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Aussie gets life in shocking child sex abuse case

AN Australian man has been sentenced to life in a Philippine prison as part of a notorious child sexual abuse case in which prosecutors say he chained the victims like dogs. Peter Scully still faces another trial and dozens more charges, including allegations he made child pornography and murdered a….....»»

Category: newsSource: journal journalJun 14th, 2018

Aussie sentenced to life term for online child porn

  CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY --- An Australian who ran an international cyberpornography trade was sentenced by a local court to life imprisonment for forcing children to perform sexual acts and for torturing them while filming their ordeal.   Judge Jose Escobido of the Regional Trial Court Branch 37 here found Peter Gerard Scully, 55, guilty for qualified trafficking. He was also given an additional six years to nine years and 11 months in jail for five counts of rape by sexual abuse.   Testimonies   Scully's former live-in partner, Filpino Carme Ann Alvarez, who allegedly lured female street children and young scavengers, was also meted the same...Keep on reading: Aussie sentenced to life term for online child porn.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 15th, 2018

Australian gets life in Philippine child sex abuse case

An Australian man has been sentenced to life in a Philippine prison as part of a notorious child sexual abuse case in which prosecutors say he chained the victims like dogs.Peter Scully still faces.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Russia talks LGBT tolerance for WCup but locals have doubts

By James Ellingworth and Iuliia Subbotovska, Associated Press MOSCOW (AP) — Tolerated during the World Cup, Russia's LGBT communities face a return to widespread discrimination when the FIFA circus packs up and leaves the country in mid-July. As head of Russia's LGBT Sports Federation, Alexander Agapov says he can't advertise sports events without hiring security and he's been attacked on public transport. Still, he predicts foreigners arriving for the World Cup won't notice a thing. "In the stadium and around it will be quite safe, I believe," to display symbols of gay activism like the rainbow flag, he told The Associated Press. That echoes the tolerant line from Russia's government-run World Cup organizing committee. "All visitors to Russia in 2018 - regardless of race, gender, religion, ability or sexual orientation - can expect a warm welcome," it said in a statement. "Persons will not be fined for expressing their feelings. The display of rainbow flags in the stands or at public celebrations will be allowed." Rainbow flags are generally seen by Russian authorities as banned "gay propaganda". Under Russian law, anyone who displays a rainbow flag in a public setting where children are present — such as a stadium — could be fined. Jonny Dzhibladze of the "Coming Out" organization in St. Petersburg suggested foreign LGBT fans will be treated better than locals. During the tournament, "if there's some kind of attack or abuse, then maybe the authorities will even start to investigate it or publicly condemn it as a demonstration case," he said. "But, knowing Russian media and the homophobic rhetoric that they use, it will probably be framed as: 'These crazy rainbow people have come from Europe. Let's forgive them and put up with them while they're here. They're guests. But as soon as they leave, we return to our Russian traditional values.'" A 2013 law bans so-called "propaganda" of homosexuality to under-18s. In practice, it's been used to stifle debate in any public context or to prevent protests in any public context where a child could conceivably see or hear. Russian anti-gay rights groups have used social media to out LGBT teachers and have them fired. Some criminals, Dzhibladze says, use gay dating apps to find targets to rob, assuming their victims won't trust the police. The law puts a financial burden on Agapov's sports federation. A football competition might only require two fields in a sports complex, he says, but the organization has to hire a third nearby, just to block it from being rented for a children's event. If that happened and children could see the LGBT competition, it could be breaking the law. Vitaly Milonov, a lawmaker who played a key role in passing the "gay propaganda" law, has called for a harder line on World Cup fans. Comparing gay people to chimpanzees, he said "sodomites" flying the rainbow flag had no place at the tournament. "I want to remind them that, no matter how much they try lobbying, their hideous way of life is condemned all over the world," he told the AP. "They do not have the right to propagandize their hideousness." Last year, reports emerged from the predominantly Muslim region of Chechnya in southern Russia that men were tortured and killed on suspicion of being gay. Chechnya will be home to the Egyptian team during the World Cup. Dozens spoke about torture at secret prison facilities overseen by allies of Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, who has claimed there are no gays in Chechnya. A Russian government investigation said there was no proof. Russia's World Cup is also a test for FIFA's image ahead of the 2022 tournament in Qatar and a possible 2026 World Cup in Morocco, both countries where gay sex is illegal. FIFA says it has a "zero-tolerance approach to discrimination" and has discussed gay rights issues with Russia. "We are absolutely aware of discriminatory concerns and have always addressed them in close collaboration with the (local organizing committee), the Russian Football Union and the Russian authorities," FIFA's head of sustainability and diversity, Federico Addiechi, told the AP by e-mail. Russia has no openly gay professional athletes. However, Agapov says he's had messages of support from closeted athletes and knows of one well-known male footballer who dates men. "We will be happy if one day a gay footballer will come out in Russian football because we know that there are gay footballers," he said, recounting how he found the player using a gay dating app in a World Cup host city. "It works in Russian football like 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'. He's open to date with guys, but he's not open to speak about his sexuality in public." The World Cup is unlikely to change much, Agapov predicts. "The World Cup is over, we are still here, and the persecution of LGBT people in Chechnya and other regions is still going on." ___ Subbotovska reported from St. Petersburg, Russia......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 2nd, 2018

$500M settlement in Nassar case won t be shared equally

By Ed White and David Eggert, Associated Press DETROIT (AP) — The $500 million settlement between Michigan State University and hundreds of Larry Nassar's victims will be divided up after weighing many factors, including the date and victim's age when the sexual assaults occurred and the impact it had on their lives, lawyers say. The school, where the sports doctor worked for nearly 20 years, announced Wednesday that it would set aside $425 million for 332 women and girls who say Nassar abused them and another $75 million to cover future claims. But it won't have a role in determining how much each victim will receive. That will likely fall to one or two former judges or experienced mediators who will be selected by lawyers to oversee the process, said John Manly, who represents roughly 200 victims in the worst sexual abuse case in sports history. "This can be wrapped up in four or five months," he predicted. Simple math says $425 million divided by 332 people would be $1.28 million each. But it's not "share and share alike," said attorney David Mittleman, whose Lansing-area firm represents 111 victims. Indeed, claims must be evaluated in many ways. Manly said some people could receive "substantially" more than $1.28 million while others get much less. Attorneys will also get a share of any award under agreements they have with clients. "The age of the abuse, the duration of the abuse," Manly said, listing the likely factors. "Treatment in the future and the past. Have you lost earnings? Are there things about a particular case that are aggravating or mitigating." Mittleman said the dates of the assaults will be important. Older abuse probably will be worth less because without the settlement, Michigan State could have been shielded by a statute of limitations. New York attorney Michael Barasch is not involved in the Nassar case but has represented hundreds of victims sexually abused by New York priests. He said a pool of money is "definitely the way to go." "You've got to have a sensible, systematic and transparent solution," Barasch said. "Who better than a fair mediator accepted by everybody? ... Some of these people are going to be disappointed — guaranteed. But I can tell you from my church abuse cases, the vast majority are so appreciative of having finality." Michigan State was accused of ignoring or dismissing complaints about Nassar, some as far back as the 1990s. The school had insisted that no one covered up assaults, although Nassar's boss was later charged with failing to properly supervise him and committing his own sexual misconduct. In a statement Thursday, his first since the settlement, Michigan State President John Engler apologized, calling Nassar an "evil doctor" whose assaults "shocked our campus and the nation." The former Michigan governor was hired as interim leader after Lou Anna Simon's sudden resignation in January. Michigan State hasn't disclosed how it will pay for the settlement besides leaning on insurance companies. Engler told reporters in Lansing on Thursday that he doesn't plan to ask state lawmakers for money. Dianne Byrum, a member of the school's governing board, said Michigan State likely would borrow money, tap savings, delay big projects and consider budget cuts. She said a tuition increase tied specifically to the Nassar case is unlikely. Nassar, 54, will be locked up for the rest of his life under three decades-long sentences for molesting athletes with his hands and possessing child pornography. He's at a federal prison in Arizona. In addition to working at Michigan State, Nassar worked with Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics, which trains U.S. Olympians. His assaults were mostly committed in Michigan at his Lansing-area home, campus clinic and area gyms, but his accusers also said he molested them at a gymnastics-training ranch in Texas and at national and international competitions. The settlement applies only to Michigan State. Lawsuits are still pending against USA Gymnastics, the U.S. Olympic Committee and an elite gymnastics club in the Lansing-area. The deal surpasses the $100 million-plus paid by Penn State University to settle claims by at least 35 people who accused assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky of sexual abuse, though the Nassar agreement covers far more victims. ___ Eggert reported from Lansing......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 18th, 2018

Resilient Vikings have taken their cue from Zimmer

By Dave Campbell, Associated Press EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (AP) — Mike Zimmer was already smiling more than usual, sporting a relaxed look of satisfaction rarely revealed in public during the NFL season, when he really let his guard down a few minutes into his postgame news conference deep inside Minnesota's still-buzzing stadium. "Hey, let's open these things up!" Zimmer blurted out mid-sentence, prodding a Vikings official to push the button that removes the window shades and allows the premium ticket-holders in an adjacent lounge to peer in the room. His wish to interact with the customers who cheered the Vikings on to a last-play divisional round victory was granted. Zimmer then proceeded to slowly and rhythmically clap above his head, dignifying the ritual "Skol" chant performed by the purple-clad fans at each game honoring the area's Scandinavian heritage and the team's nickname. "You deserve it!" Zimmer said, again interrupting his own answer to acknowledge the crowd. From peers around the league to players in the locker room to people up and down the organization, there's a strong sentiment that Zimmer has earned this, too, pulling within one win of a Super Bowl appearance. The way the Vikings finished their 29-24 victory over New Orleans on a last-chance 61-yard touchdown pass from Case Keenum to Stefon Diggs suggested they're on some kind of charmed path, an uncharted territory for this championship-deprived franchise. Zimmer, for his part, has experienced his own share of painful setbacks. "I just think he was so proud of us," tight end Kyle Rudolph said. "Proud of us for fighting until there were zeros on the clock." Zimmer is only here, preparing the Vikings for the NFC title game in Philadelphia on Sunday, because he himself resisted the urge to quit. After being passed over for so many head coach vacancies during a six-year run as Cincinnati's defensive coordinator, Zimmer nearly canceled a second interview in Minnesota in 2014 after a different team that considered him chose a different candidate. He ignored the discouragement in his head, instead accepting the offer to become the ninth head coach in team history at age 57. "Sometimes you wonder, but I have a lot of confidence in myself," Zimmer said at his introductory news conference at team headquarters. "I feel like I was destined to do this." That first season, the Vikings improved by two wins to finish 7-9 with rookie Teddy Bridgewater forced into action ahead of schedule at quarterback and running back Adrian Peterson absent for all but one game because of the child abuse case and subsequent NFL discipline dispute he was involved in. In 2015, they went 11-5 and ended Green Bay's four-year hold on the NFC North title. The potholes in the road were waiting, though. Blair Walsh's 27-yard field-goal try went wide left at the end of the one-point wild-card round loss at home to Seattle. The 5-0 start in 2016 was washed away by a torrent of season-ending injuries, including Bridgewater, Peterson and several offensive linemen. Offensive coordinator Norv Turner resigned the day after Zimmer had the first of eight eye surgeries to address a torn retina. The third procedure forced him to miss a game for the first time in his career . The first quarter of the 2017 season brought knee injuries to quarterback Sam Bradford and running back Dalvin Cook, who needed reconstructive surgery to repair a torn ACL. The Vikings didn't blink, though, particularly with the experience of 2016 so fresh. Case Keenum deftly took over for Bradford, and Jerick McKinnon and Latavius Murray became a productive backfield tandem. All of these on-field hurdles have paled next to the pain Zimmer has endured in his personal life. His wife, Vikki, died suddenly in 2009. His father and former high school coach, Bill, passed away during training camp in 2015. Zimmer was hired by the Vikings because of his acumen as a defensive strategist and teacher, having started his 24-year NFL career as the defensive backs coach for Dallas before a promotion to defensive coordinator in 2000. Calling plays has been his forte, a responsibility he has yet to give up despite his duty as the main man on the staff on game day, but his ability to mold a disciplined, selfless unit from a collection of alpha males and high draft picks helped the Vikings' defense rank first in the league in 2017 in both fewest yards and points allowed. Beneath the gruff exterior is a deep affection for his players, an emotion that has caused his voice to crack and his eyes to well up several times over the years in various public discussions of their development or character. He's a football coach just like his father, though, and the critical eye and demanding approach are always quick to come out. "We can't make these mistakes in playoff games or we'll be going home," Zimmer said on Monday, reflecting on the reality of the performance after the euphoria of the winning play had worn off. Now the Vikings must go on the road to face a team with a 14-3 record just like theirs, the last and biggest obstacle looming before they can experience a Super Bowl. "We've got a bunch of fighters on this team," Zimmer said. "They've been a resilient bunch all year long. I expect it to continue to be that way.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

Couple jailed in Germany for selling son to pedophiles online

A German court Tuesday handed down lengthy jail sentences to a couple for repeatedly sexually abusing their young son and selling him to pedophiles online for more than two years. In a case that shocked the country and raised serious questions about child protection services in Germany, the regional court in Freiburg sentenced the boy's mother, Berrin Taha, to 12-and-a-half years in prison. Her husband Christian Lais, the boy's stepfather whom he called "papa", received a 12-year sentence followed by preventive detention. Lais, 39, had a previous conviction for child abuse, raising questions why he was allowed to live in a home with a child present. The court found that the u...Keep on reading: Couple jailed in Germany for selling son to pedophiles online.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 7th, 2018

STATEMENT: LODI on Inquirer’s takedown of Pepsi Paloma stories: “A humiliating case of self-censorship  and a dangerous precedent in time of tyranny”

We in the media and arts alliance LODI express grave disappointment and alarm at the Inquirer’s decision to take down three public interest articles about Pepsi Paloma from its website. This humiliating case of self-censorship sets a dangerous precedent adverse to press freedom, history and the cause of fighting child abuse in our country. We […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsJul 6th, 2018

In light of Scully conviction, DOJ warns child porn video owners, sharers

Following the conviction of Australian pedophile Peter Gerard Scully for qualified trafficking and sexual abuse of female minors, the Regional Prosecutor’s Office has warned individuals who may have possessed or circulated pornographic photo ​graph​s or video​ clips​ online, whether related to the case or not, that such act is punishable by law......»»

Category: newsSource:  davaotodayRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

This champ uses jiu-jitsu to help victims of child sex abuse

MANILA, Philippines – Ask jiu-jitsu world champion Meggie Ochoa about her life outside the sport she loves, and she'll probably have a hard time answering you. Not that it matters to her. Ochoa has found her life's purpose in jiu-jitsu. What was just a recreational activity, she now ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 15th, 2018

Half-brother of Damian Lillard shot in mall parking lot

By Anne M. Peterson, Associated Press PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) --Authorities say the half-brother of Portland Trail Blazers star Damian Lillard was shot Thursday during a confrontation with two men in a mall parking lot. The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office says 20-year-old Jahrell Lillard received first aid at a store inside the mall before he was taken to a hospital. The severity of his injuries was unknown. Lillard said on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) before the Blazers played the Los Angeles Clippers that his half-brother was in stable condition. "He's my brother, and my number one concern is his health, and his well-being. Right now he's stable and he's doing fine," Damian Lillard said. "In a situation like this you can't ask for more than that. You've got to let the authorities do their job and do what they need to do." Sgt. Nate Thompson says callers reported hearing 5-to-10 shots Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) and seeing two men run from the Clackamas Town Center parking lot. He says multiple rounds hit Lillard and several vehicles were damaged. Though details of the case are still developing, Thompson says investigators believe Lillard may have been the victim of a targeted attack. No arrests have been made. The shooting happened the same day Damian Lillard announced that his girlfriend gave birth to their first child. Lillard said the last two days were an emotional roller coaster. "That was probably one of the highest points of my life, my son coming out and holding him, and just having that experience, then having to deal a tragedy in the middle of it, that's unfortunate," Lillard said. "But like I said he's stable, and he's doing fine so I guess you've got to look at it like things could be a lot worse.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 31st, 2018

Police search for NFL’s Aldon Smith in domestic abuse case

SAN FRANCISCO --- Police were searching for suspended Oakland Raiders linebacker Aldon Smith, who authorities said Sunday is suspected of domestic violence. Someone called 911 to report a domestic violence incident at about 8:30 p.m. Saturday, a San Francisco police spokesman said. He added Smith fled the San Francisco home before officers arrived. Sgt. Michael Andraychak said the victim's injuries were not life-threatening. Andraychak said investigators are asking for the public's help finding him. The troubled linebacker has been arrested several times on charges of drunken driving, vandalism and illegal possession of assault rifles among other charges since the San Francisco 49er...Keep on reading: Police search for NFL’s Aldon Smith in domestic abuse case.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 5th, 2018

Caloocan cops nab 92 for various offenses

      Operatives of the Caloocan City Police arrested 92 people for various offenses during a Simultaneous Anti-Criminality Law Enforcement (SACLEO) operation in North Caloocan which started on Wednesday night.   Caloocan City Police chief Senior Superintendent Jemar Modequillo said the operation started at around 11 p.m. on Wednesday and ended at 2 a.m. on Thursday.   Among those arrested were 86 people who were caught drinking in the streets and minors who violated the city's curfew law. Also nabbed were three alleged drug users, two persons with pending warrants of arrest for estafa and child abuse; and one person facing a robbery case, Ra...Keep on reading: Caloocan cops nab 92 for various offenses.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 1st, 2018

Aussie gets life sentence for child trafficking

MANILA: A Philippine court has sentenced an Australian man to life imprisonment after finding him guilty on human trafficking and child pornography charges.Drew Frederick Shobbrook (........»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsFeb 23rd, 2018

Duterte: I’ll sell my soul to the devil so OFWs can live comfortably in PH

President Rodrigo Duterte saidon Tuesdaythat he would sell his soul "to the devil" just to give repatriating overseas Filipino workers (OFW) a comfortable life in the Philippines.   "You come home and I will sell my soul to the devil to look for money so that you can come home and live comfortably here," Duterte said during the oath-taking of newly-appointed government officials in Malacaang.   In his more than 30-minute speech, Duterte vented out his anger over the abuse of some OFWs in Kuwait.   Duterte cited the cases of sexual and physical abuse OFWs in the Middle East, noting a case of a Filipina who was scaled with a flat iron by her employer. ...Keep on reading: Duterte: I’ll sell my soul to the devil so OFWs can live comfortably in PH.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 13th, 2018

Wozniacki wins 1st major title at Aussie Open

JOHN PYE, AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — It took Caroline Wozniacki 43 majors and two failed attempts in finals before finally claiming her first Grand Slam singles title. One of the first things she did as a champion was apologize to top-seeded Simona Halep following her 7-6 (2), 3-6, 6-4 win in the Australian Open final on Saturday night. "I'm sorry, I'm just taking a second to hug Daphne," Wozniacki said as she clutched the winner's trophy in the on-court ceremony. "I dreamt of this moment so many years, to be here now it's a dream come true." More than seven years after appearing in her first Grand Slam final at the 2009 U.S. Open, Wozniacki can finally erase the "but never won a major" footnote that has long been attached to her resume. "I'm never going to get the question again about being a world No. 1 without a Slam," she said after leaving the court. Wozniacki will regain the top ranking next week for the first time in six years — beating Serena Williams' record of 5 years, 29 days between stints at No. 1 on the women's tour — in another benefit of beating the top-seeded Halep. Neil Diamond's "Sweet Caroline" played over the stadium speakers as the 27-year-old Danish player carried the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup around Rod Laver Arena. Wozniacki lost two U.S. Open finals — in 2009 and 2014 — and Halep lost two French Open finals before their meeting at Melbourne Park. It was the first time in the Open era that players ranked No. 1 and 2 were meeting in a major final without either having won a Grand Slam title. So the pressure was on. It was the first time in the Open era that both Australian Open finalists had saved match points before reaching the final, also, so in some ways the pressure was off. In Halep's case, she was the first player who had saved match points in multiple matches to have reached the final. She saved triple match point and rallied in the third set to beat Laura Davis 15-13 in the third set of her third-round match, and also needed to save match points in her semifinal against Angelique Kerber. Wozniacki saved match points in her second-round win over Jana Fett and later said she was relaxed because for the rest of the tournament she was "playing with the house money." So both players rolled the dice in the 2-hour, 49-minute final, which featured some long, absorbing rallies and 10 service breaks — including six in an eight-game run in the third set. "I know that today is a tough day," Wozniacki said to Halep. "I'm sorry I had to win today but I'm sure we'll have many matches in the future. Incredible match, incredible fight. And again, I'm sorry." Halep, who was playing with an injured left ankle and had rallied from a break down in the third set to lead 4-3 when Wozniacki took a medical time out to have her left knee taped, just ran out of steam. "It's not easy to talk now, she played amazing," Halep said. "It's been a great tournament for me. I started not very well with the ankle injury. I just wanted to give my best every match, which I did. Of course I'm sad I couldn't win today but Caroline was better than me. "Sad that I couldn't make it the third time, maybe the fourth time will be with luck." Wozniacki is the third first-time major winner in the four Grand Slam tournaments since Serena Williams won the 2017 Australian Open for her record 23rd Grand Slam title. Serena Williams, who beat her older sister, Venus, in last year's final, took time out for her pregnancy and the birth of her first child in September, and is preparing to return to competition next month......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 27th, 2018

US family seeks justice in kin’s ‘suspicious’ death in PH

  Instead of recollecting wonderful memories from Christmases pasts, exchanging gifts and preparing for holiday dinners with relatives and friends, the Phinney family in Boston, Massachusetts, were comforting each other telling and stories about the life well lived by Jesse Phinney, which ended tragically in Cebu City on December 5 last year.   Phinney died while in the custody of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI), suspected of human trafficking and child abuse under Republic Act 7610.   Who was Jesse Phinney? Why was he in Cebu City? Why does his death raise more questions than answers?   Documentary filmmaker   Jesse Phin...Keep on reading: US family seeks justice in kin’s ‘suspicious’ death in PH.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 19th, 2018

Immaterial defense

This is another case of violation of RA 7610, as amended, otherwise known as the Anti Child Abuse Law......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 12th, 2017

Lenin Moreno headed for victory amid opposition fraud claims – The Guardian

Ecuador’s ruling party candidate appeared to be heading for victory in a presidential run-off that would cement the country’s reputation as a bastion of the Latin American left and provide breathing space for Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. However, the narrow 51% to 49% lead for Lenin Moreno was contested by the opposition candidate Guillermo Lasso, prompting fears for heightened political tension in the days ahead. With 96% of votes counted on Sunday night, Moreno, who was a former vice-president under outgoing president Rafael Correa, seemed to be on course to beat Lasso, a 61-year-old former banker. The head of Ecuador’s electoral council, Juan Pablo Pozo, called on the opposition candidate to recognise the results. “Ecuador deserves the ethical responsibility from its political actors to recognise the democratic decision made by the people at the ballot box,” Pozo said. However, Lasso, who earlier had claimed victory based on three exit polls that showed him leading by as much as six points, pointed to irregularities and demanded a recount. “This is very sickening. We’re not going to allow it,” he said, calling on supporters to protest the results peacefully but firmly. “They’ve crossed a line, which is pretending to abuse the people’s will” and install an “illegitimate” government, Lasso said. Several thousand of his supporters picketed the electoral council headquarters on Sunday night chanting: “We don’t want fraud, we want democracy.” Meanwhile, Moreno appeared on a stage flanked by outgoing president Rafael Correa and Jorge Glas, the vice-president, as thousands of supporters waved flags in the lime-green colours of the Alianza País coalition and cumbia music blasted into the night. Moreno called for dialogue with the opposition, saying: “We know how to hear the criticisms. Let’s work together in peace and harmony. Dancing in the crowd, Marisol Jaramillo, 34, an agricultural worker said “Now the revolution will continue, life has changed for us over the last 10 years and want the progress to carry on.” For the country’s 15 million population, at stake was whether to continue the redistributive policies of the ruling party, which won the previous three elections under Rafael Correa, including reduced poverty and improved access to education and healthcare. Correa’s administration had also been criticised for media censorship, corruption and abandoning many of its environmental promises. The alternative offered by Lasso was a pro-business, pro-austerity programme that promised tax cuts and more jobs, though Lasso was plagued with accusations of tax avoidance through dozens of offshore accounts. He also promised to ask Assange to leave the Ecuadorean embassy in London within a month of securing a mandate because he said the asylum granted to the WikiLeaks founder was posing a burden on the country’s taxpayers. Assange is reportedly sufficiently concerned to have instructed lawyers in Quito in case Lasso wins. The election will also have regional ramifications. Should a Moreno victory be confirmed, it would cement Ecuador’s reputation as a bastion of the left in Latin America. Should he lose, it will be taken as another sign of the region’s retreating “pink wave”, following defeats for the left in an Argentinian election and a Bolivian referendum, plus the impeachment and ousting of Workers’ party president Dilma Rousseff in Brazil. With the stakes high in Ecuador, there were accusations of vote-rigging and other dubious practices during the first round, which was delayed because the result was close, though independent observers from the Union of South American Nations said there was no evidence of fraud and praised the election process as transparent. The foreign minister, Guillaume Long, urged all involved not to discredit the process for political reasons. “It’s important that all sides accept the results that will be issued by the electoral authorities and show their democratic commitment without throwing around other false allegations or claiming that any defeat is due to irregularities,” he told the Guardian. Earlier in the day, Moreno voted at a polling station in the middle-class Rumipampa neighbourhood of Quito, while his supporters gathered outside chanting: “You can see it, you can feel it, Lenin president.” Moreno called for the election to be peaceful process. “Let the people make their decision,” he said. As police formed a cordon to hold back the throng, voters – many of them supporters of opposition candidate Guillermo Lasso – protested that they could not enter the polling station to vote, as Moreno sympathisers jeered. “I voted for Lasso, I voted for a change,” Maria Jose Maldonado, 33, a business administrator told the Guardian. “We don’t want a dictatorship we don’t want our freedom taken away, we don’t want to be like Venezuela,” she said, alluding to the move by the supreme court in Caracas to take over legislative powers in the opposition-controlled Venezuelan congress last week. Casting his vote in Ecuador’s port city of Guayaquil, Lasso said: “This is a crucial day, this isn’t any election, here there’s a path; there’s a path to Venezuela or a path to democracy and freedom.” At the polling station in Quito where Moreno voted, Nora Molina, 57, said she voted for him because “we have made a lot of progress in the last 10 years and we want it to continue”. Voting with her young children, Patricia Romero, 37, said she backed Moreno: “I would like him to continue with the revolution which has helped us and he is genuinely concerned for the people.” Carlos Muso, a 54-year-old taxi driver, said he [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2017

CHR files child abuse case against Bacolod teacher

CHR files child abuse case against Bacolod teacher.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2017

Teacher in 'child abuse' case transferred | SunStar - Sun.Star

Teacher in 'child abuse' case transferred | SunStar - Sun.Star.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsFeb 11th, 2017