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Ayala Land advances ‘walkability’ and pedestrian connectivity

Ayala Land advances ‘walkability’ and pedestrian connectivity.....»»

Category: financeSource: thestandard thestandardSep 13th, 2017

Ayala Land advances ‘walkability’ and pedestrian connectivity

Ayala Land advances ‘walkability’ and pedestrian connectivity.....»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 13th, 2017

Lola turns 100

Hilda Land Elzingre (seated right) celebrates her 100th birthday on Jan. 17, the same year of Muntinlupa City’s 100th Founding Anniversary, as Mayor Jaime Fresnedi (fourth from left) gives ‘Lola Lila’ a P100,000 cash incentive. A resident of Ayala Alabang, Elzingre lives with her family and helper Joy Galicha, who hugs her. Joining Fresnedi are (from left) Councilor Ivee Tadefa, City Administrator Allan Cachuela, and Rep. Ruffy Biazon......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 18th, 2017

Warriors keep evolving in rivalry with Cavs

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CLEVELAND -- You might expect, given the familiarity from what’s gone on for four years now, that the Golden State Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers have worked up some serious mutual contempt. They both covet what the other wants -- in fact, the Warriors or the Cavs could make a persuasive case that, if not for the other guys, one already would have notched a three-peat and be chasing Bill Russell’s Celtics in pursuit of a fourth consecutive championship. They both have poured buckets of blood, sweat, tears, money, Gatorade and offseason counter moves into their nouveau NBA rivalry. And they both, well, as Golden State coach Steve Kerr phrased it to the San Jose Mercury News Sunday (Monday, PHL time), “We just want to kick each other’s ass.” And yet the Warriors and the Cavaliers -- who play again Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) at Quicken Loans Arena in the NBA’s prime-time MLK showdown -- have more in common with each other than they do with any of the league’s other 28 teams. Playing 100 games or so every year. Locking in mentally and surviving physically longer than anyone else. Showing up each night targeted as a measuring stick, even a season maker, by the opponents. While trying like heck to keep things fresh. Renew. Find and tap into a new source of energy, because old ones wane over time. “It’s the biggest challenge of this whole season,” Kerr told NBA.com late last week, with the Warriors starting a back-to-back in Milwaukee and Toronto on their way back to The Land. Even if it were possible -- and it realistically is not, given free agency, injuries, trades, the salary cap, luxury taxes, hirings and firings each NBA offseason -- playing a pat hand from one championship-level season to the next isn’t desirable. Voices, locker rooms, relationships get stale. Rivals adjust and escalate in the arms race. Some players ebb in the pecking order, others flow. It’s important to inject new faces, add skills and even find fresh themes to fend off monotony, even boredom, through the 82-game slogs. The Warriors, in winning 20 of 23 games over the past seven weeks, largely have managed to do that. The Cavaliers, at 26-15 after 2-7 stretch that started at Golden State on Christmas (Dec. 26, PHL time)? Not so much. Golden State shifts gears after each season It’s easy to think of Golden State’s success since Kerr’s hiring before the 2014-15 season as one uninterrupted run of excellence. Three-pointers, “death lineups,” and the rest. But the differences from one year to the next have been fairly pronounced. “In Year 1, we were trying to prove ourselves to the world,” Kerr said. “Then we win the championship -- it was all so fresh. There were no letdowns at all that year. It was the most exciting, it was the most energized, it was the most refreshing. It was brand new to all of us. It felt like we were riding this wave all year -- we were all giddy, like, ‘Oh my God, we’re really good!’ We didn’t know we could be like that. And for me, it was my first year coaching.” Steph Curry won his first MVP award. He and Klay Thompson generated considerable conversation about the best shooting backcourts in league history. Draymond Green forever changed the old NBA notion of “’tweeners.” The Warriors finished 67-15, ranked second in the league in offense (111.6) and first in defense (101.4) and beat Cleveland in the Finals in six games. “It was maybe like the first stages when you fall in love,” Kerr said. “You’re just on Cloud 9 and she can’t do anything wrong. There’s infatuation and then you truly fall in love, and it’s amazing. “The second year, we sort of rode that wave of euphoria of being the best team in the league and having won the title. The next thing you know, we’re 24-0 and we’ve got a chance to set an all-time record. That 73-win mark carried us all year. We were going to prove that, not only were we the champs but we were one of the best teams ever.” The Warriors were -- by regular season standards. Curry won his second MVP award. Kerr missed the first 43 games due to health issues but assistant coach Luke Walton steered them to a 39-4 mark. They bought into the chase for 73 victories fairly late, but instead of a 16-5 playoff run like the previous spring’s, the Warriors went 15-9 -- coming up one victory short when the Cavaliers became the first team to claw back from a 3-1 deficit. That led directly to Golden State’s next new wrinkle, a reconfiguration that came close to buckling the league’s knees. “We got KD,” Kerr said. “Now we’re changing our team, right? Last year was about incorporating KD, welcoming this incredible player into our organization and our roster. Figuring how to do it, how we were going to adjust. I felt like there were times last year that were tiring, where our guys were done a little bit. But it was ‘new’ again.” Even the challenges were fresh, like counting Curry’s or Klay Thompson’s touches relative to Durant’s or closing ranks around Golden State’s thin man as his reputation took blows for the first time in his NBA career. Not interested in shooting for 74 victories, the Warriors simply took care of business and stayed coiled for the postseason. Then it was a 16-1 dash to title No. 2, Durant snagging the Finals MVP trophy after the five-game dispatching of the Cavs. All of which just set the Warriors’ bar higher, requiring them to search for something new, somebody borrowed, presumably nothing blue. “This year it’s just survive and advance,” Kerr said. “It’s ‘let’s get to April, May, June in one piece.’ There’s a reason we’ve lost six home games already. We don’t have the driving force that we had the last few years. We’re dealing with what any team in NBA history that’s tried to do this has dealt with. The Lakers (1982-85), the Celtics (1984-87, 1957-66)... It’s just really hard and you need that driving force.” Said Warriors vet Andre Iguodala: “Your body is mindful of it, because it hurts.” A couple of young guys -- Patrick McCaw, Kevon Looney -- have taken on bigger roles. Nick Young brings some sort of buzz into any locker room that will have him. Still, as veteran guard Shaun Livingston said: “We’re not chasing any records. We’re not adding another All Star. We’re just trying to make it through the marathon.” Cavs' challenges mount during 2017-18 The Cavaliers are just trying to make it through the marathon, too. But if they could, they might do it like Rosie Ruiz, the 1980 women’s “winner” of the Boston Marathon who perpetrated a hoax by hopping the subway and running only the final mile of Beantown’s famous race. The 2017-18 has been anything but fun for Cleveland so far. It began with the departure of All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving, a not-so-funhouse mirror image of Durant’s arrival a year earlier in the Bay Area. Irving, for reasons still not quite explained, made it known in the offseason that he wanted out. He wanted to be the man on his own team. Or he didn’t want to be left in the lurch if (when?) LeBron James took his talents elsewhere again. Or both. Or neither. Regardless, once the Cavaliers made his request come true by dealing him to Boston for All-Star point guard Isaiah Thomas and Brooklyn’s coveted first-round pick this June, their task got tougher and their season longer. Losing one of the league’s best ball handlers and shot makers doesn’t qualify as “renewal” any more than what went on in Oklahoma City when Durant packed up. There’s been more. Shooting guard J.R. Smith seemingly got old overnight. Jae Crowder, who came from the Celtics in the Irving deal, hasn’t meshed with the Cavs’ style. Kevin Love has been moved to center but hasn’t done anything to satisfy the Cavs’ need for rim protection. Thomas only returned to action from a hip injury as the calendar turned to 2018 and has played only four games in these two weeks. Even with so many new faces -- seven of the top 12 in coach Tyronn Lue’s rotation weren’t here 12 months ago -- it’s a group heavy on veterans, players a little too established or mature to naturally instill raw energy. James said recently that none of this is new, it’s another case of the Cavs biding their time for the “second” season that means everything. But Lue also introduced the topic of “agendas,” suggesting that some of his guys were looking out for their own responsibilities and performances -- particularly on defense -- rather than the group’s. At best, this is another dose of the midseason blahs, the Cavs in their doldrums in need of an All-Star break. At worst, though, they might be honing some bad habits that won’t be so easy to break in May or June. Especially if East rivals such as Toronto, Boston or Washington are emboldened after witnessing or administering some of the Cavs’ more embarrassing beat downs this season. Will any of this matter come spring? It will if the switch each team is minding stubbornly decides not to flip. “That’s the key. You’ve got to find that balance,” Kerr said. “Are you flipping the switch or are you navigating? The idea is, don’t let bad habits slip in. Right now, this moment, we’re into some bad habits. Our defensive efforts  the last five, six games [before the weekend] were awful. We got away with it because Steph was going nuts.” The Cavaliers repeatedly have not gotten away with bad defensive habits, even on nights when James has been dominant. “It’s tough,” Livingston said. “They’re a team that’s built for the playoffs. But our core guys still are in there prime. Their core guys are still good. But we’re talking about ‘prime.’” Most still would pick both Golden State and Cleveland to advance all the way to a “Finals Four” (after last year’s “Rubber Match” series). But one of these years, most will be wrong -- about one or both. That alone might be motivation enough. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 15th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Petron survives scare, advances to semis

Petron survived a scare put up by an upset-conscious Generika-Ayala side, coming back from a set down to eke out a 19-25, 25-22, 22-25, 25-17, 15-11, win Tuesday in the knockout quarterfinals of the 2017 Philippine Superliga Grand Prix at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan.    The Blazer Spikers needed a huge explosion from American import Lindsay Stalzer in the closing stretch of the fifth frame including the last two points of the match to clinch a semifinals spot against the winner between back-to-back defending champion Foton and Sta. Lucia Realty. Stalzer broke a 9-9 deadlock with consecutive hits followed by a huge block by Mika Reyes on Lifesaver’s Ukrainian import Katarina Pilepic for a 12-9 lead. Generika-Ayala made a final push as Pilepic scored on block against Stalzer following a net touch violation by Petron to close the gap, 12-11. But Blaze Spikers American reinforcement Hillary Hurley doused cold water on the Lifesavers fightback with an attack from the backrow that went off the hands of Angelica Legacion. Stalzer took matters on her own hands, scoring a monster block kill on Pilepic before sealing the victory with an off the block hit.         “Para kaming dumaan sa butas ng karayom. Sobra,” said Petron coach Shaq delos Santos as he breathed a sigh of relief after dodging an upset in game where his wards gave away 31 points off errors. “Honestly speaking hindi talaga yun ang laro namin.”  Stalzer pounded 24 kills and had three kill blocks for 27 points while Hurley had 18 attacks in her 21-point output for the Blaze Spikers. Mika Reyes had 13 markers while Ces Molina and Ria Meneses combined for 17 points for Petron in the two-hour, 42-minute encounter.   Generika-Ayala erased a 2-5 deficit in the fifth set with five straight points to take a 7-5 lead. Petron answered with a run of their own to take the helm, 9-8, only to see Pilepic knot the frame at 9. Darlene Ramdin of Trinidad and Tobago hammered 33 attacks with a couple of blocks for game-high 33 points in a lost cause for Generika-Ayala. Pilepic scored 22 while Acy Masangkay and Gen Casugod combined for eight for the Lifesavers, who closed the preliminary round with a 3-5 card.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 5th, 2017

Magsayo makes weight, ready for title defense

TAGBILARAN CITY --- Hometown hero Mark ‘Magnifico’ Magsayo easily made the weight in the weigh-ins a day before his WBO International Featherweight title defense against Japanese challenger Shota Hayashi on Saturday in “Pinoy Pride 43: Battle in Bohol”. Magsayo tipped the scale at exactly 126 lbs. and promised to put on a good show in front of his fellow Boholanos at the Bohol Wisdom Gymnasium here against the former Japanese champion looking to silence the home crowd. The proud son of Bohol puts his pristine 17-0 win-loss record, with an impressive 13 knockouts, on the line in the 12-round main match of this exciting 9-card boxing fest, set to start at 6:00 p.m. and will air live via SKY Sports pay-per-view. Magsayo, ranked world no. 2 in the division, is looking forward to big a win that will serve as a ticket to achieve his dream to land a world title fight against WBO Featherweight champ Oscar Valdez of Mexico. But Hayashi wants to write a different script. The Japanese veteran, who holds a 30-win, 6-loss and 1-draw record with 18 victories coming off KOs, came in at 125 lbs. Meanwhile, Pinoy bet Albert Pagara, who parades 28 wins (18 KOs) and a loss, tipped in at 124 lbs., a pound lighter than Tanzanian opponent Mohammed Kambuluta (17-3, 6KOs) in their non-title superbantamweight fight. Jeo 'Santino' Santisima weighed exactly 123 lbs. three pounds heavier than Indonesian opponent Ki Chang Kim.    The fight will be telecast on ABS-CBN at 3:30 p.m. with a primetime airing on S+A and S+A HD at 6:30 p.m.         Full weigh-in results:   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 24th, 2017

Pilepic powers Lifesavers past hapless Tigresses

Generika-Ayala returned in the win column after taking down listless Victoria Sports-University of Sto. Tomas in straight sets, 25-16, 25-19, 25-23, Tuesday in the 2017 Chooks to Go-Philippine Superliga Grand Prix at FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Looking to build momentum heading into the knockout quarterfinals, the Lifesavers banked on Croatian import Katarina Pilepic’s explosive game to improve to 3-4 win-loss record and bounce back from a previous setback at the hands of F2 Logistics. Pilepic had an all–around offensive outing as she hammered 18 attacks with a two kill blocks and a pair of aces for a 22-point production for Generika-Ayala. Facing a squad composed of collegiate players and still looking for the elusive win, Lifesavers coach Francis Vicente had the liberty to tweak his rotation and giving more playing time to his locals. Import Darlene Ramdin came off the bench in all of the sets scoring six points. “Kailangan ding gamitin mo ang ibang mga players mo at huwag tayong mag-rely masyado sa import,” said Vicente. Chloe Cortez finished with nine points while Angeli Araneta and Mikaela Lopez combined for eight markers. Despite a quick 51-minute workout, Vicente stressed that his squad needed more improvement especially heading into the playoffs. “Kailangan pa naming mag-step up. Although maganda and nilaro nila nakita ko lang na ‘yun na naman tayo, tending to relax at the end of the sets,” he pointed out. “Kailangan lang nilang pag-kill talaga kill, huwag ng mag-relax para dominant na sa lahat ng points na ginagawa nila. May error pa rin eh. Kailangan bawasan.” Generika-Ayala will close the elims against Sta. Lucia Realty on Nov. 30. The Tigresses took an 18-16 lead in the third frame before the Lifesavers rallied to take a 21-19 advantage. UST opposite hitter Dimdim Pacres tied the set at 23 before Pilepic gave the lead back to Generika-Ayala with a kill.   Pacres surrendered the match after sending her attack straight to the net. The fourth year spiker Pacres scored 10 points while Tin Francisco had eight markers in a lost cause for UST, which dropped to 0-5.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017

Proud ako na girlfriend ako ni Bolick -- Aby Marano

Proud ako na girlfriend niya. A simple statement that sums up all the feelings of Aby Marano on bae Robert Bolick after he led the San Beda Red Lions to their second straight title, Thursday night in the 93rd NCAA seniors basketball competition. The former De La Salle University women’s volleyball standout wasn’t at the Big Dome when Bolick unleashed his ‘beast mode’ performance in the final minutes of Game 2 of the best-of-three championship series against Lyceum of the Philippines University. Marano had a game with F2 Logistics in the 2017 Philippine Superliga Grand Prix when the Red Lions captured their 21st title overall with a 92-82 win to finish off the Pirates. “Kinakabahan nga ako kanina kasi gusto ko talaga panoorin,” she said. “Nagtatanong-tanong ako kanina tapos may random guy na lumipat sa akin tas binalita na champion na nga daw.” “Parang nawala 'yung kaba ko, naging mas light 'yung feeling ko noong game,” added Marano, who herself had a great game against Generika-Ayala. Inspired by Bolick’s heroics, Tyang Aby finished with six markers to help the unbeaten Cargo Movers sweep the Lifesavers, 25-21, 25-17, 25-17.  Though she was not there to cheer for Bolick, Marano, who was able to watch the series opener last Friday, never doubted her long-time boyfriend’s capabilities and knew that he’ll be able to deliver for the SBC. “Last year, ganoon din 'yung nangyari sa amin - may game din ako tapos di ko napanood 'yung Finals niya,” she said. “Naging positive lang kami. Whether I'm there or not, tiwala na lang na maglalaro siya nang mabuti.” After the game, Bolick thanked Marano for pushing and inspiring him to achieve his goal of giving the Red Lions another crown.   Marano was just proud to see Bolick, who transferred from De La Salle University to SBC three years ago, reap the rewards of his hard work. “Ang sarap-sarap sa pakiramdam kasi nga nasubaybayan ko 'yung struggles niya dati,” said Marano. “Every day na magkasama kami, kita mong nandoon 'yung depression. “ “Ngayon, makikita mo na bumalik talaga lahat ng confidence niya and kung sino talaga siya as a basketball player,” added Marano. “Napakasarap sa feeling.” And how would she describe her feeling as a girlfriend of an NCAA champion?  Marano had a straightforward answer. “Masasabi ko lang na sobrang proud ako na girlfriend ako ni Bolick kasi nakikita ko talaga 'yung sarili ko sa kanya,” she said. BMDC (beast mode don’t care) naman din talaga siya magalaro.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 17th, 2017

Cargo Movers remain unscathed, sweep Lifesavers

Games Saturday: (De La Salle Lipa Sentrum) 4:00 p.m. -- Foton vs Sta. Lucia 6:00 p.m. -- Victoria Sports-UST vs F2 Logistics   F2 Logistics kept its unbeaten record intact with a straight sets demolition of Generika-Ayala, 25-21, 25-17, 25-17, Thursday in the 2017 Chooks to Go-Philippine Superliga Grand Prix at the Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan. The Cargo Movers captured their fourth win in as many outings to tighten its grip of the top spot despite a sluggish start.   “Sabi ko lang naman tiyagain lang at dumepensa kasi naglalakas ng serve ‘yung Generika-Ayala and at the same time medyo magulo nu’ng una ‘yung set ni (Kim) Fajardo,” said F2 Logistics coach Ramil de Jesus. “Hindi sila magkaintindihan nu’ng import, ‘di ko alam kung kulang sa communication pero minsan inaamin naman ng import na mali niya.” Venezuelan import Maria Jose Perez and American reinforcement Kennedy Bryan poured 14 points each and combined for 24 of the Cargo Movers’ 38 attack points. Aby Marano and Kim Kianna Dy scored six markers each while Fajardo tallied 20 excellent sets. The Lifesavers dropped to 2-4 slate. Croatian import Katarina Pilepic was the only Generika-Ayala player in double figures with 11 points while Darlene Ramdin of Trinidad and Tobago was limited to only five points.   ---   Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 16th, 2017

Lady Realtors end slump, whip Tigresses in three sets

Games Thursday: (Filoil Flying V Centre) 4:15 p.m. – Cocolife vs Iriga City 7:00 p.m. – Generika-Ayala vs F2 Logistics   Sta. Lucia Realty finally long drought as the Lady Realtors schooled Victoria Sports-University of Santo Tomas, 25-19, 25-21, 25-19, Tuesday in the 2017 Chooks to-Go-Philippine Superliga (PSL) Grand Prix at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. The Lady Realtors gifted head coach Jerry Yee his first win in the league after dropping their first three games. Ukranian reinforcement Dana Anisova led SLR’s assault with 13 points anchored on 11 attacks while Canadian Marisa Field and local star Pam Lastimosa chipped in 11 markers apiece for the Lady Realtors. Rialen Sante added nine points while Rebecca Rivera tallied 20 excellent sets for SLR.     Still, Yee was from satisfied with their win against the collegiate squad.  “Madami pa rin kaming errors and lapses then, hindi pa rin nagko-connect ang setter at middle hitters natin,” he said pointing at their 23 errors. “Buti nalang nandiyan ‘yung ibang imports natin na kayang-kaya ‘yung outside hits.” “Ang hirap noon kapag natalo pa kami. So, kahit papaano may konting pressure doon. We needed a win so we got a win,” he added. “Ito ang mga baby steps namin so we’ll take it.” Dimdim Pacres scored nine points while Carla Sandoval and Caitlyn Viray tallied eight markers each for the Golden Tigresses, who remained listless in three outings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 14th, 2017

Cargo Movers add more woes to reeling Lady Realtors

Games Thursday: (FilOil Flying V Centre) 4:15 p.m. –- Iriga City vs. Generika-Ayala 7:00 p.m. –- UST vs. Petron   F2 Logistics recovered from a four-point deficit late in the third set to complete a 25-16, 25-23, 25-23 sweep of listless Sta. Lucia Tuesday for the Cargo Movers’ second straight win in the 2017 Philippine Superliga Grand Prix at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. American import Kennedy Bryan posted 13 points, all from attacks, while Venezuelan reinforcement unleashed 12 markers anchored on 10 attacks as F2 Logistics scored back-to-back victories after a four-set romp of erstwhile unbeaten Petron Saturday in Bacolod City. “Itong Sta. Lucia hindi madaling kalaban. Siguro naunahan lang namin or matter of breaks lang siguro,” said F2 Logistics coach Ramil De Jesus. “Hindi biro ‘pag nasa harap mo na ‘yung mga imports then three imports sila actually four pa nga andyan pa ‘yung (Mar-Jana) Phillips. So hindi madaling kalaban, hindi mo pwedeng biru biruin so talagang disiplina dapat pagdating sa loob ng court.” The Cargo Movers controlled the opening set but needed to mount a rally from 20-22 down in the closing stretch of the second frame. F2 Logistics again fell behind 18-22 in the third set before sparking a closing 7-1 rally. Perez tied the frame at 22 after a kill block on Rialen Sante followed by an attack error by Lady Realtors’ Ukranian import Bohdana Anisova that gave the Cargo Movers a one-point lead. Desiree Cheng sent his service short in the next play but Canadian Marisa Field smashed his serve straight to the net as F2 Logistics took match point, 24-23. Kim Dy blocked Anisova to seal the win in the 88-minute duel.  Anisova scored 14 points while Pam Lastimosa and Field combined for 15 markers for the Lady Realtors.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

Alam ko rin na hindi pa ako healthy -- Galang on skipping F2 Logistics campaign

Games on Saturday: (University of St. La Salle, Bacolod) 2:00 p.m. –- Generika-Ayala vs Foton 4:00 p.m. –- Cocolife vs Cignal 6:00 p.m. –- F2 Logistics vs Petron   BACOLOD CITY -- Ara Galang will sit out F2 Logistics’ campaign in the 2017 Philippine Superliga Grand Prix. Talking to fans who flocked the PSL’s meet-and-greet event at SM Bacolod here Friday, the former De La Salle University standout revealed that she will need some time to rest and recover from a maintenance procedure done on her previously injured knee.          “Personally, siyempre medyo sad ako pero OK lang din naman sa akin kasi alam ko naman ‘yung kondisyon ko,” said Galang, who helped the Cargo Movers capture the 2016 PSL All-Filipino Conference crown and to a runner-up in the same tournament this season.    Galang is not in the official lineup of F2 Logistics but still joined teammates Aby Marano, Dawn Macandili, Cha Cruz and Kim Kianna Dy to promote the league’s triple-bill playdate set on Saturday at University of St. La Salle-Bacolod. Representatives of eight teams not including guest team University of Sto. Tomas attended the event and were welcomed by Bacolod City congressman Greg Gasataya.  The UAAP Season 75 Most Valuable Player sustained an ACL, MCL tear and big bone bruise on her left knee during the 77th UAAP semifinals match against National University back in 2015. She came back the following year to lead DLSU in snapping archrival Ateneo de Manila University’s back-to-back reign.       “Alam ko rin na hindi pa ako healthy,” who needed to undergo a procedure to drain fluid on her knee. “Pero alam ko na nandiyan naman ang mga teammates ko, kaya naman nila maglaro.” Despite being on the sideline for this tournament, Galang said that she’s just happy to help the team on some other way. “Happy pa rin naman ako na part pa rin ako ng team at PSL,” said Galang. The Cargo Movers will make their debut against unbeaten Petron at 6:00 p.m. Cocolife and Cignal HD will meet at 4:00 p.m. after the curtain-raiser between two-time champion Foton and Generika-Ayala in the curtain-raiser at 2:00 p.m.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2017

Wrestling legend ‘Superfly’s’ granddaughter making Snuka name proud in vball

It’s just Penina Snuka’s first time in the Philippines, but she has been treated like she has been here for long. “Everyone has been so nice and accommodating, but it’s funny because everybody thinks I’m Filipino,” she told reporters. “I’ve had a lot of people just come up to me and just start speaking in your language. It’s such a beautiful language, but I’m looking at them with wide eyes and say, ‘I’m not from here.’” Of course, the Generika-Ayala reinforcement is not a Filipina. She is an American of Samoan descent who played setter for the University of Arizona. While she may not be a Filipina, Snuka still stands out – if you are familiar with her storied surname. “My last name is Snuka and I come from a big wrestling family starting with my grandfather and then my father,” she shared. “I have an auntie and an uncle who are wrestling right now. And of course, also, my uncle is ‘The Rock.’” Penina’s grandfather is the late Jimmy “Superfly” Snuka who was a wrestling star in the ‘80s and ‘90s before being inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame. Her father is Sim Snuka who was a former WWE Tag Team Champion. Current WWE superstars Roman Reigns and Tamina are her uncle and aunt, respectively. And then, there’s Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson who is also her uncle. Indeed, the now 22-year-old comes from a big wrestling family. For her, however, wrestling was never an option. “(Me and my brothers and sisters), as kids, we weren’t really into wrestling. We did a lot of sports – we did basketball, my brothers did (American) football, and I just kind of got into volleyball,” she said. She then continued, “Ever since I got into volleyball in sixth grade, I always loved it. I never wanted to do anything else but volleyball. Volleyball is my whole life.” And so, after a stellar career as in the University of Arizona where she was hailed as Pac-12 Setter of the Year in 2016, Snuka took the opportunity to showcase her skills in a country that is only falling more and more in love with the sport. “(Ayala-Generika) was the first to offer me. I talked to my parents about it and I did a little research, I really got to know them and the Philippines,” she said. She then continued, “I really felt this was a good place. I really felt blessed to be here.” Don’t make the mistake of thinking, however, that she has forgotten that she’s a Snuka – granddaughter and niece to wrestling legends. “I feel really honored that I come from this family. I’m someone who’s very close to my family so leaving them was kinda hard, but knowing that I’m taking that name with me out here, hopefully, I can make a good name for them,” she expressed. In that case, we all better get ready for another Snuka to make a “Superfly Splash.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2017

Ayala Land’s income jumped 18% to P11.5b in first half

Ayala Land’s income jumped 18% to P11.5b in first half.....»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 7th, 2017

REP and Ayala Land stage free show for Makati’s barangays

REP and Ayala Land stage free show for Makati’s barangays.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 21st, 2017

Ayala Land’s Q1 income increased 18% to P5.6b

Ayala Land’s Q1 income increased 18% to P5.6b.....»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 8th, 2017

Golden Globe winner ‘La La Land’ in cinemas now

Golden Globe winner ‘La La Land’ in cinemas now.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 12th, 2017

Storm warning up as ‘Auring’ hits land

Storm warning up as ‘Auring’ hits land.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 8th, 2017

‘More land needed for dramatic growth’

‘More land needed for dramatic growth’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 5th, 2017

Corporate News: Ayala Land eyes P5-B issuance

AYALA LAND, Inc. is looking to issue commercial papers worth at least P5 billion next year, as it advances leasing projects expected to deliver more cash flow and subsequently slash the need for external funding beyond 2020......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsOct 17th, 2016