After one for the ages, Australian Open now a fitness test

MELBOURNE, Australia — With Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic among the walking wounded and Serena Williams already deciding not to defend her title, injuries.....»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarJan 12th, 2018

Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals

JOHN PYE, AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — If Rafael Nadal wanted a fitness test in the first week of the Australian Open, he got one in his almost four-hour, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-3 win over Diego Schwartzman. No. 3-ranked Grigor Dimitrov did it tough, too, before advancing to the quarterfinals at the expense of the last Aussie in the draw. Dimitrov avenged a loss two weeks ago to Nick Kyrgios with a 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4), 4-6, 7-6 (4) win over Nick Kyrgios on Sunday night. He'll next face Kyle Edmund, who reached his first Grand Slam quarterfinal with a 6-7 (4), 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 win over Andreas Seppi earlier in the afternoon and could relax and watch the night-time entertainment. Nadal, with his spot in a 10th Australian Open quarterfinal secure, draped an arm around his Argentine friend Schwartzman and patted him on top of the head after they met at the net. "A great battle ... he's a good friend of mine," Nadal said. "This is the first big match that I played in 2018. That's confidence for myself ... confidence I can resist for four hours on court at a good intensity." Nadal lost last year's Australian Open final to Roger Federer, but went on to regain the No. 1 ranking and win the French and U.S. Open titles before bringing his season to a premature end because of an injured right knee. He didn't play a competitive match before the season-opening major, and advanced through three rounds without dropping a set. That streak finished when Schwartzman took the second set, rebounding three times after dropping serve to break back against Nadal and level the match. Nadal lifted to win the third, but Schwatzman didn't relent. The second game of the fourth set lasted almost 13 minutes and 20 points, with Nadal finally holding after saving five break points. The 16-time major winner broke again in the next game and withstood more break points — seven in all in the last set and 15 of 18 in the match — before clinching it in 3 hours, 51 minutes. "It was a good test for me. It was a lot of hours on court. Moments under pressure," Nadal said. "So, yeah, a lot of positive things that I managed well." Nadal will next play 2014 U.S. Open champion Marin Cilic, who collected his 100th Grand Slam match win with a 6-7 (2), 6-3, 7-6 (0), 7-6 (3) victory over No. 10 Pablo Carreno Busta. "I had the 300th win of my career at the U.S. Open in 2014, so this is also beautiful one," Cilic said of his latest major milestone. "I hope I'm going to continue and gather three more here." Caroline Wozniacki continued to cash in on her second chance, reaching the quarterfinals here for the first time since 2012 with a 6-3, 6-0 win over Magdalena Rybarikova. After saving match points and coming back from 5-1 down in the third set of her second-round win, No. 2-ranked Wozniacki said she was "playing with the house money" and had nothing to lose. "I played really well from being down 5-1 ... since then I've just kept that going," she said. After a tight tussle in the opening four games against No. 19-seeded Rybarikova, a Wimbledon semifinalist last year, Wozniacki dominated the fourth-round match and conceded only six points in the second set. She tried a between-the-legs shot for the first time in a tour-level match. "I think you can tell my confidence is high," Wozniacki said in an on-court TV interview. "I tried a tweener today and it went in." Wozniacki next plays Carla Suarez Navarro, who came back from a set and 4-1 down to beat No. 32 Anett Kontaveit 4-6, 6-4, 8-6. Elise Mertens reached the quarterfinals in her Australian Open debut, beating Petra Martic 7-6 (5), 7-5 to extend her winning streak to nine matches including a title run at the Hobart International. _____ More AP coverage:»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 21st, 2018

Federer survives Nadal thriller to win 18th Grand Slam title

Roger Federer defied age and his Grand Slam nemesis Rafael Nadal to win a record 18th Grand Slam title in a thrilling, five-set final at the Australian Open on Sunday. Federer, 35, won a classic encounter 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 to become the oldest major-winner in 45 years and move four titles clear of Nadal and Pete Sampras on the all-time list. The veteran Swiss jumped for joy and cried tears of happiness as he sealed the win on his second championship point, ending a five-year wait for a big victory after Wimbledon in 2012. Neither Federer nor Nadal, 30, was expected to reach the final but both players grabbed their chance after the early demise of top seeds Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic. And it was a final for the ages as momentum shifted from one side to the other before Federer finally seized control in the deciding set. 'That is a milestone in my career, they are always epic matches against Rafa,' said Federer, adding: 'Rafa has caused me the most problems in my career.' For Federer, it sealed an astonishing comeback from six months out with injury. His fifth Australian title came seven long years after his last, against Murray in 2010. 'Tennis is a tough sport, there's no draws. But if there was going to be one I would have been very happy to accept a draw tonight and share it with Rafa, really,' Federer said. 'Keep playing please, Rafa. Tennis needs you.' Federer becomes the oldest major champion since Ken Rosewall won the Australian Open in 1972 at the age of 37. His ranking has dipped to 17 after a knee problem ended last season following Wimbledon, but he will now rise to 10 when the new rankings are released this week. It was the 35th meeting between the two long-time rivals with Nadal now leading 23-12 and 6-3 in major finals, including his five-set win over Federer in the 2009 Australian final. 'Just fight' 'I would have said a great event would be making the quarters,' Federer said of his pre-tournament expectations. 'Today I just drove myself forward, I said, 'Believe in it, run for the ball. Serve and run, serve and run. Just fight and see if you get lucky. 'I did, really got lucky tonight.' Nadal, who has also come back to form and fitness after an injury-ravaged 2016, has held the edge over Federer in major finals, winning their last four. 'It's amazing how well he's playing after being away for so long. For sure, you have been working a lot to make that happen. I am very happy for you,' Nadal told the crowd. 'It was a good month for me, amazing month for me, really enjoyed it. I worked very hard to be where I am today. Probably Roger deserved it a little bit more than me.' 'I'm just going to keep on trying. Feel like I'm back to a very high level. I'll keep fighting this season.' Federer, playing aggressively and with a flatter backhand than normal, took the match to Nadal and got the only service break to take the opening set. Nadal fought back with two breaks to level before Federer got the bit between his teeth with a double break in the third set. The Spaniard hit back in the fourth set with a service break in the fourth game to take the final into a fifth set. He again broke the Swiss early in the final set but Federer stirred himself and broke Nadal twice before serving out for a brilliant and emotional victory. Federer, considered by many as the finest player in tennis history, is now the first man to win five or more titles at three different Grand Slam events. He has collected five Australian Opens, seven Wimbledons, five US Opens and one French Open in a span of victories which now stretches across 14 years. AFP    .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 29th, 2017

Federer joins Djokovic, Sharapova in 2nd round in Australia

By John Pye, Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Roger Federer picked up where he left off at the last Australian Open on a day when Maria Sharapova, Angelique Kerber and Novak Djokovic ensured there were all kinds of successful comebacks. Defending champion Federer beating Aljaz Bedene 6-3, 6-4, 6-3 in a night match, his first on Rod Laver Arena since clinching a career-reviving title here last year. He's been met on court after wins here previously by tennis greats Laver, John McEnroe and Jim Courier. On Tuesday night, he got something different. Comedian Will Ferrell stepped out of the crowd and, slipping into character as Ron Burgundy from the movie Anchorman, conducted the post-match interview. Six-time champion Djokovic and 2014 Australian Open winner Stan Wawrinka stuck to business, returning from long injury layoffs with victories in their first matches since Wimbledon. Sharapova barely missed a beat in her first match in Melbourne since a failed doping test in 2016 resulted in a 15-month ban from tennis. One of just two former champions in the women's draw, Sharapova recovered from an early break in the second set and closed out her 6-1, 6-4 victory over Tatjana Maria with an ace at Margaret Court Arena. She celebrated by twirling, waving and blowing kisses to the crowd. "It's been a couple of years since I've been back here — obviously I wanted to enjoy the moment," the 2008 Australian Open champion and three-time runner-up said in an on-court TV interview. Former No. 1-ranked Kerber, the 2016 Australian Open winner, continued her resurgent run with a 6-0, 6-4 victory over Anna-Lena Friedsam to extend her streak to 10 consecutive wins. Her ranking slid into the 20s in 2017, but she's coming back into the kind of form that won her a title in Sydney last week and makes her a strong contender at Melbourne Park. "Something is going on with Australia and me," Kerber said. "I enjoy my stay, play my best tennis." Djokovic tweaked his service motion while recovering from an injured right elbow, and used it to good effect in a 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 win over Donald Young. Djokovic lost in the second round here last year, but won five of the previous six Australian Open titles. "Obviously I wanted to start with the right intensity, which I have," Djokovic said. "I played perfect tennis, like I never stopped." Wawrinka, who had six months out after surgery on his left knee, beat Ricardas Berankis 6-3, 6-4, 2-6, 7-6 (2). No. 4-ranked 4-Alexander Zverev and No. 7 David Goffin advanced, but No. 20 Roberto Bautista Agut lost to Fernando Verdasco, a semifinalist here in 2009, and former Wimbledon finalist Milos Raonic lost 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-4, 7-6 (4) to Lukas Lacko. No. 13 Sam Querrey restored some order for the U.S. men with a 6-3, 6-4, 6-2 win over Feliciano Lopez. Two other U.S. contenders, No. 8 Jack Sock and No. 16 John Isner, were out on opening day. Madison Keys also reversed a trend, becoming the only one of the four American women who contested the U.S. Open semifinals last September to reach the second round in Australia. Sloane Stephens, Venus Williams and CoCo Vandeweghe were all eliminated on Monday. No. 17-seeded Keys, the runner-up at the U.S. Open, had a 6-1, 7-5 win over Wang Qiang. No. 9 Johanna Konta beat Madison Brengle 6-3, 6-1 and will meet another American, Bernarda Pera in the second round. The U.S. women had four wins and 14 losses in round one. No. 1-ranked Simona Halep was in serious trouble twice — having to save set points at 5-2 down in the first set, and badly twisting her left ankle early in the second — before beating 17-year-old Australian wild-card entry Destanee Aiava 7-6 (5), 6-1. Halep, who lost back-to-back first-round matches here in the previous two years, will next play Eugenie Bouchard, the 2014 Wimbledon finalist who beat Oceane Dodin 6-3, 7-6 (5). "It's always really cool to go up against the best in the world," Bouchard said. "You use it as a measuring stick. I want to try to play my game and go out there and do some damage." Other seeded players advancing included Wimbledon champion Garbine Mugurza, No. 6 Karolina Pliskova, No. 8 Caroline Garcia, No. 16 Elena Vesnina, and No. 29 Lucie Safarova. Two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova lost 6-3, 4-6, 10-8 to Andrea Petkovic. Sharapova was banned for after testing positive for the drug meldonium here in 2016, when she reached the quarterfinals, and finished last year ranked No. 60. The five-time major winner will next play No. 14-seeded Anastasija Sevastova, who beat her at the U.S. Open last year in her return to a Grand Slam to tournament. After returning in New York, Sharapova is confident she's prepared again for a major. "I felt like I have got a lot of things out of the way physically and emotionally and mentally last year with — there was a lot of firsts again for me, playing the first tournament, first Grand Slam, and just different feelings and what it would be routinely," she said. "But it felt pretty routine today.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 16th, 2018

Federer deflects attention to Nadal, Djokovic in Australia

By John Pye, Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Roger Federer prefers to think of Rafael Nadal or Novak Djokovic as the favorites for the Australian Open title, despite entering as defending champion and coming off a worry-free preparation. "I play down my chances just because I don't think a 36-year-old should be a favorite of a tournament," Federer said Sunday on the eve of the year's first Grand Slam tournament, "It should not be the case. "That's why I see things more relaxed, you know, at a later stage of my career." The 19-time major winner can afford to relax slightly longer, given the half of the draw that he shares with Djokovic doesn't start until day two. Top-ranked Nadal will get under way Monday night against Victor Estrella Burgos on Rod Laver Arena, where he lost the final in five sets to Federer last year. All four singles finalists were 30 or older here last year in what became a tournament for the ages, and three of them are back. Serena Williams beat her older sister Venus Williams in the final to capture an Open era-record 23rd major here last year but decided against defending her title because she didn't have enough time to recover from health issues after a complicated childbirth in September. Venus Williams is seeded fifth and is second match scheduled on center court to get her 77th major under way with a challenging opener against Belinda Bencic. She's 4-0 in career head-to-heads against 20-year-old Bencic — who reached a career-high No. 7 ranking in 2016 and who helped Federer win the Hopman Cup title for Switzerland earlier this month — but is coming off an abbreviated preparation that included a loss in the second round to eventual champion Angelique Kerber at the Sydney International last week. At 37, Venus Williams among the top contenders at Melbourne Park. Others in action on Monday include seventh-seeded Jelena Ostapenko, who meets Francesca Schiavone in a match featuring current vs. former French Open champions, No. 2-ranked Caroline Wozniacki, who opens against Mihaela Buzarnescu, and U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens against Zhang Shuai. Simona Halep is the No. 1 seed in the women's draw, and one of six women who can hold the No. 1 ranking at the end of the Australian Open. Halep, who has had back-to-back first-round exits on her last two trips to Melbourne Park, opens on day two against Australian wild-card entry Destanee Aiava. Only two men can hold the top ranking in the first week of February — Nadal or Federer — regardless of what No. 3 Grigor Dimitrov or No. 4 Alexander Zverev or anybody else does in Melbourne. Federer returns in contrasting circumstances to his appearance in 2017, when he was coming off a six-month break for an injured left knee and had low expectations about ending a Grand Slam title drought that dated to Wimbledon in 2012. "This year I hope to win the first few rounds and get rolling hopefully, whereas last year I was just hoping to win," a match, Federer told his pre-tournament news conference Sunday. "It was more of a 'let's see what happens' kind of tournament, maybe similar to what Novak or Stan (Wawrinka) or others are going through this year." Six-time Australian Open winner Djokovic has been sidelined for six months with an injured right elbow, returning with a remodeled service motion, and 2014 champion Wawrinka has also been out of the game since Wimbledon after surgery on his knee. Nadal, who won the French and U.S. Open titles last year, has also had a limited preparation restricted to couple of exhibition matches last week as he recovers from a sore knee. None of that makes them any less of a threat to Federer. "Rafa, with the year that he's had, and Novak with the six titles he's had here, even if it's unknown how he's feeling, they could very well be the favorites, too," Federer said. "If you're in the draw, you give yourself a chance. That's what happened for me last year — all ended up way better than I thought it would, as you know.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 14th, 2018

Brisbane too hot for Muguruza as Murray also withdraws

BRISBANE, Australia – World number two Garbine Muguruza suffered a fitness scare ahead of this month's Australian Open when she was forced to retire from the Brisbane International on Tuesday, January 2, due to severe cramping. The men's draw also suffered a major blow when Andy Murray withdrew – the second ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2018

Fitness scare for Muguruza as Brisbane proves too hot

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA — World number two Garbine Muguruza suffered a fitness scare ahead of this month’s Australian Open when she was forced to retire from the Brisbane International on Tuesday with severe cramping. Wimbledon champion Muguruza was ahead 2-1 in the deciding set against Serbia’s Aleksandra Krunic in the second round of the warm-up tournament […] The post Fitness scare for Muguruza as Brisbane proves too hot appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJan 2nd, 2018

Petro Gazz Angels ready to spread wings in PVL

New team Petro Gazz promised to give other seasoned squads in the Premier Volleyball League a run for their money when the second edition of the Reinforced Conference opens shop two months from now. The Angels will parade in the tournament, that will open on May 6, a mix of commercial league veterans and former college stars under head coach Jerry Yee. “Magkakakilala naman ‘yung ilan. So far nagi-ensayo tayo,” said Yee. “So far maganda ang ipinapakita natin so smooth naman ang transition nila defense to offense so polishing na lang talaga.” Former De La Salle University standouts skipper Paneng Mercado, Wensh Tiu, Cienne Cruz and seasoned setter Chie Saet will team up with College of St. Benilde products Rachel Austero, Ranya Musa, Djanel Cheng and Rica Enclona, ex-Pocari Sweat hitter Cai Nepomuceno and Alyssa Layug of Technological Institute of the Philippines.   Beefing up the Petro Gazz rosters are a pair of European imports in Kadi Kullerkannm of Estonia and Anastasia Trach of Ukraine. Set to join the squad are Mary Anne Mendrez of University of the East and another UAAP player. Mendrez according to team manager Camille Cruz has committed with Petro Gazz but will only join the Angels after the 80th UAAP season. “We like to be as ready as we can be. Of course, siyempre ang other teams nag-eensayo din yan,” said Yee, whose reinforcements are set to arrive . “We heard na gabi-gabi rin nage-ensayo rin sila, nagkakaubusan na rin ng tune up games ngayon dahil nadyan na rin ang yayaan. Some teams, ang lineup nila loaded din so yun ang mga challenges natin.” Petro Gazz will test their mettle against established teams like defending champion Pocari Sweat, the Alyssa Valdez-led Creamline and Perlas.    “Sa atin kung no ang meron sa ating piyesa we’ll work with that,” Yee said. “Every night wala namang mintis ang practice.”     ---           Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 16th, 2018

PlayStation responds to ‘Sea of Thieves’ with 14-game salvo

As excitement grows for Microsoft's Xbox One and Windows 10 release "Sea of Thieves", PlayStation posts a list of 14 upcoming exclusives, from "Dreams" to "Ghost of Tsushima". Xbox is making the most of March 20's release of multiplayer seafaring adventure "Sea of Thieves", whose soft-edged caricatures invite participants into a world of treasure hunting, sea shanties, and skirmishes with other player crews. After an open-doors final beta test this past weekend went hand-in-hand with the March 10 return of official video show Inside Xbox, Sony's PlayStation responded Monday with a list of 14 upcoming PlayStation 4 titles. Four release over the next three months and, given th...Keep on reading: PlayStation responds to ‘Sea of Thieves’ with 14-game salvo.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 14th, 2018

Rose embraces new home, blocks out doubters

By Steve Aschburner, MINNEAPOLIS – Don’t let go of the rope. It’s one of Tom Thibodeau’s most familiar exhortations, a mantra of sorts to keep his teams locked in, digging down and generally committed through whatever grueling test they’re facing, be it a game, a road trip, a spate of injuries or the entire season. The trouble for Derrick Rose with that particular Thibs-ism is, so often, he has been the rope. On one side of an unfortunate tug o’ war, we’ve had the Rose loyalists, the fans, friends and family who believe that the 2010-11 NBA Most Valuable Player’s return from injury hell to elite status is just one more, legit opportunity away. Pulling from the other side, there is a growing group of Rose skeptics who are convinced that the Chicago kid’s best days – his most explosive, elusive, game-changing moves – are behind him, strewn on the floors of too many surgical rooms and rehab gyms. Rose, 29, knows they’re there. One group pulling for him, the other doubting him. And in an unusually candid and forceful moment Saturday (Sunday, PHL time), the normally soft-spoken Rose delivered a stark message to them all. “Yeah,” Rose said after his first full practice since signing a minimum-salary contract Thursday (Friday, PHL tie) to join the Minnesota Timberwolves. “This is how I feel about the whole perspective on it: You can have your perspective on me as far as I’m a bum, I can’t play, I can’t shoot, this and that. All right. Cool. I have no hard feelings with that. I’m cool with that. If that’s how you feel, that’s how you feel. “But at the same time, I don’t need your [bleeping] validation.” Rose’s eyes burned bright, in a direct response to the many health challenges he has endured from acquaintances and strangers both, picking at whatever good or bad is left of his basketball career. “I know who I am,” Rose continued. “I know the type of player I am. So, you respect that and I respect that, and we should be good. That’s how I feel about it.” In other words, you work your side of the street, Rose will continue to work his. If there are NBA administrators like Thibodeau, the Wolves’ head coach and president of basketball operations, willing to give him another chance, he’ll be chasing the ghost of his own self while trying to help somebody win. One more chance Rose’s latest grab at faded glory could begin in Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) matinee against the defending champion Golden State Warriors at Target Center (editor's note: Rose wound up playing just seven minutes off the bench. He finished with two points on 1-of-5 shooting with a rebound, two assists, and two turnovers). It probably is his last, best shot to salvage something from a 2017-18 season that’s been largely lost due to injury, yes, but other factors outside Rose’s control as well. What looked like a terrific opportunity back in training camp – signing with Eastern Conference power Cleveland Cavaliers and home to the game’s best player (and Rose nemesis) in LeBron James – got sideways fast. In the Cavs’ second game, on a drive to the rim, Rose got whacked across the face and neck by Milwaukee center Greg Monroe. He landed badly on the baseline, suffering a “jacked-up” left ankle that left him in a walking boot and sidelined him for 11 of Cleveland’s next 15 games. Then word got out just before Thanksgiving that Rose had left the team, reportedly to contemplate his future as an NBA player. He was gone for nearly two weeks, at least part of it back home in Chicago, during what Cavs GM Koby Altman called “a very challenging and difficult time for Derrick.” Rose didn’t play again until Cleveland’s 44th game. In nine appearances over the next three weeks, he was a shell of the three-time All-Star he’d once been, averaging 6.3 points, 1.6 assists and 13.3 minutes, while shooting 39 percent. On Feb. 8 (Feb. 9, PHL time), he was one of six Cavaliers players dealt by Altman at the NBA trade deadline, sent to Salt Lake City as a throw-in to acquire Utah’s Rodney Hood and Sacramento’s George Hill. Two days later, the Jazz waived Rose. Four weeks passed before Thibodeau got the green light from Minnesota owner Glen Taylor to sign Rose. The Oklahoma City Thunder had sniffed in his direction, only to opt for veteran backup Corey Brewer. Rose had family duties to attend to – he and Alaina Anderson had a baby girl in Chicago to start the week – but he also had spent time working out by himself in the Cavs’ facility or at Cleveland State’s gym. The end seemed near. Given Rose’s limited involvement this season, he probably would have been a long shot to land with one of the league’s 30 teams in 2018-19, had Thibodeau not reached out. The people on the dark end of Rose’s rope were winning. Now, this buys him time for a shout-out to the folks on the other end. “‘Don’t give up,’ Rose said he would tell them. Talking later at the downtown Minneapolis hotel where he’s staying, he wanted to assure people that his desire to play remains strong, his passion to keep trying still burns, and his mental fitness for this and future challenges on or away from the court is fine. “I still have faith,” Rose said, two bags of ice strapped to each leg. “No matter what happens, I still have a lot of faith in myself and my ability. It’s just about opportunity and catching a rhythm. Whenever I do catch a rhythm, I’d rather see what it is then. Than to, like, give up knowing I have so much left. Like, ‘Damn, I should have kept playing.’ “I’m going to give it my all. And once I do, then it’s like, ‘All right, cool. I gave it my all, now what’s this next phase in my life?’ “But as far as right now, I’m still in it. I’ve got two kids that can look at me now. The oldest, my boy [P.J.] is 5 years old. He’s looking at me right now. He sees everything. I’m going to tell him, ‘No excuses. Don’t come to me cryin’, this and that. Nah.’ He’ll see what I’ve had to go through. ‘Now suck it up and go out there and do what you’ve got to do.’” A career interrupted For some NBA players whose careers got waylaid by injuries – Brandon Roy, Greg Oden, Penny Hardaway – their bodies finally refused to cooperate. They went from 60-to-0, no wiggle room on whether they would continue. Rose, for all his setbacks, has worked his way back – not back to his previous form – from each and every injury. From the ACL blowout that started him down his hobbled path in April 2012 to three subsequent meniscus knee surgeries, from the left orbital fracture he suffered when he caught teammate Taj Gibson’s errant elbow in the face in the opening practice of 2015-16 to the lingering ankle sprain dealt by Monroe’s blow in October. In that sense, Rose is more like Bernard King, Sam Bowie or Grant Hill, standout players whose career trajectories were forever altered – but not ended – by injuries. Rose speaks as if he has reached some level of peace with his maladies, referring to his injuries as “part of the game” and his particular “cross” to bear. “I’ve just had five surgeries more than other people,” he said. “That’s the way I look at it. That don’t mean that I can’t play. That don’t mean that I lost my love for the game. No.” What Rose doesn’t like is the “fragile” label that’s been affixed to him. He’s less interested that he has played in only 486 of approximately 789 regular-season games so far, while proud of the 130 he logged with the Bulls (2015-16) and Knicks (2016-17) more recently. It seems clear that the reckless abandon with which Rose played – and the excruciating torque he put on his knees with his bounding, zig-zag attacks through the lane – wreaked havoc on his knees. Beyond that, though, he’s not buying any pattern business. “You see how I was injured [in October]? I was taken out of the air,” Rose said. “People are like, ‘Aw, he’s always injured.’ Are you just watching highlights, just looking at clips, like new fans are these days? Or are you watching an entire game? Are you just reading reports that come up on your phone?” Scouts say that Rose has lost both quickness and leaping ability, without developing a perimeter game to compensate. They also bundle his Cleveland hiatus with the AWOL episode last season with the Knicks, when Rose left the team without notice before a game against New Orleans, to question his reliability and commitment. Rose disputes the comments about his game, citing the circumstances in New York and Cleveland. “I could sit here and tell you, ‘I’m gonna try to change this. Do this and do that.’ Nah, I always felt, it starts with my rhythm,” he said. “[In] New York ... I was playing the triangle [offense favored by former Knicks president Phil Jackson] and still playing pretty well [18.0 ppg, 4.4 apg, 32.5 mpg]. In Cleveland, when did I really have a chance to catch a rhythm? When did I play 20 games straight? Or 10 games? Five games?” As for his reliability – or likelihood to take a powder on the Wolves the way he did on the Knicks and seemed to do on the Cavs – Rose said there is no issue there, either. In the past couple weeks, Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan (depression) and Cleveland’s Kevin Love (panic attacks) have opened up about psychological challenges they and other athletes face. But Rose shook his head as the question was asked. “Oh no, no, no,” he said. “I’m blessed, man. Beyond blessed. It’s not even ... what do I have to complain about? I don’t have anything to complain about. Of course, I wish I was on the court more. I think in time, with the right opportunity, I’ll be out there more. “I’m not depressed, even though I think everybody deals with some depression in some way. It’s about how you deal with it. We’re emotional creatures. We hold onto things. I try to meditate, try to do little things to change my mindset and try to read things to easy my nerves.” Rose admitted he did wonder if he would get another chance, once the Cavs traded him to a Jazz team that had no use for him. “Especially when you get dropped by a team like Cleveland, that needed players,” he said. “It makes other teams think, ‘Damn, if they didn’t keep him...’” Rose has not spoken with James since being dealt, he said. “The way I take it, I don’t take it as personal,” Rose said. “They didn’t need my services. That’s the way I look at it, OK? I understand. It’s business. Does that stop me from working hard? Does that stop me from still putting out goals and trying to reach my goals? No.” Familiar faces aid return Now Rose is reunited with Thibodeau, Gibson, Jimmy Butler (sidelined after his own meniscus surgery) and familiar coaches and staff making up the “TimberBulls.” He even trusts Thibodeau, often criticized for the heavy minutes he loads on his top players, not to break him. “If anything, I want him to play me,” Rose said. “I want to show to him that I can still play. I want him to see me and be like, ‘Damn, he’s still got it.’ I want him to count on me. I want to be held accountable. You know what I mean? I don’t just want to be, like, an average guy on the team riding along just to see how far they go. I really want to add.” Said Thibodeau, who ran Rose Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) through a rigorous refresher course on his playbook: “Obviously when he was at an MVP level, that was the peak. But he also, my last year in Chicago, he had a great year. ... He still has the potential to be very good. He’s young, that was the other part of it. He knows some of our guys, he knows the system. “Like all stories, there’s a beginning, there’s a middle and there’s an end,” the Wolves coach added. “I don’t think it’s a finished story.” Gibson thinks Rose can shoulder some of Butler’s late-game duties, simply because the scoring guard has strong muscle memory of such situations. He, too, hopes Rose’s story can take a happy turn. “I’ve got my fingers crossed,” the veteran forward said. “I truly believe in him. He’s got a lot left in the tank. It’s just, sometimes life doesn’t go your way and you have to push through it and keep fighting.” Thibodeau has said that Rose, like starter Jeff Teague and backup Tyus Jones, can play both backcourt spots, so he can mix-and-match based on situations. Rose anticipates no problem walking that line between asserting his game and rocking the Wolves’ boat. “My job coming here, I’m not trying to step on nobody’s toes. I’m not trying to take someone’s spot,” he said. “I’m not trying to show myself. Nah. I’m here to win. Me going out there and playing, hopefully you all see that. ‘He’s making money plays. He’s playing to win. And that’s what we wanted from him.’” Not that Rose, lest we forget from up top, needs anyone’s bleeping validation. Boosters and doubters can pull this way or that, but he said he’ll be the one who decides when his time is up. “When my love of the game is not there,” Rose said, sounding sincere near the end of his 10th season overall. “When I get tired of going to the gym. “Don’t get me wrong, we all go through that. But after a couple of days, I get antsy, I want to be in the gym. When a week or two goes by and I haven’t touched the gym, even in the summer, oh yeah, I’d know it was over.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Injured Rafael Nadal will miss Indian Wells, Miami events

NEW YORK --- Rafael Nadal will miss the upcoming Indian Wells and Miami tournaments because of a lingering right hip injury. Nadal made the announcement Friday on Facebook. He withdrew from the Mexico Open before his first match on Wednesday, saying he needed more time to recover. He wrote Friday "the injury I suffered in Acapulco before starting the tournament is the same area as the one suffered in Melbourne." The second-ranked Spanish star hasn't played since retiring in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open in late January. Last year, Nadal lost to Roger Federer in the fourth round at Indian Wells and in the final at Miami....Keep on reading: Injured Rafael Nadal will miss Indian Wells, Miami events.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2018

Mental battle key to Djokovic comeback, says former coach

Former world number one Novak Djokovic's toughest hurdle when he returns to the ATP Tour after a long injury absence will be a mental one, believes former coach Boris Becker. The 30-year-old Serbian's return to competitive action is yet to be confirmed although he published photos of himself on the practice courts earlier this week for the first time since he underwent a minor "medical intervention" following a fourth round exit at the Australian Open. The 12-time Grand Slam winner struggled through his defeat by Chung Hyeon of South Korea, troubled still by a persistent elbow injury, that had seen him off the circuit since Wimbledon last year, and a hip problem. Becker, w...Keep on reading: Mental battle key to Djokovic comeback, says former coach.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2018

Mitsubishi Motors PHL to hold a 3-day XPANDER Xpo beginning March 2

MITSUBISHI Motors Philippines Corp. (MMPC) is pleased to invite everyone to a public expo and test drive event as it officially launches the much anticipated all-new Mitsubishi XPANDER. Dubbed as the XPANDER XPO, this exclusive Mitsubishi motor show and test drive event will open on March 2 (Friday) until March 4 (Sunday), from 10AM to […] The post Mitsubishi Motors PHL to hold a 3-day XPANDER Xpo beginning March 2 appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2018

Donnie Nietes open to moving up to 115-pounds

In two days, Donnie Nietes has arguably has one of his biggest fights in front of him, as he makes his HBO debut in an IBF Flyweight world title defense against Argentina’s Juan Carlos Reveco on the Superfly 2 card in The Forum, Los Angeles. Against Reveco, Nietes will be taking on a two-division world champion and someone who has an almost identical record, so it won’t be a cakewalk by any means. While Nietes isn’t taking anything for granted, nor is he taking Reveco lightly, talks of the future have surfaced, and the three division champion says he’s open to moving up in weight, should he be victorious against Reveco on Saturday. Speaking through ALA Promotions CEO Michael Aldeguer, Nietes reveals that he’s always intended to move up to Super Flyweight, and has his sights set on either of the Superfly 2 main eventers, reigning WBC Super Flyweight World Champion Srisaket Sor Rungvisai or challenger Juan Francisco Estrada. “He’s always had plans to move up in weight, he wants to see what’s out there.” Aldeguer said. “If Ruingvisai is available, or Estrada, he’s always wanted to fight Estrada, even before, he wanted to fight Estrada at 112 but now he’s moved up to 115. He’s focused on Saturday, but he’s also open to move up in weight. If he wins on Saturday, he wants to move up to 115 and fight anybody out there.” Another intriguing matchup for Nietes at 115, should he decide to make the jump, is former pound-for-pound king Roman ‘Chocolatito’ Gonzales. Nietes has long called for a match against the Nicaraguan, but it has never come to fruition. After losing back-to-back fights against Rungvisai for the WBC title, Chocolatito has expressed interest in fighting Nietes for the vacant WBO Super Flyweight title in Nicaragua. Nietes says that should the fight happen, it should happen in neutral ground. “He’s always wanted to fight Chocolatito, but with Chocolatito being a champion and him being a champion, we think it’s best to fight in a neutral country, maybe in the US.” And while consecutive losses has bumped Chocolatito off the top of the pound-for-pound rankings, Nietes believes that the Nicaraguan is still a stern test for anyone, including himself. “He still feels that Chocolatito is one of the great fighters. He just felt that maybe he wasn’t training or wasn’t in top shape in the last fight, but he knows he’s still a great fighter.” For Aldeguer, nothing is set in stone and everything would depend on Saturday’s contest against Reveco. “If he does win impressively on Saturday, hopefully we’ll see if he has to stay at 112 or move up to 115.”  “Of course names have always been there like ‘Chocolatito’ Gonzales, he wants to fight the winner of Rungvisai versus Estrada, Cuardas is there, so there’s a lot at stake for Donnie, he knows what’s there, he just has to take care of business on Saturday.” Aldeguer added.   H/T: Steve Angeles, ABS-CBN News   Donnie Nietes defends his IBF Flyweight World Title agaisnt Argentina's Juan Carlos Reveco on Superfly 2! Catch the telecast on Sunday, February 25 at 3:30 PM on ABS-CBN channel 2 and 6:30 PM on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23 (Replay February 28, 7:00 PM).....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018

Tokyo stocks open higher after Wall St gains

TOKYO — Tokyo stocks opened higher on Monday, buoyed by investor relief over continued gains on Wall Street last week. The benchmark Nikkei 225 index rose 0.72 percent or 155.32 points to 21,875.57 in early trade while the broader Topix index was up 0.82 percent or 14.28 points at 1,751.65. “Japanese stocks this week will likely test a rebound from [...] The post Tokyo stocks open higher after Wall St gains appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

52-year-old Filipina Ironman finisher aims to replicate feat in home soil

At 52 years old, Filipina triathlete Chang Hitalia powered through the grueling test of endurance that is the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii. The Ironman entails for triathletes to accomplish the following: Swim 3.86 km, ride a bike for 180.25 km, and run 42.2 km. It’s so tough that only 1 out of 10,000 people actually finish it.  For Hitalia, who only started doing triathlons at the age of 46, it was by no means an easy feat.  Hitalia may have a tiny physique but she’s powered by a strong desire to achieve her fitness goals—a must for anyone who wishes to be an Ironman.  Hitalia was like most people wanting to be a better version of themselves. Her journey began eight years ago when she joined a running group with the goal of shedding a few pounds.  Regular running gave her a high and soon, she joined races. In 2010, she started yearning for a tougher challenge. She added swimming and biking to her routine and soon, Hitalia was a full-fledged triathlete.  Unlike her running pursuits, Triathlon is much more demanding in terms of training time, cost, and motivation. Hitalia needed to make major adjustments to her daily routine to ensure she gets to train for all three sports and still have ample time for other things.  Soon, Hitalia aimed at loftier goals in the sport and in 2014, she finished strong in the Langkawi Ironman, bagging second place for her age group despite it being her first crack at an Ironman race.  Hitalia continued her swim, bike, run lifestyle, competing in two Ironman 70.3 races in Hefei and Xiamen, China in 2016. The latter earned her a coveted slot to compete in the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii.  “It was always a goal to qualify since I embraced triathlon as part of my life,” Hitalia shares. After qualifying, she knew the sacrifices she needed to make in order to finish strong in Kona.  Hitalia spent seven months reinforcing her stamina to endure the Ironman grueling leg. In between, she joined a number of races to check her progress. She also underwent training in different conditions—hot weather, strong winds, and uphill routes—essentially what the Kona race was infamous for.   Despite being prepared, Hitalia says that “you have to come in and fight” as far as Ironman races go. During the swim leg of her race in Kona, water conditions were not ideal to swim in. “Starting off with more than 600 female age groupers was really a struggle. I kept my calm and stuck with my rhythm,” she recalls. The bike part was equally brutal, too. “The hills were punishing, the heat and humidity were harsh, and it was crazy windy,” she describes.  Hitalia made up for lost time during the 42.2 km run. However, as with the tough nature of Ironman races, fatigue soon set in.  Thoughts of giving-up creeped up in her mind. With her dream almost within reach, Hitalia decided to soldier on.  As she crossed the finish line, she describes the experience as nothing but amazing. “The cheers from the crowd, the festive mood, and the red carpet made it an overwhelming experience. Suddenly all the pain subsided and all my hard work became reality. The happiness when you finally hear your name being called out is surreal,” Hitalia shares.  Having accomplished her goal of crossing the finish line in Kona, Hitalia’s next target is to finish strong on home soil. She’s focused to achieve this in June at the Philippine leg of Ironman.  Knowing what it takes to finish the grueling race and the elation that takes over, Hitalia wishes for her fellow Pinoy triathletes to experience this.  Her advice for those looking to join: Respect the distance.  “Train right, work with a certified coach, and come in adequately prepared. When race day comes, enjoy the experience,” Hitalia says.  With the Ironman Philippines posing a challenge for Filipino triathletes in June, Hitalia’s story of perseverance and success rings even truer now as she hopes to inspire more Pinoys to pursue fitness and be part of making the Philippines a healthier and fitter nation. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2018

Wozniacki falls to Kasatkina in St. Petersburg quarters

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — Australian Open champion Caroline Wozniacki's lost to Daria Kasatkina 7-6 (2), 6-3 in the quarterfinals of the St. Petersburg Ladies Trophy on Friday. Kasatkina came back from a break down to win the first set in a tiebreaker before speeding to a 3-0 lead over the top-ranked Wozniacki in the second set. The eighth-seeded Kasatkina, the last Russian left in the draw, will face France's Kristina Mladenovic in Saturday's semifinals. Mladenovic defeated Katerina Siniakova 6-4, 6-3. Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic continued her strong wild-card run with a 6-0, 6-2 win over French Open champion Jelena Ostapenko. Kvitova's will face Julia Goerges of Germany, who defeated Russian qualifier Elena Rybakina 6-3, 6-3......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2018

Durable Roger Federer

MELBOURNE — Australian Open champion Roger Federer is set to continue defying Father Time after announcing he will return to defend his title next year, the Swiss said on Monday. The 36-year-old notched up his 20th grand slam title and sixth at Melbourne Park on Sunday with a 6-2, 6-7(5), 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 victory over […] The post Durable Roger Federer appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJan 29th, 2018

Federer ‘no idea’ how long he’ll play after 6th Australian Open title, 20th ‘Slam’

MELBOURNE: Age-defying Roger Federer says after winning his third Grand Slam title in a year he has no idea how long he will continue playing. The 36-year-old Swiss marvel continues to defy the years and attrition rate, reaching his 30th Grand Slam decider and claiming his sixth Australian crown and 20th Grand Slam title. The world No.2 [...] The post Federer ‘no idea’ how long he’ll play after 6th Australian Open title, 20th ‘Slam’ appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsJan 29th, 2018

Federer wraps up 20th slam title

MELBOURNE – Roger Federer powered home to beat Marin Cilic in five sets to win his sixth Australian Open and 20th Grand Slam title in a riveting final on Sun.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 29th, 2018

Tough Mudder makes Phl debut

MANILA, Philippines — Filipinos seeking to test their strength, stamina and over-all fitness will have a new event to look forward to as Tough Mudder, one of.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 29th, 2018