’s ‘plastic-neutral’ appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2020

Simone Soars: Biles named 2019 AP Female Athlete of the Year

By Will Graves, Associated Press They’re called “Simone Things,” a catchall phrase for the casual ease with which Simone Biles seems to soar through her sport and her life. The irony, of course, is that there’s nothing casual or easy about it. Any of it. The greatest gymnast of all time and 2019 Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year only makes it seem that way. Those jaw-dropping routines that are rewriting her sport's code of points and redefining what can be done on the competition floor? Born from a mix of natural talent, hard work and a splash of ego. The 25 world championship medals, the most by any gymnast ever? The result of a promise the 22-year-old made to herself when she returned to competition in 2017 after taking time off following her golden run at the 2016 Olympics. The stoicism and grace she has shown in becoming an advocate for survivors — herself included — and an agent for change in the wake of the Larry Nassar sexual abuse scandal that’s shaken USA Gymnastics to its core? The byproduct of a conscious decision to embrace the immense clout she carries. “I realize now with the platform I have it will be powerful if I speak up and speak for what I believe in,” Biles told The Associated Press. “It’s an honor to speak for those that are less fortunate. So if I can be a voice for them in a positive manner, then of course I’m going to do whatever I can.” And it's that mission — combined with her otherworldly skill and boundless charisma — that's enabled Biles to keep gymnastics in the spotlight, a rarity for a sport that typically retreats into the background once the Olympic flame goes out. She is the first gymnast to be named AP Female Athlete of the Year twice and the first to do it in a non-Olympic year. Biles edged U.S. women's soccer star Megan Rapinoe in a vote by AP member sports editors and AP beat writers. Skiing star Mikaela Schiffrin placed third, with WNBA MVP Elena Delle Donne fourth. Biles captured the award in 2016 following a showstopping performance at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, where she won five medals in all, four of them gold. She spent most of the following 12 months taking a break before returning to the gym in the fall of 2017, saying she owed it to herself to mine the depth of her talent. Check social media following one of her routines and you’ll find people -- from LeBron James to Michelle Obama to Chrissy Teigen -- struggling to distill what they’ve witnessed into 280 characters or fewer, with whatever they settle on typically followed by multiple exclamation points and a goat emoji, a nod to Biles being considered the Greatest Of All Time. Her triple-twisting double-flip (the “triple double”) at the end of her first tumbling pass on floor exercise is a wondrous blur. Her double-twisting double-flip beam dismount (the “double double”) is so tough the International Gymnastics Federation made the unusual decision to downplay its value in an effort to deter other gymnasts from even trying it. This is both the blessing and the curse of making the nearly impossible look tantalizingly attainable. When Biles learned about the FIG's decision, she vented on Twitter, her palpable frustration highlighting the realness she's maintained even as her first name has become synonymous with her sport's royalty. It can lead to a bit of a balancing act. In some ways, she's still the kid from Texas who just wants to hang out with her boyfriend and her dog and go to the grocery story without being bothered. In other ways, she's trying to be respectful of the world she's built. Take the GOAT thing. It’s a title she embraces — Biles wore a goat-themed leotard during training at the national championships in August — but also takes with a grain of salt, determined to stay grounded even as the hype around her grows. Yes, GOAT happens to be the acronym for her planned post-Olympic “Gold Over America Tour,” but ask her where the inspiration came from and she laughs and gives credit to a friend, Kevin, who came up with it in a group chat. It is both paying tribute to and winking at her status at the same time. Biles has become well aware over the last three years that her every word and action carries far greater weight than she ever imagined. Her most impactful moment of 2019 might not have come during a meet but sitting for an interview on the eve of winning her record sixth national title, when she fought back tears while talking about how USA Gymnastics, the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee and the FBI failed to protect athletes during an investigation into Nassar's abusive behavior. The moment went viral, as most things surrounding her tend to do these days. “I’m starting to realize it’s not just the gymternet anymore,” Biles said, using the term for her sport's dedicated fans. "It’s an overall thing. It’s weird to get that kind of attention, but at the end of the day, I feel gymnastics has been overlooked in non-Olympic years. Yeah, it puts pressure on me. But I’m not trying to think about all the attention from the outside world.” The attention figures to only grow in the run-up to Tokyo, where she will attempt to become the first female gymnast in more than half a century to repeat as Olympic champion. Her smiling face serves as the exclamation point at the end of every television promo for the Summer Games. Let it be known: The smile is real. That might not have always been the case, but is is now. Heading into the final months of a singular career, she is trying to revel in the journey while anxiously awaiting what's next. Add it to the list of Simone Things. “I feel like this is the beginning of my life and I don’t want gymnastics to be my whole entire life,” she said. “I’m definitely going to soak in the moment and enjoy it so 10 years from now I can look back and say ‘I had the time of my life out there’ ... rather than ‘I was good, but I was miserable.’”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 26th, 2019

Benzema scores on last kick as Madrid draws 1-1 at Valencia

By Joseph Wilson, Associated Press BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Karim Benzema scored with the final kick of the match to snatch a 1-1 draw for Real Madrid at Valencia in the Spanish league on Sunday. The draw wasted a chance for Madrid to take the outright lead. Second-place Madrid is level on points with league leader Barcelona before the teams meet in their "clásico" at Camp Nou on Wednesday. Thibaut Courtois played a key role in Benzema’s goal when the Belgium goalkeeper joined the attack on a corner kick five minutes into stoppage time. Thibaut rose to connect with a powerful header that his counterpart Jaume Domenech batted down into the crowded box, where it reached Benzema to smash it home. Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane rested holding midfielder Casemiro, who has four yellow cards and would have risked a suspension if he had played. Federico Valverde took the Brazilian’s place and had the game’s first scoring chance when he combined quick passes with Benzema before forcing Domenech to get low. Madrid was also without injured left backs Marcelo and Ferland Mendy, and Zidane had to employ the little-used Nacho Fernández, a central defender, on the left side of his back line. Madrid dominated the first half hour, working several flowing passing combinations to get into firing range. Valencia held firm thanks to holding midfielder Francis Coquelin until playmaker Dani Parejo shifted the action into a back-and-forth exchange. Rising talent Ferrán Torres had a great opportunity for the hosts just after halftime on the break, only for Courtois to close in fast and snuff out his attempt. Zidane sent on Gareth Bale and Vinicius Junior with just over 20 minutes left to take advantage of the open space. But it was Valencia that broke the stalemate when Daniel Wass spotted Carlos Soler on a team break. Soler coolly fired in Wass’ pass after teammates had drawn off the backtracking defenders to take the lead in the 78th. STREAK OVER Villarreal ended Sevilla’s eight-match unbeaten run in the Spanish league with a 2-1 away win, leaving the hosts four points behind Barcelona and Real Madrid. Sevilla had equalized and was pressing for a second when Villarreal got its second goal against the flow of play. Moi Gómez responded to Manuel Trigueros' run behind the defense with a lobbed pass that the midfielder controlled with his back to the net. Trigueros then stayed calm as goalkeeper Tomas Vaclik rushed off his line before passing for the unmarked Toko Ekambi to get the 74th-minute winner. Munir El Haddadi had canceled out Raúl Albiol’s header for Villarreal when the Sevilla forward rifled in a cross from Sergio Reguilón in the 61st. The win was Villarreal’s first in seven rounds. BACK IN FORM Getafe got goals from Ángel Rodríguez and Marc Cucurella to beat Valladolid 2-0 and move past Atlético Madrid into fourth place. After only one win in its first seven games, José Bordalás has got Getafe back to its good form from last season. The modest Madrid-based club is in contention for a Champions League berth after seven wins, two draws and one loss in its last 10 games. STILL WINLESS Last-place Espanyol remained without a victory at its stadium in nine games after a 2-2 draw against Real Betis. Betis got its opening goal from Borja Iglesias. Both Iglesias and Betis coach Joan “Rubi” Ferrer helped Espanyol earn a Europa League berth last season before changing clubs. Despite remaining five points from safety, Espanyol coach Pablo Machín was pleased by his team’s fightback from an early deficit to take a 2-1 lead before conceding a second goal to Betis’ Marc Bartra. “The point has more value than just a number. Today’s match shows us the way forward,” Machín said. RELEGATION FIGHT Ante Budimir scored for Mallorca with seven minutes left to earn a 2-2 draw at struggling Celta Vigo. The point allowed promoted Mallorca to stay just above Celta, which is in the drop zone......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 16th, 2019

SEA Games: PHI forces Singapore to 6-6 draw in men’s water polo

Almost but not quite. The Philippines got powerhouse Singapore on the ropes in the first two quarters only to see the defending champions rally in the next two to force a 6-6 draw Friday in the 30th Southeast Asian Games men’s water polo at the New Clark City Aquatics Center. With the stalemate, the Filipinos now sport a 1-2-0 win-draw-loss record and boosted its chances of claiming a silver medal if it wins convincingly against winless Malaysia on Sunday at the close of the competition.    Coming off a big win the night before, the Filipinos played an inspired first half, building a 4-2 lead after three goals in the second canto. But the Singaporeans, who has been dominating the sport in the biennial meet with 27 titles, fought back with pairs of goals in the third and fourth periods. Singapore tied it at 5-5 in the fourth quarter before the Philippines slotted in a goal to regain the lead. But a late goal by the determined Singaporeans broke the hearts of the upset-conscious home team.   Singapore improved to 1-1-1 card heading into its final match against Thailand on Sunday. Indonesia, which defeated Malaysia, 14-7, already have the gold medal in the bag after closing its campaign with a commanding 3-1-0 slate. The Indonesians' lone draw came at the hands of the Filipinos after their opening day game resulted to a 6-6 deadlock.     ---    Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 29th, 2019

Filipinos still out for floorball bronze after putting up a fight vs Singapore

The Philippines drew first blood and then put up a fight all match long, Wednesday at UP CHK Gym in Quezon City, but ultimately bowed to powerhouse Singapore, 2-5, in the preliminary round of men’s floorball in the 2019 Southeast Asian Games. Ryan Hallder Cater fired the first shot in the Filipinos’ ambush as his completion of a Henrik Dahmen setup in the just the third minute put them ahead, 1-0. “I’m proud of the team,” he said post-match. “We really fought hard and dueled out there. Each guy deserves a medal.” The home team would hold the lead for 12 minutes before Suria equalized for the Singaporeans at the 15th minute. Syazni Ramlee (20’) and Jeremy Chia (22’) restored order for the visitors with back-to-back goals, but the Philippines just kept coming. With six minutes having gone in the second period, Christian Schoultze blasted one through for the Filipinos. Not long after, however, Suria made his presence felt anew, this time fresh off the bench, with an interception all the way to a conversion at the 33rd minute. Juen Jie Ng would be the last player to hit the mark after seven minutes in the third period, cementing Singapore’s margin of victory. Despite the defeat, their second straight following a tournament-opening win, the Filipinos proved they can hang with the squad that won gold the last time the competition was held in the regional meet back in 2015. Then, they just fell short of the podium. Now, while the hosts have been booted out of the gold medal match, they still have a shot to win bronze. To do so, the Philippines will have to find a way through Malaysia. The two teams, both with 1-2 records, will first meet on Friday still at the same venue to end the preliminary round. “We’re gonna go to that game with the same attitude as this one,” Cater said. “We’re gonna bring it home.” They will then go at it once more on Sunday, that time for third-place. On the other hand, the title defense continues for the Singaporeans who are now assured of a top two finish. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 28th, 2019

SEA Games: PHI barges in men’s water polo win column

Five huge goals in the second and third periods lifted the Philippines past Thailand, 7-4, on Thursday to barge in the win column of the 30th Southeast Asian Games men’s water polo competition at the New Clark City Aquatics Center. Tied at one point apiece after the first canto, the Filipinos flicked in three goals in the second period before adding two more in the next quarter for a 6-3 lead. The Nationals scored another goal in the last period to put the game away and notch their first win after a 6-6 draw in their opening day showdown against Indonesia. The Philippines and Indonesia are tied with one win and one draw in the round robin format. The Thais, which the Filipinos also beat in their meeting in the 2017 Kuala Lumpur edition of the biennial meet, fell to 1-1 win-loss record tied with defending champion Singapore, which bowed to Indonesia, 5-7. The Philippines will take on Singapore Friday at 7:00 p.m. Meanwhile, the Filipinas were pummeled by Thailand, 5-32, to fall to 0-2 slate......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 28th, 2019

Unforgettable UAAP Final Four Moments

A Final Four in any of the UAAP seasons in the last 26 years has always been memorable and epic. Since Season 56, the format has intensified the competitiveness in the league, as it has since given four teams the chance at a championship, instead of just two teams in the 55 seasons prior. Here we witnessed dramatic, climactic face-offs between the first and fourth placers, and the second and third placers, with the top two teams enjoying a twice-to-beat advantage. This is to determine who will slug it out in the Finals. Yet there are rare instances when a school tops the eliminations unscathed, just like this year’s mighty Ateneo Blue Eagles, who advanced to the Finals outright after sweeping the round. In this case, a stepladder Final Four is implemented wherein the third and fourth battle each other in a do-or-die match before facing the second placer, which has a twice-to-beat advantage. And yes, these teams have made their playoff wars exciting and spectacular with a level of play that is truly exceptional. Here are some of the most powerful, controversial, heroic, and reverberating moments in the UAAP Final Four that have been forever etched in our minds:   1) UP enters Finals for first time in 32 years in Season 81 In their first Final Four appearance in 21 years, the UP Fighting Maroons had the utmost desire to make history once more with the battlecry “Atin ‘To,” captain Paul Desiderio’s famous call to arms.  And, in Season 81, barreling into the semifinals was already a gigantic feat, having been in the cellar for quite a while in the UAAP.  But they wanted more, and facing a championship-ready Adamson Soaring Falcons was an immense challenge with its lean and mean arsenal, given how the San Marcelino cagers had waylaid the competition in the eliminations, including the defending champions Ateneo. But they were unfazed with Adamson’s twice-to-beat advantage, and in Game 1, they would beat the odds, as the Fighting Maroons and the Soaring Falcons ended up tied at 71-all with three seconds to go. As Juan Gomez de Liano was inbounding, he found an open Bright Akhuetie near the basket to convert the game-winner for UP to arrange a winner-take-all.  And in the decider, it was again a tedious trek for both teams, with the game tied for the last time at 87-all in overtime. Then, the fiery captain will again own it for the Fighting Maroons as he swooshed a jumper off Adamson’s Sean Maganti with 6.6 seconds left. With Falcon guard Jeron Lastimosa missing a three off a timeout as time ran out led to utter euphoria in the Maroon-dominated Araneta Coliseum, spilling out to the numerous UP campuses across the nation, as the Fighting Maroons entered the Finals for the first time in 32 years. They would be denied a repeat of their 1986 title run however by the back-to-back champions Ateneo Blue Eagles, which won the Finals convincingly.   2) Blue Eagle Gec Chia’s miracle “shot” in Season 65 Season 65 was certainly the most unforgettable for the Ateneo Blue Eagles as it achieved a flurry of milestones. Already with a well-developed line-up and the immense motivation to win it all, after their previous heartbreaking campaigns, the Eagles had beaten the league-leading and four-peat-hunting DLSU Green Archers in the last game of the eliminations, denying them a sweep and an outright finals berth. And in third place at the end of the elims, the Eagles would face another formidable squad, the James Yap and Paul Artadi-enforced second-placers UE Red Warriors. After staging a stunning upset in the first game of their Final Four match-up, 84-78, Ateneo again engaged UE in a close, hard fought decider and both teams were tied at 70-all with 7.8 seconds left.  With LA Tenorio trapped in the offensive play, he would kick the ball out to the gutsy marksman Gec Chia, who would rise to the occasion and soar over a phalanx of defenders to make that miracle “Shot” heard everywhere as time expired. That unforgettable shot pushed the Eagles into that climactic end to a 14-year title drought in the Finals by that Herculean drubbing of La Salle.   3) FEU’s Mac Belo buries last-second corner three against La Salle in Season 77 On October 1, 2014, the defending champions DLSU Green Archers threatened the second placers FEU Tamaraws, with a menacing win in their first match in the Final Four of Season 77, nearing to book another trip to the Finals. In Game Two, with 24 ticks remaining, the Tamaraws used up the remaining seconds with the intent of taking the last shot.  FEU point guard Mike Tolomia then barreled his way through the paint, drawing two La Salle defenders and leaving Mac Belo free at the corner. With a little over two seconds to go, Tolomia would hand the ball off to Belo for a catch-and-shoot beyond the arc at the right corner and buried the three as time expired, giving the Tamaraws a return trip to the Finals. They would, however, eventually lose to a gritty NU Bulldogs, which won their first title in 60 years.   4) FEU eliminates Ateneo with Mac Belo’s follow up buzzer beater in Season 78 In Season 78, the FEU Tamaraws would most certainly want another crack at the title, after losing to NU the previous year. And they were really scorching hot in the eliminations, ending up tied with the UST Growling Tigers at the top of the heap, but dropped to second place due to a lower quotient. In the Final Four, they would face the third placers Ateneo Blue Eagles with a twice-to-beat advantage. On November 21, 2015, the FEU and Ateneo were stuck in a really close game with Roger Pogoy waxing hot for the Tams, and Kiefer Ravena leading all departments for the Eagles. With ten seconds to go, Adrian Wong of Ateneo streaked for a layup after a Richard Escoto miss. Wong’s daredevil shot was deflected and the ball ended up in the hands of Mike Tolomia, who rushed back to the FEU side of the court for the final shot. He would make a gallant incursion with a near acrobatic layup with one second to go. And as the ball rimmed out, a well-positioned Mac Belo was below the basket for the quick, buzzer beating putback that once more sent the Tamaraws to the Finals. FEU would then claim their 20th title overall over the UST Growling Tigers in the Finals.   5) FEU's Miko Roldan hits game-winner against Ateneo in Season 63  Mac Belo breaking the hearts of Ateneans with that buzzer beater in Season 78 was like history repeating itself. Fifteen years earlier, the Tamaraws, led by Celino Cruz and Edwin Bacani, also engaged the Blue Eagles to a Final Four battle, with Ateneo having that twice-to-beat privilege.  Led by Rich Alvarez, LA Tenorio and Larry Fonacier, the Blue Eagles were really soaring to get that elusive title it last won in 1988. And in the first game in the Final Four, people were expecting the Blue Eagles to cruise past FEU, having beaten them twice in the elims.  But the Tamaraws really gave them a hell of a match. As Andrew Cruz flubbed two charities in the dying seconds that should have given the Blue Eagles a comfortable three-point lead, FEU gunner Miko Roldan sank a semi-hook shot at the buzzer in the ensuing play to break the hearts of Ateneans everywhere and extend the series, 61-60. In the decider, Cruz and Bacani would conspire for 39 points to complete a monster upset, 75-67, and reach the Finals. The defending champions DLSU Green Archers, led by the legendary Renren Ritualo, was just too much for the Tams in the Finals and copped their three-peat.   6) Fight-marred Ateneo-La Salle Final Four series in Season 66 Joseph Yeo was all over the court in a scoring binge while Rookie-of-the-Year JVee Casio showed a glimpse of being a clutch player as the DLSU Green Archers, the fourth seed, took their storied rivalry with defending champions Ateneo Blue Eagles, the top seed, to a tenacious, heated Final Four war. Heightened emotions were at play since Ateneo’s colossal Finals victory the previous season, and the animosity between the two ballclubs was at its fiercest and most intense. In Game 1, after La Salle’s Jerwin Gaco’s putback sent the game into overtime, the extended play’s physicality went to overdrive. With 1:31 left in overtime, Gaco bumped LA Tenorio in the battle for the loose ball. Tenorio would then sneak a punch at Gaco, who then nudged the Ateneo guard. This led to a bench-clearing brawl, as players punched, kicked and shoved each other while the coaches tried to break up the fight even as referees whistled repeatedly.  La Salle’s Ryan Arana kicked Ateneo’s Wesley Gonzales from behind and the league meted the Archer with a one-game suspension. Also suspended were Tenorio and fellow Blue Eagle Christian "Badjie" del Rosario. The Archers would prevail after the five-minute extension, 76-72. The decider was also as heated with on-court and off-court flare-ups and violent confrontations between players and supporters. Ateneo’s steady offense, however, prevailed in the final minute, as the Blue Eagles hung on to 74-68 victory, entering the Finals for the second straight year. FEU, however, would deny Ateneo a back-to-back run, winning the championship in two games.   7) UST trounces NU twice to become first fourth placer to eliminate the top-seed in a Final Four series in Season 76 The NU Bulldogs were on a roll, and 2013 seemed to be their year, with Bobby Ray Parks returning after back-to-back MVP seasons and leading them to reach the top of the standings at the end of eliminations. But they have their Achilles heel—the dribblers of Espana—who have exerted their mastery of the Bulldogs, winning twice in the elims. And bad news for the Bulldogs, they would meet the UST Growling Tigers, which ended at fourth place, in the Final Four.  In Game 1, a red-hot Kevin Ferrer would lead UST to its biggest margin of 18 within the match, but they needed to fend off NU’s late charge, 71-62, to force a rubber match. And in the winner-take-all, UST completed its mastery of top-ranked Bulldogs, again with a game-long dominance to end at 76-69, marking the first time a fourth seed would snatch a Finals berth from a first-placer in the league.   8) NU’s Alfred Aroga’s monster block on Ateneo’s Kiefer Ravena in Season 77 After a frustrating loss to UST in the Season 76 Final Four, NU would get another crack at gaining that elusive Finals appearance. But in the next chapter of the semifinals, NU will hope for a Cinderella finish to gain that berth, trying to beat the top placers Ateneo Blue Eagles, just like what UST did to them in the previous year when they were the top-seed. Jay-Jay Alejandrino and Troy Rosario led NU’s surge in the fourth quarter of the first game to spoil Ateneo’s twice to beat to force a deciding game. In the rubber match, no clear advantage was evident in the majority of the game. But after NU’s Gelo Alolino broke a 63-all tie with two charities off a foul from Ateneo’s Nico Elorde, 65-63, Kiefer Ravena would try to send the game to overtime with a drive against several NU defenders with three seconds left.  He failed however after NU’s Alfred Aroga swatted his attempt as time expired—a monster block that brought NU to its first finals appearance in 44 years. The Bulldogs would then wallop the FEU Tamaraws in the Finals, 2-1, to clinch their first title in 60 years. 9) Coming out party of UE’s Paul Lee in Season 72 The UE Red Warriors had come off from a heartbreaking Finals loss to the DLSU Green Archers in Season 70 after sweeping the eliminations, and another hurtful exit the succeeding year with a Final Four defeat at the hands of the Ateneo Blue Eagles. The Red Warriors would then make another trip to the Final Four in Season 72, which was the coming out party of prolific scorer Paul Lee, as the league’s third best after the eliminations. UE would battle second placers FEU for the chance to enter the Finals once more after the Season 70 debacle. They extended the series after Lee led a late game spurt with three consecutive three-pointers in a devastating 18-5 run, he would end up with a game-high 26 points. In the rubber match, with UE trailing FEU in the first half, the Red Warriors would make an explosive comeback in the second half and would again rely on the dependable Lee and Pari Llagas for their late-game heroics. Llagas would lift UE up for good with two straight field goals, 72-70, while Lee showed nerves of steel as he sank four consecutive free throws at the end of the game, 78-72, to give UE their Finals ticket. UE, however, would bow to powerhouse Ateneo Blue Eagles in the Finals in three games.   10) UST’s Jojo Duncil completes winning three-point play that frustrated UE in Season 69 By this time, the UE Red Warriors were in their fifth straight Final Four appearance. And in Season 69, UE would land at second place after the eliminations behind Ateneo, relishing its twice-to-beat advantage.  In the Final Four, UE would face a determined UST Growling Tigers, who were seeking redemption after last winning the championship in 1996, the last year of their 90s four-peat dynasty. UST would eke out a hard-earned Game 1 victory, 79-75 victory over UE that led to a deciding Game 2. In this clincher, both UST and UE kept the match close.  And in the final quarter, with the score tied at 79-all in the dying seconds, Growling Tiger Jojo Duncil converted on a tip-in, and-1, after a previous miss and teammate Jervy Cruz’s failed putback. Duncil would then complete the three-point play to give the UST an 82-79 edge, a few seconds left. UE’s Marcy Arellano would drive unmolested for an easy two to cut the lead to a solitary point, 82-81, nearing the end of the game. After UST committed a turnover, the Red Warriors had the chance to drop the game-winner but UE’s Jorel Cañizares missed a medium-range jump shot and a follow-up. Teammate Robert Labagala would then grab the rebound, but time ran out on the Recto dribblers. UST entered the Finals and annexed its first UAAP title in 10 years over the Ateneo Blue Eagles. Will there be another unforgettable Final Four moment in this current Season 82? Catch the start of the stepladder Final Four hostilities with the do-or-die match between the UST Growling Tigers and the FEU Tamaraws on Wednesday, November 6, for the right to meet the twice-to-beat second placers UP Fighting Maroons on Sunday, November 10......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 4th, 2019

17 NBA things that have been ghosted from memory

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com On a night traditionally known more for tricks and treats than picks and rolls, it seems appropriate to do a little ghost hunting, NBA-style. We’re not talking the Ghost Ballers of BIG3 fame or even the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in Oklahoma City, a stop on the circuit that some teams claim is actually haunted. We’re thinking of things that used to be, gone-but-not-forgotten aspects of the league that lurk in the memory, even if they’re never coming back. Here in no particular order are some Halloween hoops hobgoblins that fall somewhere on the scary scale between the chain-rattling Jacob Marley and Casper: 1. Long-gone arenas. Oracle Arena, so recently vacated by the Golden State Warriors, is the latest addition to the NBA’s long list of abandoned homes. Many are gone themselves, though you still can catch a glimpse now and then on Hardwood Classics. There are too many to list, due to NBA teams moving on up to bigger, better digs over time. But a sampling would include the Cow Palace, Cobo Arena, Chicago Stadium, Boston Garden, The Forum, L.A. Sports Arena, Milwaukee’s MECCA, the Salt Palace, McNichols Arena, HemisFair Arena, Market Square, the Summit, the Spectrum, the Omni, the Pyramid, ARCO Arena/Sleep Train Arena and on and on. 2. Belted shorts. Relegated to the throwback bin, along with the more recent sleeved jerseys. 3. The six-foot lane. Heck, the 12-foot lane. The former was widened in 1951 in response to Minneapolis big man George Mikan’s dominance. Then it was widened again in 1964 to its current 16 feet in hopes of tamping down Wilt Chamberlain’s impact. 4. Commercial air travel. Some things on a used-to-be list inspire nostalgia in those who experienced them and curiosity in those who didn’t. But it’s highly unlikely any former or current players and coaches would swap today’s luxury charter flights for the way the NBA used to travel. Wake-up calls at 5 a.m. for the first flight out. Waiting out delays at the gate with the beat writers and civilians. Seven-footers folding themselves into economy class seating. 5. Obstacle-course schedules. The NBA in recent years has tried to be responsive to players’ performance needs and physical limitations, working to minimize the number of back-to-back games and four-in-five-night stretches. Didn’t used to be that way. Consider the Baltimore Bullets, who in January 1966 were put through these paces: Games in St. Louis, Detroit, back to St. Louis, day off, to Philadelphia, to Boston, home vs. Lakers. A week later, they bounced back and forth between L.A. (Lakers) and San Francisco for four games in four nights, then traveled to New York to face the Knicks for their fifth game in five nights. Baltimore’s record in those 11 games: 2-9. 6. Doubleheaders. Some teams in the NBA’s first few decades would book a Harlem Globetrotters exhibition as the night’s opening attraction. But the biggies were when the Knicks would host at Madison Square Garden a neutral-site game for two other NBA clubs. A lingering memory for some who attended: The thick haze that hung over the arena’s upper reaches, courtesy of the smokers puffing away all evening. 7. Tape-delay. It seems inconceivable in 2019 that an NBA playoff game, never mind a Finals contest, might be shown on anything but live TV. Nope. The league didn’t have much leverage in the late 1970s, before Magic Johnson and Larry Bird arrived to help goose interest and ratings. Networks forced fans to stay up late to watch games that were off before the telecasts tipped off. The practice continued into the ‘80s, with four of six Finals games in 1981 held till 11:30 p.m. ET. Michael Jordan was already creating new fans when the last tape-delayed game, Game 3 of the West finals between the Lakers and Rockets, aired on Friday, May 16, 1986. 8. “Illegal!” That used to be a frequent bellow from the league’s benches, with coaches trying to alert the refs when opposing defenses breached (or didn’t) the complicated illegal defense rules. The NBA purged most of that around the turn of the century by legislating in zone play. 9. Shattered backboards. For a while, it seemed as if backboards were exploding every few weeks in the Association. Darryl (“Chocolate Thunder”) Dawkins was the most avid crack-titioner, getting two in 1979. The earliest recorded instance came in 1946, when a Celtics forward named Chuck Connors (later more famous as TV’s “Rifleman”) shattered one during warmups. Baltimore’s Gus Johnson is said to have shattered three. Shaquille O’Neal didn’t get the glass but twice got entire support structures, pulling the backboards down to the court in his rookie season. In March 1993, against Chicago, New Jersey’s Chris Morris dunked and shattered a board without glass falling to the floor. 10. Three to make two. That old free-throw bonus was abolished by 1981-82. It made the game drag, and Jerry Colangelo, then GM of the Suns and the chairman of the NBA’s competition committee, rightly said: “Pro players shouldn’t need that extra foul shot.” 11. Phantom franchises. Oooh, pretty scary, kids, when you think of all the teams that are no more. They are rattling around in the mind long after they were supposedly dead and buried. We’re not talking just about the antiquities such as the Indianapolis Olympians, the Washington Capitols or the Toronto Huskies. The spirits of the Seattle SuperSonics, Buffalo Braves, San Diego Clippers and Vancouver Grizzlies still walk the NBA earth. Then there are most of the ABA franchises -- Virginia Squires, Utah Stars, Kentucky Colonels, Spirits of St. Louis -- that died more than 40 years ago before or in the merger. 12. Hand checking. A lot of capable defenders had their effectiveness vaporized overnight when the laying on of hands vs. a ball handler was outlawed in 2004. The NBA, in case you hadn’t noticed, likes scoring. 13. Injury shenanigans. As silly or frustrating as labels like “DNP-Old” or “load management” seem today, the reporting of injuries real or feigned used to be much less authentic. Before the inactive list, there was “injured reserve,” to which NBA teams would designate up to two players. Anyone put on that list was sidelined for a minimum of five games, and with smaller roster sizes in effect, it was a handy place to stash guys. So there was a whole lot of tendinitis and plantar fasciitis going on. This practice was snuffed in 2005-06. 14. “Play on!” Like the force-out ruling, this is a remnant of the days when the referees had and used more discretion in working their games. If a player lost the ball out of bounds but his elbow was knocked by a foe, the force-out meant the ball handler’s team retained possession. “Play on!” was a frequent order barked by refs when certain contact or violations were deemed minimally intrusive. Heavier scrutiny of the game officials’ performance and, later, video reviews now try to adjudicate everything down to the tip of a fingernail. 15. The 2-3-2 Finals format. This was adopted in 1985 as a reaction to those Lakers-Celtics or Lakers-Sixers championship series, which had the NBA universe crossing the country four or five times in a span of two weeks. Suggestions that the league was being energy-conscious, in terms of jet fuel, were part of it, too. The practice fiddled some with the notion of home-court advantage, although MLB continues to use it for its World Series. With charter flights deployed by all teams, league execs and even some of the media, the NBA changed back to the 2-2-1-1-1 format in 2014 to align with its postseasons’ earlier rounds. 16. Player-coaches. Forty men in NBA history have done it. The first was Ed Sadowski of the Toronto Huskies in the Basketball Association of America precursor to the NBA. Only two men won championships as player-coaches: Baltimore’s Buddy Jeannette in 1948 and Boston’s Bill Russell in 1968 and 1969. The youngest player coach ever was Dave DeBusschere, who took over the Pistons in 1964 at age 24 (not long after ending his second career as an MLB pitcher). The Hawks’ Richie Guerin logged the most games (372) in the role, yet was named Coach of the Year in the one season in the middle when he stopped playing. Legend Lenny Wilkens was a player-coach for two teams, spending three seasons at it in Seattle and one in Portland. And the last player-coach in NBA history was Dave Cowens, who accepted the gig after coach Satch Sanders got fired in 1978-79. None of the players wanted to learn a new system, Cowens said, so “I kind of took one for the team.” The practice died with the arrival of the salary cap in 1984, with NBA brass wary that paying a coaching bonus might enable a team to circumvent the cap. 17. Victory cigars. For obvious reasons. Probably victory vaping, too. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 1st, 2019

UAAP 82: Daos leads Ateneo to third-straight Women s Swimming title

LOS BAÑOS, LAGUNA – Chloe Daos and Ateneo capped another dominant campaign by securing the school's third straight UAAP Women's Swimming Championship, Sunday at Trace Aquatics Center here. Ateneo added 115 more points to end up on top in the four-day, four-team meet with 458 points to win the school's sixth overall crown in the competition. But besides another flawless campaign by Daos, Ateneo swimming program director Archie Lim credited the school's rookies for delivering. "We were lucky na madami pumasok din na freshmen, at the same time yung mga MVP and leader swimmers namin are still there, so it's just a matter of maintaining the culture and hoping the new swimmers catch the spirit," Lim said. Daos clocked in a UAAP record time of 2:19.03 in the 200m Butterfly to reset the five-year-old 2:19.71 mark of Hannah Dato and complete her third straight flawless, seven-gold-medal haul season. The Lady Eagles displayed their depth and dominance of the league with a sweep of the said event after Suzanne Himor (2:27.26), Raegan Gavino (2:28.57) and Kristine Santos (2:32.24) occupied the second to fourth positions. UP’s Cindy Fernandez (31.51 seconds) and La Salle’s Nikki Pamintuan (31.70 seconds) rounded out the podium in the 50m Backstroke while Ateneo’s Andrea Ngui (27.65 seconds) and UP’s Angela Villamil (27.89 seconds) did the same for the 50m Freestyle. On the other hand, University of the Philippines’ prized recruit Erin Castrillo ended her maiden season with a golden double, claiming the 50m Backstroke (30.98 seconds) and 50m Freestyle (27.23 seconds) titles. The sprint queen thus captured the Rookie of the Year award with 96 points. The Lady Eagles had a rookie ace of their own in Nirel Ibarra who produced a golden performance in the 200m Breaststroke by finishing in 2:50.63 ahead of teammate Jazmin Chua (2:51.72) and Lady Maroons’ Pricila Aquino (2:52.16). In the tournament’s final event, Courtney Gray, Chua, Himor, and Marjorie Manguiat teamed up for Ateneo to capture the 400m Medley Relay gold in 4:41.08. UP was a distant second in 4:46.33 while UST took the bronze in 4:50.38. "Yun na, naging challenge for the MVP swimmers namin, to inspire the new ones by showing them to never stop improvement and setting higher goals in spite sa achievements nila or ng team," added Lim. UP tallied 395 points for second while La Salle completed the podium with 203. UST had 96 points......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 21st, 2019

England, Ronaldo keep up scoring form in Euro qualifying

By Jerome Pugmire, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — England's scoring form was on display again in European Championships qualifying on Tuesday. So was Cristiano Ronaldo's. England made it four wins out of four in Group A with a 5-3 win over Kosovo and Ronaldo netted four goals in European champion Portugal's 5-1 away win at Lithuania. On a night of heavy scoring, it took the five-time Golden Ball winner's international tally to a whopping 93. Ronaldo might well hit the century mark before next year's tournament, considering Portugal still faces Lithuania at home and twice plays lowly Luxembourg. "I'm going through a good phase, but the team has been playing well too," Ronaldo said. "I'm enjoying this moment not only because of my goals, but also because of the team's performances in recent years. I just have to keep helping the team." Striker Harry Kane moved onto a more modest 26 for England, whose fans got a jolt when midfielder Valon Berisha put the visiting side ahead after just 35 seconds. They were soon reassured by Raheem Sterling's equalizer and Kane's latest goal for England, both inside the opening 20 minutes at St. Mary's Stadium in Southampton on a rare occasion England wasn't playing at Wembley Stadium. By halftime fans had been treated to five home goals, including 19-year-old winger Jadon Sancho scoring his first two for England. But the second half proved more inspiring for Kosovo's fans as they witnessed a mini-comeback, with Berisha enjoying a memorable night with a fine second goal curled into the top corner. Kane could have netted a brace, too, but saw his penalty saved by Arijanet Muric. World Cup winner France labored at times against a well-organized Andorra side in a 3-0 home win, with Barcelona forward Antoine Griezmann missing a penalty for the second straight qualifier. After Kingsley Coman found a way through in the first half, center half Clément Lenglet and substitute Wissam Ben Yedder added goals after the break. DEFENSE IN QUESTION England's attack is purring with 19 goals in four games, but alarming questions will be asked of the defense. From a commanding position of 5-1 up, England leaked two goals after the break — one of those a penalty conceded by the expensively-acquired Manchester United center back Harry Maguire. Kosovo's opening goal was the result of a careless pass from defender Michael Keane. England still hasn't lost a qualifier for either the World Cup or European Championship in 10 years. But coach Gareth Southgate knows his defense has to eradicate such sloppy errors if his side wants to win Euro 2020. "The outstanding play was obvious," Southgate said, "and the errors were obvious." The Czech Republic overtook Kosovo to move into second place in Group A with nine points after a 3-0 win at Montenegro and hosts England on Oct. 11. RAMPAGING RONALDO Ronaldo scored from the penalty spot in the seventh minute, before Lithuania hit back through Vytautas Andriuskevicius' header. Portugal's second goal was given to Ronaldo before being changed to an own goal, and then given back to him on UEFA's website. The bizarre-looking 62nd-minute effort was a low shot from outside the area. It was saved by Lithuania goalkeeper Ernestas Setkus, before the ball bounced off the goalkeeper's back and went in. Three minutes later, Ronaldo tapped in from Bernardo Silva's pass, and the attacking midfielder set him up again in the 76th. William Carvalho completed the scoring in stoppage time against last-place Lithuania. Portugal is second in Group B with eight points and five behind Ukraine, which has 13 points having played one game more. Powerful striker Aleksandar Mitrovic netted twice as third-place Serbia won 3-1 away to Luxembourg. PENALTY FLOP Griezmann remains stuck on 29 international goals after hitting his spot kick too close to goalkeeper Josep Gomes in a one-sided first half where France largely struggled to turn possession into chances. Coman pounced in the 18th after latching onto Jonathan Ikone's pass behind the defense for his third goal in two France games. Griezmann's curling free kick from the left was headed in by Clément Lenglet soon after the break. Substitute Wissam Ben Yedder added the third during injury time, steering the ball in from close range after Nabil Fekir's free kick was spilled by Gomes. Turkey and France top Group H with 15 points and meet at Stade de France on Oct. 14. Striker Cenk Tosun netted twice in Turkey's 4-0 win at Moldova. Third-place Iceland slipped three points behind the top two after losing 4-2 away to Albania. Andorra has scored no goals and conceded 14 in six defeats......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2019

Team Lakay’s Honorio Banario, Lito Adiwang added to ONE: Century

The Philippines will be well-represented on ONE Championship’s upcoming 100th event, ONE: Century at the Ryogoku Kokugikan in Tokyo, Japan on Sunday, October 13th.  Headlining the Sunday evening card will be ONE Heavyweight World Champion Brandon “The Truth” Vera of the Philippines moving down a weight class to challenge reigning and defending ONE Light Heavyweight World Champion “The Burmese” Python” Aung La N Sang of Myanmar. In the co-headliner of that same card will be Kevin “The Silencer” Belingon of the Philippines challenging Brazilian legend Bibiano “The Flash” Fernandes for the ONE Bantamweight World Championship.  In the co-main event of the Sunday morning card, Danny “The King” Kingad of the Philippines will face former long-time UFC Flyweight World Champion Demetrious” Mighty Mouse” Johnson of the United States in the Finals of the ONE Flyweight World Grand Prix.  Also added to the massive event in Tokyo are a pair of standouts from Team Lakay. Joining Belingon and Kingad are former ONE Featherweight World Champion Honorio “The Rock” Banario and the latest ONE Warrior Series contract winner Lito “Thunder Kid” Adiwang.  Banario, who now competes at lightweight is looking to get back on track after back-to-back losses, but it won’t be an easy night for “The Rock” as he’s set to face former two-time ONE Lightweight World Champion and Japanese legend Shinya “Tobikan Judan” Aoki on the Sunday evening card.  Aoki is coming off a stunning second-round TKO loss to Christian Lee back in May.  Making his official ONE Championship debut will be Adiwang, the newest Team Lakay member to make it to the ONE roster.  The strawweight standout made a name for himself on ONE Warrior Series, picking up three impressive wins before finally being offered a spot on the main roster.  Adiwang will meet Japanese veteran Senzo Ikeda on the Sunday morning card.    ONE: Century will be available on multiple ABS-CBN platforms on October 13th! Stay tuned for more news in the coming days. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2019

Century Pacific commits to be ‘plastic-neutral’ by 2020

The Century Pacific Group (CPG), the group behind Century canned tuna and the iconic Shakey’s Pizza chain, has committed to be “plastic-neutral” by 2020......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 7th, 2019

UAAP 81 Football Finals: Ateneo, DLSU coaches expecting exciting Finals matchup

For the first time in 13 years, collegiate rivals Ateneo de Manila University and De La Salle University will be facing off in the UAAP Season 81 Men's Football Finals.  Top-seeded Ateneo took care of business against fourth-seeded Far Eastern University in the semifinals, while third-seeded DLSU upset second-seeded defending champions University of the Philippines in their Final Four pairing.  Now, the two sides meet to determine who brings home the UAAP Season 81 Men's Football Championship.  For Ateneo, it's a chance to capture their second title in three years. For La Salle, it's an opportunity to bring a men's football title back to Taft for the first time since the 1997-1998 season.  Interestingly enough, one of the members of that last title-winning DLSU squad is none other than current DLSU coach Alvin Ocampo, who has basically taken over the head coaching duties for long-time mentor Hans-Peter Smit, who still oversees the DLSU Football Program.  Ocampo sees the rivalry matchup as a good thing Philippine football.  "[This will be] good for Philippine football, because definitely, Rizal will be packed, at least this will up the ante of the crowd," Ocampo told ABS-CBN Sports. Apart from that, Ocampo also expects the Ateneo-La Salle battle as a reunion of sorts, being that both communities will surely want to be in attendance for the season finale.  "Plus, reunion game yan ng mga previous na La Salle-Ateneo games eh, siyempre pride yan eh, walang mag-papatalo," he said.  Ateneo head coach Jaypee Merida echoed Ocampo's sentiments about the crowd. After all, no matter the setting, an Ateneo-La Salle battle will always draw large contingents from both sides.  "Of course we’re excited because it’s a rivalry game, it’s Ateneo-La Salle, talagang we’re expecting more crowds," Merida stated. Merida feels that the Taft-based side will have a bit of a home-field advantage given that they will be playing at the historic Rizal Memorial Football Stadium, which serves a DLSU's training ground.  "We need to be ready, kailangan hindi kami mag-create ng small details para hindi kami mag-concede ng goals."  "Towards this championship, kailangan namin na mag-ready mentally talaga. It’s Ateneo-La Salle, it’s a battle of hearts, so we need to be ready talaga, we need to work, dapat hindi kami mag-create ng small mistakes," Merida added.  Ateneo and De La Salle battle for the UAAP Season 81 Men's Football Championship on Thursday, May 16th at 4:30 PM. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 9th, 2019

New Zealand unveils plan to go carbon neutral by 2050

WELLINGTON, New Zealand – New Zealand introduced legislation Wednesday to make the South Pacific nation carbon neutral by 2050, although greenhouse gas emissions from the economically vital agricultural sector will not have to meet the commitment. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the bill would help New Zealand contribute to a goal ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 8th, 2019

Qatar eyes diplomatic win with US-Taliban agreement

Doha---Providing neutral space for talks on ending Afghanistan’s 18-year conflict has boosted Qatar’s international profile and helped it defy a painful embargo enforced by neighbors and former allies......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated News17 min. ago

Libya export blockade helping OPEC meet oil production cuts & mdash; analysts

London, United Kingdom―Libya’s almost total retreat from the world oil market as unrest blocks its vital terminals, is helping OPEC meet production cuts, analysts say......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2020

Rubio leads Suns over Jazz in his return to Utah

By MATTHEW COLES Associated Press SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Ricky Rubio always felt comfortable in Utah and hated to leave. He made sure his return was noticed. Rubio had 22 points, 11 assists and seven steals to lead the Phoenix Suns to a 131-111 victory over the reeling Jazz on Monday night. “I know their game and I played with them for a long time,” Rubio said, acknowledging he often knew where the Jazz wanted to go with their motion and their passes and stepped into the passing lanes. In his first game back in Salt Lake City after playing for the Jazz for two seasons, Rubio led an offense that shot 56% and seemed a step ahead of the Jazz all night. “That’s a tough game coming back here to play against your former team with so many emotions going through his mind. He dominated the game,” Phoenix coach Monty Williams said. Rubio used the All-Star break to get some rest and refocus. He also admitted he got extra juice in playing his former teammates. “I haven’t felt this fresh all year,” he said. “This was special for me.” Devin Booker had 24 points and a season-high 10 assists, Kelly Oubre scored 18 while Deandre Ayton added 16 for the Suns. “We were moving the ball. The ball moves faster than bodies can and we took advantage of that tonight. Ricky and I both had over 10 assists and when you have two people creating like that, we were making the game easy for everyone else,” Booker said. Donovan Mitchell scored 38 points and Bojan Bogdanovic added 16 for Utah. The Jazz made a season-high 37 free throws -- on 43 attempts -- but looked disjointed while committing 19 turnovers. The Suns made three 3-pointers in a row to get some breathing room, and then Jevon Carter made a layup and Oubre dunked to take a 99-88 lead into the fourth quarter. "That third quarter used to be lethal for us. That used to be a thing where we come out and that's where we'd make our push. The roles have reversed," Mitchell said. Oubre dunked over Rudy Gobert early in the fourth quarter and let him know all about it, drawing a technical foul. “We didn’t get complacent. Once we got the lead, we kept building on it and we haven’t done that a lot this year,” Booker said. Rubio made an off-balance 3-pointer from the corner that brought audible gasps from the Utah crowd. The knock on Rubio in Utah was that he wasn't enough of a perimeter threat to keep defenses from sagging. “It was an emotional game for him. To come out and play aggressive and play the right way is exciting for him. I know how badly he wanted this one,” Booker said. The Suns made their first five shots and set the tone early that if the Jazz weren't going to stop their drives, they were headed for a big night. The Suns outscored the Jazz in the paint 66-42. "It's all defense. It doesn't matter how many points you score if you can't guard anybody. We gotta go out there and do it -- myself included. No one is excluded from that,” Mitchell said. Rubio, who also had six rebounds, had 13 points in the first half as the Suns shot 59.5 percent and matched the Jazz at 62-62 at the break. Known for their defense over the past few years, the Jazz suddenly can't stop anyone as they dropped their third straight home game for the first time since early last season. "We're going to keep getting the same result if we don't focus and execute on the defensive end. This is a group that's done that, but that doesn't matter right now. (What) that should tell us is we're capable — at least on some level. But, right now, that's not who we are,” Utah coach Quin Snyder said. BE LEGENDARY Booker attended the Kobe Bryant Memorial in Los Angeles earlier Monday and it inspired him. “All of those people in one building because of that man. It was a very important for all of us. I wouldn’t say closure, because we’re all missing a piece of us for the rest of our lives, but seeing Vanessa speak and seeing the girls there helped a lot of people,” Booker said. Bryant would tell Booker to be legendary. That’s what will motivate him as his career unfolds. “When you are out there emulating the same moves, same approach, same mindset that he passed on to us … that sticks with you,” Booker said. “But it’s not just basketball. ‘Be legendary’ is a message for life.” TIP-INS Suns: Ayton got a technical foul 8:00 before halftime. ... With their 24th win, the Suns have now tied their highest win total in the last five years. ... The Suns had 33 assists and made more baskets (33) in the paint than the Jazz had field goals (32). Jazz: Former Jazz point guard Deron Williams sat courtside. ... Snyder was hit with a technical with 7:11 left in second quarter. ... Mike Conley, Rubio's replacement at the point, had eights and one assist. UP NEXT Suns: Host the Los Angeles Clippers on Wednesday night to open a six-game homestand. Jazz: Host Boston on Wednesday night......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2020

Fury wins in stunning stoppage of Wilder in heavyweight tilt

By TIM DAHLBERG AP Boxing Writer LAS VEGAS (AP) — Tyson Fury is a heavyweight champion once again, dominating Deontay Wilder in their title rematch Saturday night before Wilder’s corner threw in the towel in the seventh round. A boxer in their first fight, Fury went on the attack in the rematch and knocked Wilder down twice before a flurry of punches in the seventh prompted his corner to call an end to the highly anticipated rematch. Fury dropped Wilder in the third round with a right hand that seemed to take the legs out of the champion. He put him down again in the fifth round, this time with a left hand to the body. The end came at 1:39 of the seventh round when referee Kenny Bayless stopped the fight after Wilder’s corner threw in the towel as he was getting pummeled in a neutral corner. It was the first loss for Wilder in 44 fights, and it came in the 11th defense of the title he won in 2015. Fury stalked Wilder almost from the opening bell, using his jab to control the early rounds. He won every round on the scorecard of the Associated Press and was in total command of the fight when it ended. Wilder briefly protested the stoppage, as a pro-Fury crowd at the MGM Grand hotel roared in delight. Fury had bulked up to 273 pounds for the rematch, vowing to change tactics and become the big puncher. He was true to his word, dominating early with a jab that stopped Wilder in his tracks and then landing combinations to the head and body. The rematch drew a sellout crowd that set a record of more than $17 for the live gate and was expected to do well on pay-per-view. Both fighters were guaranteed $5 million but could make $40 million apiece......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 23rd, 2020

Diaz, Petecio lead PSA major awards honor roll

A boxing world champion and an Olympic silver medalist are among those to be rendered with major awards in next month’s annual SMC-PSA (Philippine Sportswriters Association) Awards Night at the Centennial Hall of the Manila Hotel. Nesthy Petecio and Hidilyn Diaz lead the 12 personalities who are the recipients of major awards from the country’s oldest media organization in the March 6 gala night presented by the Philippine Sports Commission, MILO, Philippine Basketball Association, Rain or Shine, and Air Asia. The two lady athletes are also members of Team Philippines which will be honored with the coveted Athlete of the Year award on account of its successful regaining of the Southeast Asian Games overall championship. Petecio, 27, won the featherweight gold in the AIBA Women’s World Boxing Championships in Ulan-Ude, Russia, while Diaz, 29, and silver medal winner in the 2016 Rio Olympics, bagged a silver in the Asian Championships and a pair of bronze in the World Weightlifting Championships. The country’s first qualifier in the Tokyo Olympics in pole vaulter Ernest John Obiena is also a major awardee for topping the qualifying meet in Chiara, Italy. He also won golds in the Asian Athletics Championship and the Summer Universiade. Two other world boxing champions are also in the honor roll list in reigning International Boxing Federation (IBF) super-flyweight title holder Jerwin Ancajas and World Boxing Organization (WBO) bantamweight king Johnriel Casimero. Not to be left out are major awardees in basketball composed of the undefeated, sixth-time UAAP women’s champion National University, five-time PBA Philippine Cup winner San Miguel Beermen, and five-time MVP June Mar Fajardo. Completing the list of major awardees are golfers Juvic Pagunsan, Aidric Chan, and Princess Superal, and Horse of the Year Union Bell. Still to be named are recipients of special citation, the MILO Junior Athletes of the Year, the regular Tony Siddayao .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 23rd, 2020

What APAC& rsquo;s companies need to do to drive the region into New & lsquo;Asian age& rsquo;

Asia’s economy dominated until the 19th century, before being knocked off its pedestal by Europe and then the US.  Since then, while the region has grown to become home to more than half the world’s population and soon half of the world’s middle class, it has not yet retaken this financial crown......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 21st, 2020