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Cagers add spice to new & lsquo;The Score& rsquo; on S + A

Cagers add spice to new & lsquo;The Score& rsquo; on S + A.....»»

Category: sportsSource: thestandard thestandardOct 12th, 2018

UAAP Finals: In showing character, UP earns Ateneo s respect

Ateneo de Manila University left no doubt in claiming back-to-back championships in the UAAP 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament. Following a convincing nine-point victory in Game 1, the Blue Eagles ran the University of the Philippines out of the Araneta Coliseum in Game 2 on Wednesday by a score of 99-81. That 18-point win was more than enough for them to clinch their seventh title in the last 11 years. Despite the dominant series sweep, the now two-time defending champions had nothing but good words for their fallen foes. “At the end of the day, yes, there’s only one champion, but there are only two teams that play the last game of the season. That means the one that doesn’t win still must’ve done a lot of things pretty well,” head coach Tab Baldwin told reporters post-game. Indeed, while Ateneo was in complete control of the Finals, Fighting Maroons Bright Akhuetie, Paul Desiderio, and Juan Gomez de Liano kept coming at them. In the eyes of coach Tab, that just showed the character they have discovered and then developed throughout the tournament. “When you look at their season, their season had a lot of character to it because they were a struggling team early on and looked out of sorts. It’s really difficult so you scratch your head all the time and say, ‘We got talent, we got some good players, how do we pull this thing together,’” he shared. He then continued, “I don’t know what they did, but they sure got it together and they got these guys playing as a team, playing extremely hard, and they put together a great season.” At the start of the second round, UP found itself at 3-5 and at the outside looking into the playoff picture. From there, though, they went 7-1 to make a run to the Finals which was a pleasant surprise for just about everybody. And though the Fighting Maroons had to settle for a runner-up finish, the Blue Eagles said they deserve nothing but respect for their magical season. “I think that you got to give credit to every single one of them. The coaches obviously did a good job and the players worked with the coaches so they deserve credit for that,” coach Tab said. He then continued, “They were a really tough opponent for us.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 6th, 2018

Score first dibs on tickets to & lsquo;Blackpink Live in Manila& rsquo;

Score first dibs on tickets to & lsquo;Blackpink Live in Manila& rsquo;.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

Adamson Pep only gracious after getting dethroned in UAAP CDC

There was not going to be any back-to-back in this year’s UAAP Cheerdance Competition. The NU Pep Squad made sure of that with an effortless, flawless, and ultimately peerless performance in the middle of the MOA Arena floor on Saturday. With that, Adamson Pep Squad, last year’s feel-good story as champions, got dethroned. Still, head coach Jam Lorenzo was nothing but gracious. “Very well-deserved ang mga nanalo this year. Talagang pana-panahon lang yan,” he told reporters after they placed third. Indeed, NU dominated the event, with a total score that was 60 points better than their closest competitor all while topping all but one of the five criteria. On the other hand, Adamson registered 638.5 points – just 0.5 points better than fourth-running UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe. And even in the eyes of coach Jam, the judges were right. “Kailangan mo ng sportsmanship para ma-accept kung ano mang rank yan,” he said. What matters for the young mentor is that his wards remained on the podium for the third year in a row. “Kahit natalo kami, thankful pa rin kami kasi nasa top three pa rin kami. Masaya ako kasi witness ako ng sacrifice mga bata and, at least, binigay pa rin sa amin ni Lord ito,” he said. And who knows, the Adamson Pep Squad may very well make its way back to the mountaintop sooner than later. “I only started in 2016 and nasa podium kami lagi. ‘Di kami mawawalan ng pag-asa kasi ‘di naman dito nagtatapos,” coach Jam said. After all, that’s exactly what they did in 2016 and 2017 – place third and then climb to first --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 17th, 2018

Q& A: Hornets Walker starts season in scoring groove

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com With the new season underway, and with his game as hot as almost anyone to start, Charlotte Hornets guard Kemba Walker was asked what impressed or surprised him about the first 10 days or so of 2018-19. “Nothing besides my own play,” Walker said, laughing after a shootaround Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “Nothing besides seeing my name near the top of the NBA scoring, which is pretty weird.” Eh, maybe not so weird. Walker, a two-time All-Star, is the Hornets’ all-time leading scorer. At 28, the former ninth overall pick in the 2011 Draft is in his prime as a player. The 41 points he dropped on Milwaukee on opening night and the fact he’s gone for at least 23 every game since (with three more games of 30 or more) seems like the next logical step. It earned him the season’s first Eastern Conference Player of the Week honor and as Week 2 ended, his 31.7 ppg trailed only Golden State’s Stephen Curry (33.9) and Portland’s Damian Lillard (33.8). “It was [gratifying]. Who wouldn’t want it to keep going?” Walker told NBA.com. “I know teams will be gearing up on me and double-teaming me. But I just want to win, man. I want to get back to the playoffs any way possible. I don’t care what I average the rest of the year.” Walker, in the final year of a four-year, $48 million deal he signed in 2014, never has shot the ball so well -- 40.5 percent from the arc, 46.6 percent overall. Neither has he shot it so often and from such range. Walker is averaging 23 shots, including more than 11 3-point attempts. His usage rate of 33.5 trails only Milwaukee’s Giannis Antetokounmpo (35.1) and his 29.4 PER puts him ahead of Kevin Durant and LeBron James. Is it sustainable? That was one of multiple topics Walker talked about with NBA.com’s Steve Aschburner: *** Steve Aschburner: On Media Day, you made it sound as if you would hit this season hard from the start, and that’s exactly what we’ve seen. How do you explain it? Kemba Walker: I knew I had a good summer. I put in the work and the time and the effort to get better. And I’m healthy -- I haven’t felt healthy like this in a long time. Over the last three summers, I wasn’t healthy, having knee surgeries and ‘scopes. So I was rehabbing. This summer, I had a chance to work on my game. Being able to work on my shooting over a long period of time really helped as well. SA: You took as many 3FGAs last season as you shot your first two seasons combined. Now you’re launching them at a pace (11.3 per game) to break Steph Curry’s single season record (886). Is this a conscious change by you or a reaction to the league’s preferred style? KW: Both. The league definitely has changed from the time I first came in. Everybody’s shooting more threes, no matter their position. Me, I’ve just become more confident. I worked on my shot tremendously to get to this point. I’m comfortable now shooting it, whenever I can get to my spots. SA: What’s your preference -- pull-up threes, spot-up threes or those halfcourt threes like Steph takes? KW: Not at all [laughing]. Steph is a different type of shooter, maybe the best to ever shoot the basketball. But I’m comfortable shooting them however. It doesn’t matter. If I can get ‘em up, I try to make ‘em. But I do love for my teammates to create for me and get me some easy ones. It does take some stress, some pressure, off of me. SA: Your coach, James Borrego, has talked of using you more off the ball. Does that suit you? KW: It really helps. It gets me a little bit of rest, and it opens up a different dynamic in my game. As well as giving other guys a chance to have the ball in their hands and create for others. But the main thing is, it just keeps me fresher, which is huge for me. SA: What’s your take on the Charlotte rookies? KW: Oh, I’m a huge fan. Devonte’ [Graham] really hasn’t gotten a chance to play yet, but I’ve always been a huge fan, even when he was at Kansas. Just love his game, love his poise. And that’s skill -- I don’t think people understand how much of a skill it is to be poised, especially at a young age. It’s something that I didn’t have, something that took me a very long time to get. Miles [Bridges], he’s a hard-playing kid. Smart, always in the right spot on both ends of the floor. I can see him getting more minutes as the season progresses. SA: Malik Monk is a second-year guy who didn’t have the most satisfying rookie season. What do you see from him, and can he become a reliable backcourt mate? KW: Oh yeah, he’s growing. Every single day. His efficiency will come. He needs time to learn, needs time to develop, to figure out where his shots are going to come. He’s getting better already. He’s passing the ball really well, getting other guys involved. He needs to know we need him every night, with him coming off the bench for us. SA: Your rookie season was about as challenging as could be -- delayed by a lockout, rushed through training camp and a quickie preseason, and then a 7-59 experience. Did that set you back as a player? KW: Nah, it wasn’t a setback. It was humbling. I took it as a point in my career where I was going through adversity. It was tough -- nobody likes to lose -- and through my basketball career I felt I had been a winner. But I just stuck to it, just kept working hard. SA: You said you don’t want to talk anymore about your free agency next summer -- and your general manager, Mitch Kupchak, is on record saying, “Our intention is for him to end his career in a Hornet uniform.” Some people wonder what the market might be, though, given how many terrific point guards are out there. So let’s address that another way: what is it like competing with all those rivals? KW: It’s unbelievable, man. Every night. Every single night, somebody is there to … I can’t even explain it. Every team, there’s so many great point guards out there who are just ready to showcase their talents. There are young guys ready to show how good they are. Yeah, it’s a point guard league. SA: We’re seeing more and more teams switching everything defensively. How hard is that on a 6-foot-1 point guard? KW: It’s … tough sometimes. Some matchups, you don’t want to get. But I rely on my teammates to help out as much as possible. The most challenging part probably is boxing guys out. But I’m always up for the challenge. SA: Some players talk or at least play like defense is optional. Your thoughts? KW: Not at all. I’m paid to do it all. It’s not even about being paid -- I’m just competitive. I want to play defense. I want to score. I want to do it all. SA: I’ve often wondered what it’s like to play for the team that Michael Jordan owns. Other teams, the owners aren’t basketball experts. But that’s not the case for the Hornets. Is it intimidating? KW: I wouldn’t say intimidating. I love it. I want my owner to have played. He knows what’s going on, he knows how it feels after losses, after wins. Traveling. Being tired. He’s been through it. He knows what it takes to win games in this league. Even though basketball’s a bit different now from when he played, but still, he knows. I feel like I’m at an advantage because I can go to him, I can ask him things. Or he can just come to me, or text me or call me to let me know things. And let me know how to get past things. No, it’s an honor for us, it’s an honor for me to have him as an owner. SA: How is basketball different from when Jordan played? KW: For me, just the threes. A lot of bigs shooting threes. The bigs are different in general, you know? Back with MJ, I feel like the shooting guards and the forwards were dominant, and it was more of a post-up league. Now it’s a point guard’s league for the most part. And it’s not a post-up league much anymore. There are so many threes up in the air. SA: Do you little guys resent the stretch-fours and stretch-fives coming out onto your turf these days? KW: Yeah, man, it’s crazy. But it’s fun. Just seeing the development and the change. Even from when I first got in the league it wasn’t like that. But guys are so talented nowadays, it’s unbelievable. SA: Tell me about the Big Brothers Big Sisters work you do, mentoring four kids -- two boys and two girls -- in the Charlotte area. KW: Just to be in their lives. I take ‘em out to eat, take ‘em to Dave & Buster’s every now and then. It’s fun. I try to avoid the cameras. It’s not for social media. It’s not for anything but them. The kids are doing great in school. That’s the biggest progress, that’s what you want. They’ve really started to love basketball now -- they come to games sometimes. It’s been fun to see them grow, each and every time I see them. One of the kids, his mom passed away. I know it’s been a struggle for him. For me to be able to help get his mind off of that for a time, just be there for him, that’s definitely rewarding for me but I hope it’s more rewarding for him. SA: You’re in your eighth season, and you’ve played a total of 11 playoff games. What stands out for you about the postseason? KW: I remember every game. We played Miami twice. The first year [2014] was when they had LeBron, Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosh. They swept us, but I thought we played really well. Obviously it wasn’t enough -- they had three Hall of Famers. I remember the level of intensity those guys played with. I remember telling myself, the next time I get to the playoffs, I’m going to try my best to play like that. The next time [2016], that’s what I did. People thought we might get swept again, but we went to seven games. It was really fun. The whole atmosphere was so intense. I loved it. You have to take your game to a whole ‘nother level. You have to play hard every possession, every second of those games. The competitiveness, the toughness, everything goes up. SA: A problem that team had, it still has -- you’re carrying such a big load offensively. Do you need a second reliable scorer, and is that guy on the roster now? KW: Of course. We need it. I’m not going to have huge games every night. It’s on one of these guys to step up. I think guys are still searching for their roles at this point, especially with a new coach, new system. We’re still learning. But as the season progresses, I think they will. We have guys who are capable of putting points up for us. SA: The All-Star Game this season is in Charlotte. You’ve been selected twice. What would you think of playing in that game in your market? KW: That’d be amazing. To be in Charlotte, the team that drafted me, the team I’ve played with for eight years now, it would be a really special moment. Hopefully I can get there. It’d be fun. A really important and fun moment in my career. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 30th, 2018

NCAA: With JP Calvo at full strength, would LPU have beaten Letran?

Colegio de San Juan de Letran’s return to the playoffs lasted one game. Unable to keep up with Lyceum of the Philippines University on Friday, the Knights were quickly dispatched just in their first Final Four game since their 2015 championship. Of course, head coach Jeff Napa did nothing but give credit to the Pirates. “Give credit sa Lyceum kasi they gave their best. Kami, medyo nagmalamya kami pumasok,” he told reporters after they were beaten down by 24 points, 85-109. He, however, also added, “Mabigat din kasi yung pagka-down ni Toto e. Dun kami nagkaroon ng problema. Yun yung naging story of the game – we lost our point guard.” Coach Jeff was referring to JP Calvo who suffered an apparent left leg injury early in the third quarter. LPU only exploited his absence and put their opponents inside a pressure cooker and went on a 15-0 tear to turn a one-point deficit into a 70-56 advantage. In the eyes of the Letran head coach, that was the turning point of the game. “Nakakuha na ng kumpyansa yung mga bata nun e. Yung momentum na hinahanap namin, nandun na tapos biglang may nangyaring aksidente na ‘di naman sadya,” he said. Indeed, they were dominated by a score of 38-58 with their court general out of action. And while Calvo was willing to play through the injury, his mentor was not risking doing more damage to his left leg. “Pinu-push niya sarili niya, pero ayaw rin naman naming i-abrupt (end) yung career ni JP dahil actually, siya yung pinakamagaling na point guard ngayon kahit UAAP (or NCAA),” coach Jeff shared. He then continued, “Ayokong sirain yung career niya ngayon. Malaki pa (chance) ni JP sa PBA.” Indeed, the graduating guard only understood their head coach. “Kung ako ang tatanungin, maglalaro pa talaga ako para sa Letran lalo na last year ko na ‘to e. Wala na akong next year pa,” he said. He then continued, “Pero sinabihan ako ni coach Jeff na wag ko na pilitin so tinanggap ko na lang.” And so, Calvo’s last game in blue and red was far from his best – with just nine points in just 19 minutes of play. Now, all he could do is make sure his now-substitutes and future-replacements will do much better than they did on this day. “Sa mga kapalitan ko, sina Fran Yu, [Jason] Celis, [Bonbon] Batiller, sinasabihan ko sila na dapat, wag mag-relax at kung anong dapat nilang i-improve, i-improve nila. Yun ang key sa isang player e,” he said. For his part, coach Jeff also said he will do his all to make sure the point guards he has left will be better prepared without Calvo. “Siguro, kasalanan ko na ‘di ko sila na-ready sa ganung situation, pero nandun na, wala na tayong magagawa. It’s a matter of kailangan kong paghandaan pa siguro,” he said. He then continued, “Siguro, kaya ‘di ako pinalad at saka yung team kasi kailangang magsumikap pa talaga kami.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 26th, 2018

Beauty queen Michele Gumabao joins & lsquo;The Score& rsquo;

Beauty queen Michele Gumabao joins & lsquo;The Score& rsquo;.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

PVL: Ateneo-Motolite back in win column

Ateneo-Motolite took the fight out of Iriga-Navy with a devastating rally in the second set before sustaining its momentum in the third to complete a bounce back 25-19, 29-27, 25-14, win Sunday in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Down by 12 points in the second set, the Lady Eagles once again clung to their heartstrong mantra to fuel an impressive fight back that highlighted Ateneo-Motolite’s third win in four games tied with Creamline and Pocari-Air Force. The Lady Eagles rebounded from a straight sets loss to BanKo last week by downing a revamped but still winless Lady Oragons. “Unang-una I just told them that you have to have pride and be responsible on everything you do. So I guess ‘yun ang dapat na number one na matutunan ng mga bata. Most of them know how to play but sometimes they forget how to win so I just told them to be responsible,” said Atenei-Motolite coach Oliver Almadro. “I guess ‘yung responsibility inako talaga nila and nag-make way para maka recover kami pero unfortunately, 24-20, inabutan pa rin kami. Pero siguro they just refused to lose na kasi nandoon na eh,” he added. Kat Tolentino finished with 14 points off 10 attacks, three kill blocks and an ace for the Lady Eagles. Middles Maddie Madayag and Bea De Leon had seven each while Ponggay Gaston posted eight markers for Ateneo-Motolite, which received 31 free points off Iriga-Navy’s errors. After taking the opening set, Ateneo-Motolite stared at a 17-5 deficit in the second frame. The Lady Oragons were still up, 20-12, before the Lady Eagles unleashed a 12-0 barrage to move at set point, 24-20. Iriga-Navy came back to life and moved at set point, 25-24. Ateneo-Motolite answered with two straight points before the Lady Oragons forced another deuce.   Tolentino gave the Lady Eagles back the lead but Hezzymie Acuna was quick to counter for knot the score at 27. Ponggay Gaston pushed Ateneo-Motolite on its third set point advantage before Nene Bautista committed an attack error to surrender the frame to the Lady Eagles.     With momentum on their side, Ateneo-Motolite created an early separation and never looked back in the third. The Lady Oragons, who inserted three Army players in Bautista, Joanne Bunag and libero Tin Agno to beef up their lineup, absorbed their sixth straight defeat in as many outings. Bunag had 11 points while Grazielle Bombita and Divine Eguia scored eight each for Iriga-Navy.     ---           Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 13th, 2018

NCAA: Bolick doesn t score 50, San Beda still downs Arellano

San Beda University will have a twice-to-beat advantage against whoever it will face in the Final Four of the NCAA 94 Men’s Basketball Tournament. The Red Lions scored the much-welcome playoff incentive after making quick work of also-ran Arellano University, 90-52, on Thursday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. Robert Bolick didn’t have a historic 50-point performance like he did the last time the two teams met, but he still made waves all over with 11 points, nine assists, and five rebounds. As always, Javee Mocon was right there with him and posted a 24-point, 11-rebound double-double. “Springboard sa amin ‘to going into the Lyceum game – especially for our bench players,” he told reporters post-game. It was also Mocon who fronted the 16-8 second quarter that broke the game wide open for the defending champions. The Chiefs would never recover from there and only saw their opponents mount a lead of as much as 38. With the win, San Beda has secured a top two finish in the elimination rounds still with two games left on its schedule. “At least, ngayong twice-to-beat na kami, we will have to consider the rest of our elimination round games as playoff games,” coach Boyet said, referring to their last two assignments against Lyceum of the Philippines University and University of Perpetual Help, both already in the Final Four. On the other hand, already-eliminated Arellano saw its standing fall to 5-12. Dariel Bayla topped the scoring column with 12 points and six rebounds while Ian Alban chipped in 10 markers of his own. BOX SCORES SAN BEDA 90 – Mocon 24, Bolick 11, Oftana 9, Tankoua 8, Doliguez 8, Canlas 6, Carino 5, Nelle 5, Soberano 5, Cuntapay 4, Presbitero 3, Eugene 2, Tongco 0, Abuda 0, Cabanag 0 ARELLANO 52 – Bayla 12, Alban 10, Canete 7, Alcoriza 6, Dela Torre 5, Concepcion 4, Dela Cruz 2, Segura 2, Sera Josef 2, Sacramento 2, Ongolo Ongolo 0, Codinera 0 QUARTER SCORES: 22-15, 38-23, 60-37, 90-52 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

Bigger, better & lsquo;The Score& rsquo; on ABS-CBN& rsquo;s Sports+Action

Bigger, better & lsquo;The Score& rsquo; on ABS-CBN& rsquo;s Sports+Action.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 28th, 2018

NCAA Season 94: Rolly, you will be missed

NCAA coaches and stars were one in saying that the passing of Rolly Manlapaz, considered as the voice of the college basketball, was a great loss in the tight-knit community. The former disk jockey and longtime UAAP and NCAA basketball barker, who also saw stints in volleyball games passed away Thursday after a bout with ALS. He was 58. “I just love the way he calls games,” said Lyceum of the Philippines head coach Topex Robinson. “Sometimes he makes it look like spooky by that sound but then again basketball will never be the same without that voice.” Manlapaz’s last stint with the NCAA was two years ago in Season 92 and called his last game four months ago in UAAP Season 80 women's volleyball Finals. His career spanned for two decades.  “I’m sure he will be remembered not only by the NCAA but by the whole basketball community,” he added. The voice that defined college and amateur basketball in this generation made even the most boring or one-sided game lively with his jewel of a voice and antics why calling out plays. Manlapaz can make an exciting game even more colorful, adding a different flavor and flare that only the stadium legend can deliver. Manlapaz also endeared himself with players and coaches by calling out their full name instead of their nicknames. “Sayang mami-miss namin ang mga sigaw niya dito sa Arena especially when he calls me Teodorico not Boyet. We’re gonna miss them,” said San Beda coach Boyet Fernandez. But Manlapaz’s greatest contribution in the game was his knack of baptizing players with lasting monikers. One of the cagers that got that honor was reigning NCAA Most Valuable Player CJ Perez.  Manlapaz gave Perez the moniker ‘Baby Beast’ when he was still playing for San Sebastian College’s high school team. Perez got the moniker for showing the same aggressiveness and tenacity of former Stag and now PBA star Calvin Abueva while wearing the same No. 7 jersey.  “Kay Sir Rolly nanggaling yung ‘Baby Beast’ na yun, noong FilOil pa lang ata yun,” Perez said. “It’s an honor na naging part siya ng mga league dito. Sobrang happy kami na nabibigyan kami ng moniker dahil sa kanya. Lumalabas ang pangalan namin dahil sa kanya.” San Beda’s Robert Bolick also shared his feelings on the passing of a friend. “Nagulat nga ako na ganyan ang nangyari akala ko naging OK na siya,” he said. “Nakaka-miss ‘yun kasi nakakagana maglaro ‘yun eh.” “Kaya ngayon ayoko na magganun-ganun (na layup). Dati kapag gumaganun ako siya kaagad yung, “Oh dipsy doo!” Ngayon medyo di na siya ganoon kasaya, nawawala ang saya,” he added. Manlapaz according to Bolick made any player perform better with his adrenaline-pumping calls. “Kahit sa UAAP ganoon ‘yan eh. ‘Pag tinawag nya ang pangalan mo parang feeling mo nasa NBA ka eh,” he said. “Maganda ang feeling kapag pumasok ka sa court. Nakakapagpaganda ng laro. Barker yun ang trabaho niya.” Bolick also remembered all the fun moments he had with Manlapaz. “Kahit noong La Salle pa ako kahit nasa bench lang ako tinatawag pa rin nya ako. Di ko nga alam eh (kung bakit ako tinatawag),” joked Bolick, drawing laughter from reporters. “Talagang may pinagsamahan din kaming dalawa. May koneksyon din kami.” “Nu’ng sa La Salle noong nag-championship kami sa UST, kapag nagwa-warmup kami ako pa rin tinatawag niya. Di ko nga alam, di naman ako naglalaro,” he continued. “Nahihiya tuloy akong mag-warmup.” “Nakaka-miss talaga yun and hopefully nasa magandang lugar na siya.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles          .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018

PBA: On bad knees and feet, Joe Devance still stood tall against San Miguel

If it weren't for the persistence of Joe Devance, Ginebra would have only Prince Caperal as their only big man. The crowd darlings had a glaring shortage of centers and power forwards. Japeth Aguilar and Greg Slaughter, the famed Ginebra twin towers, were missing in action due to injury. Jervy Cruz was also not on the active list as he continues his recovery. Palms sweating, knees weak, Joe Devance provided a huge spark for Ginebra. If it were not for his 17 points, 4 rebounds, and 7 assists, things might have gone differently for the defending champions. Devance was not really going to play, but after Aguilar went down, he came at a crossroads. "It was a few days ago, Japeth got hurt in practice. He got hurt so I was like, ‘Oh man we don’t have any bigs, it’s just Prince’ so I just tried in practice and see how I feel. I just told coach that if I can get through it, I’ll do whatever I can to get through it," the burly big man shared after the game. Facing an equally-hobbled team in San Miguel, who were without four-time reigning MVP June Mar Fajardo and Marcio Lassiter, Devance stood in awe on how his team managed to score their fourth win of the conference. "It feels good to get a win especially against San Miguel. I know they have some guys that are hurt too but, it’s pretty crazy how many injuries we have right now. I think it’s like six or seven or something like that. It’s pretty amazing with just the things we are able to do right now." Despite not having a very positive assessment of his own knees -- which he said was 60 percent fine -- Devance maintained that he will do everything just to help the team, even at the expense of his own body. At 36 years old, the number 1 pick of the 2007 PBA draft is nearing the twilight of his career, and just elects to savor every moment he can while he's playing. "I don’t know if it’s my age or what it is but, I’m just trying to hang on and just keep up with these young guys, you know. I’m still having fun, it’s just when the pain is really bad, that’s when it gets tough." "Now again, it’s kinda hard but I’m hoping I can get back to just at least playing a little bit better. But I’m just proud of the guys. It’s all about the guys stepping up and they have been."   __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

NCAA Season 94: Cardinals snap slump in pulsating win

Laurenz Victoria buried the game-winning turnaround jumper to help Mapua University snap a six-game losing slump at the expense of Jose Rizal University, 81-79, Thursday in the NCAA Season 94 seniors basketball competition at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. With the game tied at 79 with 21 ticks left, Victoria took matters on his own hands as he drove hard to the right side before putting on the brakes and hitting the turnaround jumper over the outstretched hands of Jed Mendoza with 1.5 second left. The Cardinals breathed a sigh of relief after JR Aguilar’s bank shot jumper at the buzzer as the ball rimmed out. “Sabi ni coach kasi sa last play namin itira namin ng five seconds. ‘Pagkakita ko sa shot clock ng six seconds ginawa ko na kung ano ang makakaya ko. Inisip ko na last na ‘to. Segundo na lang eh nagka-cramps na rin rin ako. Swerte na-shoot,” said Victoria. Victoria finished with 17 points while Warren Bonifacio added 13 for Mapua, which improved to 3-8 win-loss record. Noah Lugo and Cedric Pelayo chipped in 10 each for the Cardinals. Mark Mallari tied the game at 79 after sinking the last two his 11 free throws made in the fourth quarter with just 21.5 seconds left in the ball game. But Victoria answered with his game-winner on the other end after Mapua’s timeout. JRU absorbed its fourth straight defeat for a 2-10 slate. Jed Mendoza had 22 points while Mallari posted 18 markers for the Heavy Bombers. Jun Silvarez posted 13 for JRU.   Box score: MU (81) - Victoria 17, Bonifacio 13, Lugo 10, Pelayo 10, Aguirre 7, Gamboa 6, Serrano 6, Buñag 4, Biteng 4, Jabel 4, Nieles 0. JRU (79) - Mendoza 22, Mallari 18, Silvarez 13, Estrella 9, Aguilar 5, Esguerra 4, Dela Virgen 3, Bordon 2, Miranda 2, Padua 1, Doromal 0, David 0. Quarterscores: 15-17, 36-42, 60-55, 81-79            --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

PVL Finals: ‘Atin ‘to, atin to’ is the new UP Ikot

Last year, Paul Desiderio shouted ‘Atin ‘to!’ during University of the Philippines’ last huddle in a UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball game. After that, Desiderio sank the game-winning buzzer-beating triple to down University of Sto. Tomas. It has since been the battle cry of the Diliman-based student-athletes. On Wednesday, the Lady Maroons did their own version that morale-boosting mantra. Down 7-13 in the pivotal stretch of the fifth set, the words again echoed in UP’s huddle up until they marched back inside the court.          “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to!” Like a shot of adrenaline, the Lady Maroons charged with renewed energy. Afterwards, they made history. UP completed a sweet sweep of the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference best-of-three Finals series, 25-20, 25-18, 23-25, 20-25, 15-13, to hoist its first major title in 36 years at the FilOil Flying V Centre. “Nu’ng nagsimula pa lang ‘yung fifth set we talked na how much do we want to win and in order for us to actually get the championship title,” said veteran setter Ayel Estranero, whose ace, which landed like a dagger right at the middle of the stunned Lady Tamaraws, sealed the championship that eluded UP in almost four decades. “Kailangan namin gustuhin lahat kami,” added Estranero, whose squad won the series opener also in five sets. “‘That’s why everyone actually never gave up until the end.” Estranero and Isa Molde, who collected the conference and Finals Most Valuable Player as well as the 1st Best Outside Spiker, took matters on their own hands in that closing stretch as they scored six of the last eight points.    But the duo was quick to give credit to the collective effort of the whole team. “Kita naman e,” said Estranero. “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to,” Molde butted in during the postgame interview where the two joined head coach Godfrey Okumu. “Yeah, atin ‘to, atin ‘to. Di kami makakapalo talaga kung walang dumepensa or di ako maka-set ng walang dumepensa so until the end it was still a collective effort from everyone from the coaches and the players even those in the bench,” Estranero pointed out. “So ‘yun pero siyempre andun din yung conscious effort na gugustuhin mo talaga and you’ll do whatever it takes,” added Estranero. When the playmaker trooped behind the service line – UP at championship point – Estranero murmured a little prayer.    “When I was serving I was just actually praying and I just actually believed that the team can actually win despite na sobrang haba ng hinabol namin. Kahit ang layo ng score namin but then na-feel namin sa loob na hindi pa kami talaga susuko that everyone is still willing to fight,” she recalled.  “So ‘yun nu’ng nag-serve ako hindi ako kinakabahan as in I just really want to win for the team and for everyone,” Estranero added. When she made the connection on her serve, the ball flew in at a low arching trajectory. “Gulat ako kasi I mean like hindi ko naman totally alam ano mangyayari sa bola pag release ko,” said Estranero. It was supposed to be a sure reception from FEU's libero. But like having their feet cemented on the taraflex floor, FEU libero Buding Duremdes and the rest of the Lady Tams just froze. “But when I saw the ball dropped and touch the floor, it was just so overwhelming,” said Estranero. Estranero rolled and then sprawled on the floor face down after the final whistle, slamming her hand on the court. Her teammates were already crying, shouting, hugging and congratulating each other as they round inside the court after completing their conquest. Confetti slowly fell. History made. “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to.” UP owned the night.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

NCAA: Coaches describe Robert Bolick as unique, unstoppable

Robert Bolick is the first player to score 50 points in the NCAA in three decades. Without a doubt, San Beda University main man’s 50-point explosion last Friday is rare as the last time the league has seen such occurrence was in 1979 when Lim Eng Beng fired 55 points for De La Salle University. That means that Bolick is just the second player in the 94-year history of the first and oldest collegiate league in the country to score 50 points or more. That is exactly why, for Red Lions head coach Boyet Fernandez, his main man is nothing but special. “Maraming players na magagaling, pero nag-iisa lang ang Robert Bolick. You cannot compare other players to him,” he told reporters. That, coming after Bolick destroyed Arellano University by dropping 50 points in efficient 18-of-25 shooting from the field and perfect 9-of-9 shooting from the free throw line. Even after being on the receiving end of such destruction, Chiefs tactician Jerry Codinera could only also marvel at the masterpiece by the graduating guard. “Magaling, magusay naman talaga yan, no doubt. He’s a good two-guard, may character lumaro, relentless, ‘di siya nakukuntento,” he said. He then continued, “For me, there’s no collegiate player (who) can stop him.” With that, coach Jerry, a Philippine basketball legend, has no qualms about saying that Bolick will take the PBA by storm once he gets there. “Very promising yan. Watch out, PBA – there’s a new kid on the block,” he said. More than the scoring spree, however, coach Boyet said his graduating guard can do it all – even in the PBA. As he put it, “Robert is an all-around player. ‘Di niya iniisip yung scoring kasi he’s a facilitator for our team and a leader for our defense.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018

Margielyn Didal s uphill climb to Asian Games gold

PALEMBANG - Filipina skateboarder Margielyn Arda Didal reigned supreme in the women's street competition at the 2018 Asian Games from start to finish. The 19-year-old Cebuana paced the pack after her second run and never looked back to bag the Philippines' fourth gold medal. Didal was so dominating that she posted an untouchable top score of 30.4 points for her smashing Asian Games debut. Japan’s Isa Kaya placed a distant second with 25.0 points from the combined two runs and two top tricks with 25.0 for silver while 12-year-old Nyimas Bunga of Indonesia took the bronze with a tally of 19.8 in this captivating millennial sport making its maiden appearance in the quadrennial, 45-nation sportsfest. “I am very happy I did my best. Sobra ang saya po, lalung –lalo na sa mga skateboarders natin,” said the gregarious Didal, who  lived up to her billing as the top favorite after her devil-may-care showing at the packed arena. After her resounding win, Didal revealed the hardships she had to work through just to get some practice back in Cebu. Asian Games Skateboarding Gold medal winner Didal from Cebu recounts hardship just to practice ‘hinahabol kami ng police kasi Bawal’ pic.twitter.com/tKaQbDJWWT — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) August 29, 2018 "Sa streets lang, hinahabol kami ng pulis, mga security pag may nakitang nag-skate," Didal told ABS-CBN News' Dyan Castillejo via video interview. "Minsan po pag nasa mall, pag nakahawak ka ng board, bawal ka pumasok," she continued. “Gusto ko rin na maipakita na skateboarding is a serious sport but can also be fun as well.” Didal's mother is a streetfood vendor back in Cebu, while his father is a carpenter. Both her parents were unable to accompany or even witness her historic feat. With the win however, a lot of opportunities are set to arise for the young skateboarder.  Didal will receive P6 million in incentives from the government and other groups as a reward for gold medalists in the Asiad, and she plans to use the money to finally bring her family to her next event. Margielyn’s mother is a street food vendor in Cebu , her father a carpenter. She hopes to be able to get them a passport so they can be at her next comp abroad . pic.twitter.com/QADA0LoXtQ — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) August 29, 2018 "Kukuhan ko rin sila (parents) ng passport after Asian Games kasi maraming invitations sa skate event. Para makasama sa next event ko, sa Brazil," she bared. Skateboarding made its debut in this iteration of the quadrennial meet, and will become a medal sport in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Didal trained in the United States for two months before competing in Indonesia, with nothing more than a dream to erase skateboarding's negative connotation in the country.  "[Para] sa skate scene sa Pinas, manibago naman yung tingin ng ibang tao sa skateboarding," an emotional Didal bared. Now a gold medalist, Didal hopes her success leads to better support for the discipline.  Margielyn spent 2 months training in the USA sponsored by MVP Sports Foundation , NB , POC . She gets emotional talking about how she hopes skateboarding would be given attention as a Sport . pic.twitter.com/ORTcIE4jPI — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) August 29, 2018 Didal leanred to skate in the streets of Cebu . She hopes there will be Public Skateparks set up around the country as so much talent among Pinoys in this Sport , says the 19 yr old . pic.twitter.com/c3T7Lt4aUK — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) August 29, 2018 Her golden achievement was the fourth mint courtesy of Pinoy female athletes after weightlifter Hidylin Diaz, golfer Yuka Saso and the PH women’s gold squad, and the first major contribution of the compact national contingent competing in 10 events here to the country’s overall medal tally.      Philippine Olympic Committee President Ricky Vargas and chairman Bambol Tolentino, who went straight from the airport to the venue,  arrived just in time to witness  the former street kid go  from strength to strength in garnering  “I am blessed to witness this great event by a young girl, a carpenter’s daughter and former street kid, who did so well.  Because of her hard work and belief in herself she is now where she is,” noted Vargas after witnessing Didal’s impressive run. “Congratulations Margie. The country is grateful for your efforts and sacrifices ,” said Philippine Sports Commission chairman Butch Ramirez in statement from Manila immediately after learning of the Cebuana’s accomplisthment. “We are arranging a hero’s welcome for  you. “Your PSC family is behind you all the way. Mabuhay ang atletang Pilipino.” Also greeting Didal immediately after her victory were deputy chef de mission Manny Cabili  and POC officials Col. Jeff Tamayo and Jonne Go. A veteran of the prestigious Street League championships in London last May – the first Southeast Asian to be invited to the event – Didal led from start to finish, setting the tone of the lopsided contest with an opening score of 6.7 points, highlighted by a difficult  ”Board Slide” on the railings after taking the higher platform.      Using a 8Five2 yellow skateboard, she displayed her own version of hang time with an “Ollie” on her second run to go comfortably ahead with 14.4 points to second-running Isa’s 13.3, and seemingly was just getting started. In the tricks section, where the two best scores out five tries count , Didal went full throttle with another “Board Slide” to net 6.0 in her initial run, took it easy with a 3.7 output in the second, before wrapping the gold up with eye-popping scores of 7.1 and 8.9 points in the third and fourth attempts. With a flair for the dramatic, her coup de grace was an acrobatic “Backside 50/50, 360-degree Flip Out” that drew oohs and ahhs from the gallery – an astonishing feat considering that it was the first time she did it in a major international competition. “This was the first time that Margielyn tried that stunt and is the highest score garnered by any skateboarder so far in the street event,”noted Skateboard Association of the Philippines Inc. president Monty Mendigoria. Didal and the rest of the skateboarding were scheduled to return to Manila on Thursday in what undoubtedly will be a hero's welcome for the country’s latest golden Asian Games sensation. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2018

Coach Joe overseeing Pasaol’s transformation into a beast

Unlike De La Salle University and University of Sto. Tomas, who also have new coaches, University of the East will have a Mythical Team member fronting its new era. Alvin Pasaol, who famously scored 49-points in a game last season in the UAAP, will be playing two more years for the Red Warriors. That means that new mentor Joe Silva will have a top five player in his first year as at the helm for UE – as compared to Louie Gonzales with the Green Archers and Aldin Ayo with the Growling Tigers who wont' have that luxury.  Of course, Silva recognized how big is it to have somebody like that. “Siyempre, it helps na may Mythical 5 kami na go-to-guy,” he said of his main man who averaged 20.6 points, 7.1 rebounds, 1.7 steals, and 1.6 assists last year. Still, UE’s new head coach, who knows a thing or two about top players, said we haven’t seen the best of Pasaol just yet. As he put it: “Alvin, for me, hasn’t reached his potential yet. Tip of the iceberg pa lang yan.” During his time as coach of the Ateneo De Manila Blue Eaglets, Silva had a hand in the development of the likes of Thirdy Ravena, Nieto twins Matt and Mike, SJ Belangel, Dave Ildefonso, and Kai Sotto. As such, he went on to point out that his new top gun, well-known for his big body, could do much more with better conditioning. “I want him to get stronger. Isipin niyo, he’s kind of on the pudgy side, tapos andami na niyang nagagawa,” he said. He then continued, “Paano pa kung kundisyon? He’ll be a beast.” A toned and tireless Alvin Pasaol? Could he score more than 49 points in a game? For his part, Pasaol said he’s ready and raring to answer his mentor’s challenge. “Sinasabi nga ni coach Joe na kailangang totally fit ako. Agree naman akong kailangan kong pumayat kahit konti para mas shifty pa akong gumalaw at mas kayang tumalon,” he said. That doesn’t mean, however, that the 49-point man we all have come to love is going away. “Kahit pumayat, ‘di naman mawawala yun. Siguro, mas lalo ko lang i-eenhance ginagawa ko para rin ma-break ko yung record ko,” he said. Along with the weight, though, Pasaol said he’s aiming to take the reins of leadership for the new-look Red Warriors. “Yung leadership, yun yung gusto kong ma-achieve ngayon. Gusto ko, lahat ng teammates ko, papagalingin ko,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 13th, 2018

ONE: No longer just a contender, Kevin Belingon has more surprises in store for Bibiano Fernandes

It took nearly two years, but Team Lakay bantamweight star Kevin Belingon has finally secured his status as the next guy in line to face reigning ONE Championship Bantamweight World Champion Bibiano Fernandes. Now, he even has a world championship to show for it. Friday night at the Mall of Asia Arena, Belingon outworked two-division world champion Martin Nguyen to become the new interim ONE Championship Bantamweight World Champion, finally setting up a long-awaited rematch against Fernandes. While Belingon did pretty much leave no doubt in his win over Nguyen, the popular belief was that he had already earned his shot against Fernandes, even before the Nguyen bout. After losing to Fernandes the first time around, Belingon wasted no time in working his way back to the top-tier of the division, demolishing three former world title contenders on his way to a five-fight winning streak. And as ONE Championship founder and Chairman Chatri Sityodtong revealed days before the Belingon-Nguyen bout in Manila, the Pinoy knockout artist was indeed supposed to finally get his shot against Fernandes, unfortunately the champ was still out with an injury. All the should haves and shoud be’s however, are in the past now. Belingon has secured his shot, and all he’s going to do now is keep training and wait for a date for his rematch with Fernandes. “Yun nga, meron na [‘tong belt], kaya wala nang conte-contender.” Belingon said, beaming with confidence during the post-fight press conference. “Ako na yung nasa linya talaga na makalaban ni Bibiano [Fernandes], kaya antay-antay lang kung ano yung sabihin ng ONE ulit kung kailan para mapag-handaan ng husto.” As for the upcoming rematch with Fernandes, ‘The Silencer’ says that he’s got some more surprises in store for the Brazilian grappling ace. “Marami pa, maramin pang surprises kaya yun yung abangan niyo sa paghaharap namin ni Bibi.” The last time that Belingon and Fernandes met, it didn’t end well for the 30-year old Baguio native, as Fernandes needed just one round to score the submission. That, of course, was the pre-Baguio Jiu-Jitsu days of Team Lakay. (READ ALSO: Joshua Pacio 'amazed' Renzo Gracie with his Baguio Jiu-Jitsu) Since then, Belingon and the rest of the Benguet-based MMA stable has put a premium on improving their ground game, and the last few years have shown their steady improvement. And while they can hold their own against the best grapplers in the game, they aren’t about to rest on their laurels. Belingon knows that to be able to finally dethrone ONE Championship’s longest-reigning world champion, there’s a whole lot more work to be done. “Marami pang kailangan i-improve, lalo na sa wrestling and sa ground, kasi magaling si Bibiano dun.” Belingon admitted. “Yun yung isang pag-hahandaan namin para pag nagka-harap kami, at least malalabanan ko siya sa ground, sa gilid ng cage, sa striking, kahit anong angulo.” It took nearly two years and six wins for Kevin Belingon to get another shot at the guy in the bantamweight division. Now, all he needs is just one more win to become the guy in the bantamweight division. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 30th, 2018

NCAA: No upsetting LPU on the watch of ‘special’ CJ Perez

Lyceum of the Philippines University has won 22 elimination games in a row. On Tuesday, though, that streak was in real jeopardy as the Pirates found themselves trailing Arellano University by as much as 16 early on. Little by little, the league’s pacesetters battled back starting in the second quarter. Of course, they followed the lead of main man CJ Perez. “He’s special. You have to love him, you have to trust him. I just told him, ‘I’m gonna win and lose games with you,’” head coach Topex Robinson shared. He then continued, “I don’t even care what’s gonna happen as long as you gave your best.” Perez gave his best – and then some. He dropped a new career-high 31 points, 23 coming in the second half, to go along with six rebounds, six assists, and five steals. “Ginawa ko lang po yung best ko para makabalik kami,” he told reporters post-game, modest as always. Behind him, LPU dominated the Chiefs by a score of 63-32 in the second to fourth quarters. And he did all that, because his always amiable mentor kept him focused. “I always told him lang na he’s gonna make mistakes and that’s okay. That took out the pressure sa kanya,” he said. In the end, the Pirates dodged an upset ax because their main man just wouldn’t let them take it. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

PBA: Lalaban tayo hanggang sa huli -- Aces coach Compton

ANTIPOLO -- Down 0-2 in a best-of-five semifinals series against the best and most star-studded team in the league, Alaska could’ve waived the white flag. But the Aces aren’t going down without a fight. Faced against overwhelming odds, Alaska stood its ground and made giant San Miguel Beer know that if it wants to advance into the 2018 PBA Commissioner’s Cup Finals the Beermen must go through them first. Even with their import Diamon Simpson playing hurt, the Aces blew out San Miguel, 125-104, to deny the Beermen a series sweep and live to fight another day Friday at the Ynares Sports Center here. “I thought everybody contributed at a time where, obviously, we’re still down, at a time we’re very down,” said Alaska coach Alex Compton, whose bench produced 71 points. “To tell you what guys, I love my guys. You heard me say it before I love my guys they don’t give up.” “We’re down 2-0 against the best team in the league, there’s every possibility to give up but they didn’t,” he added. The Aces dropped the series’ first two games including a painful Game 2 loss where Alaska squandered a 16-point lead. Ahead by nine points in at the half in Game 3, Alaska this time kept its hold of the lead and even extended it to 17 heading into the payoff period for a comfortable cushion. “Yun ang hiningi ko sa kanila, ‘lalaban tayo hanggang sa huli’. Lumaban sila,” said Compton. “You know we have to play great to beat San Miguel, I thought we played great tonight.” The mentor also praised his wards for stepping up as Simpson played with a sprained ankle he sustained in Game 2.     “I’m really proud of the guys when I had to sub him out when he looked like he was really hurt in the second quarter,” Compton said. “They were able to maintain and even at point extend our lead a little bit.” Vic Manuel delivered 24 points while Simpson still managed to score 21 markers and grab 13 boards. JV Casio also contributed with 15 markers while Simon Enciso flirted with a double-double with 10 points and eight assists in a time Alaska need all the help it could get. “It just feels like it was one of our days. Alam naman naming na doon sa kabila hindi biro ang bigat ng kalaban but we got one and we needed to get one,” said Compton. Now Alaska has a chance to get back in the series and take an equalizer on Sunday in Game 4.         ---   Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles      .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018