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Angelica Panganiban thanks 2017 for being a happy year, with a bit of ‘hugot’

Aside from her dramatic acting chops, Angelica Panganiban is known for her humor, which she not only shows on camera but on social media as well. That humor was again seen as she posted a photo of herself on Instagram last Monday, while on vacation in Hokkaido, Japan. She is shown to have her hand on her head. She wrote, "Masakit ka saulo, 2017." (You've been a headache, 2017) [emoji]pero ito ang pinakamasayang taon ko (but this was my happiest year)." But while being funny, the actress remained honest as she recalled her heartbreaks of the past year. "Sa pag pagtitiwala, pero binigo. Sa pagiyak, pero kinaya. Sa pag tawa ng walang humpay. Sa pagkakaron ng mga bagong kaibi...Keep on reading: Angelica Panganiban thanks 2017 for being a happy year, with a bit of ‘hugot’.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJan 4th, 2018

Ang Dalawang ‘Mrs Reyes’ airs on Cinema One this July 22

    This year's first blockbuster film "Ang Dalawang Mrs Reyes" starring Angelica Panganiban and Judy Ann Santos is all set to bring amusement for the whole family as it airs for the first time on Cinema One this Sunday (July 22) starting 7 pm.   Santos and Panganiban play devoted wives Lianne and Cindy, respectively, two different women who have the same goal -to keep their husbands. They realize they get cheated on by their partners who turn out to be in a gay relationship. Lianne and Cindy join forces to make sure their exes do not get a happy ending.   Meanwhile, Kapamilya hunk JC de Vera (Felix) plays the role of Cindy's husband, and versati...Keep on reading: Ang Dalawang ‘Mrs Reyes’ airs on Cinema One this July 22.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News3 hr. 46 min. ago

Blockbuster trade not what Kawhi, DeRozan hoped for

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst Kawhi Leonard’s turbulent last days with the San Antonio Spurs ended Wednesday morning (late Wednesday, PHL time) with a trade that neither major party involved in the deal liked. The Spurs traded Leonard, the 2014 Finals MVP, two-time Defensive Player of the Year and two-time All-Star, along with veteran guard Danny Green, to the Toronto Raptors for four-time All-Star DeMar DeRozan, second-year big man Jakob Poeltl and a 2019 first-round Draft pick, which is protected from 1-20 next year. In doing so, San Antonio ended a relationship with the player that was poised to be the Spurs’ next lynchpin, but who had grown disenchanted with the franchise and wanted out. Leonard wanted to be traded to Los Angeles, closer to his hometown of Moreno Valley, Calif. He preferred the Lakers, and made that known in June, but was not averse to playing with the LA Clippers. However, the Spurs were adamant that they would not trade him to a Western Conference team, even though there was a strong likelihood that he would only stay with any team that traded for him until next year. That is when he would likely opt out of his contract, become a free agent and go to Los Angeles. Even though the 27-year-old Leonard told the Raptors in conversations between Toronto and his camp over the last week that he did not want to go there, the Raptors were willing to take the chance, anyway. DeRozan sought assurances from the Raptors that he wasn’t being moved in recent days. Both he and his representatives met with Raptors officials during NBA Summer League in Las Vegas, according to a source, at which time Toronto insisted that it wasn’t going to trade him. Now, DeRozan feels “lied to,” the source said, and, while having no personal grudges with the Spurs, is extremely upset at the deal. Meanwhile, @DeMar_DeRozan not backing off of claim he was lied to by Toronto regarding a potential trade, per source. Extremely upset. — David Aldridge (@daldridgetnt) July 18, 2018 Leonard also is not happy at going to Toronto, for several reasons, including the higher taxation rate in Canada than in Texas, which has no state income tax. Leonard’s camp had informed the Spurs he didn’t want to go there, but the Spurs made no promises either way. San Antonio had had significant discussions with the Philadelphia 76ers -- a team Leonard would have given a fair shake at convincing him to stay had it been able to make a deal with San Antonio. But the 76ers were unwilling to include guard Markelle Fultz, the former first pick overall in the 2017 Draft, or forward Dario Saric in any package proposals for Leonard. Leonard only played in nine games last season, citing an injured quad muscle that did not respond to treatment. But privately, Leonard was unhappy with what he thought was bad advice from the Spurs’ medical staff, and sought advice from his own group of doctors, removing himself from San Antonio to continue treatments in New York as the regular season ended and playoffs began. The Spurs did not push Leonard during his rehab, and referred questions about his status during their first-round series with the Golden State Warriors to his camp. Leonard’s uncle has acted as his agent for the last couple of years. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich informed Leonard’s camp of the trade early Wednesday (Wednesday, PHL time) in what was deemed a “cordial” conversation, according to a source. However, given the trade, Leonard is now contemplating not taking part in next week’s USA Basketball minicamp in Las Vegas. A final decision has not yet been made. For his part, the 28-year-old DeRozan let his feelings be known in an Instagram post early Wednesday (Wednesday, PHL time), saying in part, “Ain’t no loyalty in this game” after being dealt from the only team he’s played for in nine NBA seasons, and for whom he has been nothing but a first-class ambassador. The Raptors took DeRozan with the ninth pick in the 2009 Draft, during which time DeRozan became the franchise’s leader in several categories, including games, points and minutes played. He grew as the franchise did, helping lead it to the most successful period in its history alongside his close friend and All-Star teammate, Kyle Lowry. The backcourt did ads together, took vacations together with family and led Toronto to franchise records for wins, reaching the Eastern Conference finals in 2016. At every turn, DeRozan expressed happiness at playing for and living in Toronto, even as he had to make several cross-country trips last season to be with his ailing father in Los Angeles. DeRozan remade his game as part of the “culture reset” demanded by general manager Masai Ujiri after Toronto was beaten in the playoffs by LeBron James and the Cavaliers in 2017 -- a familiar outcome, as James and Cleveland beat the Raptors in three straight postseasons. DeRozan relied less on isolation sets than he had in years past, trying to move more without the ball and give it up so others could be more involved. Toronto won a franchise-best 59 regular season games last season and was the top seed in the Eastern Conference. However, Toronto suffered another playoff loss to Cleveland, this time a 4-0 sweep. It was especially galling considering the Cavaliers had been extended to a seventh game in their first-round series with Indiana, yet still managed to rally from a double-digit deficit to shock the Raptors in Game 1 in Toronto. The Cavs then cruised the rest of the way in the series. Ujiri fired coach Dwane Casey afterward, ultimately picking assistant coach Nick Nurse as Casey’s successor. But the reset of the team wasn’t complete. The Raptors believe strongly in their young core group of players, all of whom have been developed by Toronto the last few seasons -- guards Fred Van Vleet and Delon Wright, forward O.G. Anunoby and big man Pascal Siakham. Toronto initially opted to keep its existing vets around the kids, giving DeRozan a five-year, $138 million extension in 2016, then giving Lowry and forward Serge Ibaka extensions last summer – Lowry got a three-year, $100 million deal and Ibaka got a three-year, $65 million deal. However, after the latest playoff debacle, the Raptors let it be known around the Draft that none of their players were untouchable. If Toronto can get Leonard on board, the Raptors would have a potentially dynamic defensive group on the wings, with Leonard and Anunoby capable of guarding multiple positions. Ibaka isn’t the defender he was in Oklahoma City, where he was first team all-Defensive three years in a row, but he’s still a plus defender at his position. The 31-year-old Green is entering the final year of his contract. Long considered one of the best two-way guards in the game, Green was outstanding in the Spurs’ seven-game loss to the Heat in the 2013 Finals, making 27 3-pointers in the series en route to setting a Finals record. Poeltl, 22, was taken ninth overall by Toronto in the 2016 Draft. He worked his way quickly into the Raptors’ rotation, averaging 6.9 points and 4.8 rebounds last season. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 19th, 2018

Comm. Silver, NBPA say competitive imbalance not a problem

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com LAS VEGAS -- First came the backlash. Next, backlash to the backlash. By Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), much of the whipsawing over competitive balance -- or more accurately, imbalance -- as an NBA problem rising to the level of crisis had calmed down. Yet powerful voices from the league’s summer nerve center could not dismiss it entirely as an issue meriting closer inspection. “I'm not here to say we have a problem,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said Tuesday after the Board of Governors meeting. “And I love where the league is right now. [But] I think we can create a better system.” Neither Silver nor Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, sounded an alarm in their separate news conferences about what many see as a widening gap between the league’s haves and have-nots. Roberts, in fact, seemed to feel that all is well and that talent inequality is in the eye of the beholder. “Competitive balance, it almost depends on what your favorite team is,” said Roberts, who was rehired as head of the players union in another four-year contract announced Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “I don’t hear anybody in the Bay Area worrying about competitive balance. I also don’t hear the people in Philadelphia worrying about competitive balance, or Houston. “We’ve got great teams. And it’s never been the case, as far as I’m concerned, where I was not able most of the time to predict what teams were going to be in the Finals.” The topic came up in precisely that context before the Finals last month when Silver was asked about Golden State and Cleveland meeting in the championship series for the fourth consecutive year, a first in any of the major professional sports leagues. It reared its head again this month soon after free agency opened on July 1, with events conspiring to make insiders wonder about a growing disparity among teams. LeBron James’ signing with the Los Angeles Lakers was the biggest move in what appeared to be a continuing shift of strength into the league’s Western Conference. That was followed by the news that DeMarcus Cousins, New Orleans’ All-Star center, had joined the champion Warriors. That signing sparked the initial backlash, a rich-getting-richer cry that pointed not to Cousins’ one-year deal for $5.3 million in 2018-19 salary but the fact that the Warriors will spend in excess of $20 million for it when luxury taxes are counted. Golden State had the NBA’s fattest payroll in 2017-18 of $137.5 million, despite a $99 million salary cap, thanks to various exceptions in the prevailing “soft cap” system. “I don't necessarily think it's per se bad that the Warriors are so dominant,” Silver told reporters, not long after discussing the “competitive landscape” with the owners. “As I've said before, we're not trying to create some sort of forced parity. What we really focus on is parity of opportunity. And a fair point could be made in the tax system, when certain teams are spending significantly more than others, that that's not parity of opportunity.” The counter-backlash came from folks who rushed to the Warriors’ and Cousins’ defense, correctly noting that neither did anything wrong, conducting their business within the rules as specified by the collective bargaining agreement between the owners and the players. That CBA is the object of endless study and imagined revision, with amendments possible if negotiated prior to the end of the current deal after the 2023-24 season. Shooting for a “hard cap” likely would be a tough sell to players accustomed to the freedom of movement they currently enjoy. “It's not necessarily [Roberts’] issue,” Silver said in response to the union director’s characterization. “I think it's on me and our Labor Relations Committee, ultimately, to sit with the players and their committee and convince them that there may be a better way of doing things.” Silver mentioned Charlotte owner and legendary NBA superstar Michael Jordan, chairman of that Labor Relations Committee, as a valuable resource in addressing owners’ and players’ competition concerns. Both sides have valid arguments. Interest in the NBA never has been higher by almost any metric chosen, from selected TV ratings and licensing revenues to the game’s growth globally. Attendance at the MGM Resorts Las Vegas Summer League keeps pushing higher, with fans eager to see top rookies, second-year players and relative free-agent unknowns chasing their pro hoops’ dreams. The valuations of the 30 NBA franchises, of course, all have soared beyond $1 billion, according to Forbes.com, with the Knicks, the Lakers and the Warriors all estimated to be worth more than $3 billion. Longtime NBA observers such as TNT’s David Aldridge wrote a column this week that argued on behalf of dominant teams, anyway, saying that they actually drive rather than depress fan interest. As for any inability to win games or titles, he laid the blame for that on poor franchise management. The Knicks and the Clippers have all sorts of big-market advantages but haven’t won any championships lately (or at all in the Clippers' case). For Roberts, whose players reap 51 percent of NBA basketball-related income that tops $7 billion annually, business is good, period. “I’m excited about this new season,” she said Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “This free agency, there’s been a lot to write about so we’re all, I think, looking forward to what’s going to happen come October. “To the extent that people are predicting the end of the game, I just don’t think so. I would be surprised if Adam called me to say, ‘What the hell are we going to do?’ I think he’s as happy as I am. ... I think we’re in good shape.” Critics note Golden State’s on-court dominance in winning the last two championships. It only took nine NBA Finals games --one over the minimum -- while facing arguably the league’s best player in LeBron James. But those same critics seem to foget that the Warriors were pushed to the full seven games in the conference finals, and actually faced elimination twice before beating the Rockets. “I recognize what Michele's saying,” Silver said. “But at the same time, if you talk to players in the league, and I've talked to plenty of individual players as well, they want to be in the most competitive league possible too.” For every player on the Warriors' roster -- or the Rockets, the Thunder, the Celtics or the Sixers -- there are five or six on teams that realistically have no chance of chasing a ring or the Larry O’Brien Trophy. Cleveland went to four straight Finals thanks to James; no one envisions the Cavaliers getting back any time soon. “Maybe there are some players who think they’re on a second-class team,” said Sacramento wing Garrett Temple, one of the NBPA vice presidents. “But most players I’ve played with or been around, their thought process is, ‘We’re gonna get our team to become one of those first-class teams.’ It’s more of a challenge. More so than, ‘We need them to disband so we can make everybody equal.’ Because we’re competitors.” That really is the crux of the issue. Silver and some franchises want most of the competition to come on the floor, in games, in full view of fans who believe their teams can sufficiently compete. The league’s current title contenders are fine with a system that allows them to compete all the way to the top, with an owner stroking gargantuan checks to crowd out rivals. “Let me make clear that under the current system we want teams to compete like crazy,” Silver said. “So I think the Warriors within the framework of this deal should be doing everything they can to increase their dominance. That's what you want to see in a league. “You want teams to compete in every way they can within the rules.” Silver addressed a variety of topics that were came from the BOG agenda, including: -- Change is coming on multiple fronts, most notably in the league’s age limit. That seems likely to be re-set back to 18 years old from 19, permitting players to enter the league from high school. It’s a move that the NBA should be better equipped to handle with a near 30-for-30 farm-system affiliation with its G League. It also fits with the findings of an NCAA task force that cites dissatisfaction with “one-and-done” college players. Said Silver: “My personal view is that we’re ready to make that change.” -- The start of free agency, annually triggered at midnight ET on July 1 (12:00pm, July 1, PHL time), will be moved to a daytime or prime time opening bell. It’s one of those traditions that no one thought to change, Silver said. -- The league’s investigation into the Dallas Mavericks’ sexual harassment issues should be completed by the end of the month. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

PBA: Hotshots import Wayne Chism enjoyed playing against former team NLEX

Wednesday night at the Mall of Asia Arena, Wayne Chism made his return to the PBA, suiting up for the Magnolia Hotshots Pambansang Manok.  Making Chism's conference debut more interesting was that he went up against his former team in the NLEX Road Warriors.  Already their fourth reinforcement this conference after Vernon Macklin, Curtis Kelly, and Justin Jackson all came and went, the playoff-chasing Magnolia now pin their hopes on the 6-foot-9 former Best Import.  And he delivered.  In his first game back, Chism put up 27 points to go with eight rebounds, four assists, three blocks, and two steals, leading the Hotshots to a 116-89 win over the Road Warriors.  Not bad for someone who's still adjusting to a new system.  For the 31-year old however, playing against his former mentor in Coach Yeng Guiao was the most enjoyable part of his return.  "It was a good game, I enjoyed myself out there today, especially against Coach Yeng and my former teammates." Chism said after the win.  Chism played with for NLEX in the 2017 PBA Commissioner's Cup.  "It's always feelings with Coach, I mean we've been together for a while and this is the first time I'm playing against him and against his team. It was very tough to start off, 'cause I know Coach know me and what my tendencies are, so I had to adjust real quick." Chism added. "Other than that, I'm very happy I played against him just to see how it is on the other side. It was fun, I really enjoyed it." It also took a while for Chism to adjust to playing against his former teammates, jokingly saying that he wanted to assist them, but obviously couldn't.  "Everybody misses each other, I missed 'em too, but playing against 'em, being on the opposite side, it was very challenging 'cause I wanted to pass 'em the ball, but I couldn't."  "Other than that, it was very good to be out there with them and share the game with them again." Chism added.  As far as the win, which was important for the Hotshots as they continue to push for a spot in the playoffs, Chism said that it was about building confidence, more than anything.  "It was very important, today's game, to get my teammates' confidence up, and show 'em that we can win games and we can get them back and get them more confidence and get them back on the winning track." Magnolia closes out the elimination round against defending champions San Miguel on Saturday, July 7th at the Smart Araneta Coliseum. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 4th, 2018

Ateneo tops San Beda to take Filoil Preseason crown

For the third year in a row, there has been a clean sweep of the Filoil Flying V Preseason Tournament. And just like in 2017, the 2018 edition of the tournament has seen one sweeping squad get replaced by another. Claiming control from the get-go on Saturday at the Filoil Flying V Centre, Ateneo de Manila University didn’t give any chances to now dethroned champion San Beda University for a convincing 76-62 victory. The Blue Eagles scored the first basket and seized the lead right from tip-off. “We gotta give credit to the players. We didn’t really have practices so it was all verbal,” coach Sandy Arespacochaga said post-game. Still, the Red Lions were only behind by four after the opening salvo until Ivorian reinforcement Angelo Kouame imposed his will down low and fueled Ateneo’s 26-11 rush that mounted a 45-26 lead. San Beda would not be able to threaten from that point. With that, the UAAP champions proved that they were the top team in the tournament. Kouame finished with 15 points, 16 rebounds, and three blocks en route to being hailed as the Tournament MVP. “We’re very happy for him individually. We’d like to see him continue to improve,” Arespacochaga said. Fellow Mythical team member Thirdy Ravena contributed seven points, two rebounds, and two assists while Jolo Mendoza and Raffy Verano also added nine markers each. Ateneo’s sweep of the 2018 Filoil Preseason follows San Beda’s sweep of the 2017 Filoil Preseason which itself followed De La Salle University’s sweep of the 2016 Filoil Preseason. Last year, the Red Lions dethroned the Green Archers en route to a clean sweep. San Beda got a taste of its own medicine this time around, falling victim to a Blue Eagle side that did not lose in 11 games. Javee Mocon showed the way for them with a 14-point, 12-rebound double-double. Donald Tankoua also had 13 markers and five boards. Robert Bolick was scoreless in 10 minutes of play, but did not play much of the second half after suffering an apparent ankle injury in the second quarter. In the battle for third, Far Eastern University made quick work of College of St. Benilde, 78-58. No Tamaraw was in double-digits, but they counted seven players who contributed somewhere between six to nine points in the scoring column. For the Blazers, Kendrix Belgica and Robbie Nayve topped the scoring column with 12 points apiece. However, they elected not to play top guns Justin Gutang and Clement Leutcheu to rest them for the looming NCAA season. BOX SCORES FINALS ATENEO 76 – Kouame 15, Mendoza 9, Verano 9, Ravena 7, Belangel 7, Nieto Mi 6, Asistio 6, Go 6, Mamuyac 5, Navarro 3, Maagdenberg 3, Nieto Ma 0, Tio 0, Wong 0, Black 0, Andrade 0 SAN BEDA 62 – Mocon 14, Tankoua 13, Abuda 9, Canlas 7, Doliguez 6, Nelle 5, Cabanag 4, Oftana 2, Carino 2, Tongco 0, Bolick 0, Eugene 0, Cuntapay 0, Burri 0 QUARTER SCORES: 19-15, 45-26, 56-42, 76-62 BATTLE FOR THIRD FEU 78 – Tuffin 9, Nunag 9, Tolentino 8, Inigo 7, Comboy 6, Jopia 6, Ramirez 6, Orizu 5, Ebona 4, Gonzales 4, Parker 4, Escoto 4, Casino 4, Bienes 2, Stockton 0, Cani 0 CSB 58 – Belgica 12, Nayve 12, Pagulayan 11, Barnes 10, Carlos 6, Naboa 3, Young 2, Dixon 2, Velasco 0, Pasturan 0, Haruna 0 QUARTER SCORES: 13-17, 32-24, 56-40, 78-58 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

PBA: Good guy Tony dela Cruz reflects on storied career after being honored by Alaska

​After a long and storied career in the PBA, Tony dela Cruz was honored by the Alaska Aces in a special ceremony during halftime of the Aces-Magnolia Hotshots tussle at the Big Dome Sunday evening. The UC Irvine product, who was brought in by the Shell Turbo Chargers in 1999 as a direct hire, enjoyed 11 fruitful seasons with Aces before officially announcing his retirement in 2017, along with veteran sharpshooter Dondon Hontiveros. A recipient of the PBA Sportsmanship award in 2006, he could boast of a record that could be comparable to that belonging to Wilt Chamberlain. If the Big Dipper could boast that he did not foul out in his 14-year NBA career, dela Cruz could also be proud of not incurring a single technical foul throughout his PBA journey. "I’m super proud of the way I carried myself each and everyday on the court so no matter how many awards I wished I would’ve won of course, I would’ve won 20 championships and a million MVPs but it’s just the fact I know what I did in my career and the fact that I am proud of how I played each and everyday in practice, super, super like proud," the now Aces assistant coach said after the game. Also included in the halftime tribute was a video montage containing tributes from former Shell teammates Rob Wainwright, Chris Jackson, Rich Alvarez, and former team governor Bobby Kanapi. The 39-year old said that he could not contain his emotions from the messages showered upon him, and was moved by the compilation. Looking back, the 6'5” dela Cruz said that his proudest moment in the PBA was their championship win over Ginebra in 2013, and the 2010 PBA Fiesta Conference Finals series win over the San Miguel Beermen, where he played with sore eyes in Game 6, the series clincher. He also recalled how he was called for his lone flagrant foul, a landing spot foul on Dennis Espino.  "I went into the commissioner’s office and he said we’re not judging you as a person, just the action and I said it was fair and I apologized to Dennis there was no harm but again, maybe I wished I would’ve gotten a couple more technicals to like feel some of my frustration but just super proud that I can look back at my career and really, really happy," he quipped. Now bringing a lot of experience to the table as an assistant coach under Alex Compton, he hopes to get better and get more experience while being on the sidelines. "I just want to continue to learn. But everyone keeps making jokes, letting me know how much weight I’ve gained but like Don Allado said, ‘You know what, I played so many seasons in the PBA, I have the right to eat whatever I want.’" "But again, I think the biggest transition is being in shape. I do wanna get out there and play with the guys sometimes but I think the biggest transition for me is wanting to be knowledgeable but at the same time, curious about how to get better at basketball." With no less than team owner Wilfred Uytengsu in attendance for the honor, longtime Alaska public relations manager CK Kanapi told Spin.ph's Gerry Ramos that the honor bestowed upon dela Cruz was not a formal jersey retirement, unlike the likes of former players Jeff Cariaso, Bong Hawkins, import Sean Chambers, Jojo Lastimosa, and three-time MVP Bogs Adornado. __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 10th, 2018

Get ready for Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova in Paris

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — If the upcoming French Open showdown between Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova provides any of the sort of animus and back-and-forth they manage to stir up away from the court, look out. During a news conference after both won Saturday to set up the longtime rivals' fourth-round matchup at Roland Garros, Williams criticized Sharapova's autobiography as "hearsay" and twice brought up the Russian's 15-month doping ban. Producing by far the best performance in her return to Grand Slam tennis — 16 months after her last major tournament and nine months after having a baby — Williams played cleanly and powerfully in a 6-3, 6-4 tour de force against 11th-seeded Julia Goerges that lasted a mere 75 minutes and lacked much in the way of theatrics. "There is still a ways to go, but it's moving in the right direction," said Williams, who made only three unforced errors in the first set, 12 in all. "And I think that as long as it's moving in the right direction, I know I will get there." Sharapova advanced with a similarly lopsided win, 6-2, 6-1 against 2016 U.S. Open runner-up Karolina Pliskova. Now comes the drama: Williams vs. Sharapova on Monday with a quarterfinal spot at stake. They have verbally clashed in the past, such as a 2013 public spat about their private lives. Williams, 36, owns 23 major singles titles. Sharapova, 31, has won five. Williams has won the French Open three times, Sharapova twice. They are the only active women with a career Grand Slam; they are two of six in history to accomplish that. Both have been ranked No. 1. But the head-to-head history is overwhelmingly in Williams' favor: She has won 19 of 21 meetings, including 18 in a row. "Quite frankly, she's probably a favorite in this match, for sure," Williams said with a chuckle. "She's been playing ... for over a year now. I just started. So I'm just really trying to get my bearings and trying to feel out where I am and see where I can go." The last time Sharapova beat Williams was in 2004. The last time they played was in the 2016 Australian Open quarterfinals, Sharapova's final appearance before her 15-month drug suspension. "Well, it's been a while," Sharapova said, "and I think a lot has happened in our lives for the both of us, in very different ways." Williams was asked about Sharapova's book, which was published last year. It contains quite a bit of material about the American, including a reference to Williams crying in the locker room after losing to Sharapova in the Wimbledon final 14 years ago. "As a fan, I wanted to read the book and I was really excited for it to come out and I was really happy for her. And then the book was a lot about me. I was surprised about that, to be honest," Williams said. "I was, like, 'Oh, OK, I didn't expect to be reading a book about me — that wasn't necessarily true.'" Insisting she doesn't "have any negative feelings" toward Sharapova, Williams said "the success of one female should be the inspiration to another." Seconds later, Williams made reference to Sharapova's "incident of drugs." There were plenty of other results involving top names at the French Open on Saturday. Other women moving into the fourth round included 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza, two-time runner-up Simona Halep, two-time major title winner Angelique Kerber and reigning U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens. Men's winners included 10-time champion Rafael Nadal, No. 3 Marin Cilic, No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro, No. 6 Kevin Anderson and No. 9 John Isner. The story of Day 7, though, was what everyone can look forward to on Day 9: Williams vs. Sharapova. This is Williams' first Grand Slam tournament since January 2017, when she won the Australian Open while pregnant. The American made a brief foray on the tour earlier this season, but she played only four matches. She had some problems in her initial two outings in Paris, including in the second round, when she dropped the first set against 17th-seeded Ashleigh Barty before — as Williams herself put it — "Serena came out." Against Goerges, the careless errors were largely absent. The missing energy was back. In front of a crowd that included former heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson, it took 15 minutes for Williams to gain the upper hand, sprinting to reach a drop shot and whip a cross-court forehand passing winner for a 3-1 lead. Williams yelled loudly and raised her fist. It was almost as if she'd never left the scene. "Any time you play against Serena, you know what you're up against. You know the challenge that is upon you," Sharapova said. "Despite the record that I have against her, I always look forward to coming out on the court and competing against the best players.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

Eduard Folayang and his familiar path to glory

Eduard Folayang has been here before. Back in 2014, after racking up back-to-back wins in in a span of half a year, the Team Lakay star was slowly building a name for himself as a top-tier contender in ONE Championship’s lightweight division. A third straight win would have possibly put him in the title picture. And then, he ran into Russian Timofey Nastyukhin. A sequence that will forever be burned in the minds of Filipino MMA fans, Nasytukhin dropped Folayang with a well-timed flying knee to the jaw, and then finished it off with a crushing soccer kick, back when soccer kicks were allowed. While it wasn’t Folayang’s first stoppage loss, it was arguably his most violent to date. The Filipino MMA star lay motionless in front of a Filipino crowd at the Mall of Asia Arena. It took Folayang over a year before he made his return, a decision win over Tetsuya Yamada. That win would set Folayang on his path to the ONE Lightweight Word Championship, one of the most celebrated stories in MMA in the past couple of years. Roughly three years removed since his knockout loss to Nastyukhin at the Mall of Asia Arena, it would seem like a cruel repetition of history, as Folayang would once again find himself staring up at the MoA Arena lights in late 2017. Folayang, a single day away from celebrating his one-year anniversary of being a ONE world champion, saw his spot at the top of the lightweight division taken away with one, well-timed overhand right, courtesy of Martin Nguyen. Nguyen made history that night at the expense of Folayang, becoming ONE Championship’s first ever two-division world champion. For the Pinoy MMA hero, it was another setback, not unlike the many he’s faced through the course of his career.   The Road to Redemption No matter what other people said, those who knew him knew he’d be back, and one of those whose believe never wavered was that of ONE Championship Chairman and CEO Chatri Sityodtong, saying that this is just the start of Folayang's journey.  So finally, when it was announced that Folayang would indeed be coming back to the cage, it was a big deal. Immediately, it was clear that redemption was on the former champion’s mind. “Yun naman ang nagpapa-sarap sa isang life story, yung paano ka mag-rise after you fall, and it adds a lot of spices sa life if ganun ulit yung mangyayari, although syempre may different versions yung story ng bawat isa sa atin, and I’m still looking forward on my redemption in this upcoming fight.” Folayang said. Folayang’s return was set for May, in one of the most-stacked ONE cards of the year, and even with three world title bouts featuring the biggest ONE Championship stars also on the card, Filipino fight fans’ eyes were on Folayang’s highly-anticipated return.   Parallel Experiences With 25 professional bouts under his belt, Eduard Folayang isn’t new to the game, by any means. From fighting in front of small crowds to main eventing a packed Singapore Indoor Stadium for the world title, Folayang has seen it all and done it all, that’s why pre-fight jitters isn’t expected to be an issue for a fighter the caliber and experience of ‘The Landslide.’ And while it wasn’t so much as jitters, Folayang admits that he had a lot going through his head in the days leading up to his comeback fight. “Yung siguro sa akin lang, andaming pumapasok sa isipan ko, hindi mo maiiwasan yung mga ‘what ifs’ mga paano kung natalo ulit ako dito, ganun,” Folayang told ABS-CBN Sports. Having already been in this situation before, Folayang added that it was indeed a big help being able to look back at a parallel experience. “Oo naman, nakatulong, kasi looking back noong 2014, nung na-knockout din ako kay Timofey, tapos yung same feeling nung kakalabanin ko ulit nung 2016 si Tetsuya Yamada, andaming tumatakbo sa utak, mas lalo na since naging champion ako, syempre hindi mawawala yung expectations ng tao and andyan na yung mga bashers e, naka-ready na sila. So the best thing to do is dapat maging mentally strong and accurate sa pagpapatupad ng gameplan para manalo.” And implement a gameplan successfully, he did.   The Comeback Against an undefeated grappler in Russian Kharun Atlangeriev, Folayang was visibily patient and picked his shots while shrugging off takedown attempts to earn the unanimous decision win. “Yun yung isa sa mga nakita ko na parang naging cautious ako, siguro yung thinking na talagang parang masyadong worth yung game, as much as possible talaga, hindi mo na iniisip na maging fancy  yung fight, mas nananaig yung goal mo na manalo.” Folayang said of his performance against Atlangeriev. “Siguro yun yung isa sa mga pinaka-reason kung bakit medyo naging conservative yung approach ko sa fight, at saka napansin ko din, although gusto ko mag-all out, very passive yung kalaban eh, hindi mo alam kung ano yung iniisip niya, yun din yung isa sa mga naging reason.” Folayang went on record and gave himself a three out of five rating in his comeback fight. While ultimately he was happy with the result, the Baguio City native believes that he could have done way more, and that’s what he intends to do in the future. “Masaya, although sa akin I believe I can do much better, syempre ngayon comeback fight kasi kaya andyan palagi yung pressure, the more we learn a lot of lessons, the more na magiging maganda yung adjustment natin for the upcoming bouts na dadating.” Step one of the comeback was complete.   Second Shot at Glory And again, Eduard Folayang finds himself on the comeback trail. The 34-year old Team Lakay star has successfully bounced back from a loss, but arguably more important now is what lies ahead. With the win, Folayang is on his way, if not already back in the title picture, and if you ask him, he’ll be the first to tell you that he’s ready to get back what was once his. “Parang more na na-boost yung desire ulit para makabalik dun sa nawala sa atin, and hopefully this year, magkaroon ulit ng opportunity para maka-laban for the title.” Fueling the fire even more for Folayang is the fact that after seeing Nguyen’s last two bouts - a unanimous decision loss to ONE Bantamweight World champion Bibiano Fernandes and a split decision win over Christian Lee - he feels he can perform better if given a second go-around. “Especially after panoorin yung last two fights nung tumalo sa akin, parang nasasayangan ba. Feeling ko talaga, mas deserving na ako yung nakahawak, parang ganun yung pakiramdam ko.” Folayang shared. “Parang I could have done better kung hindi lang ako naging careless on one point, and kung na-oversee ko lang talaga na yung strength ko, dun ako papasukin.” While only time will tell whether or not Folayang does get a shot at the title again, whether a rematch or be it against someone else, the former champ is certain that he’s still in this, and he’s hungrier than ever for another taste of glory. “Malakas pa rin eh [yung hunger], it’s just a matter of paano natin alagaan yung career natin, yung health natin, iba kasi, yun din yung kagandahan ng mixed martial arts eh, the more na pumupunta yung age mo, the more na mas nagiging cautious ka, hindi na lang puro lakas yung ilalaban mo kundi parang nagiging wiser ka na din sa approach mo.” “I think yung hunger ko andun parin, I’m still hungry.” Folayang adds. When it’s all said and done, Folayang won’t be happy with just being at the top once and then crashing down after. For the Team Lakay star, there are still chapters to be written as he begins what is hopefully another run towards the pinnacle of the sport. “Yun naman yung gusto natin, hindi yung natapos na yung end ng chapter ng story natin, kundi may mga magaganda and exciting stories pa na maisusulat in that book.” After all, “multi-time world champion” Eduard Folayang has better ring to it, no? “Yun yung gusto natin, mas magandang pakinggan.” Eduard Folayang’s been here before, and if you’ve been paying attention, you know that this is just the start of great things to come......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 28th, 2018

Ateneo fan Angelica Panganiban makes ultimate hugot after Lady Eagles exit

Kapamilya star Angelica Panganiban has had her fair share of on-screen drama.  No role is that fact more evident than in her character as Mace Castillo in the 2014 romantic comedy 'That Thing Called Tadhana' alongside JM De Guzman. That thing called...volleyball 💯 pic.twitter.com/dtcIrv43tv — Mico Halili (@micohalili) April 15, 2018 The dramatic film set off a wave of heartbreak among its audience that resonate up to this day, and it looks like Angelica has assumed that role, even off-screen. Moments after Ateneo, her favorite volleyball team in the UAAP, was eliminated by Far Eastern University in Final Four, she Tweeted this out:  Sanay akong masaktan! Kaya ko to ateneo!!! — Angelica Panganiban (@angelica_114) April 21, 2018 Panganiban has been one of the most recognizable, and easily the most passionate fans of the Lady Eagles, and that's saying a lot. Angelica Panganiban is every Ateneo fan right now after they took set 3 😂 #UAAPSeason80Volleyball pic.twitter.com/6Yf5HYn1KQ — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) March 3, 2018 Even Angelica Panganiban was a fan of that quick hit by BDL! #UAAPSeason80Volleyball pic.twitter.com/IGfrPYu9pD — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) April 21, 2018 Still, she got her reps by playing a 'sawi' character before, so she'll probably handle this quite well, knowing that none of the Lady Eagles are graduating, and that she'll be a fan no matter what.    5 years in a relationship with the ALE 💙 I’m still here for another 5. Or another 10. Or maybe 20 more years. A post shared by Angelica Panganiban (@iamangelicap) on Apr 21, 2018 at 5:38am PDT.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 21st, 2018

DE JESUS: Genius, disciplinarian, champion coach

This story was originally published on May 7, 2017 De La Salle University head coach Ramil De Jesus came inside the press room of the Big Dome for a post-game interview wearing the same smile he had in the past nine times the Lady Spikers closed the UAAP season as champions. The only difference in those championship interviews were the players that accompanied him to answer questions from reporters. From Iris Ortega-Patrona, Desiree Hernandez, Maureen Penetrante, the legendary Manilla Santos, the Big Three of Cha Cruz, Paneng Mercado and Jacq Alarca, to Michel Gumabao and beast-mode-don’t-care Aby Marano to Ara Galang, Mika Reyes, Kim Dy and gem of a setter in Kim Fajaro – all of them stood beside a genius and architect of DLSU’s successful volleyball program. Victory after victory, De Jesus built his reputation as a one of the best women’s volleyball mentors in the country. Last Saturday, De Jesus added another feather to his cap when he steered the Taft-based squad to back-to-back titles in the 79th UAAP women’s volleyball tournament at the expense of archrival Ateneo de Manila. Two decades since his arrival to the school of a different shade of green after playing for Far Eastern University, delivered 10 titles and brought the Lady Spikers to the Finals 17 times.   De Jesus shared the secret of his success. “Siguro, sistema siguro then hard work. And then, well-disciplined ‘yung mga bata. Siguro, ‘yun ‘yung key,” he said. His success earned him the respect of his peers including three-time UAAP men’s volleyball champion Oliver Almadro of Ateneo, who was once one of his lieutenants, and players alike. DLSU embraced him as one of its own. “Natutuwa ako kasi kahit hindi ako alumnus doon niyakap nila ako bilang parang doon na din nag-graduate,” said De Jesus. “Hindi ko naman napapansin ang mga nanyayari sa akin sila lang ang nakakapansin, binigyan nga ako ng award. Happy, very happy (ako).” De Jesus is known to be a no nonsense coach. Strict, straightforward and a disciplinarian – traits he inherited from FEU men’s coach Kid Santos.                He doesn’t like fanfare and as much as possible keeps attention away from him. De Jesus carefully chooses his words but when he gives one, everybody listens. He means business all the time.   Brilliance of De Jesus 246-65. De Jesus knows how to win and his career win-loss record says it all. The main reason why DLSU trusted De Jesus to handle the team for that many years – a rare feat considering that a UAAP coach’s tenure is very volatile.   It was summer 20 years ago when former basketball Olympian and influential DLSU sport personality Ramoncito Campos brought in a young mentor in De Jesus to save the school’s volleyball program, which then had yet to win a title since joining the league in 1986.           He entered the UAAP volleyball scene during the time when powerhouse teams Far Eastern University and University of Sto. Tomas, then mentored by legendary coach August Sta. Maria, were the ones lording over here the competition. Of course the road to glory didn’t come easy but his first tour of duty gave DLSU a chance to feel what it was to be in the Final Four when the Lady Spikers finished fourth a year when after strings of forgettable seasons. Quenching the thirst to salvage some pride in the sport that will eventually be DLSU’s second most valued contest next to basketball, the Lady Spikers began to hunger for the crown – something the school never felt before since winning it all back in 1976 as a member of the NCAA.   De Jesus submitted his team to Spartan-like training and hammering discipline and slowly molded the Lady Spikers to a championship-caliber squad. In Season 61, DLSU challenged FEU for the crown but the Lady Tamaraws’ championship experience prevailed. The loss only fueled De Jesus’ desire to bring the Lady Spikers to the throne even more. With the core of ace hitter Ortega-Patrona, setter Valerie Bautista, Sally Macasaet, Sheryl Magallanes, Demelle Chua, Hollie Reyes and then sophomore Ivy Remulla, De Jesus steered DLSU on the right track for another shot at the crown. Midway in the season Bautista got pregnant. De Jesus, calm and composed, knew what to do. He converted open spiker Reyes into a setter and the gambit worked as DLSU once again punched a ticket to the Finals, this time against UST – a very hungry team looking to reclaim the title. A year removed from the throne, UST was ready for the kill. But the Espana-based squad went against a famished team – DLSU will not leave the sweltering University of the Philippines Human Kinetics Gym without the championship trophy. In front of a crowd - dwarf-sized compared to the multitude of fans that troop bigger venues of today – the Lady Spikers wrote history. DLSU slew a giant in a thrilling five-set game behind the stellar performance of Ortega-Patrona, who won that Season’s Most Valuable Player award – the first of many incredible volleybelles that will bag the highest individual honor under De Jesus’ tutelage.     It was an incredible feat but it won’t see a repeat in the next three years.              Grand Slam After their breakthrough title, the Lady Spikers had three straight bride’s maid finishes behind FEU. Heartbreaks brought by Ortega-Patrona’s falling out with De Jesus over a disciplinary issue in Season 63 and the unstoppable power of FEU's Monica Aleta, who won three straight MVP awards while towing the Lady Tams to a three-peat. Like a chess master, De Jesus learned from his mistakes before pulling off a feat that will cement his name as one of the greatest. With Hernandez, Penetrante and a young Santos as his main pieces, he steered the Lady Spikers to a rare three-peat. DLSU brought into heel FEU, UST and Adamson to complete a grand slam. A four-peat loomed for the celebrated Lady Spikers but fate played a cruel trick on them after UAAP suspended DLSU in Season 69 because the Green Archers' basketball squad fielded two ineligible players the previous year.       When the ban was lifted in Season 70, De Jesus and the Lady Spikers were again under the radar as title contenders together with the defending champion UST, FEU and Adamson. But team was forced to file a leave of absence from the school while the tournament was ongoing because Alarca saw action despite incomplete academic credentials to be eligible to play. All of the team’s won games where Alarca played where forfeited and the Lady Spikers ended up at seventh place. It was a painful setback but it also served as a rallying point for DLSU. With Santos playing her final year and the emergence of enigmatic but then rookie libero Mel Gohing in Season 71, the Lady Spikers denied the then graduating Rachel Anne Daquis and FEU back-to-back crowns. DLSU relinquished the throne to the Angeli Tabaquero and Aiza Maizo-led Tigresses the following year. The Lady Spikers avenged their loss the next season in a rematch with UST behind Alarca, Mercado, Cruz, Gumabao and Gohing in the start of De Jesus’ second three-peat.   DLSU-Ateneo rivalry Nobody really knows when UAAP volleyball picked up the tremendous following it has today. Maybe it needed something for people to get hooked into. A continuous rivalry, perhaps? For six straight years DLSU and Ateneo did just that. The storied rivalry between La Salle and Ateneo spilled from the basketball court to the taraflex mat of volleyball. De Jesus had in his bench the core of veterans Cruz, Gumabao and Marano back and freshmen Galang, Reyes and Demecillo when they met in the Season 74 Finals a young and promising Lady Eagles side – much like the Lady Spikers De Jesus inherited 14 seasons back. Led by Fille Cainglet, Dzi Gervacio and a fresh recruit from University of Sto. Tomas high school Alyssa Valdez, Ateneo gave DLSU a tough challenge for two seasons but the Lady Spikers repelled them both times. Then came Lady Eagles Thai mentor Tai Bundit. For three years in a row, De Jesus’ system bested the rest of the field including that of then Ateneo coach Roger Gorayeb. However, a coach who barely spoke English or Filipino provided him a challenge in Season 76. DLSU with an intact core led by Marano, swept its way straight to the Finals with a thrice-to-beat advantage. Ateneo crawled its way to the championship round through a series of do-or-die games. De Jesus is an old-school type of coach. His system is hinged on well-planned strategies and tactics. He was pitted against Bundit’s Thai-style of play anchored on a heartstrong mantra and a ‘happy, happy’ approach of the game. Bundit dances on the sideline, an animated fellow during the matches. De Jesus is stoic as always. When the two collided for the title for the first time, Bundit shocked De Jesus and DLSU when Ateneo beat them thrice in a four-game series that went the full distance. Bundit and the Valdez-led Lady Eagles did it again the following year, completing a season sweep at the expense of the Lady Spikers, who struggled to pose any form resistance in the Finals after Galang went down with a season-ending ACL tear in the semis. It was a devastating loss to say the least. But De Jesus, a general who fought many battles for the green and white, stuck with the weapon that brought him success – his ability to adjust. Outdueled by Bundit in their last six matches, De Jesus found a way to stop the rampaging Lady Eagles in their first meeting in Season 78. Ateneo equalized in the second round and even took the top spot after the elimination. The Lady Spikers and the Lady Eagles would eventually meet in the Finals for the fifth year in a row. De Jesus was ready for Ateneo. He knew the strengths and weaknesses of the Lady Eagles and used it to his advantage to win the series opener. The then graduating Valdez brought Ateneo back in Game 2 to tie the series, but DLSU completed its long-awaited revenge in the decider and gave Reyes, Demecillo and Galang a fitting sendoff gift.                  Road to back-to-back Losing five veterans including three of their key players heading into Season 79 gave De Jesus one of the toughest challenges he ever faced as a DLSU mentor.  Setter Kim Fajardo returned for her swan song together with fourth year playes Kim Dy, Dawn Macandili and Majoy Baron. Desiree Cheng also came back after a year of absence due to a knee injury, but De Jesus was still left to navigate with a relatively young crew.  “Sa laht nang nai-form kong team, ito yung medyo (up and down) yung performance,” he said. “Sobrang babaw ng bench, wala ka halos (mahugot) pagtingin mo, wala ka makuha.” DLSU struggled early and was on the losing end of two elims matches against Ateneo. “Ateneo nu’ng buong elimination NU lang ang halos tumalo. Sabi ko ano bang meron ang team na ito?” he said. “Pinilit lang naming habulin.” “Kasi alam ko nag-start kami medyo hilaw ang team namin. Early part ng first round natalo kami sa UP sabi ko pukpok pa tayo, habol pa,” De Jesus added. “Ang nakakatuwa sa mga bata, ang determinasyon na humabol nandoon.” When the De Jesus found himself leading the Lady Spikers to a sixth straight title series against Bundit and the Lady Eagles, he knew his squad was ready to defend their crown. And protect it they did in a series sweep capped by a dramatic five-set victory.    “Siguro buong eliminations, nire-review namin ang mga games, nakikita mo yung difference, ‘yung advantage at disadvantage ng team, so siguro doon kami nag-focus, kung saan kami medyo dehado. Concentrate kami sa training,” he said. “Ine-explain ko rin sa players kung ano yung dapat naming gawin, although mahirap. So, tanggapin na lang nila.” In a rare moment, when Ateneo’s Jho Maraguinot sent her attack long that signaled DLSU’s back-to-back championships, De Jesus let his hair down a little. He was jumping, dancing, celebrating the victory and even held his hands up, both his palms wide open as confetti dropped and the deafening roar of the crowd and banging of the drums echoed inside the arena. De Jesus won his tenth title. When the celebration subsided, De Jesus fashioned the same smile he wore in his past nine championships as he was led inside the pressroom of the Big Dome. Only this time around, Fajardo, Cheng and Dy were the ones who followed him from behind.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 20th, 2018

Refreshed Honorio Banario excited to prove he s a top lightweight contender

When Team Lakay lightweight contender Honorio 'The Rock' Banario steps into the cage at ONE Championship: Heroes of Honor at the Mall of Asia Arena Friday, April 20th it'll be his first time to do so in roughly a year...364 days to be exact.  Banario last outing, a second-round knockout win over Jaroslav Jartim, was back in April 21, 2017, also at the MoA Arena.  As it turns out, Banario's lengthy absence was due to an injury, and it needed half a year to recover.  "May injury ako last year, at least hindi naman gaano ka-lala, pero kailangan ko i-rest kasi yung parts ng katawan ko na na-injure is yung usually na lagi kong ginagamit, so kailangan yung total rest, so I rested it for six months, and I just started training last December until now, then strengthening four months prior to the fight." Banario said during the pre-fight press conference for ONE: Heroes of Honor.  Aside from getting his injuries healed up, Banario adds that the time off has also helped take care of his other aches and pains.  "Parang yung mga wear and tear ng muscle ko, na-repair din, so at least parang maganda yung katawan ulit," "Parang na-refresh, so expect na malakas ulit ako sa laban and in the future fights." Banario added.  On Friday, Banario finally makes his long awaited return to the cage against hard-hitting Australian Adrian Pang, and the 28-year old Baguio native couldn't be more eager to get back in the cage.  "I’m very very excited to come back and fight, especially here in our country, and to challenge myself to  a great opponent like Adrian Pang." For Banario, taking on a tough test like Pang will help solidify his position as a top guy in ONE Championship's lightweight division.  As it stands, Banario is already riding a four-fight winning streak, and a win over a guy like Pang will no doubt add to his stock.  "I’m very happy na they gave him as my opponent, kasi it’s a challenge for me to train hard and answer the question in my mind, if I am a top contender as a lightweight," "I need to fight this great athlete and surpass him and win the fight so that I can call myself a top, world class lightweight athlete." Banario added. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 17th, 2018

Brownlee, Balkman help Alab get its first-ever playoff win

History was made on Sunday inside the Filoil Flying V Centre. Getting the better of Saigon, 110-100, in the quarterfinals opener of the 2017-2018 Asean Basketball League, Alab Pilipinas scored its first playoff win in its two years of existence. San Miguel @AlabPilipinas 🇵🇭 claim their first playoff win in franchise history with a win over @SaigonHeat 🇻🇳 110-100.#ABL8Playoffs#MakeHistory pic.twitter.com/BzMCWgEon1 — ABL (@aseanbasketball) Abril 1, 2018 The Filipinos made the playoffs in their maiden campaign a year ago, but got swept in the best-of-three series. Now, they raise their post-eliminations record to 1-2. For American reinforcement Justin Brownlee, the win was special – even though he was a little late in fully grasping its significance. Told that he had just helped the new Philippine representatives to their first-ever playoff win, he reacted, “That was the first-ever? Oh wow!” He then continued, “It’s special, man. It always feels great to be the first to be able to do something.” And one win away from winning their first-ever playoff series, Brownlee said this is just the start for them. “This just shows the character of this team. Hopefully, there’s gonna be a lot more playoff wins in the near future,” he said. Indeed, Puerto Rican reinforcement Renaldo Balkman also said this is far from the end for Alab. As he put it, “It’s a great win tonight, but we gotta take care of business on Saturday so we keep moving forward.” Even Ray Parks Jr., who has been with the squad for both of its two seasons, wasn’t celebrating just yet. “It feels great, but we have to continue to grow. We can’t overlook our opponent because they’re a great team and they got firepower,” he said. That is exactly why, even after the 10-point margin of victory, head coach Jimmy Alapag vowed that his wards will be much more determined and disciplined in Game 2 next Saturday at the CIS Arena in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. “I’m happy we won, but from an effort standpoint, we were far from the sharpest we could be,” he said. He then continued, “That’s on me. We will prepare better for (the next game).” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 1st, 2018

Check out these Pinoy athletes cute bundles of joy

Have you ever wondered why some of our favorite athletes seem to be so motivated and seem not to get exhausted even after their non-stop grind? Aside from following their well-balanced diet, exercising regularly, practicing their routines, and undergoing other required procedures to ensure their fitness, what surely keeps our favorite athletes in tip-top shape physically, emotionally, and mentally is the love and inspiration they consistently get from their families and other loved-ones.  Those who already have a loving family behind them will surely get inspiration from the irresistible charm of their so adorable babies we spotted on their Instagram accounts! Idris Saint Norwood   Strictly going by the calendar, you were a little early. But to us, you were right on time! Welcome to the the world Idris Saint Norwood! 7.16.17 #LilNorwoods A post shared by Gabe Norwood (@gnorwood5) on Jul 16, 2017 at 3:42am PDT Despite just welcoming their newborn Idris Saint a month ago, Gabe had to be separated from his wife and #LilNorwoods for quite some time to play for Gilas Pilipinas in the on-going FIBA Asia tourney in Lebanon. Ezekiel Kai Devance   today im 1! #Ezekielkai #birthdayboy A post shared by joe devance (@them_devance_kids) on Jul 26, 2017 at 3:35pm PDT Joe Devance stands out not only because of his tallness and unusual hairstyle, but with his incredible performance as a baller and his swagas a dancer as well. And browsing through his IG snaps, it appears that his cute children, including one year old Baby Zeke, also brandish the humor and talent he possesses. Michael James Yap   Buon compleanno amore mio!!! ❤️ A post shared by Mic (@michelacazzola) on Aug 8, 2017 at 4:14am PDT The “little explorer” recently celebrated his birthday party as his doting parents Rain or Shine cager James Yap and Michela Cazzola prepared a safari-themed party for him! Amanda Claire Tiu   To our little one who can turn a rough day into a beautiful one, make a happy day an even sweeter one, and give life a whole new meaning and purpose -- Happy 1st birthday to our dearest Amanda Abu bear!! May you grow up to be beautiful inside out and a faithful servant of Christ. You are our greatest blessing! We love you so much ❤️❤️ - love your Papa and Mama A post shared by Chris Tiu (@chris_tiu17) on Jun 5, 2017 at 7:30am PDT One of Baby MJ’s special guests was the pretty unica hija of Chris Tiu with his equally beautiful wife Clarisse who just turned one last June. We wonder if they’re going to be good friends when they grow up? Lucas Alejandro Tenorio   😂😂😆 what happens when I'm queen, and you got a wife/momma that's trippin! 😂😆 matching outfits for all the boys this Father's Day!!!! 😍 lol we love you Daddy @la_tenorio , Happy Dad's day! 😘 A post shared by Chesca B T (@chesca_bt) on Jun 18, 2017 at 2:26am PDT The Tenorios have another LA in the house! However, he is not his daddy’s junior. Behold how cute they are in matching outfits, thanks to their power-tripper matriarch.  Zoey Isabelle Rosario   Isa sa aking inspirasyon. Mahal na mahal kita prinsesa ko. Happy 7 months! 😘❤️🎀🌻 #ZoeyIsabelle🌷 A post shared by Jeth Troy U. Rosario (@troyrosario18) on Aug 3, 2017 at 3:51am PDT The TropangTexter sophomore forward cannot hide how smitten he is to his seven-month-old princess as his feed is bombarded with candid shots of their Baby Zoey. Despite his busyness in their practices and games, he still finds time to bond with her like clipping off her fingernails. Pristine Althea Cruz   Disneyland you've been great! Had a superb time and my baby @pristinealthea felt like she was in her dreamland. Till next time 🙌🏼 A post shared by Jericho Xavier Cruz (@jerichoxcruz) on Jun 14, 2017 at 8:12am PDT His father Jericho Cruz is a fleet-footed guard for the ROS Painters. We’re thinking if he exudes the same protectiveness when it comes to their three-year-old baby. David Castro   David at Disneyland🤗 A post shared by Jayson Castro (@jaywill_17) on Mar 14, 2017 at 11:50pm PDT Meet David, the one year old small but terrible son of Asia’s Best Point Guard Jayson Castro. We hope his dad would pass on him his formidable basketball skills so we can have the The Blur Junior in the future. Lucia Intal   my little cheerleader ❤ #babyrocket A post shared by JBL (@jcintal7) on Jul 30, 2017 at 11:50pm PDT Time flies so fast as JC and Bianca’s little angel is turning two this coming October. No wonder that her daddy is always inspirited to win their games for his little cheerleader is always in the bleachers. Fille Renee Cainglet-Cayetano   We made it to number #1 ! Happy happy birthday @fillereneecayetano my sweet angel! Love you so much!💘 A post shared by Fille C. Cayetano (@fillecainglet_15) on Aug 8, 2017 at 12:04am PDT The sweet little angel of Direk Lino Cayetano and Pocari Sweat Lady Warrior Fille Cainglet just reached her first year last August 8! When she grows up, will she be a filmmaker like her dad or an athlete like her mom? Let’s just all find out! Chloe Sapphire Santiago-Manabat   Disney chloe and mommy BIG 'D'😘😘😘 A post shared by Chico Manabat (@kots_chico) on Apr 10, 2017 at 6:13pm PDT Being a daughter to two of this country’s most celebrated people in the athletics department – Mommy Dindin’s one of the finest volleybelles in the league today while Daddy Chico, a former National University Bulldog, is theassistant coach for both Letran Knights and NU Bullpups – we assume that Baby Chloe’s going to be in inclined with sports too! Jace Alonzo Lizardo   First wedding event of jace!! Congratulations insan @naldjpm and carmelie!! God bless you both!! . . #andnewmrandmrsmacapagal #TheLizardoSquad #squadgoals #family A post shared by Japoy Lizardo (@japoy_lizardo) on Aug 13, 2017 at 3:35am PDT For sure, the “future champion” of taekwondo power couple Japoy Lizardo and Janice Lagman would also be the future heartthrob as Baby Jace already captures a lot of hearts with his piercing eyes, bewitching smile, and astonishinglong, thick hair. Don’t grow too fast, little champ! We guess, we’re going to have a beautiful and bright future seeing these cute little babies who could be the country’s greatest athletes, artists, or influencers someday!.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 28th, 2018

Gumabao to use lucky 'No. 19' for Creamline jersey

After her success in the pageant world, Michele Gumabao will be back on the volleyball court to beef up a star-studded Creamline squad for the coming 2nd Premier Volleyball League Reinforced Conference starting May 6. The former three-time UAAP champion will be bringing in the same lucky charm she had when she won the Binibining Pilipinas-Globe crown recently for good measure. Gumabao will be donning the Cool Smasher jersey no. 19, parting ways with her long-time volleyball jersey no. 7 – the number she carried since her college days in De La Salle University. The 5-foot-10 opposite spiker is the newest recruit of Creamline, which is looking to capture its breakthrough title after finishing third in both the Reinforced and Open conferences last year.         She and long-time friend libero Melissa Gohing are reunited after a year following Gumabao’s transfer to Cocolife in the Philippine Superliga in 2017. The duo brought Pocari Sweat together with top hitter Myla Pablo to a sweep of the Open and Reinforced conferences of the defunct V-League two years ago. Unfortunately, for Gumabao, holdover Ivy Remulla has been wearing the no. 7 jersey since last season.   “Every time naman when you join an new team, syempre being a rookie you don’t want to take naybody’s number and Ate Ivy is no. 7,” said Gumabao. “So sabi ko ayoko ng issue siyempre so sabi ko, ‘Sir ako na ang magpapalit siyempre ayoko ng issue. Don’t ask her to change.’” “Kasi even though kilala ka naman on that number, it’s just a jersey number at the end of the day,” she added. “Nagkataon lang talaga na when I’ve been transferring teams the past few years, nagkakataon na walang jersey no. 7 o bagong team talaga. So it’s the first time na I’m joining a team that’s already there.” With her jersey No. 7 already taken, the next option for Gumabao is a no-brainer. “So may jersey no. 7 na so sabi ko, ‘Oh, I’ll just get jersey no. 19 kasi it’s also my Binibining Pilipinas candidate number,’” she explained. “Everything just worked out naman, walang may no. 19 and I’m very happy na I’m bringing the number. Something new, that’s the only thing I want naman no, change,” Gumabao added. “The fans naman I think they'll love it all. At least kilala ka bilang Binibini 19 and jersey no. 19.” Gumabao’s presence adds firepower, experience and leadership to the Cool Smashers bannered by ace scorer Alyssa Valdez and setter Jia Morado.   ---  Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles      .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 27th, 2018

Sans election windfall, ABS-CBN profit down 10%

ABS-CBN Corp., the media holding company of the Lopez family, said net income last year hit P3.16 billion, lower than in 2016 but in line with internal forecasts. The decline of about 10 percent was attributed to the absence of an election advertising windfall seen the previous year. In 2017, however, revenues rose 9 percent to P40.7 billion, driven by consumer sales. "Overall, we are pleased with our performance for 2017 and we are particularly happy to have exceeded our guidance for net income," ABS-CBN chief financial officer Aldrin Cerrado said on Friday. ABS-CBN adopted the cost per individual rating point pricing (CPIRP) scheme in 2015, which rewards the company for an inc...Keep on reading: Sans election windfall, ABS-CBN profit down 10%.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2018

Hamilton: Australian GP could be start of competitive season

By Justin Bergman, Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Lewis Hamilton won the Formula One driver's title in three of the last four years, but the Mercedes driver said Thursday on the eve of the season-opening Australian Grand Prix that he believes this year could be one of the most competitive yet in the sport. Ferrari's Sebastian Vettel, who pushed the British driver hard last season, performed well in testing a few weeks ago in Spain, along with teammate Kimi Raikkonen. And Hamilton said F1 fans will "be surprised just how competitive" Red Bull's Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen will be in Melbourne after putting a frustrating and inconsistent 2017 behind them. "There's a lot of hype around our team," Hamilton said. "I'm excited to see how we all fare up when we get to practice." For Mercedes, the hype at the start of each season is well-deserved: the team has dominated Formula One since 2014, winning four straight constructors' championships and 63 of 79 total races. But Ferrari demonstrated it could challenge Mercedes for a good portion of last season — Vettel actually led Hamilton through 12 races before the Mercedes driver took the lead for good at the Italian Grand Prix. Vettel said although he still believes Hamilton is the favorite to win the title again this year, his team has reason to be confident. "Our car is great . there's plenty to look forward to," he said. "Usually around this point, you don't know where the others are. That's why it's a bit pointless to come here and say you'll blow everyone away based on testing. I think we are in good shape. We could be in better shape, but it's always like that." Hamilton and Vettel have something else to vie for this year — a chance to pull even with former Argentine driver Juan Manuel Fangio for second place on the all-time championship list. Both drivers are tied with four titles, one short of Fangio's five. Michael Schumacher leads the list with seven titles. But for both Hamilton and Vettel, this statistic isn't top of mind. At least not at this early point of the season. "It's a long, long season," Hamilton said. "You don't really think about what could be, in the sense of matching others." And don't count out Red Bull. After a disastrous 2017 that saw the team struggle with engine problems and Ricciardo and Verstappen fail to finish 13 races combined, Red Bull is coming into the new season with hopes of challenging for victories again. "I think the car, compared to last year, definitely made good improvements," said the 20-year-old Verstappen, who finished last season strongly with two wins and a second-place finish in his last six races. "From my personal feeling, we have quite a strong car, but we have to wait and see how good our overall package is with the straights here (in Melbourne)." Ricciardo said anything will be better than last year's Australian GP, when he crashed in qualifying, started the race from pit lane due to a mechanical problem and then was forced to retire on the 28th lap. "Last year, we missed the anthem on the grid because I was in the garage trying to get the (car) going. I missed a lot of the Sunday build-up which was not fun," he said. "So, for sure this preparation is going to make more fun this weekend and we'll see where that fun takes us." It could take Red Bull all the way to the top of the podium — a result that couldn't come at a better time for Ricciardo, whose contract with the team expires at the end of 2018. "He's in a great place still with Red Bull," Hamilton said. "I think this year, he can really have a fighting chance to win the championship." Ricciardo, who's also facing a spirited challenge from his precocious teammate for the No. 1 position on Red Bull, said he's putting contract talks on hold to focus on starting the season strongly. "This is the year," he said. "Obviously, our prep's been good and I really, really hope Lewis is right and we will have a chance to fight for title and that will ultimately make me happy." Hamilton, though, isn't about to give an inch. He sounded a bit world-weary on Thursday, saying that after 12 seasons he's "not the most excited" about doing media conferences anymore, but he believes he still has as much passion for the sport as he did when he started out. "In my mind, I'm trying to break down new barriers, push the envelope," he said. "I'm seeing how far I can take the opportunity I have and obviously the ability I have to my full potential. I don't know what that is, and that's what I'm discovering.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2018

Philippine Azkals back with high spirits, high morale ahead of important matches

New year, fresh start. Heading into an important pair or matches, the Philippine Azkals have been refreshed and rejuvenated, according to team captain Phil Younghusband. Speaking at the pre-match press conference for their International Friendly match against Fiji on Thursday, March 22nd, Younghusband shared that there’s an overall upbeat feeling among the members of the men’s senior national football team. “I think definitely, being with the players three or four times now, spirits are high, everyone’s happy to be with each other.” The Azkals’ match against Fiji will serve as a tuneup for arguably the most important match in Philippine football history, their match against Tajikistan in the final matchday of the 2019 AFC Asian Cup Qualifiers on Tuesday, March 27th. A win over Tajikistan will ensure the Azkals’ entry into the 2019 AFC Asian Cup, a first in Philippine football. When the Azkals saw action in the Asian Cup Qualifiers in early November of 2017, ‘fresh’ wouldn’t be an accurate way to describe the players. The Azkal’s last three AFC Asian Cup Qualifier matches happened within a span of three months, and majority of the National Team callups also had club duties to attend to. Simply put, the players were quite tired. “I think coach mentioned earlier, I think this time around, compared to last year, we had a busier schedule last year and players were doing a lot of travelling, so when we were together, you could sense an air of tiredness,” Younghusband added. Now, the Azkals are coming into their next pair of matches coming off a four-month break and with a lighter schedule. Already, Younghusband sees a change in the atmosphere. “During this camp, everyone seems to have more energy, everyone seems to be laughing more, everyone seems to be smiling more, everyone seems to be more confident,” “I think going into the next two games, against Fiji and against Tajikistan, the players’ morale is very high, it’s good to see.” Younghusband added.   Catch the Azkals as they take on Fiji in an International Friendly Match on Thursday, March 22nd, LIVE on LIGA channel 86 and LIGA HD channel 183. Kickoff is at 7:30 PM......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 21st, 2018

Rose embraces new home, blocks out doubters

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com MINNEAPOLIS – Don’t let go of the rope. It’s one of Tom Thibodeau’s most familiar exhortations, a mantra of sorts to keep his teams locked in, digging down and generally committed through whatever grueling test they’re facing, be it a game, a road trip, a spate of injuries or the entire season. The trouble for Derrick Rose with that particular Thibs-ism is, so often, he has been the rope. On one side of an unfortunate tug o’ war, we’ve had the Rose loyalists, the fans, friends and family who believe that the 2010-11 NBA Most Valuable Player’s return from injury hell to elite status is just one more, legit opportunity away. Pulling from the other side, there is a growing group of Rose skeptics who are convinced that the Chicago kid’s best days – his most explosive, elusive, game-changing moves – are behind him, strewn on the floors of too many surgical rooms and rehab gyms. Rose, 29, knows they’re there. One group pulling for him, the other doubting him. And in an unusually candid and forceful moment Saturday (Sunday, PHL time), the normally soft-spoken Rose delivered a stark message to them all. “Yeah,” Rose said after his first full practice since signing a minimum-salary contract Thursday (Friday, PHL tie) to join the Minnesota Timberwolves. “This is how I feel about the whole perspective on it: You can have your perspective on me as far as I’m a bum, I can’t play, I can’t shoot, this and that. All right. Cool. I have no hard feelings with that. I’m cool with that. If that’s how you feel, that’s how you feel. “But at the same time, I don’t need your [bleeping] validation.” Rose’s eyes burned bright, in a direct response to the many health challenges he has endured from acquaintances and strangers both, picking at whatever good or bad is left of his basketball career. “I know who I am,” Rose continued. “I know the type of player I am. So, you respect that and I respect that, and we should be good. That’s how I feel about it.” In other words, you work your side of the street, Rose will continue to work his. If there are NBA administrators like Thibodeau, the Wolves’ head coach and president of basketball operations, willing to give him another chance, he’ll be chasing the ghost of his own self while trying to help somebody win. One more chance Rose’s latest grab at faded glory could begin in Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) matinee against the defending champion Golden State Warriors at Target Center (editor's note: Rose wound up playing just seven minutes off the bench. He finished with two points on 1-of-5 shooting with a rebound, two assists, and two turnovers). It probably is his last, best shot to salvage something from a 2017-18 season that’s been largely lost due to injury, yes, but other factors outside Rose’s control as well. What looked like a terrific opportunity back in training camp – signing with Eastern Conference power Cleveland Cavaliers and home to the game’s best player (and Rose nemesis) in LeBron James – got sideways fast. In the Cavs’ second game, on a drive to the rim, Rose got whacked across the face and neck by Milwaukee center Greg Monroe. He landed badly on the baseline, suffering a “jacked-up” left ankle that left him in a walking boot and sidelined him for 11 of Cleveland’s next 15 games. Then word got out just before Thanksgiving that Rose had left the team, reportedly to contemplate his future as an NBA player. He was gone for nearly two weeks, at least part of it back home in Chicago, during what Cavs GM Koby Altman called “a very challenging and difficult time for Derrick.” Rose didn’t play again until Cleveland’s 44th game. In nine appearances over the next three weeks, he was a shell of the three-time All-Star he’d once been, averaging 6.3 points, 1.6 assists and 13.3 minutes, while shooting 39 percent. On Feb. 8 (Feb. 9, PHL time), he was one of six Cavaliers players dealt by Altman at the NBA trade deadline, sent to Salt Lake City as a throw-in to acquire Utah’s Rodney Hood and Sacramento’s George Hill. Two days later, the Jazz waived Rose. Four weeks passed before Thibodeau got the green light from Minnesota owner Glen Taylor to sign Rose. The Oklahoma City Thunder had sniffed in his direction, only to opt for veteran backup Corey Brewer. Rose had family duties to attend to – he and Alaina Anderson had a baby girl in Chicago to start the week – but he also had spent time working out by himself in the Cavs’ facility or at Cleveland State’s gym. The end seemed near. Given Rose’s limited involvement this season, he probably would have been a long shot to land with one of the league’s 30 teams in 2018-19, had Thibodeau not reached out. The people on the dark end of Rose’s rope were winning. Now, this buys him time for a shout-out to the folks on the other end. “‘Don’t give up,’ Rose said he would tell them. Talking later at the downtown Minneapolis hotel where he’s staying, he wanted to assure people that his desire to play remains strong, his passion to keep trying still burns, and his mental fitness for this and future challenges on or away from the court is fine. “I still have faith,” Rose said, two bags of ice strapped to each leg. “No matter what happens, I still have a lot of faith in myself and my ability. It’s just about opportunity and catching a rhythm. Whenever I do catch a rhythm, I’d rather see what it is then. Than to, like, give up knowing I have so much left. Like, ‘Damn, I should have kept playing.’ “I’m going to give it my all. And once I do, then it’s like, ‘All right, cool. I gave it my all, now what’s this next phase in my life?’ “But as far as right now, I’m still in it. I’ve got two kids that can look at me now. The oldest, my boy [P.J.] is 5 years old. He’s looking at me right now. He sees everything. I’m going to tell him, ‘No excuses. Don’t come to me cryin’, this and that. Nah.’ He’ll see what I’ve had to go through. ‘Now suck it up and go out there and do what you’ve got to do.’” A career interrupted For some NBA players whose careers got waylaid by injuries – Brandon Roy, Greg Oden, Penny Hardaway – their bodies finally refused to cooperate. They went from 60-to-0, no wiggle room on whether they would continue. Rose, for all his setbacks, has worked his way back – not back to his previous form – from each and every injury. From the ACL blowout that started him down his hobbled path in April 2012 to three subsequent meniscus knee surgeries, from the left orbital fracture he suffered when he caught teammate Taj Gibson’s errant elbow in the face in the opening practice of 2015-16 to the lingering ankle sprain dealt by Monroe’s blow in October. In that sense, Rose is more like Bernard King, Sam Bowie or Grant Hill, standout players whose career trajectories were forever altered – but not ended – by injuries. Rose speaks as if he has reached some level of peace with his maladies, referring to his injuries as “part of the game” and his particular “cross” to bear. “I’ve just had five surgeries more than other people,” he said. “That’s the way I look at it. That don’t mean that I can’t play. That don’t mean that I lost my love for the game. No.” What Rose doesn’t like is the “fragile” label that’s been affixed to him. He’s less interested that he has played in only 486 of approximately 789 regular-season games so far, while proud of the 130 he logged with the Bulls (2015-16) and Knicks (2016-17) more recently. It seems clear that the reckless abandon with which Rose played – and the excruciating torque he put on his knees with his bounding, zig-zag attacks through the lane – wreaked havoc on his knees. Beyond that, though, he’s not buying any pattern business. “You see how I was injured [in October]? I was taken out of the air,” Rose said. “People are like, ‘Aw, he’s always injured.’ Are you just watching highlights, just looking at clips, like new fans are these days? Or are you watching an entire game? Are you just reading reports that come up on your phone?” Scouts say that Rose has lost both quickness and leaping ability, without developing a perimeter game to compensate. They also bundle his Cleveland hiatus with the AWOL episode last season with the Knicks, when Rose left the team without notice before a game against New Orleans, to question his reliability and commitment. Rose disputes the comments about his game, citing the circumstances in New York and Cleveland. “I could sit here and tell you, ‘I’m gonna try to change this. Do this and do that.’ Nah, I always felt, it starts with my rhythm,” he said. “[In] New York ... I was playing the triangle [offense favored by former Knicks president Phil Jackson] and still playing pretty well [18.0 ppg, 4.4 apg, 32.5 mpg]. In Cleveland, when did I really have a chance to catch a rhythm? When did I play 20 games straight? Or 10 games? Five games?” As for his reliability – or likelihood to take a powder on the Wolves the way he did on the Knicks and seemed to do on the Cavs – Rose said there is no issue there, either. In the past couple weeks, Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan (depression) and Cleveland’s Kevin Love (panic attacks) have opened up about psychological challenges they and other athletes face. But Rose shook his head as the question was asked. “Oh no, no, no,” he said. “I’m blessed, man. Beyond blessed. It’s not even ... what do I have to complain about? I don’t have anything to complain about. Of course, I wish I was on the court more. I think in time, with the right opportunity, I’ll be out there more. “I’m not depressed, even though I think everybody deals with some depression in some way. It’s about how you deal with it. We’re emotional creatures. We hold onto things. I try to meditate, try to do little things to change my mindset and try to read things to easy my nerves.” Rose admitted he did wonder if he would get another chance, once the Cavs traded him to a Jazz team that had no use for him. “Especially when you get dropped by a team like Cleveland, that needed players,” he said. “It makes other teams think, ‘Damn, if they didn’t keep him...’” Rose has not spoken with James since being dealt, he said. “The way I take it, I don’t take it as personal,” Rose said. “They didn’t need my services. That’s the way I look at it, OK? I understand. It’s business. Does that stop me from working hard? Does that stop me from still putting out goals and trying to reach my goals? No.” Familiar faces aid return Now Rose is reunited with Thibodeau, Gibson, Jimmy Butler (sidelined after his own meniscus surgery) and familiar coaches and staff making up the “TimberBulls.” He even trusts Thibodeau, often criticized for the heavy minutes he loads on his top players, not to break him. “If anything, I want him to play me,” Rose said. “I want to show to him that I can still play. I want him to see me and be like, ‘Damn, he’s still got it.’ I want him to count on me. I want to be held accountable. You know what I mean? I don’t just want to be, like, an average guy on the team riding along just to see how far they go. I really want to add.” Said Thibodeau, who ran Rose Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) through a rigorous refresher course on his playbook: “Obviously when he was at an MVP level, that was the peak. But he also, my last year in Chicago, he had a great year. ... He still has the potential to be very good. He’s young, that was the other part of it. He knows some of our guys, he knows the system. “Like all stories, there’s a beginning, there’s a middle and there’s an end,” the Wolves coach added. “I don’t think it’s a finished story.” Gibson thinks Rose can shoulder some of Butler’s late-game duties, simply because the scoring guard has strong muscle memory of such situations. He, too, hopes Rose’s story can take a happy turn. “I’ve got my fingers crossed,” the veteran forward said. “I truly believe in him. He’s got a lot left in the tank. It’s just, sometimes life doesn’t go your way and you have to push through it and keep fighting.” Thibodeau has said that Rose, like starter Jeff Teague and backup Tyus Jones, can play both backcourt spots, so he can mix-and-match based on situations. Rose anticipates no problem walking that line between asserting his game and rocking the Wolves’ boat. “My job coming here, I’m not trying to step on nobody’s toes. I’m not trying to take someone’s spot,” he said. “I’m not trying to show myself. Nah. I’m here to win. Me going out there and playing, hopefully you all see that. ‘He’s making money plays. He’s playing to win. And that’s what we wanted from him.’” Not that Rose, lest we forget from up top, needs anyone’s bleeping validation. Boosters and doubters can pull this way or that, but he said he’ll be the one who decides when his time is up. “When my love of the game is not there,” Rose said, sounding sincere near the end of his 10th season overall. “When I get tired of going to the gym. “Don’t get me wrong, we all go through that. But after a couple of days, I get antsy, I want to be in the gym. When a week or two goes by and I haven’t touched the gym, even in the summer, oh yeah, I’d know it was over.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Doubters pushed world champ Biado to Athlete of the Year level

When it rains, it pours. That was exactly the kind of year 2017 was for Carlo Biado, pocketing glory like he effortlessly does on the billiard table wherever he takes the cue. After winning gold medals in the 2017 World Games and in the 2017 SEA Games, the 34-year-old cuemaster had his biggest moment when he ruled the 2017World 9-Ball Championship in Doha, Qatar. READ:Carlo Biado rules world 9-ball "I'm so happy because I never expected the continued success I'll achieve," he said Tuesday when he was named as one of the three Athletes of the Year in the SMC-Philippine Sportswriters Association Awards night. Biado's triumph reasserted the Philippines' standing as one of...Keep on reading: Doubters pushed world champ Biado to Athlete of the Year level.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

Analysts on banks’ stocks: Aggressive purchase and hold at current levels (4th Quarter Banking Report 2017)

By Carmina Angelica V. Olano THE GROWTH of banking stocks during the quarter accelerated, an uptrend which analysts attribute to lenders’ impressive corporate earnings. For this year, they also signalled an “overweight” on the sector, amid favourable interest rate environment and sustained strong economic fundamentals. The Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) breached the 8,500 level […] The post Analysts on banks’ stocks: Aggressive purchase and hold at current levels (4th Quarter Banking Report 2017) appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018