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Algeria breast cancer survivors shunned as ‘half-women’

As if losing a breast to cancer was not traumatic enough, Algerian mother-of-three Linda was then spurned by her husband for being "mutilated" and a "half-woman." "Cancer? It's nothing compared with being rejected after 18 years of marriage," the 50-year-old medical assistant said, still clearly upset years later. Linda is one of hundreds of Algerian women to have been abandoned by their husbands or fiances after being diagnosed with breast cancer, a charity says. Thousands of women are found to suffer from the disease every year in Algeria, leaving many with no option but to surgically remove a part of their body deeply associated with their feminity. Hayat says her fian...Keep on reading: Algeria breast cancer survivors shunned as ‘half-women’.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJan 2nd, 2018

Breast cancer gene does not boost risk of death – study

PARIS, France – Young women with the BRCA gene mutation that prompted actress Angelina Jolie's pre-emptive and much-publicized double mastectomy are not more likely to die after a breast cancer diagnosis, scientists said Friday, January 12. In fact, they may have a "survival advantage" over non-carriers if diagnosed with triple-negative ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Breast cancer gene does not boost risk of death: study

Young women with the BRCA (BReastCAncer) gene mutation that prompted actress Angelina Jolie's pre-emptive and much-publicized double mastectomy are not more likely to die after a breast cancer diagnosis, scientists said on Friday.   In fact, they may have a "survival advantage" over non-carriers if diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer, a form that is particularly hard to treat, a team wrote in the journal The Lancet Oncology.   "Women diagnosed with early breast cancer who carry a BRCA mutation are often offered double mastectomies soon after their diagnosis or chemotherapy treatment" compared to non-mutation carriers, study co-author Diana Eccles of the Uni...Keep on reading: Breast cancer gene does not boost risk of death: study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

At least 108 children, women dead, missing in Western Mindanao flashfloods

SALVADOR, Lanao del Norte---Ricardo Abalo, principal of the Salvador Central School, could barely contain his emotion as one by one, the bodies of eight school children were plucked out of the thick mud that descended into several villages on Friday. "It's very painful to see the dead bodies of the children, whom we also considered to be our own," the muddied Abalo told the Inquirer. Salvador has suffered 41 confirmed deaths but about half of the figure had not yet been recovered. Abalo had joined the search and retrieval team that combed the thick mud in the hope of finding survivors in the villages of Pansor, Buntong, and Madaya. Among those missing was the 17-year-old chil...Keep on reading: At least 108 children, women dead, missing in Western Mindanao flashfloods.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 24th, 2017

Risk of breast cancer’s return looms for 20 years—study

Women who are treated for a kind of breast cancer that is fueled by the hormone estrogen face a substantial risk of the cancer returning, even 20 years later, researcher said earlier this week. The risk is highest in women whose original tumors were large and affected four or more lymph nodes, said the report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers analyzed data from 88 clinical trials involving nearly 63,000 women with estrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, one of the most common types. Patients in the study all received endocrine therapy---such as tamoxifen which is the standard of care to cut the risk of cancer recurrence---for five years and...Keep on reading: Risk of breast cancer’s return looms for 20 years—study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 11th, 2017

World’s first profit-for-charity breast care center opens in Makati City

MANILA, Philippines — According to the Department of Health, one out of four Filipino women is at risk of getting breast cancer in her lifetime......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 16th, 2017

‘Half a glass of wine every day’ increases breast cancer risk – BBC News

‘Half a glass of wine every day’ increases breast cancer risk – BBC News.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2017

Stars walk for breast-cancer survivors at 2nd Fashion Can Serve gala night

Stars walk for breast-cancer survivors at 2nd Fashion Can Serve gala night.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  pepRelated NewsOct 18th, 2016

Arts & Leisure: Fashion show focuses on support for cancer survivors

A PERSON's battle against breast cancer is not done alone as one needs the support from family and friends in order to succeed, that is the theme of ICanServe Foundation's second fashion show/fund-raiser slated on Oct. 13 at the Raffles Makati......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsOct 9th, 2016

Breastfeeding for 6 months cuts diabetes risk in half – study

MIAMI: Women who breastfeed their babies for six months or more may be able to cut their risk of developing diabetes in the future by nearly half, according to a study Tuesday. The findings from a three-decade US study of more than 1,200 white and African-American women were published in the Journal of the American [...] The post Breastfeeding for 6 months cuts diabetes risk in half – study appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

Federer deflects attention to Nadal, Djokovic in Australia

By John Pye, Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Roger Federer prefers to think of Rafael Nadal or Novak Djokovic as the favorites for the Australian Open title, despite entering as defending champion and coming off a worry-free preparation. "I play down my chances just because I don't think a 36-year-old should be a favorite of a tournament," Federer said Sunday on the eve of the year's first Grand Slam tournament, "It should not be the case. "That's why I see things more relaxed, you know, at a later stage of my career." The 19-time major winner can afford to relax slightly longer, given the half of the draw that he shares with Djokovic doesn't start until day two. Top-ranked Nadal will get under way Monday night against Victor Estrella Burgos on Rod Laver Arena, where he lost the final in five sets to Federer last year. All four singles finalists were 30 or older here last year in what became a tournament for the ages, and three of them are back. Serena Williams beat her older sister Venus Williams in the final to capture an Open era-record 23rd major here last year but decided against defending her title because she didn't have enough time to recover from health issues after a complicated childbirth in September. Venus Williams is seeded fifth and is second match scheduled on center court to get her 77th major under way with a challenging opener against Belinda Bencic. She's 4-0 in career head-to-heads against 20-year-old Bencic — who reached a career-high No. 7 ranking in 2016 and who helped Federer win the Hopman Cup title for Switzerland earlier this month — but is coming off an abbreviated preparation that included a loss in the second round to eventual champion Angelique Kerber at the Sydney International last week. At 37, Venus Williams among the top contenders at Melbourne Park. Others in action on Monday include seventh-seeded Jelena Ostapenko, who meets Francesca Schiavone in a match featuring current vs. former French Open champions, No. 2-ranked Caroline Wozniacki, who opens against Mihaela Buzarnescu, and U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens against Zhang Shuai. Simona Halep is the No. 1 seed in the women's draw, and one of six women who can hold the No. 1 ranking at the end of the Australian Open. Halep, who has had back-to-back first-round exits on her last two trips to Melbourne Park, opens on day two against Australian wild-card entry Destanee Aiava. Only two men can hold the top ranking in the first week of February — Nadal or Federer — regardless of what No. 3 Grigor Dimitrov or No. 4 Alexander Zverev or anybody else does in Melbourne. Federer returns in contrasting circumstances to his appearance in 2017, when he was coming off a six-month break for an injured left knee and had low expectations about ending a Grand Slam title drought that dated to Wimbledon in 2012. "This year I hope to win the first few rounds and get rolling hopefully, whereas last year I was just hoping to win," a match, Federer told his pre-tournament news conference Sunday. "It was more of a 'let's see what happens' kind of tournament, maybe similar to what Novak or Stan (Wawrinka) or others are going through this year." Six-time Australian Open winner Djokovic has been sidelined for six months with an injured right elbow, returning with a remodeled service motion, and 2014 champion Wawrinka has also been out of the game since Wimbledon after surgery on his knee. Nadal, who won the French and U.S. Open titles last year, has also had a limited preparation restricted to couple of exhibition matches last week as he recovers from a sore knee. None of that makes them any less of a threat to Federer. "Rafa, with the year that he's had, and Novak with the six titles he's had here, even if it's unknown how he's feeling, they could very well be the favorites, too," Federer said. "If you're in the draw, you give yourself a chance. That's what happened for me last year — all ended up way better than I thought it would, as you know.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 14th, 2018

Let Sisi Rondina give you 10 explosive reasons to get hyped for UAAP 80

UST hitter Cherry "Sisi" Rondina has a Herculean task ahead of her in the upcoming UAAP season 80 women's volleyball tournament. Aside from having the responsibility to lead a relatively young, yet hardened Golden Tigress squad to the wars, she'll have to do it without running mate EJ Laure who was sidelined due to a lingering shoulder injury. With one half of the Espana hitters gone, Rondina's workload will be doubled.  Last season, the two spikers both placed high on the scoring list, with Laure finishing 3rd (192 points), and Sisi immediately behind at 4th (191 points). Still, it's not all bad for UST, because it means more room for the other Tigresses to develop, and of course, more touches for the incoming fourth-year player Rondina. As one of the most electrifying scorers in the league, the diminutive 5'6" hitter stands tall every time she takes off for a kill, and with an increased number of touches, Rondina can wreak havoc on the court. Ahead of season 80, let's take a look back at the Cherry Bomb's 10 most explosive hits from last season. UST hitter Sisi Rondina cherry-bombed her way to 191 points this season! Here are 10 of her most explosive hits in #UAAPSeason79! 🍒💣 pic.twitter.com/TlTGf0OueV — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) April 21, 2017.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Study: Women who work night shifts face higher cancer risk

MIAMI, USA – Women who regularly work the night shift in Europe and North America may face a 19 percent higher risk of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

CSB sweeps Letran

Games Sunday: (FilOil Flying V Centre) 8:00 a.m. –- LPU vs. Perpetual (jrs) 9:30 a.m. -- LPU vs. Perpetual (m) 11 a.m. –- LPU vs. Perpetual (w) 12:30 p.m. -- EAC vs. Arellano (w) 2:00 p.m. -- EAC vs Arellano (m) 3:30 p.m. – EAC vs. Arellano (jrs)   College of St. Benilde bucked a slow start and a sloppy outing in the third set to eke out a straight-set 25-22, 25-11, 25-20, victory over Letran Friday in the 93rd NCAA women’s volleyball competition at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Graduating veteran Ranya Musa and Rachel Austero led the Lady Blazers with 14 points each while transferees Marites Pablo and Klarisa Abriam, who both came from National University, combined for 17 markers in their debut game. Musa scored 10 off attacks while Austero smashed nine spikes and nailed four of the Taft-based squad’s 12 service aces. New Lady Blazers head coach Arnold Laniog was far from satisfied with his wards’ performance in their 69-minute rout.        “Naka-adapt na sila sa sistema pero hindi pa nila totally ma-run yung gusto naming mangyari,” said new Lady Blazers head coach Arnold Laniog. The mentor was disappointed specifically with the numbers of errors they committed. CSB, who ruled the tournament in Season 91, gave away 30 points off errors, more than half of the total markers earned by the Lady Knights in their 53-point game total. “Like kanina sa first set medyo struggle tapos nakita ko sa mukha nila na, ‘Oh teka anong problema, anong nangyari?’ Eh ang usapan namin as much as possible on the start of the first set makuha kaagad namin ang momentum,” said Laniog. “Kanina nakita ko na parang nag-aanatayan kung sino magi-initiate o sino magpu-push para gumalaw. Eventually naka-adjust na.” “After the second set sinabi ko na nananalo tayo pero once na nanalo tayo doon natatapos. Ipinakita ko yun stats and nagulat sila na on the first set 19 points ang kalaban binigyan namin sila ng 18 points. So 18 points came from our errors,” added the mentor, who steered the CSB men’s team to its breakthrough title last year before taking the Lady Blazers’ coaching position left by Macky Carino. “Sinabi ko sa kanila na mas mataas yung binibigay nating puntos kaysa sa ini-earn nila. Thankful na lang kami na hindi sila ganoon ka-aggressive gumawa ng puntos and at the same time yung service namin naging threat na kanina.” After a dominating second set, CSB went down 1-6 to open the third frame. The Lady Blazers were down 9-11 before mounting a five-point blitz to overtake Letran, 14-11. CSB went up, 21-16, the Lady Knights closed the gap 23-20 before the Lady Blazers sealed the match with back-to-back hits capped by Arianne Daguil smash. Miracle Mendoza led Letran with five points while Glayssa Torres and Marie Simborio added four each. Meanwhile, defending champion CSB defeated Letran, 25-12, 25-21, 25-18, in men’s play while the CSB-La Salle Greenhills Junior Blazers outplayed the Squires, 25-15, 25-20, 19-25, 25-20, to complete the school’s sweep over the Intramuros-based rival. Isaah Arda and Mark Orian scored 17 and 13 points, respectively, for the Blazers while Christian Antonio exploded with 24 to lead the Junior Blazers.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Cancer-alcohol link found in study

PARIS, France --- Alcohol damages the DNA of stem cells responsible for producing new blood, according to a mouse study which may explain the link between drinking and cancer, scientists said on Wednesday. Health watchdogs have long warned that alcohol consumption contributes to seven types of cancer -- of the mouth, throat, larynx or voice box, esophagus or food pipe, breast, liver and bowel. What was not well understood was: how? For the new study, published in the science journal Nature, researchers gave lab mice diluted alcohol, known chemically as ethanol. They then used chromosome and DNA analysis to examine genetic damage caused by acetaldehyde, a chemical produced...Keep on reading: Cancer-alcohol link found in study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 4th, 2018

Tel Aviv toy towers over world record

Municipality workers and volunteers in Israel's coastal city of Tel Aviv have built a 36-meter (118-foot) tower of Lego bricks designed to set a new world record. It was constructed from more than half a million of the brightly coloured plastic bricks donated by the city's residents. The project was launched just over a year ago by teachers of eight-year-old Omer Sayag who died of cancer in 2014, and who used to build Lego towers during his illness. The tower was raised in sections opposite the Tel Aviv municipality building in Rabin Square. According to Guinness World Records, the previous record was set in 2015 when the Italian subsidiary of Lego built a 35.05-meter (11...Keep on reading: Tel Aviv toy towers over world record.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 28th, 2017

Kings rally in second half to top Embiid-less 76ers

By Aaron Bracy, Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Zach Randolph scored 27 points and Buddy Hield added 24 to lead the Sacramento Kings to a 101-95 victory over the Philadelphia 76ers on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). Frank Mason III added 16 points for the Kings, who came back from a 16-point second-half deficit. Ben Simmons had 13 points, 12 rebounds and eight assists for slumping Philadelphia, which lost for the seventh time in eight games while playing without center Joel Embiid for the second straight night due to a back injury. Robert Covington led the 76ers with 17 points. Embiid did not travel with the team to Chicago for Monday’s (Tuesday, PHL time) 117-115 loss to the Bulls. He was expected to play against the Kings on the second night of back-to-back games, but coach Brett Brown said the team’s medical staff advised him to keep the seven-foot center on the sideline. The injury has kept Embiid out for four of the last six games. Brown said Embiid’s back “is still a little bit sore.” Philadelphia looked out of sync without Embiid and Sacramento took advantage. Hield gave the Kings a 79-78 lead with a three-pointer with 9:48 remaining. Vince Carter made a full-court outlet pass to Garrett Temple for a layup that made it 92-86 Sacramento with 4:18 left. Carter made another crucial play down the stretch, hustling for an offensive rebound that led to Randolph’s jumper with 1:59 to play. Simmons answered with a driving basket that made it 96-92, but he couldn’t convert the free throw after being fouled and the rally fizzled from there. BROWN ON OKAFOR Jahlil Okafor, whom Philadelphia traded to Brooklyn earlier this month, made headlines in New York on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) for saying he was glad to be with an organization that had “an actual NBA coaching staff.” “Jahlil knows what we did here,” Brown said prior to Tuesday’s (Wednesday, PHL time) game against the Kings. “It’s a young person who gave a quote. ... I think everybody understands how we treat people here and the attention he received while he was here.” TIP-INS Kings: G George Hill (illness) did not play. ... Malachi Richardson had three points in 19 minutes after not playing Sunday (Monday, PHL time) due to an ankle injury. ... Randolph (rest) didn’t play in Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) 108-93 loss at Toronto. ... G De’Aaron Fox was back in the lineup after missing Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) game at Toronto due to a bruised right thigh, but he didn’t return after re-injuring it in the first half. He had two points in 11 minutes. 76ers: Embiid last played in Philadelphia’s nationally televised game against Oklahoma City on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time), finishing with 34 points, eight rebounds and six assists in the 76ers’ 119-117 triple-overtime loss. ... Prior to the game, the 76ers honored Philadelphia native and South Carolina women’s basketball coach Dawn Staley. The Gamecocks play at Temple on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time). ... J.J. Redick left after injuring his hamstring. He had eight points in 15 minutes. UP NEXT Kings: Finish four-game road trip at Brooklyn on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time). Sixers: Host Toronto on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) in the first game of a home-and-home series. Philadelphia will play at the Raptors on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 20th, 2017

Observe smoke-free holiday, Pinoys urged

MANILA, Philippines — A group of cancer survivors yesterday urged the public, particularly cigarette smokers, to observe a smoke-free holiday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 18th, 2017

Serious talks

Napili na ni Kris Aquino ang follower niya sa social media na binigyan niya ng Neverfull LV bag na kasama sa kanyang #Christmas-lovelovelove sharing campaign para sa Pasko. Si Michele Bernal ang napili niya na isa ring single mom at may stage 3 breast cancer. ’Katuwa ang pakiusap ni Kris….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsDec 9th, 2017

Democrats tell scandal-hit Franken to quit U.S. Senate

WASHINGTON DC, USA – US Senator Al Franken's political career was on the brink Wednesday, December 6, after more than half of his fellow Senate Democrats demanded his departure over multiple claims that he groped women. Franken – a former comedian who made his name on the popular late-night comedy ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 7th, 2017