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Canada-US relations at a low after Trudeau-Trump trade tiff

For the first time in decades, one of the world's most durable and amicable alliances faces serious strain as Canadians — widely seen as some of the nicest, politest people on Earth — absorb Donald Trump's insults against their prime minister and attacks on their country's trade policies......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJun 15th, 2018

Canada-US relations at a low after Trudeau-Trump trade tiff

For the first time in decades, one of the world's most durable and amicable alliances faces serious strain as Canadians — widely seen as some of the nicest, politest people on Earth — absorb Donald Trump's insults against their prime minister and attacks on their country's trade policies......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 15th, 2018

‘What’s his name again?’ Once smitten by ‘Trudeaumania,’ drama-stricken D.C. too anxious to fete PM – ABC News

Canada's prime minister was in town, but Jamal Turner was drawing a blank. On a blustery sidewalk of downtown Washington, the 30-year-old Baltimore native was in a chatty mood about &'8220;the good country of Canada,&'8221; extrapolating impressively on U.S.-Canada trade relations and the finer points of the North American Free Trade Agreement, while, just blocks away, the heads of both governments met face-to-face for the first time. There are 35 states that depend on Canada as a top exporter,&'8221; said Turner, rattling off a key talking point of the economic relationship. Well, maybe not, but it depends on who you ask around the U.S. capital. Just shy of a year after former U.S. president Barack Obama hosted Prime Minister Trudeau's family for a state dinner at the White House, a new American president Trump was in the White House to greet the Canadian leader on Monday. Last March's Obama invitation ushered in talk of &'8220;Trudeaumania&'8221; in reports by U.S. media outlets like Fox News and the Boston Herald, launching internet memes about an Obama-Trudeau &'8220;bromance.&'8221; The state dinner was the hottest ticket in town. On the morning that Trudeau arrived at the Trump White House for a straightforward working meeting, American news outlets around the capital were preoccupied by North Korean missile tests, by reports about tumult within the National Security Council, by fallout of Trump's travel ban, and by allegations that new National Security Adviser Michael Flynn discussed sanctions with a Russian official before Trump took office. &'8220;It's crazy. It's just day to day, a full spectrum of things,&'8221; said 29-year-old Pete Hansel, while browsing the First Amendment-themed Newseum's outdoor gallery of newspapers from that morning's U.S. and international front pages. (Of the 60 covers displayed, one made mention of Trudeau in a headline — Canada's Globe and Mail.) Hansel had heard Trudeau was coming to town, but the new presidency has been beset with so much controversy in the first month that he says the Canadian prime minister's arrival &'8220;is just not top of mind right now&'8221; for Washingtonians &'8220;It's anything from what Trump is trying to do around voting rights; around environmental protections; around banning people from entering this country, and just his failure to recognize news and facts.&'8221; Lack of chemistry aside, a will-they-or-won't-they tension was building between Trump and Trudeau. Much of it was rooted in expectations the two leaders might publicly criticize each other or clash on ideologies, whether it be tackling climate change or opening borders to Syrian refugees. Trump had already made diplomatic slights against the leaders of Mexico and Australia. In a city that routinely sees foreign heads of state roll through for high-level meetings with the U.S. administration, Trudeaumania — if it was there — was muted. At Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House, passersby couldn't place the name. Shown a photo of Trudeau, though, the recognition set in. &'8220;He's the handsome guy,&'8221; said Carlos Castillo, 36, a firefighter from Virginia. Fenella Henderson said she was hearing more about Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe playing golf with and high-fiving Trump than about any anticipation for Trudeau's visit. Even U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson did not show up, according to reports. A subordinate, Thomas Shannon, was instead scheduled to attend a Trudeau meeting. Canadian expat Naveed Bandali, 29, heard about Tillerson's reported snub. &'8220;Did they take it seriously?&'8221; the Edmonton native said of the Trump administration. &'8220;Or are we so below the radar that I guess we can co-exist mutually, despite having big differences on refugees and climate change, without us causing too much of an aggravated response?&'8221; Last March, he said, the big news in America felt like it was Canada. There was a &'8220;novelty&'8221; to the Trudeau-Obama relationship owing to the fact they not only had overlapping priorities, &'8220;but these guys actually seemed to like each other.&'8221; &'8220;I feel like the novelty now is, what's Trump going to tweet after?&'8221; This was a high-stakes meeting for Trudeau, who walked into the Oval Office with a mission to convince the president that NAFTA, which Trump has signalled he might withdraw from or renegotiate, is worth preserving. Trudeau's cabinet had done some advance legwork. His arrival was preceded days earlier by a parade of Liberal government cabinet ministers who dropped in last week to meet their U.S. counterparts. There was little room for whimsy on Monday. As a parliamentary pool reporter noted, gone were Trudeau's signature &'8220;fancy bright socks,&'8221; swapped for some more understated footwear, black with small blue diamonds for his sit-down with Trump. The prime minister departed Washington without major incident. &'8220;A lot of people in Canada are breathing a sigh of relief,&'8221; Roland Paris, Trudeau's former foreign policy adviser, said from Ottawa. &'8220;Those men were obviously determined not to criticize the other directly, but also took the chance to reiterate their points of view, with Trudeau saying his role is to govern in a way that reflects Canadians' approach. That's a very difficult task to strike that balance.&'8221; The prime minister departed Washington without major incident. &'8220;A lot of people in Canada are breathing a sigh of relief,&'8221; Roland Paris, Trudeau's former foreign policy adviser, said from Ottawa. &'8220;Those men were obviously determined not to criticize the other directly, but also took the chance to reiterate their points of view, with Trudeau saying his role is to govern in a way that reflects Canadians' approach. That's a very [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2017

Trump Trade War: Canada retaliates with $12.6B tariffs on U.S. goods

In this file photo, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario. Canada announced Friday, June 29, billions of dollars in retaliatory tariffs against t.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018

Trudeau declines to meet Trump because of US precondition

TORONTO --- Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Thursday that he offered to go to Washington this week to complete talks on renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) but that Vice President Mike Pence called and told him a meeting with the United State president would only happen if the Canadian leader agreed to put a five-year sunset clause into the deal.   Trudeau said he refused to go because of the "totally unacceptable" precondition. He made the comment while outlining Canada's response to US tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.   Late Thursday, President Donald Trump responded in a statement released by the White House, "Earlie...Keep on reading: Trudeau declines to meet Trump because of US precondition.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 1st, 2018

Trudeau, Trump: NAFTA talks could conclude soon

  OTTAWA, Canada – Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and US President Donald Trump discussed Monday, May 14, ongoing negotiations to revamp the North American Free Trade Agreement, with the White House highlighting the "importance" of reaching a quick conclusion. While Trudeau's office mentioned the "progress" made, and the "possibility of bringing the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 15th, 2018

US challenges China, EU and others at WTO over steel tariffs

The Trump administration on Monday brought cases against China, the European Union, Canada, Mexico and Turkey at the World Trade Organization for retaliating against American tariffs on imported steel and aluminum. Source link link: US challenges China, EU and others at WTO over steel tariffs.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

EU ‘possibly as bad as China’ on trade: Trump

Europe is “possibly as bad as China” on trade, US President Donald Trump said in an interview broadcast Sunday, with trade wars emerging against both the Asian giant as well as longtime allies in Europe and Canada. “The European Union is possibly as bad as China, only smaller,” Trump said on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJul 2nd, 2018

Canada hits back at U.S. with tariffs on metals, bourbon, orange juice

OTTAWA, Canada – Canada hit back at the United States on Friday, June 29, with retaliatory tariffs on American summertime essentials including Florida orange juice, ketchup and Kentucky bourbon in its opening salvo in a trade war with President Donald Trump. As temperatures and tensions increase, the measures targeting Can$16.6 billion ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

Canadians defiant of Trump, boycotts, nuclearization urged

OTTAWA, Canada -- US President Donald Trump’s trade threats and bellicose diplomacy is being met on America’s northern frontier with boycotts of US goods and travel, and even a call for nuclearization. The grassroots backlash reflects the angry mood that has set in since Trump slapped punishing US tariffs on….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Mexico, Canada welcome hosting 2026 World Cup with U.S. despite frayed ties

MOSCOW — The leaders of Mexico and Canada gleefully cheered winning the right to host the 2026 World Cup jointly with the United States on Wednesday, emphasizing unity at a time when U.S. President Donald Trump has frayed relations with the two neighbours during his 18 months in office. Trump, who as part of a tougher U.S. immigration […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Report: Navarro apologizes for harsh comment about Canada PM

President Donald Trump’s trade adviser Peter Navarro has apologized for having said there is “a special place in hell” for Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Report: Navarro apologizes for harsh comment about Canada PM President Donald Trump’s trade adviser Peter Navarro has apologized for having said there is “a special place in hell” for Canadian… link: Report: Navarro apologizes for harsh comment about Canada PM.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018

Global markets higher ahead of Trump-Kim meeting

BEIJING --- Global markets were mostly higher Monday as Donald Trump prepared to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un following the American president's outburst at Canada's prime minister over trade. Keeping score In early trading, Frankfurt's DAX rose 0.6 percent to 12,845.25 and London's FTSE 100 gained 0.5 percent to 7,722.01. Paris's CAC 40 added 0.3 percent to 5,465.37. On Friday, the CAC 40 rose less than 1 percent while the DAX and the FTSE 100 both lost 0.3 percent. On Wall Street, the future for the Dow Jones industrial average was up 0.3 percent and that for the Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 0.1 percent. Asia's day Tokyo's Nikkei 225 rose 0.5 percent to 22,804.0...Keep on reading: Global markets higher ahead of Trump-Kim meeting.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

Trump pulls out of joint G-7 statement, attacks Trudeau

The annual G-7 summit appeared to have weathered tensions over President Donald Trump's threats of a tariff-fueled trade war until the mercurial American pulled out of a joint statement while citing "false statements" by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 10th, 2018

Trump pulls out of joint G-7 statement, attacks Trudeau

The annual G-7 summit appeared to have weathered tensions over President Donald Trump's threats of a tariff-fueled trade war until the mercurial American pulled out of a joint statement while citing "false statements" by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 10th, 2018

Trump pulls out of joint G-7 statement, attacks Trudeau

The annual G-7 summit appeared to have weathered tensions over President Donald Trump's threats of a tariff-fueled trade war until the mercurial American pulled out of a joint statement while citing "false statements" by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 10th, 2018

Trump trade fury plunges G7 summit into chaos

LA MALBAIE, Canada – The G7 summit ended in farce and a renewed threat of trade war Saturday, June 9, as US President Donald Trump rejected an attempt to write a consensus statement and bitterly insulted the Canadian host.  Just minutes after a joint communique that had ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 10th, 2018

Allies race to clinch G7 face-saver before Trump s early exit

LA MALBAIE, Canada (UPDATED) – President Donald Trump quit the G7 summit in Quebec early Saturday, June 9, having made no concessions to his allies' anger at his imposition of tariffs designed, in his eyes, to rebalance world trade. In fact, the US leader instead boasted he had made progress ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 9th, 2018

Lorenzana: RP can buy choppers elsewhere

The government is ready to look for other sources of utility helicopters if Canada chooses not to proceed with the P11.7 billion sale of 16 brand new Bell 412s to the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said. Canadian papers have reported that the Canadian government has ordered a review of the deal amid concerns that the helicopters would be used in fighting rebels.Lorenzana, in a statement, stressed that the 16 brand new Bell412 combat utility helicopters would be used by the AFP to save lives.“Should the Canadian government choose to discontinue their sale of the aircraft to us, then we will procure them from another source,” said Lorenzana.The $233 million agreement was only signed last Wednesday.Immediately after, the Canadian government, through Trade Minister Francois Philippe Champagne reportedly ordered a review of the deal after learning that the helicopters would be used for internal security operations of the AFP.“When we saw that declaration ... we immediately launched a review with the relevant authorities. And we will obviously review the facts and take the right decision,” Champagne was quoted in the reports.But Lorenzana maintained that the helicopters would be used by the AFP “primarily for the transportation of personnel and supplies, ferrying wounded and injured soldiers, and the conduct of humanitarian assistance and disaster response (HADR) operations.” “They are not attack or close support aircraft. While they may be used in support of Internal Security Operations or ISO, their role is limited to those that I mentioned,” he said.“As its designation ‘combat utility helicopter or CUH’ connotes, the Bell CUH 412 is a utility helicopter and, contrary to what some parties mistakenly believe, its mission is to save lives,” Lorenzana added.The Bell 412EPI helicopters were supposed to be delivered early next year.Canada cites HR strings on dealChampagne also mentioned human rights as key element in Canada’s foreign and trade policy.It will be recalled that Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, during last November’s Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (Apec) Summit in Manila, raised questions on President Duterte’s war against illegal drugs which is being blamed for thousands of alleged extra judicial killings in the country.The Department of National Defense (DND), however, stressed that while it is the prerogative of the Canadian government to review the deal, human rights issue should not equate to the ISO of the AFP in general.“I think it is unfair to equate internal security operations in general with human rights violations first of all the alleged human rights violations are unverified there are still being investigated and have to be documented,” DND’s Public Affairs Service chief Arsenio Andolong said.“I think it’s premature to cast judgment on the armed forces in this regard so I think it would be to the best interests of both our countries to step back and reconsider what the Canadian government is thinking,” Andolong added.“If they don’t want to sell, well, we may consider the prospect of procuring them from other sources,” presidential spokesman Harry Roque said. Politicization raised“They must not politicize the acquisition,” said Major-General Restituto Padilla, the deputy chief of staff for plans and programmes of the Philippine armed forces.According to the Philippine defense department, the deal was signed with trade promotion outfit Canadian Commercial Corp last December, shortly after Trudeau clashed with Duterte during a Manila visit over alleged Philippine police murders of thousands of drug suspects.The Philippines employs attack helicopters and planes to support ground troops battling militants in the Muslim south, as well as against communist guerrillas in other parts of the mainly Catholic Asian nation.As well as in the drug war, the Philippine military has for years been saddled with allegations of human rights abuses in its counter-insurgency campaigns.“They are purely for utility purposes — ergo, transport purposes especially during HADR operations,” Padilla said, using a military term for disaster response.“We have separate and dedicated attack helicopters,” he added.Apart from armed insurgencies, the Philippines is also regularly battered by typhoons.“These will be used to transport personnel, supplies, humanitarian missions, ferrying of wounded and injured soldiers, and other forms of humanitarian assistance and disaster response,” Roque added.Bell Helicopter said the Philippine military would use the aircraft “for a variety of missions such as disaster relief, search and rescue, passenger transport and utility transport”. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 7th, 2018

Trump would prefer separate deals with Canada, Mexico – White House

WASHINGTON, USA – President Donald Trump is "seriously contemplating" making separate trade deals with Canada and Mexico, in place of the two-decade-old North American Free Trade Agreement, a White House official said Tuesday, June 5. "He prefers bilateral negotiations and he is looking at two much different countries," Trump economic adviser ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2018

EU joins global battle against Trump tariff onslaught

WHISTLER, Canada – The EU on Friday, June 1, launched its first counteroffensive against Washington's punishing steel and aluminum tariffs  while the US began meetings in Canada with outraged finance ministers from its top trading partners. Meanwhile in Washington, US President Donald Trump floated the possibility of scrapping the 24-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 2nd, 2018