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Britain accuses reckless Russia of breaking chemical arms ban

THE HAGUE, Netherlands – Britain accused Russia on Wednesday, April 18, of breaking the two-decade international ban on chemical weapons, at emergency talks on last month's poisoning with a nerve agent of a former Russian spy. The accusations came as diplomats from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons met ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerApr 19th, 2018

Watchdog confirms UK findings on nerve agent used on Russian spy

  LONDON, United Kingdom – The world's chemical arms watchdog on Thursday, April 12 said it had confirmed Britain's findings on a nerve agent used in an attack on a former spy last month, which London said came from Russia. Samples tested by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 12th, 2018

Russia accuses US of breaking treaty over defense system sale to Japan

MOSCOW, Russia – Russia's deputy foreign minister Sergei Ryabkov on Saturday, December 30, accused the United States of violating a key arms treaty by selling a missile defense system to Japan.  "The US is deploying them (missile defense systems) at their military bases in Romania and Poland, that is near our ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 30th, 2017

West accuses Russia of global hacking conspiracy

THE HAGUE, Netherlands – Western powers have accused Russia of orchestrating a string of global cyber attacks including a bungled plot to hack the world's chemical weapons watchdog in The Netherlands. The United States indicted seven alleged Russian members of the GRU military intelligence agency Thursday for targeting the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 5th, 2018

US hits Russia with sanctions over nerve agent attack in Britain

  Washington, United States -- The United States said Wednesday it was imposing new sanctions on Russia over Moscow's involvement in the use of a "lethal" nerve agent in the attempted killing of a former spy in Britain. The State Department said the sanctions were in response to "the use of a 'Novichok' nerve agent in an attempt to assassinate UK citizen Sergei Skripal" -- who was a double agent -- and his daughter Yulia in March. The action is aimed at punishing President Vladimir Putin's government for having "used chemical or biological weapons in violation of international law," State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement.   The new sa...Keep on reading: US hits Russia with sanctions over nerve agent attack in Britain.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Moscow accuses UK of dirty political games over nerve agent

MOSCOW, Russia –  Moscow accused Britain on Thursday, July 5, of playing "dirty political games" after London demanded answers from Russia over the poisoning of a couple with what British police said was the same nerve agent used against a former Russian spy. Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova also said London would ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

UN in security talks with Syria and Russia

BEIRUT -- UN security experts have said they were negotiating with Syrian and Russian authorities for international chemical inspectors to deploy to the site of an alleged toxic gas attack near Damascus, after a reconnaissance mission came under fire. The team from the world’s chemical arms watchdog has not yet….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 19th, 2018

Syria: from chemical attack to retaliatory strikes

LEBANON – The United States, France and Britain launched retaliatory strikes on the Syrian regime a week after an alleged chemical attack on an ex-rebel town, despite warnings from Russia. Here is a recap of a week of high-stakes international drama: 'Toxic gas' On April 7, the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS) and Syria's White ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 14th, 2018

Britain accuses Russia of secretly stockpiling deadly nerve agent used in attack

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said on Sunday that Russia has been stockpiling the deadly nerve agent used to poison a Russian former double agent in England and has been investigating how such weapons can be used in assassinations. Source link link: Britain accuses Russia of secretly stockpiling deadly nerve agent used in attack.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

U.S., France, Germany Join Britain Over Spy Poisoning Row

The spy poisoning row escalated on Thursday as the leaders of France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States issued a joint statement to blame Russia for a chemical attack on a former Russian spy, a charge denied by Moscow. “We, the leaders of France, Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom, abhor […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsMar 18th, 2018

Russia ex-spy poisoning extremely worrying – Chemical weapons watchdog

THE HAGUE, Netherlands – The nerve agent poisoning of Russian former double agent Sergei Skripal in Britain was "extremely worrying", a global chemical weapons watchdog said Tuesday. "The recent report that two people became seriously ill in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland as a result ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 13th, 2018

US warns of unilateral Syria moves if UN fails to act – Al Jazeera

The United States has warned it could take unilateral action if the United Nations fails to respond to a suspected chemical attack on a rebel-held town in Syria that killed more than 80 people, including many children. &'8220;When the United Nations consistently fails in its duty to act collectively, there are times in the life of states that we are compelled to take our own action,&'8221; US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley said on Wednesday. The warning came during an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council called by France and Britain after an early morning attack on Tuesday in Khan Sheikhoun in Idlib province. Britain, France and the US presented a draft resolution demanding a full investigation of the attack, which they blamed on the Syrian government. But talks ended without a vote after Russia, an ally of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, said the text was &'8220;categorically unacceptable&'8221;. Syria has denied the allegations, while Russia had blamed the rebels, saying the deaths occurred when a government shell hit a rebel chemical weapons depot. Haley lashed out at Moscow for failing to rein in Damascus, standing in the council chamber to hold up photographs of victims &'' one showing a young child lying lifeless, a mask covering his face. &'8220;How many more children have to die before Russia cares?&'8221; she asked. &'8220;If Russia has the influence in Syria that it claims to have, we need to see them use it,&'8221; she said. &'8220;We need to see them put an end to these horrific acts.&'8221; The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group said at least 86 people, including 30 children, were killed in the raid on Khan Sheikhoun. Dozens more were left gasping for air, convulsing, and foaming at the mouth, doctors said. If confirmed, it will be be the worst chemical weapons attack in Syria since 2013, when sarin gas was used on a rebel-held area of Damascus. &'8220;If we are not prepared to act, then this council will keep meeting, month after month to express outrage at the continuing use of chemical weapons and it will not end,&'8221; Haley said. &'8220;We will see more conflict in Syria. We will see more pictures that we can never unsee.&'8221; The draft resolution backs a probe by the Organisation of the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and demands that Syria cooperate to provide information on its military operations on the day of the assault. Russia's Deputy Ambassador Vladimir Safronkov told the council the proposed measure was hastily prepared and unnecessary, but voiced support for an investigation. &'8220;The main task now is to have an objective inquiry into what happened,&'8221; he said. Negotiations continued on the proposed resolutions throughout most of Wednesday. Diplomats said it could come up for a vote at the council as early as Thursday. In a press conference at the White House later in the day, US President Donald Trump said the chemical attack had crossed &'8220;many, many lines&'8221; and had abruptly changed his thinking about Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. &'160; Only days earlier multiple members of Trump's administration had said Assad's ouster was no longer a US priority, drawing outrage from Assad critics in the United States and abroad. But Trump said Tuesday's attack &'8220;had a big impact on me &'' big impact&'8221;. &'8220;My attitude towards Syria and Assad has changed very much,&'8221; he said, but refused to telegraph any potential US military retaliation. Since the attack, Trump has been under increasing pressure to explain whether it was egregious enough to force a US response. Robert Ford, former US ambassador to Syria, expressed scepticism that Trump would resort to military action. &'8220;As a presidential candidate he could not have been more clear that he wanted to avoid military involvement in the Syrian civil war,&'8221; he told Al Jazeera. &'8220;For him to order military strikes, even limited military strikes, in response to the chemical attack in Idlib, would be a gigantic change and not one that I'm at all sure that the administration is actually going to do.&'8221; Ford said all fingers point to the Syrian government as the culprit of the attack. &'8220;I find it laughable that governments such as Russia would suggest that rebels have a chemical weapons capacity but they always seem to use it on their own people and never on the Syrian army,&'8221; he added. Idlib hospitals overwhelmed after suspected gas attack Trump's first reaction to the attack was to blame former president Barack Obama's &'8220;weakness&'8221; in earlier years for enabling Assad. Obama had put Assad on notice that using chemical weapons would cross a &'8220;red line&'8221; necessitating a US response, but then failed to follow through, pulling back from planned air strikes on Assad's forces after Congress would not vote to approve them. Trump and other critics have cited that as a key moment the US lost much global credibility. &'8220;I now have responsibility,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;That responsibility could be made a lot easier if it was handled years ago.&'8221; Joshua Landis, director for the Centre of Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, told Al Jazeera that the US would likely warn Moscow if it was to resort to using military might in Syria. &'8220;They have to disambiguate and they have to make sure that they don’t hurt any Russian soldiers,&'8221; he said. &'8220;But there’s a wide palette of things they can do. They can bomb airports and destroy the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 6th, 2017

Russia says deadly Syrian airstrike targeted chemical weapons factory – CNN News

Russia's defense ministry is blaming a Syrian airstrike on a &'8220;terrorist&'8221; ammunition depot for the deaths of dozens of people in what has been described as a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria's Idlib province. At least 70 people, including many children, died Tuesday after suffering symptoms of chemical poisoning, including foaming at the mouth and suffocation. According to a statement posted Wednesday on the Russian ministry's Facebook page, the strike hit &'8220;workshops, which produced chemical warfare munitions&'8221; in the eastern outskirts of the Khan Sheikhoun town. Activists said the Syrian regime dropped a chemical bomb and was responsible for the killings, leading the United Nations to replace a scheduled Security Council session for Wednesday morning with an emergency meeting. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's military denied using chemical weapons and blamed rebels for the carnage. Eyewitnesses said the attack's aftermath was nightmarish and unlike anything that they had previously seen. Feras al-Jundi, a physician who was an early responder in the town of Khan Sheikhoun in Idlib told CNN that, upon entering the hospital where many victims were taken, &'8220;there were many, many atrocious things to see.&'8221; He described seeing whole families who had died, corpses of those who had perished instantly in the attack, and also the dying breaths of those who the medical teams were unable to save. &'8220;I have never in my life seen anything like that,&'8221; he told CNN's Christiane Amanpour. &'8220;The view was heartbreaking. It makes you (cry) blood.&'8221; He added he didn't see anyone who looked like a combatant among the dead. As an EU-UN chaired conference on Syria's future got underway in Brussels, the United States, Great Britain and France circulated a resolution to be presented at an emergency session at the United Nations Security Council condemning a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria. If the resolution goes to a vote, it is likely to face a veto threat from Russia. The move is seen as forcing Moscow to be shamed by supporting the Assad regime even as it's again suspected of a chemical weapons attack. Arriving at the EU-brokered conference in Belgium, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said of the suspected gas attack in Syria that he has &'8220;seen absolutely nothing to lead us to think that it is anything but the regime.&'8221; France's Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development, Jean-Marc Ayrault, will use the Brussels meeting to &'8220;reaffirm that the international community must remain mobilized in the face of the tragic situation in Syria after six years of war,&'8221; according to a statement from his ministry. At the conference, which runs from April 4 &'' 5, he will &'8220;underscore the urgent need to implement a political transition in Syria,&'8221; the statement says. But Feras, the doctor who witnessed the aftermath of the attack, says the mood on the ground in some parts of Syria is frustration that the international community is not holding the Syrian regime to account for its atrocities. &'8220;I feel frustrated, because of the international community and the UN that have not forced the regime to abide by the Security Council resolution but&' has been watching and doing nothing, which has allowed the regime to keep bombing the people with cluster bombs, scud missiles and now gas.&'8221; US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley condemned the attack but previously had said that Assad's ouster was not a priority for the Trump administration. &'8220;Do we think he's a hindrance? Yes. Are we going to sit there and focus on getting him out? No,&'8221; she said last week. The Syrian Coalition, an umbrella opposition group, referred to the suspected chemical attack as a &'8220;crime similar to that in Eastern Ghouta in 2013 that the international community allowed to pass without accountability or punishment.&'8221; That attack tested the resolve of then-President Barack Obama in the face of atrocities committed by the Assad regime. Referring to the 2013 attack, McCain told CNN: &'8220;We've seen this movie before, it was when Barack Obama said they would have a red line, they crossed it and he did nothing. Bashar Assad and his friends, the Russians, take note of what Americans say.&'8221; The Ghouta attack prompted Obama to ask Congress to authorize military action against Syria in 2013. Shortly after, Syria agreed to a Russian proposal to give up control of its chemical weapons, leading Obama to retreat from threats of military action. White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters Tuesday that the attack is a &'8220;consequence of the past administration's weakness and irresolution.&'8221; Khaula Sawah, board member and former CEO of the Union of Medical Care and Relief Organizations (OUSSM), another umbrella organization, said that her field team in Idlib had received reports of whole families discovered dead, and were expecting the body count to rise. She said that her field team had reported that, while nerve gas cannot be confirmed at this time, based on the symptoms of the patients, doctors believe that this is some form of organophosphate nerve agent. &'8220;The symptoms rapidly developed within minutes, including redness of eyes, foaming at the mouth, contracted pupils, severe dyspnoea (labored breathing) or shortness of breath and suffocation,&'8221; she told CNN. &'8220;The symptoms progressed so rapid that fatality occurred within 10 minutes. If there were no supportive care or ICU, people were dying.&'8221; She said that a decontamination point had been set up for victims before taking them to Turkey to receive [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 5th, 2017

Russia accuses Syria rebels of using chemical weapons in Aleppo

Russia accuses Syria rebels of using chemical weapons in Aleppo.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 11th, 2016

World powers clash over chemical arms watchdogs new role | News

World powers clash over chemical arms watchdogs new role | News.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

Big powers set to clash at chemical weapons watchdog

THE HAGUE: Major powers are set to clash Monday at the global toxic arms watchdog over a Russian spy scandal and a new ability to attribute blame. The meeting of…READ The post Big powers set to clash at chemical weapons watchdog appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

Big powers set to clash at chemical weapons watchdog

THE HAGUE, Netherlands – Major powers are set to clash on Monday, November 19, at the global toxic arms watchdog over a Russian spy scandal and a new ability to attribute blame. The meeting of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons in The Hague is the first since member ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

Chemical arms meet sees clash of major powers

Chemical arms meet sees clash of major powers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 17th, 2018

World War I timeline: From first shot to silence of peace

PARIS --- Unleashed by an archduke's assassination, World War I gradually entangled more and more countries, killing millions of soldiers and civilians and touching several continents. As the world marks 100 years since the fighting stopped, here is a look at some key moments in WWI: 1914 June 28: Serb teenager Gavrilo Princip kills Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand July 28: Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia Aug. 1: Germany declares war on Russia Aug. 3: Germany declares war on France Aug. 4: Germany invades Belgium; Britain declares war on Germany Aug. 23: Japan declares war on Germany September: Battle of the Marne stops the German advance in France Oct. 29: Ottoma...Keep on reading: World War I timeline: From first shot to silence of peace.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 11th, 2018

U.S. prepares more Russia sanctions over Britain nerve gas attack

WASHINGTON, DC, USA – The United States said on Tuesday, November 6,  it was preparing fresh sanctions against Moscow over the attempted assassination in Britain of a former spy, after a previous round sowed chaos on Russian markets. Three months after the United States declared that Russia violated a US law ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 7th, 2018

Russian State Arms Exporter s Order Book Tops $50 bln

TEHRAN (Tasnim) - The order book of Russia's state arms seller Rosoboronexport (part of the state hi-tech corporation Rostec) has exceeded $50 billion, Rostec CEO Sergei Chemezov said on Thursday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018