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Africa startled by Trump s sudden and vulgar attention

JOHANNESBURG — Africans woke up on yesterday to find President Donald Trump had finally taken an interest in their continent......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 13th, 2018

Who’d prefer their country to Trump’s US? Norwegians would

STAVANGER, Norway --- Norwegians generally live longer than Americans. There's a generous safety net of health care and pensions. And although it's pricey, the country last year was named the happiest on Earth. President Donald Trump says the United States should take in more Norwegians, but is it any wonder that more Americans are going the other way? The country of 5.2 million people that seldom makes global headlines awoke Friday to the news that Trump wanted to have more immigrants from Norway, rather than Haiti and countries in Africa that he disparaged with a vulgar term. The comments came after Trump met Wednesday with Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg in Washingt...Keep on reading: Who’d prefer their country to Trump’s US? Norwegians would.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Trump comments highlight racial impact of migration platform

DENVER --- For years, a movement to limit the number of migrants into the US and end a system that favors family members of legal residents has had to fend off criticism that it's as a poorly veiled attempt to produce a whiter America. Then its most prominent supporter told members of Congress in the Oval Office this week that the US needs fewer immigrants from Haiti and Africa and more from places like Norway. President Donald Trump's use of a vulgar term to describe African countries triggered widespread condemnation, and left the small cluster of immigration hard-line groups whose agenda Trump has embraced scrambling to distance themselves from the president. "They say it...Keep on reading: Trump comments highlight racial impact of migration platform.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Trump: Why allow immigrants from ‘shithole countries’?

President Donald Trump questioned Thursday why the U.S. would accept more immigrants from Haiti and “shithole countries” in Africa rather than places like Norway, as he rejected a bipartisan immigration deal, according to people briefed on the extraordinary Oval Office conversation. #BeFullyInformed Trump: Why allow immigrants from ‘shithole countries’? Washington — In bluntly vulgar language,… link: Trump: Why allow immigrants from ‘shithole countries’?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Trump’s ‘shi**hole’ insult demands censure

  Martin Luther King Jr. Day in America is supposed to be a celebration of the civil rights giant. But as we approach the holiday, there is an undeniable truth. The American president is a racist, having branded himself a potty-mouth pol by use of the term "shithole" to describe people from poor countries, specifically immigrants from Africa, Haiti and El Salvador. Racist. Disgusting. And considering what the Philippine president has said about Obama, practically Dutertian. But if Trump's pussy grabbing rhetoric wasn't enough to sink his candidacy in 2016, why do you think Trump's latest racist insult will faze him? Still, the president has gone too far. His ra...Keep on reading: Trump’s ‘shi**hole’ insult demands censure.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 15th, 2018

Trump says immigration deal ‘probably dead’

WASHINGTON, D.C.: US President Donald Trump vehemently denied Sunday that he was a racist (Monday in Manila) after his vulgar disparagement of African countries and Haiti complicated a bipartisan deal on immigration. “I’m not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed,” Trump told reporters at the Trump International Golf Club [...] The post Trump says immigration deal ‘probably dead’ appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJan 15th, 2018

Trump refutes racism talk; massages DACA child immigrants messaging

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – U.S. President Donald Trump said over the weekend that he is “not a racist” despite reports of his derogatory comments about immigrants from Haiti and Africa, adding that he was “ready, willing and able” to reach a deal to protect immigrants brought to the United States as children. Asked by […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJan 15th, 2018

Evangelical rift intensifies over Trump immigration remarks

NEW YORK — Donald Trump's vulgar remarks questioning why the U.S......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 14th, 2018

Trump defends vulgar remarks while partly denying them

WASHINGTON --- President Donald Trump offered a partial denial in public but privately defended his extraordinary remarks disparaging Haitians and African countries. Trump said he was only expressing what many people think but won't say about immigrants from economically depressed countries, according to a person who spoke to the president as criticism of his comments ricocheted around the globe. Trump spent Thursday evening calling friends and outside advisers to judge their reaction, said the confidant, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to disclose a private conversation. Trump wasn't apologetic about the inflammatory remarks and denied he was r...Keep on reading: Trump defends vulgar remarks while partly denying them.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 14th, 2018

Trump defends vulgar immigrant comments, partly denies them

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump offered a partial denial in public but privately defended his extraordinary remarks disparaging Haitians and African coun.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

African countries demand Trump apology

UNITED NATIONS -- A group of "extremely appalled" African countries demanded Friday that US President Donald Trump retract and apologize for his reported denunciation of immigration from "shithole" nations. After an emergency session to weigh Trump's remarks, the group of African ambassadors to the United Nations said it was "concerned at the continuing and growing trend from the US administration toward Africa and people of African descent to denigrate the continent and people of color." The group is "extremely appalled at, and strongly condemns the outrageous, racist and xenophobic remarks by the president of the United States of America as widely reported by the media," a st...Keep on reading: African countries demand Trump apology.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Trump denies he used vulgarity to describe African countries

WASHINGTON — In bluntly vulgar language, President Donald Trump questioned Thursday why the US would accept more immigrants from Haiti and "shithole countrie.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Trump uses slur to describe immigrants from Haiti, Africa

WASHINGTON DC, USA – President Donald Trump reportedly lashed out in a meeting on Thursday, January 11, with lawmakers about immigration reform, demanding to know why the US should accept citizens from what he called "shithole" countries. The comments, first reported by The Washington Post, sparked anger among Democrats and Republicans ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Koi story: priceless Japanese fish make a splash

Hand-reared for their color and beauty, koi carp have become an iconic symbol of Japan that can sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars and even participate in fishy beauty contests. The nation's koi carp were brought to the world's attention when visiting US President Donald Trump was snapped unceremoniously dumping the last of a box of feed into a palace pond in Tokyo. But the fish have for decades been popular in Japan, where top breeders take their most prized specimens (known as "nishikigoi") to highly competitive "beauty parades." At one such competition in Tokyo, judges in sharp suits, notebooks in hand, stride around tanks lined up along a pedestrian street where t...Keep on reading: Koi story: priceless Japanese fish make a splash.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 7th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

UK woman wrongly tweeted by Trump waiting for apology

A British woman inundated with unwanted attention after US President Donald Trump sent her a scolding tweet intended for Prime Minister Theresa May said Thursday she was waiting for an apology. Source link link: UK woman wrongly tweeted by Trump 'waiting' for apology.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Tiger Woods getting strong reviews in return to golf

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — All eyes are on Tiger Woods and his return to golf, even the players he has to beat. Especially the players. Woods was on the back end of the practice range Monday at Albany Golf Club, hitting balls with Patrick Reed, when he looked up at a drone buzzing some 50 feet over him in the cloudy sky. He had no idea that Daniel Berger was at the controls. Berger was on the front of the range, blocked by a row of bushes in the sand dunes. As the drone's camera zoomed in, Dustin Johnson, Matt Kuchar, Kevin Kisner and their caddies crowded around Berger to look. They cared more about his reaction to the drone than his swing. But they are curious about his game. And those who have played with Woods in recent weeks believe there is reason for the hype. "People are going to be shocked at how good his game looks," PGA champion Justin Thomas said. Thomas will have the best seat in the house Thursday when Woods, who had fusion surgery on his lower back in April, plays for the first time in 10 months at the Hero World Challenge. Thomas, named the PGA Tour player of the year after winning five times and the FedEx Cup, is paired with him in the first round. Thomas spends a fair bit of time with Woods at their Florida homes, and they played a few weeks ago. The attention on Woods increased in recent days as more players joined him for casual rounds. Brad Faxon caused a stir when he played with Woods, Johnson and President Donald Trump on Friday. "Tiger looked great to me," Faxon wrote in a story for Golfweek . "I was impressed with how far he hit the ball. Probably on the 10 holes that they were both hitting driver, Tiger hit it past Dustin half the time and Dustin hit it past Tiger half the time. He looked great. I think more than anything, he looked at ease. He was not concerned about swinging hard and going at it with driver. The ball flight, the sound off the club, all of it was right there." Johnson is among the elite power players in the game. True story? Johnson smiled. "He hit it by me a couple of times," Johnson said. "Did I bomb one and he hit it past me? No. But he did it past me a few times. He was moving it, though." All this hype in the chill environment of the Bahamas should sound familiar. It was only last year when Woods returned after 15 months away from the game. He had gone through three back surgeries at that point, the first one right before the 2014 Masters, and Woods looked relatively normal, with freedom in his swing. He made 24 birdies, along with enough mistakes that he finished 14 shots out of the lead, in 15th place among an 18-man field. Woods missed the cut at Torrey Pines two months later, flew to Dubai and managed one round — a 77 in calm conditions — before withdrawing with back spasms. What appears to be different this time, at least from those who have played with him, is the absence of pain. Patrick Reed played nine holes of practice with him Monday morning. He saw Woods do whatever he wanted with his swing and saw an assortment of shots — a stinger off the tee, a low draw, a high cut. "He seemed to have command of not only the golf club, but his body," Reed said. It was the first time Reed had played with Woods since the opening round of the Hero World Challenge last year. The difference Reed noticed was that Woods looked more free and fluid in going after any shot. "It looked like there was a little hesitation the last time I played with him," Reed said. "This time, he was fully committed and fully trusted in his body. There was no pain. That's the biggest thing for me. If he stays healthy, then he'll be back playing golf, hopefully like he used to. I want to see it and I want to compete against it." Johnson said Friday's round with Woods and the president was a big change from when the two played the opening two rounds at Torrey Pines together in January, when both missed the cut. "His speed was back. He played a lot better than he did in San Diego, for sure," Johnson said. "He's healthy. To me, he looks strong. He's swinging with speed instead of in San Diego. When I played with him there, he wasn't swinging at it. You could tell he was hurt." The question is whether there is rust from having been gone from competition for so long. Woods has played only three tournaments since August 2015. Three of the four times that he returned to competition dating to that first back surgery before the 2014 Masters, Woods lasted no more than three starts before taking more time off......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 28th, 2017

Ateneo hopes to find way around Mbala in finals rematch

Ateneo Blue Eagles head coach Sandy Arespachochaga said that the team would have to find a way around reigning MVP Ben Mbala to even have a chance of beating La Salle in the UAAP Season 80 Men’s Basketball finals which begins Saturday. Mbala, who is expected to win his second straight MVP award and currently averaging 26.1 points and 13.2 rebounds for the Green Archers, is seen as the premier threat to their defense, and hopes to find a way to avoid foul trouble for the Blue Eagles. Though Mbala is both the defensive and offensive anchor for La Salle, Arespacochaga added that the defending champions will not be only be defined by the star center. “There is a reason why they're in the finals, they're the defending champs. We have no illusion that it's going to be easy game for us. We have to dig deep, and really play,” the assistant coach said after their 88-84 victory against tough FEU. In writing another chapter for the most storied rivalry in collegiate sports, the Blue Eagles have found their stride and now will be focusing their attention at a chance for payback in last year’s loss. Now that a year has passed, Arespacochaga said that lessons have indeed been learned and that though history has a way of repeating itself, but then again they have an opportunity to rewrite it. “It's a very good test of character for the boys, another opportunity for them to grow. And we're thankful for this opportunity just to have a chance to compete, to have a chance to win the championship.” Mike Nieto, who scored several clutch baskets to help the Blue Eagles book another trip to the Finals seconded his coach’s sentiments, adding that he and Vince Tolentino as leaders told their team to just enjoy the series, and just stay in the moment. “Importante ang game one on Saturday because the next game, it's an Ateneo-La Salle game, we'll treat it as a normal game, kasi wala eh, nag-two games na kami against them, we won the other one, and we lost the next one,” Nieto said. With Ateneo trailing by eight midway through the fourth quarter, 67-59, the lead assistant coach praised the team’s focus, which was the key in helping them avoid a major upset. “You do not expect them to be perfect, and bounce back from the mistakes. We committed some mistakes and FEU capitalized on that. Our boys remained focused, they didn't succumb to the pressure, and they stayed focus to the task at hand.” Though they are enjoying the victory, Arespacochaga said that the team will not delve on the win and will stay focused for Game 1 on Saturday at the MOA Arena. For a fourth-seeded Tamaraw team that forced sudden death and even was one defensive stop away from an upset and a Finals berth, Arespacochaga commended the team’s effort for taking the top-seeded Blue Eagles to the limit. As for the individual player matchups against a deep roster in La Salle, Arespacochaga said that that they will approach the matchup as a collective effort, and not put emphasis on a player-to-player matchup. “La Salle's the defending champs. They have the MVP, they've got very good players. And it you look for it, man for man, it's a very big task for us.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2017

Clinton accuses WikiLeaks of blunting impact of crude Trump tape

SYDNEY, Australia – Hillary Clinton Monday, October16, accused WikiLeaks of working with Russia to deflect attention away from an infamous tape of Donald Trump bragging about groping women in the run-up to the US presidential election. The former secretary of state's devastating election loss to Trump remains raw and she ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 16th, 2017

Could North Korean, US threats of destruction cause an accidental war? – CNN News

The war of words between North Korea and the United States could be pushing the region closer to the brink of an accidental conflict. While neither country is outwardly moving towards an actual war footing, military displays of power, mixed with threats and counter threats may result in an ugly outcome, Stratfor Vice President of Strategic Analysis Rodger Baker told CNN. &'8220;The North Koreans assume that the threats will be enough to restrain US action but the US might be thinking the same thing, so you end up in a situation where a provocation from one side is seen by the other as an actual move towards war,&'8221; he said. North Korea's Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho announced on Monday that US President Donald Trump had &'8220;declared a war&'8221; on his country by tweeting that North Korea &'8220;won't be around much longer.&'8221; Ri's interpretation of Trump's tweet was roundly dismissed by the White House later that day. The South Korean government has been desperately calling for calm on both sides, as the country's citizens would be among the first to suffer in any war. Speaking in Washington on Monday, South Korea's Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha said the United States has to help to reduce tensions on the peninsula. &'8220;It is very likely that North Korea will conduct further provocations,&'8221; she said. &'8220;It is imperative that we, Korea and the US together, manage the situation &' in order to prevent further escalation of tensions or any kind of accidental military clashes which can quickly go out of control.&'8221; Foreign Minister Ri told reporters Monday North Korea would shoot down any US bombers which flew near the Korean Peninsula, even if they didn't enter North Korea's airspace. &'8220;In light of the declaration of war by Trump, all options will be on the operating table of the Supreme leadership of DPRK,&'8221; Ri said, according to his official English translator. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders was quick to respond, saying Monday the US had not declared war and any suggestion along those lines was &'8220;absurd.&'8221; Euan Graham, director of the International Security Program at Sydney's Lowy Institute, said while the physical threat of war had not increased, every unfulfilled threat from the US did damage to its international position. &'8220;When threats are made and not followed through US credibility suffers both in the eyes of North Korea and its allies,&'8221; Graham said. &'8220;The US is very unlikely to engage in a preventative war against North Korea, so it's more the risk of stumbling into this because the North Koreans decide they have to escalate or they believe something US is doing is a preventative strike or a decapitation attack (against the leadership).&'8221; Over the weekend, North Korea moved airplanes and boosted defenses on its east coast, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported Tuesday, quoting intelligence agencies. It followed a flyover by US bombers close to North Korea on Saturday. US B-1B bombers from Guam flew in international airspace over waters east of North Korea, according to the Pentagon, a move they said underscored the seriousness of Pyongyang's &'8220;reckless behavior.&'8221; It was the furthest north of the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), the area of land between North and South Korea, which US fighters or bombers had flown in the 21st Century, the Pentagon said. Stratfor's Baker said he was concerned any moves by North Korea to shadow US planes or to engage in displays of military might could lead to accidental conflict. &'8220;There haven't been many incidents where they've engaged in this sort of behavior so they don't know how to deal with each other in this situation, they don't know how to read the way that each side is acting, so you can get accidents and the North Koreans, again, they may overestimate their hand,&'8221; he said. But Baker added it was important to note that neither side had engaged in the large movement of troops or evacuation of civilians which would precipitate a full blown war. &'8220;We don't see the US taking action to rapidly reduce the number of civilians and non military personnel in South Korea &' at the same time, rhetoric is working to increase the potential of an accident.&'8221; The latest standoff between Washington and Pyongyang came as a North Korean Foreign Ministry official flew to Moscow to meet with a representative of the Russian government. According to state media KCNA, director general at the Foreign Ministry's North American Department Choe Son Hui left for Moscow on Monday. She'll meet with Oleg Burmistrov, a &'8220;roving ambassador&'8221; with Russia's Foreign Ministry. The meeting comes amid cooling relations between Pyongyang and Beijing, with China's Ministry of Commerce announcing on Saturday it would immediately restrict petroleum exports to North Korea in line with UN sanctions. &'8220;Russia has been a supplier of petroleum products either directly or not paying attention to what it's own countries are doing in regard to North Korea,&'8221; Baker said. The latest round of sanctions, agreed to on September 11, were reportedly amended by the US after it became clear Russia and China wouldn't allow stronger restrictions. &'8220;Russia is a potential helpful card for the North Koreans to use particularly if they're worried that China is going to get more hostile and especially as secondary sanctions (from the US) come into play,&'8221; Graham said.(&'8220;Russia is a potential helpful card for the North Koreans to use particularly if they're worried that China is going to [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsSep 26th, 2017

Hillary Clinton’s new memoir compares Trump’s ‘war on truth’ to Orwell’s 1984 p The Guardian

Hillary Clinton uses her new memoir to draw parallels between Donald Trump’s “war on truth” and the Soviet Union and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. “Attempting to define reality is a core feature of authoritarianism,” the defeated presidential candidate writes in What Happened, published on Tuesday. “This is what the Soviets did when they erased political dissidents from historical photos. This is what happens in George Orwell’s classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, when a torturer holds up four fingers and delivers electric shocks until his prisoner sees five fingers as ordered.” The goal is to make you question logic and and reason and to sow mistrust, Clinton writes. “For Trump, as with so much he does, it’s about simple dominance.” She argues that Trump has taken “the war on truth” to a whole new level. “If he stood up tomorrow and declared that the Earth is flat, his counselor Kellyanne Conway might just go on Fox News and defend it as an ‘alternative fact,’ and too many people would believe it.” The cathartic 469-page memoir is heartfelt, honest and at times funny as it tries to come to grips with Clinton’s personally and politically catastrophic defeat last November. She identifies many reasons, including racism, sexism, the late intervention of the FBI and her own mistakes. She writes: “I was running a traditional presidential campaign with carefully thought-out policies and painstakingly built coalitions, while Trump was running a reality TV show that expertly and relentlessly stoked Americans’ anger and resentment. I was giving speeches laying out how to solve the country’s problems. He was ranting on Twitter.” The cathartic 469-page memoir is heartfelt, honest and at times funny as it tries to come to grips with Clinton’s personally and politically catastrophic defeat last November. She identifies many reasons, including racism, sexism, the late intervention of the FBI and her own mistakes. She writes: “I was running a traditional presidential campaign with carefully thought-out policies and painstakingly built coalitions, while Trump was running a reality TV show that expertly and relentlessly stoked Americans’ anger and resentment. I was giving speeches laying out how to solve the country’s problems. He was ranting on Twitter.” Clinton peppers the book with insults aimed at Trump. These include: “a clear and present danger to the country and the world”; “he’d remade himself from tabloid scoundrel into right-wing crank”; “for Trump, if everyone’s down in the mud with him, then he’s no dirtier than anyone else”; “he had no ideological core apart from his towering self-regard, which blotted out all hope of learning or growing”. Clinton also shows little affection for her rival for the Democratic nomination, Bernie Sanders, identifying him as another causal factor in her defeat. “His attacks caused lasting damage, making it harder to unify progressives in the general election and paving the way for Trump’s ‘Crooked Hillary’ campaign. I don’t know if that bothered Bernie or not.” Clinton was hammered by both Sanders and Trump over her paid speeches to Wall Street. She admits these were a “mistake”, explaining: “Just because many former government officials have been paid large fees to give speeches, I shouldn’t have assumed it was okay for me to do it. Especially after the financial crisis of 2008-09, I should have realized it would be bad ‘optics’ and stayed away from anything having to do with Wall Street. I didn’t. That’s on me.” The Clinton campaign’s frustration with a lack of media attention toward reported attempts by Moscow to interfere with the race were well-known. But Clinton dedicates a lengthy section not simply to how she and her aides became increasingly aware of Russian efforts, but also to warn that Vladimir Putin has only just scratched the surface. Clinton attests to sharing a relationship with Putin that has long been “sour”, saying of the Russian president: “Putin doesn’t respect women and despises anyone who stands up to him, so I’m a double problem.” It was for that reason, and her desire to pursue a more hawkish posture toward Russia, that Putin had developed a “personal vendetta” against her, Clinton writes. But, she writes, she would not have anticipated the assault that was subsequently waged against her campaign, and the minimizing of Russia’s role behind it. “This wasn’t the normal rough-and-tumble of politics,” Clinton writes. “This was – there’s no other word for it – war.” The wounds are reopened with each revelation about possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Clinton confessed that she has followed “every twist and turn”. As one of the young attorneys who worked for the House judiciary committee’s impeachment inquiry into Richard Nixon, Clinton advises the Trump-Russia investigation is “much more serious” than Watergate. Each time a new shoe drops, Clinton can’t help but hear Trump’s infamous words to her in their final debate when she confronted him over his affinity for Putin: “No puppet. You’re the puppet.” “This man is President of the United States,” Clinton writes, “And no one is happier than Vladimir Putin.” Clinton is at her most scathing when she reflects on the coverage of her decision to use a private email server as secretary of state. In a chapter dedicated to what she calls the single most decisive factor in her loss, Clinton envisions a history class, 30 years from now, in which students learn about the election that “brought to power the least experienced, least knowledgeable, least competent President our [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsSep 12th, 2017